Milton’s Nute Chapel Ministers of 1890-21

By Muriel Bristol | September 26, 2019

The Nute Chapel was often described as a “union” church, which is to say it functioned as a non-denominational church or, as our sources more charmingly put it, as an “undenominational” church. Various sources identified it as the Nute Chapel, Nute’s Chapel, Nute Memorial Chapel, Nute Ridge Chapel, Nute Bible Chapel, Nute Ridge Bible Chapel, Union Nute Chapel, or even as the West Milton church.

The Milton historical sketch in the Mitchell-Cony directory of 1907 informs us that Rev. William A. Bacon was the first pastor of the Nute Chapel, and that he remained there for “several years.”

Nute Chapel - Nute Chapel
Nute Ridge Bible Chapel (Photo: Nute Ridge Bible Chapel)

NUTE CHAPEL. NUTE RIDGE. The Nute Chapel was built about 1891 or 1892, to be used for “Union” meetings, from a fund left by the late Hon. Lewis W. Nute, of this town, to whom Milton owes so much. The first pastor was Rev. Wm. A. Bacon, who remained several years. The present pastor of the church is Rev. Robert M. Peacock, who has been here about ten years. There was a Christian Church at West Milton about fifty years ago, but no services have been held there by that society for many years (Mitchell-Cony, 1907).  

In unpacking and arranging the Mitchell-Coney time hints a bit, it would seem that Rev. William A. Bacon did occupy the Nute Chapel’s pulpit for “several years” from some point after the chapel’s October 1890 dedication, and that Rev. Robert M. Peacock did arrive there about 1896, continuing for “about ten years” to the directory’s 1907 publication date (but then beyond).

But that account overlooks the October 1890 news account of the chapel’s dedication, which identified Rev. H.H. Hamilton as its pastor. It might be that his tenure was brief – perhaps only for the ceremony itself – or that he had only the status of a “supply” pastor, but he was listed as its first pastor nevertheless.

A more complete Nute Chapel minister list, and one that extends out through its first thirty years, would be: Rev. Henry H. Hamilton, Rev. William A. Bacon, Rev. Charles S. Bates, Rev. Robert M. Peacock, Rev. Edward P. Eastman, Rev. Danville A. Gammon, and Rev. George A. Bennett.

There might conceivably have been still others, perhaps filling interstices in the latter years of this sequence, but no records have come to hand that would identify them, nor any that would tell us who may have filled the Nute Chapel pulpit from the untimely 1921 death of Rev. George A. Bennett through about 1930.


Rev. Henry Harrison Hamilton – October 1890

Henry H. Hamilton was born in Chester, MA, January 31, 1841, son of John and Sarah (Burton) Hamilton.

Henry H. Hamilton married in Derry, NH, June 4, 1872, Helen McGregor, he of Andover, MA, and she of Derry. He was a clergyman, aged thirty years; she was aged twenty-three years. She was born in Brooklyn, NY, October 12, 1848, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth W. (Tucker) McGregor.

Rev. Henry H. Hamilton, born in Chester, Mass., February 1, 1842, fitted for college at Williston seminary and graduated from Amherst in 1868, from Union Theological seminary, New York, in 1871, and also passed an extra year at Andover Theological seminary. He was installed pastor of the Union Congregational church of Westfield [Westford], Mass., June 4, 1872, and continued its pastor just five years. His next settlement was over the Congregational church of Hinsdale, March 1, 1878, where he still remains (Hurd, 1886).

NEW ENGLAND BY MAIL. MASSACHUSETTS. Townsend. The Middlesex Northwest Temperance Union will bold an all-day meeting at Townsend Centre, today, Judge Wallace presiding. Addresses will be made by the Rev. C.Y. Swan of Boston, the Rev. H.H. Hamilton of Westford and others (Boston Globe, September 14, 1875).

Died. HAMILTON. – In Westford, 16th inst., very suddenly, of cholera infantum, Allan McGregor, only child of the Rev. H.H. and Helen McGregor Hamilton, I year 9 months (Boston Globe, July 19, 1876).

Henry H. Hamilton, a minister, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Hinsdale, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Helen M.G. Hamilton, keeping house, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), his child, John B. Hamilton, aged one year (b. NH), and his servant, Elizabeth B. Flynn, a nurse, aged twenty-eight years (b. MA).

The Connecticut Valley. The Hinsdale, N.H., Congregationalists, Rev. H.H. Hamilton pastor, and the Methodists of that town, Rev. Mr. Eaton pastor, propose union meetings, this month, with evangelistic aid from abroad and, with the joint efforts of these earnest ministers and of their best people, the meetings cannot but be a success (Berkshire County Eagle, September 9, 1886).

Rev. Henry H. Hamilton was in Hinsdale, NH, as late as 1887. He was said to have been pastor of West Milton’s Nute Chapel at its October 1890 dedication. (He cannot have been there very long after without crowding out Rev. Bacon’s tenure of “several years”). He was settled in Lexington, MA, as early as October 1893.

Rev. Henry H. Hamilton and his family hosted a “musicale” at their Lexington home in July 1897, which featured some of his own compositions (Ditson, 1897).

HINSDALE, N.H. The Christian Endeavor society has had enlarged a picture of Rev. H.H. Hamilton, who was pastor of the church for several years, and It will be hung in the church vestry. The pastor recently presented the Sunday school a picture of Rev. E. Payson Hammond, which is already bung in the vestry (Boston Globe, January 21, 1898).

Henry Hamilton a clergyman, aged fify-eight years, (b. MA), headed a Lexington, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Hellen Hamilton, aged fifty-one years (b. NY), his children, Lillian Hamilton, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Samuel G. Hamilton, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and McGregor Hamilton, aged twelve years (b. MA). Hellen Hamilton was the mother of seven children, of whom four were still living. He owned their house at 5 Bedford Street, but with a mortgage.

HINSDALE, N.H. Rev. H.H. Hamilton of York, Me., who was pastor of the Hinsdale Congregational church from 1879 [1878] to 1887, was in town calling on old parishioners Thursday and Friday (Vermont Phoenix (Brattleboro, VT), August 19, 1904).

Church and Ministerial Record. Material Gain. York, Me., Second, Rev. H.H. Hamilton. Foundation of edifice relaid, with other improvements including steel sheathing and choir removed from rear of auditorium to side of pulpit. Cost, $1,000 (Pilgrim Press, 1907). 

YORK. Miss Lillian McG. Hamilton, daughter of Rev. H.H. Hamilton of Boston, Mass., is a guest at the Shaw farm (Portsmouth Herald, July 30, 1909).

Henry H. Hamilton, a church clergyman, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Helen Hamilton, aged sixty-one years (b. NY), his children, John Hamilton, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Vivian Hamilton, a church concert prof. singer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and McGregor Hamilton, aged twenty-three years (b. MA). They resided in a rented house at 5 Banks Street.

Henry H. Hamilton, no occupation listed, aged seventy-seven years (b. MA), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Helen Hamilton, aged seventy-one years (b. NY), his children, John B. Hamilton, a brokerage office general clerk, aged forty years (b. NH), and McGregor Hamilton, an auto accessories salesman, aged thirty-two years (b. MA). They resided in a rented two-family dwelling at 45 Banks Street, which they shared with the household of Kinsman S. Blois, a cracker bakery machinist, aged fifty-nine years (b. Canada (Eng.)).

SOMERVILLE. The funeral of Rev. Henry H. Hamilton, retired Congregational minister, who died yesterday at his home, 31 Burnside av., will take place Friday afternoon at 1 o’clock. Rev. David Fraser, pastor of the West Somerville Congregational Church, will officiate. Burial will be in Derry, N.H. He was 83, a native of Chester. In 1872 he married Miss Helen MacGregor, who survives with four children. He was educated at Amherst, Union Theological Seminary and Andover Theological Seminary. He held pulpits in Maine and New Hampshire towns, his last in York, Me. He was a composer of anthems (Boston Globe, June 3, 1925).


Rev. William Augustus Bacon – circa 1890-92

William Augustus Bacon was born on Main Street in the Amesbury Mills district of Amesbury, MA, October 11, 1869, son of William F. and Mary W. (Beal) Bacon. His father was a clergyman.

He attended school at the Williston Seminary, in Easthampton, MA, and Dartmouth College, in Hanover, NH, where he graduated with the Class of 1890. Nute Chapel would have been his first parish. He graduated also from Hartford Theological Seminary in 1895, but apparently after his time in West Milton.

William A. Bacon married in Miller’s Falls, Erving, MA, December 3, 1896, Sarah B. Mahoney, he of Amesbury, MA, and she of Erving. He was a minister of the gospel, aged twenty-seven years (b. Amesbury, [October 11, 1869,] son of William F. and Mary W. (Beal) Bacon); and she was a houseworker, aged twenty-three years (b. Northampton, MA, [January 3, 1873,] daughter of J.H. and Anna Mahoney). His father, W.F. Bacon, of Medford, MA, performed the ceremony.

Mrs. William A. Bacon Dead. BEVERLY, Jan. 24 – In the death of Mrs. Sara B., wife of Rev. William A. Bacon, this city has lost one of its noblest women. She was born at Millers Falls, Mass., Jan. 5, 1873, her parents being deacon and Mrs. J.H. Mahoney. Dec. 30, 1896, she was married to Rev. William A. Bacon, pastor of the Washington st. church. The burial will be at Millers Falls (Boston Globe, January 25, 1898).

William A. Bacon, a widowed clergyman, aged thirty years (b.MA), headed a Shelburne, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his sister, Julia Bacon, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and his aunt,  Adeline A. Wilkins,  widow, aged seventy-three years (b. MA).

A Dartmouth College Alumni catalog of 1900 listed him as

CLASS OF 1890. William Augustus Bacon. Hartford Theol. Sem., 1895; b. 16 Oct. 1869, Amesbury, Mass.; Pastor Shelburn Falls, Mass. 

William Augustus Bacon married (2nd) in Shelburne, MA, August 6, 1902, Lucy Annette Stebbins, he of Springfield, MA, and she of Shelburne. She was born in Shelburne, circa 1883, daughter of Edwin A. and Adelle (Smith) Stebbins. His father, W.F. Bacon, of Medford, MA, performed the ceremony.

Springfield Pastor Resigns. Springfield, Mass., Jan. 18. Rev. William A. Bacon, who is now in London, Eng., has resigned the pastorate of Park Congregational Church in this city. Mr. Bacon went abroad with his bride last August and has been detained in London by Mrs. Bacon’s illness. He came to this city from Shelburne Falls a year ago (Hartford Courant, January 19, 1903),

The Granite State. Northern New Hampshire. Two of our largest churches have recently taken to themselves pastors. Littleton has shown commendable speed in securing a successor to Mr. Cooley, allowing only two months to pass without a resident pastor. In the meantime only one candidate was considered, so that when Rev. W.A. Bacon assumed the pastorate Dec. 1 the unanimous sentiment of church and society was with him. Mr. Bacon is to the manner born. The son of a minister now in active service, Rev. W.F. Bacon of Medford, Mass., educated at Williston Seminary, Dartmouth College and Hartford Theological Seminary, he has ministered to churches in Milton, N.H., Beverly, Shelburne Falls and Springfield, Mass. Obliged by illness in his family to go abroad, has spent the last three years in England, where he became a member of the London Union, was acting pastor of the Canning Town Church, a director in the settlement work of Mansfield House, and a member of the school board of West Ham, when the new Act was first put in force. He now returns to the state where his ministry began with accumulations of faith and experience that make him a preacher, a wise pastor and an inspiring leader (Pilgrim Press, 1906).

Dartmouth College listed William Augustus Bacon, of the Class of 1890, as being a minister, resident at High Street, Littleton, NH, in its Alumni directory of 1906. The same information appeared in the Theta Delta Chi fraternity catalog of that same year.

William A. Bacon, a preacher, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Littleton, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Lucy A. Bacon, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), his children, Lawrence E. Bacon, aged six years (b. England), Mary A. Bacon, aged three years (b. NH), and Marshall W. Bacon, aged two months (b. NH), and his servant, Lillian M. McVety, a private family servant, aged seventeen years (b. VT). Lucy A. Bacon was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. They resided in a rented house in Littleton Village.

SHELBURNE FALLS. CHURCH SERVICES. Congregational church: The preacher of the day will be the Rev. William A. Bacon, now of the Congregational church In Littleton, N.H., but who was formerly pastor of the local church. No doubt but the church will be well filled tomorrow tor the services as all are pleased to have the opportunity of hearing Mr. Bacon in this pulpit again after an absence of several years. The regular session on the Sunday school and Men’s forum will be held at the close of the morning service under the direction of the regular leaders (North Adams Transcript, May 24, 1919).

SHELBURNE FALLS. REV. WILLIAM BACON TO OCCUPY HIS OLD PULPIT. Rev. William A. Bacon of Littleton, N.H., who was pastor of the local Congregational church about 20 years ago is visiting in town and will occupy his old pulpit Sunday morning. Rev. Mr. Bacon has met with considerable success in his work since leaving the local parish and is considered one of the strongest preachers in his section of the state. He will have a stirring message for his old parishioners Sunday morning. Rev. Thomas Lutman, the present pastor, left today for Centerville, R.I. He will occupy the Congregational pulpit there on Sunday (North Adams Transcript, August 15, 1919).

William A. Bacon, a Congregational minister, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a Littleton, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucy A. Bacon, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), his children, Lawrence E. Bacon, aged sixteen years (b. England “Am. Cit.”), Mary A. Bacon, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Marshall W. Bacon, aged nine years (b. NH). They resided in a rented house in Littleton Village.

ACCEPTS CALL TO CONG’L CHURCH IN LYNDONVILLE. Rev. William A. Bacon of Littleton Coming February 15th. The call which the Congregational church at Lyndonville extended to the Rev. W.A. Bacon of the Congregational church in Littleton, N.H., has been accepted and the New Hampshire clergyman will begin his labors in Lyndonville February 15. The church has been without a pastor since last November when the Rev. H.T. Hinman went to a charge in Tuckahoe, New York . An effort was made to unite the Congregational and Methodist churches in Lyndonville but this failed and various supplies and candidates have looked after the services since the resignation of Mr. Hinman. “Mr. Hinman [Bacon] has been in Littleton for the past 17 years” says the Littleton Courier, and has endeared himself to many. He is a very able preacher and the Vermont town is fortunate in the addition of Mr. Bacon and his family to its residents” (St. Johnsbury Republican, January 11, 1923).

LYNDONVILLE CLERIC GOES TO BAY STATE. (Special to The Herald.) LYNDONVILLE, Dec. 30. Rev. William A. Bacon, who resigned as pastor of the Congregational church in April has accepted a call to the Mystic Side Congregational church in Everett, Mass., and begins his work there next Sunday. He is a graduate of Dartmouth college and Hartford theological seminary and came here from Littleton about five years ago, having been pastor of the New Hampshire church 17 years. During his pastorate here the church has prospered and its membership steadily increased. Mr. Bacon inaugurated the vested choir and was instrumental in raising a fund for a thorough renovation of the church edifice. Since his resignation he has supplied in various New England churches, occupying the pulpit of the South Congregational church today in the absence of its pastor (Rutland Daily Herald, December 31, 1928).

William A. Bacon, a Congregational Church clergyman, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annette S. Bacon, aged forty-six years (b. MA), and his children, Mary A. Bacon, an electric co. clerk, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and Marshall W. Bacon, aged twenty years (b. NH). William A. Bacon rented their house at 67 Converse Ave, for $55 per month. They did not have a radio set.

William A. Bacon died during a heatwave in Saugus, MA, July 28 1931, aged sixty-one years.

FOUR DEAD, MANY STRICKEN BY HEAT. Mercury Rises to 97.4 on the Hottest July 28 for Boston. Crowd Rushes to Beaches, Remaining There After Midnight.  Deaths, Prostrations on Year’s Hottest Day. Deaths.

  • REV. WILLIAM A. BACON, 61, Pastor of Mystic Side Congregational Church, West Everett, Collapsed on Saugus Bus and died.
  • JOSEPH BOYLE, 45, 184 Union st., Lynn, fruit pedler. Collapsed in front of home at 6 o’clock. Died in hospital.
  • JOHN J. MAHONEY, 47, 477 Medford st., Somerville. Died on Somerville-Charlestown bus.
  • RICHARD MOODY, 65, Somerville. Died while bathing at Revere Beach (Boston Globe, July 29, 1931).

SERVICES TODAY FOR FORMER PASTOR. Funeral of Rev. William A. Bacon. IN WEST EVERETT. Malden Resident, Formerly of Local Congregational Church, Stricken by Heat. Funeral services were held in West Everett today for Rev. William A. Bacon, a former pastor of the local Congregational church, who died Tuesday in Saugus. The services were conducted in the Mystic Side Congregational church of which Rev. Mr. Bacon had been pastor since January 1, 1929. Interment will be in the family lot in Arms cemetery here at 2 o’clock tomorrow afternoon. Rev. Mr. Bacon was overcome early Tuesday night while riding on a bus in Saugus and died before medical attention could reach him. Physicians said that a weak heart, aggravated by the extreme heat, caused his death. He was on his way to his home at 67 Converse avenue, Malden, accompanied by his wife. When he was stricken ill, Mrs. Bacon sent the driver of a bus to call a doctor, but nothing could be done to save him. Mr. Bacon had been pastor of the West Everett church for two years, coming there January 1, 1929, from Lyndonvllle, Vt. He had previously held pastorates in Beverly, Shelburne Falls, Springfield, Littleton, N.H., and London, England. He was born in Amesbury 61 years ago, was graduated from Dartmouth college in 1890, and from the Hartford Theological seminary in 1895. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Annette S. Bacon, formerly of this place, two sons, Lawrence E., a teacher in the high school at Unadilla, N.Y., and Marshall W., a student at Boston university, and a daughter, Mrs. Mary A. Winchell of Malden, and three brothers, George P. of Medford, Theodore of St. Louis, and Arthur of Beirut, Syria (North Adams Transcript, July 30, 1931).

This obituary list of his pastorates omitted his first parish: Nute Chapel, West Milton, NH.

Annette L. (Stebbins) Bacon died in 1979.

DEATHS. BACON – In Mashpee, June 15, formerly of Malden, Annette (Stebbins) Bacon. Wife of the late Rev. William A Bacon, who was the former Pastor of Mystic Side Congregational Church in Everett. Mother of Mr. William Bacon of Dayton, Ohio. Also survived by 10 grandchildren. 18 great grandchildren and 7 great great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held on Thursday, June 21 at the Mystic Side Congregational Church, Main St., Everett. Burial will be private. Visiting hours have been omitted. Gifts in Mrs. Bacon’s memory may be made to the Mystic Side Congregational Church. Arrangements by the Jenkins Funeral Home, WEST FALMOUTH (Boston Globe, June 19, 1979).


Rev. Charles Sumner Bates – 1892-95

Charles S. Bates was born in Marshfield, MA, November 26, 1865, son of Henry S. and Bethia C. (Ewell) Bates. (He may have been a namesake for Massachusetts’s US Senator Charles Sumner, who was brutally beaten on the US Senate floor, by a pro-slavery US Representative in 1856. Massachusetts’s other US Senator, Henry Wilson, originally of Farmington, NH, was threatened also).

He graduated from the Bangor Theological Seminary in 1890, and was ordained in Lee, NH, in June 1890.

MINISTERIAL PERSONALS. C.S. Bates was installed as pastor of the church in Lee, N.H., on June 25 (Christian Union, July 10, 1890).

LEE. Monday, Jan. 4, the annual business meeting of the church and society was held.  The usual number was in attendance, and a unanimous vote was passed to procure the services of the pastor, Rev. C.S. Bates, the coming year.  His efforts in our behalf have been duly appreciated, and he seems to have won the respect and esteem of all his people.  The treasurer’s report shows there are funds in the treasury, and more has been raised for benevolent purposes than for many years.  Resolutions were p[assed expressing gratitude to one of our number who so generously donated a handsome sum, the income of which is to be devoted yearly to the support of the Gospel in this place (Newmarket Advertiser, January 8, 1892).

Religious Intelligence. New Hampshire. Lee. At the Christmas celebration of the Congregational church the pastor, Rev. C.S. Bates, was presented with a fur overcoat and dogskin driving gloves, worth together over $32, with $6 in cash, a silver napkin ring and several minor gifts. Deacon N.C Spell, superintendent of the Sunday school, received a pair of gold-bowed spectacles, valued at $6. from the members of the school (Vermont Chronicle, January 8, 1892).

LEE. Rev. Charles Bates is taking a three weeks vacation, and rumor says – well she’s always saying things (Newmarket Advertiser, February 6, 1892).

Charles S. Bates married in Solon, ME, April 20, 1892, Nellie E. Bean, he of Lee, NH, and she of Solon. He was a clergyman, aged twenty-six years; she was a teacher, aged twenty-five years. She was born in Concord, ME, [January 1, 1867,] daughter of Amos J. and Angie M. (Grant) Bean.

LEE. There will be services in the Union meeting house every Sabbath afternoon, commencing May 1st. Rev. Charles Bates will conduct them. … Our genial young minister, Charles S. Bates, has demonstrated the fact that it is not well for man to live alone in a great parsonage, and has taken unto himself a helpmeet.  May their life’s journey together be a happy one (Newmarket Advertiser, April 30, 1892).

LEE. On Tuesday evening, May 3, the Rev. Charles Bates, who has recently taken a prize ticket in the “matrimonial lottery,” was treated to a donation party by his parishioners.  These days are unlike the old times, when donation parties meant, give the poor “Elder” something that nobody wanted, and eat up all that he needed himself. Therefore, we are able to chronicle that Mr. Bates’ pantry and cellar were generously filled and an enjoyable evening spent (Newmarket Advertiser, May 14, 1892).

LEE. Our esteemed pastor, Chas. S. Bates, has received an invitation to take the pastorate at Milton, with a largely increased salary.  He has not yet decided whether to accept or not.  His people here are very anxious to have him remain here (Newmarket Advertiser, July 2, 1892).

LEE. Rev. Charles S. Bates will exchange pulpits Sunday with Rev. Mr. Bacon of Milton (Newmarket Advertiser, July 16, 1892).

Religious Intelligence. New Hampshire. Milton. The reported call of the Rev. C.S. Bates of Lee to this town is true, notwithstanding the doubt occasioned by the fact that the Congregational church here was already provided with a pastor. Mr. Bates’ call is not to this church but to the undenominational Nute’s chapel. He will enter upon his new duties on the 10th instant. His post-office address will be Farmington (Vermont Chronicle, August 5, 1892).

LEE. Chas. S. Bates preached his farewell sermon Sunday, both at the Chapel, and the Union meeting house. It is a matter of regret to all that he has decided to leave us (Newmarket Advertiser, August 6, 1892).

Strafford (N.H.) Conference. The sixty-fifth annual meeting of this conference was held in Durham on Tuesday and Wednesday, June 6 and 7. It was called to order Tuesday morning by the moderator, Rev. R.H. Davies of North Conway. The devotional service was conducted by Rev. C.S. Bates of Nute chapel. The first prayer of the service and of the conference was made by Rev. George E. Hall of Dover. The thought of the devotional service was the presence of Christ as promised, Matthew xxviii: 20 (Vermont Chronicle, June 23, 1893).

A Bangor Theological Seminary catalog of 1895 listed Charles Sumner Bates, Class of 1890, as having a Parish in Farmington, NH. (His post-office address had been listed in 1892 as Farmington, NH. The Nute Chapel Association has been based also at various times in Farmington) (Smith, 1895).

Rev. Charles S. Bates occupied a pulpit in Hanson, MA, by November 1896.

Charles S. Bates, a minister, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), headed a Hanson, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Nellie E. Bates, aged thirty-three years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Angie M. Bean, a houseworker, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME). Angie M. Bean was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. They resided in a rented house.

Charles S. Bates, a Congregational church clergyman, aged forty-four years (b. MA), headed a Wendell, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Nellie E. Bates, aged forty-three years (b. ME). They resided in a rented house on Main Street in Wendell Centre.

Charles S. Bates gave up the ministry after 1917. He appeared in the Portland directory of 1919 as a laborer, resident at 25 Summit street in South Portland, ME. His wife, Nellie E. (Bean) Bates of 25 Summit Street, South Portland, ME, died of breast cancer in South Portland, January 26, 1919.  (She was buried in Solon, ME).

Charles S. Bates, a marine hardware laborer, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a South Portland, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. He shared a rented two-family dwelling at 25 Summit Street with the household of Jennie Jewett, a widow, aged fifty-one years (b. ME).

Charles S. Bates appeared in the Portland directory of 1922 as a Buxton teacher, resident at 25 Summit street in South Portland, ME.; a Yarmouth teacher, with the same address, in 1923; and as having removed to Yarmouth, ME, in 1924.

Charles S. Bates, a grammar school teacher, aged sixty-four years (b. MA), boarded in the Pownal, ME, household of Lauren H. Tuttle, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. ME), at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census.

Charles S. Bates, aged seventy-four years (b. MA), boarded in the Pownal, ME, household of Lauren H. Tuttle, a farmer, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census.

Charles S. Bates died in Eloise, MI, December 17, 1949.


Rev. Robert MacQueen Peacock – 1896-11

Robert M. Peacock was born in Rosetta, Lanark, Ontario, Canada, September 15, 1848, son of Robert and Catherine (MacQueen) Peacock.

John Cummings, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Bingham, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lydia S. Cummings, keeping house, aged thirty-eight years, Blanche Cummings, at home, aged thirteen years (b, ME), and Harry Cummings, aged seven years (b. ME), and his boarder, Robert H. Peacock, a clergyman, aged twenty-eight years (b. Canada),

He married, September 4, 1880, Ada Mabel Lee. She was born in Vassalborough, ME, September 5, 1859 daughter of Alfred and Nancy J. Lee.

BUILT FOR TWO, SURE. Pigeon Cove Couple Start on Their Wedding Tour on a Tandem. GLOUCESTER, Oct. 17 – James Arthur Vincent Hurd, formerly of Lowell, and Arliss Lottie Whittredge Tuttle, two of Pigeon Cove’s two most popular young people, were married Monday afternoon at the residence of the bride’s parents, Rev. R.M. Peacock performing the ceremony. Both are expert bicyclists. Mr. Hurd being one of the first wheelmen on cape Ann. Instead of taking the customary departure on a train, with a host of admiring friends to scatter rice. etc., they mounted a tandem bicycle, and in a few minutes disappeared over the hills of Rockport. Their objective point is the White mountains (Boston Globe, October 17, 1894).

Robert M. Peacock, a clergyman, aged fifty-one years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty years), Ada M. Peacock, aged forty years (b. ME), and his children, Ellie M. Peacock, at school, aged eighteen years (ME), Harold L. Peacock, at school, aged fourteen years (MA), Robert B. Peacock, aged five years (MA), and Alfred G. Peacock, aged one year (NH). Ada M. Peacock was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living. Robert M. Peacock was a permanent alien, having immigrated in 1875. They resided in a rented house.

Robert M. Peacock appeared in the Milton directories of 1905-06 and 1909 as pastor of the Union Nute Chapel, Nute Ridge, Milton.

Church and Ministerial Record. Anniversaries. PIGEON COVE, MASS., Rev. E.P. Kelley. 50th of Sunday school. Original members and former teachers gathered home and participated. Greetings from former pastors superintendents, among them Rev. R.M. Peacock, now of Milton, N.H. Original hymn by another former pastor (Pilgrim Press, 1907). 

Robert M. Peacock, a clergyman, aged sixty-one years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Ada M. Peacock, aged fifty years (b. ME), and his children, Robert B. Peacock, aged fifteen years (MA), and Alfred G. Peacock,  aged eleven years (NH), and his niece, Winifred Langley, aged fourteen years (b. NH). Ada M. Peacock was the mother of five children, of whom four were still living. Robert M. Peacock was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated in 1875. They resided in a rented house.

REGISTRAR’S REPORT. Necrology. Robert M. Peacock died in the hospital at Augusta, January 30, 1918. He was born in Rosetta, Ontario, September 15, 1848, graduating from Bangor Seminary June, 1878, and later taking post-graduate work in Bowdoin College. His first parish was the churches of Solon and Bingham, where he was ordained. On September 4, 1880, he was married to Miss Ada Lee of Riverside, Maine, where he had preached as a student. He was pastor in Monmouth, Maine, from 1884 to 1887; Somerset, Mass., 1887 to 1892; Pigeon Cove, Mass., 1892 to 1896. In 1896, Mr. Peacock was called to the Nute Chapel, Milton, N.H., an undenominational work established and endowed by a former resident of the town, and here for fifteen years he ministered in this community service. In 1911, he was called to the churches of Vassalboro and Riverside. This proved to be his last, as it was his hardest and most difficult parish and here he was stricken with the disease of which he died. Of him it can be said that he “died in the harness.” He is survived by Mrs. Peacock, a daughter and three sons (Congregational Conference, 1918). 

Mrs. Nancy J. Lee, a widow, aged eighty-five years (b. ME), headed a Vassalborough, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Mrs. Ada L. Peacock, a widow, aged sixty years (b. ME), and Clarence W. Lee, a general farm laborer, aged forty-one years, and her grandson, Alfred G. Peacock, a general farm laborer, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). Mrs. Nancy J. Lee owned their house free-and-clear.

FUNERAL IN MELROSE FOR MRS. ADA PEACOCK. MELROSE, Nov. 19 – The funeral of Mrs. Ada M. Peacock, widow of Rev. Robert M. Peacock, who died Monday at the home or her son, Dr. Harold L. Peacock, 40, Woodland av., Melrose Highlands, was held this morn in the home at 11 o’clock. Rev John H. Leamon of the Melrose Highlands Congregational Church officiated. Burial was this afternoon in Nute Ridge Cemetery, Milton, N.H. Mrs. Peacock was born in Riverside, Me, 1859, and was married to Rev. Mr. Peacock in 1880. Immediately after their marriage they went to Solon, Me, where he assumed pastorate of the Congregational Church. They also lived in Monmouth, Me; Somerset and Pigeon Cove, Mass; Milton, N.H., and Vassalboro, Me., where Rev. Mr. Peacock held pastorates. Besides her son, she leaves two other sons, Robert B. of Boston and Rev. Alfred G. Peacock of Lisbon, N.H., and a daughter, Mrs. Seth A. Moulton of California (Boston Globe, November 19, 1930).


Rev. Edward Payson Eastman – 1912

Edward P. Eastman was born in Conway, NH,  July 15, 1838, son of John L. and Margaret (Douglas) Eastman. (He may have been a namesake for Rev. Edward Payson, a famous Maine divine).

Edward P. Eastman of North Conway, NH, was a “Middle” classman at the Bangor Theological Seminary in 1865 (the 1864-65 academic year). There were three student classes or cohorts there: Junior, Middle, and Senior. His education appears to have been interrupted by the Civil War. (He graduated with the Class of 1871, rather than his original Class of 1866) (Smith, 1865).

Edward P. Eastman of Conway, NH, enlisted in Co. E of the First NH Heavy Artillery, in Conway, NH, September 1, 1864. He mustered out in Washington, DC, June 15, 1865.

Edward P. Eastman married in Conway, NH, March 8, 1868, Elvira N. Sawyer, he of Conway and she of Westbrook, ME. He was a student, aged thirty years; she was aged twenty-four years. She was born in Westbrook, ME, circa 1843-44, daughter of Frederick and Harriet (Merrill) Sawyer.

John L. Eastman, a farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Conway (North Conway P.O.), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Margaret Eastman, keeps house, aged fifty-five (b. ME), Charles Eastman, a carpenter, aged twenty-nine (b. NH), John L. Eastman, Jr., a farm laborer, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Edward P. Eastman, a clergyman, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and Eliza Eastman, housework, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH).

Maine. The following graduates of the last class at Bangor Theological Seminary are engaged in labor: Mr. J.E. Walker, Forest Grove, Oregon, goes as a missionary to Turkey; Mr. John T. Rea of Boston, goes to Taftsville, Conn.; Mr. Alvin B. Jordan of Raymond, to Turner; Mr. Wm. C. Hulse of Johnston, Wis., to Mich.; Mr. D.W. Hardy, of Chicago to Sherman Mills; Mr. Edward P. Eastman of North Conway, N.H., to Conway; and Mr. Wm. H. Bolster of South Park, to Wiscasset (Vermont Chronicle, June 24, 1871).

Edward P. Eastman, a clergyman, aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed an Ossipee, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-two years), Eliza N. Eastman, keeping house, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), his children, Fred L. Eastman, aged ten years (b. NH), Louisa S. Eastman, aged eight years (b. NH), Hattie F. Eastman, aged five years (b. ME). They resided in a rented house.

Edward P. Eastman, a clergyman, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Danbury, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-two years), Eliza N. Eastman, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), his children, Louisa S. Eastman, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Harriet F. Eastman, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), Charlotte H. Eastman, aged eighteen years (b. ME), and Grace F. Eastman, at school, aged fifteen years (b. ME), and his mother in law, Harriet E. Sawyer, aged ninety years (b. NH). Eliza N. Eastman was the mother of six children, of whom five were stilling living. Harriet E. Sawyer was the mother of six children, of whom three were stilling living. They resided in a rented house.

Edward P. Eastman was settled at Union village, in Wakefield, NH, in at least the years 1902-11. The Mitchell-Cony directory of 1907 included him in a list of Union Congregational church pastors as being the current pastor.

… and Rev. E.P. Eastman, who came Dec. 1, 1902, and still continues as pastor of the church. The members of the church at the present time number fifty-two, of whom thirty-two are residents at Union village. Mr. Chas. W. Page and Mr. Chas. S. Boody are the deacons of the church, and Mrs. Helen M. Hanson is clerk (Mitchell-Cony, 1907).

Edward P. Eastman, living on his own income, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield (“Union Village”), NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-two years), Elvira N.S. Eastman, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), and his daughter, Charlotte H. Eastman, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME). Elvira N.S. Eastman was the mother of six children, of whom five were still living. They resided in a rented house on Main Street.

Edward P. Eastman appeared in the Milton directory of 1912 as pastor of the Union Nute Chapel, Nute Ridge, Milton.

Edward P. Eastman died in Wakefield, NH, January 20, 1917. Eliza N. (Sawyer) Eastman died in 1935.


Rev. Danville A. Gammon – 1914-18

Danville A. Gammon was born in Canton, ME, July 20, 1861, son of Charles E. and Matilda T. (Brown) Gammon.

Danville Gammon appeared in the Maine Register directories of 1890 and 1892, as the F. Bap. pastor of the West Church of Peru, ME.

He married in Roxbury, ME, May 6, 1891, Carrie A. Locke. She was born in Roxbury, ME, May 10, 1866, daughter of Silas M. and Elizabeth T. (Kimball) Locke.

Danville Gammon appeared in the Maine Register directory of 1893, as the F. Bap. pastor of the East Church of Hebron, ME. “Rev. D.A. Gammon and 63 others of Hebron,” ME, submitted a remonstrance, i.e., a petition, to the Maine State legislature, February 14, 1893.

Danville A. Gammon appeared in an Androscoggin, ME, county directory of 1898-99 as an Auburn, ME, clergyman. He resided at 107 Pleasant street in Auburn.

Danvill A. Gammon, a clergyman, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Jefferson, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Carrie A. Gammon, aged thirty-four years (b. ME).

Rev. D.A. Gammon succeeded Rev. W.H. Newell as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church of New Gloucester, ME, in 1903 (Gray and New Gloucester Register, 1905).

Carrie A. (Locke) Gammon became a minister in her own right. In a historical piece discussing the Free-Will Baptists receiving ordained women from other denominations, her name was given as an example. (We have seen already the example of Rev. Mrs. Elizabeth S. Barker having preached initially for the Baptists, before being ordained by the Methodists).

A few previously ordained women were received into the Free-Will Baptist denomination from other origins. Ella S. Cheney’s previous ordination by a holiness sect was recognized in 1905. Jennie Jackson’s previous ordination by the World Faith Mission was recognized in 1907. And some switched. In 1903 Mrs. S.W. Treworgy who had been preaching for Free-Will Baptists became a Northern Baptist. In 1904 Mrs. Carrie A. Gammon, formerly a Northern Baptist, became a Free-Will Baptist (American Baptist Historical Society, 1994).

In a 1909 statistical tabulation of ordained Free-Will Baptists in the New Durham Quarterly Meeting, New Hampshire Yearly Meeting, Maine Conference, the names of both D.A. Gammon and Carrie A. Gammon appeared in the column for Ordained and Licensed Ministers for the 2 Strafford church, i.e., the Strafford Second or Strafford Corner church. His name had the designation “p” for pastor, but she was also ordained (the names of unordained persons were italicized in the list, which hers was not). Their parish had thirty-nine Resident members, and a total of seventy-six members in the Whole church. Their address was Rochester, R.F.D. 1 (General Conference, 1909).

FREE BAPTISTS AT GONIC. Many Attended Second Day of Two Counties Convention. Rochester, Jan. 27 – The second day of the joint session of New Durham quarterly meeting and Rockingham association of Free Baptist churches, held in the Free Baptist church at Gonic, on Wednesday, was largely attended. The program In the morning consisted of a devotional exercise, led by Rev. L.W. Pease of Stratford Center, a service conducted by Rev. S. Phillips of Hampton and a conference sermon by Rev. B.H. Tilton of Somersworth. In the afternoon- the exercises opened with a devotional service in charge of Rev. D.A. Gammon of Strafford Corner, followed by an address on “New Hampton Institute” by Principal Frank W. Preston of New Hampton after which Rev. A.E. Kenyon of Dover conducted an experience meeting and communion. In the evening there was a song and prayer service, led by Rev. E.P. Moulton of Kittery, Me., and a sermon by Rev. M.L. Gregg of Laconia. The meetings will close this afternoon (Portsmouth Herald, January 27, 1910).

In a 1911 statistical tabulation of ordained Free-Will Baptists in the Wolfeboro Quarterly Meeting, the names of both D.A. Gammon and Carrie A. Gammon appeared in the column for Ordained and Licensed Ministers for the Chocorua church. On this occasion, both of their names had the designation “p” for pastor, but her name was italicized. L.C. Clark was also listed there. Their parish had twenty-two Resident members, and a total of forty-five members in the Whole church. Their address was Chocorua (General Conference, 1911).

Clergyman D.A. Gammon of Tamworth, NH, of which Chocorua is a village, performed a Tamworth marriage for a couple from Madison, NH, May 21, 1912 (Madison VRs).

Danville A. Gammon of Milton, clergyman, performed marriages in Milton as early as August 1914.

D.A. Gammon of Farmington, NH, replied to a poultry query by a fellow minister in the American Poultry Advocate issue of March 1915. We have seen that Nute Chapel ministers sometimes based themselves in Farmington village, as being closer to the chapel than Milton Three-Ponds.

An Experience With Parcel Post. Rev. Edgar Warren, Hampton, N.H. Dear Sir, In response to your inquiry in the January POULTRY ADVOCATE I will say that I have not been successful in making a market for eggs by parcel post. In the Wright egg boxes the eggs went safely, and I have used the same carton three or four times. After the Postoffice department advertised to take eggs and produce as ordinarily packed to ship express, I sent five shipments (15 dozen case) to Winthrop Highlands, Mass., insuring each package or shipment. Two of the five were badly smashed (31 in one case and in the last 51) and then I quit. I entered complaints, put in my claims. One was paid for in about six months; the other has never been settled. Not much value to such insurance. In small packages parcel post is expensive to suit. It looks as if city people were not willing to pay the producer what they must pay the retailer, even if the former gives them fresher goods. D.A. GAMMON, Farmington, N.H. (Depuy, 1915). 

D.A. Gammon appeared in the Milton directory of 1917 as pastor of the Union Nute Chapel, Nute Ridge, Milton. He appeared as pastor of the West church, i.e., the Nute Chapel, in 1918.

Danville A. Gammon appeared in the Maine Register directories of 1919 and 1920, as the pastor of the North Lebanon F. Bap. church.

Danville A. Gammon, a Free Baptist Ch. clergyman, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie A. Gammon, aged fifty-three years (b. ME). They resided in a rented house on the Milton Mills road.

OLD HOME EXERCISES HELD AT NORTH LEBANON CHURCH. LEBANON, Me., Sept. 1 – Old Home Day was observed this afternoon at the North Lebanon Church. Many former residents came back for the event. Rev. Franklin Blake, Rev. George Kneeland and Rev. D.A. Gammon were the speakers (Boston Globe, September 2, 1929).

Gammon, Danville and Carrie - Connie L. Russell
Carrie A. and Danville A. Gammon (Photo: Carrie L. Russell)

Danville A. Gammon, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Alfred, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie A. Gammon, aged sixty-three years (b. ME). They rented their house on Waterboro Street for $15 per month. They had a radio set.

Danville A. (Carrie A.) Gammon, retired, appeared in the Alfred, ME, directories of 1932, 1935, 1938, and 1939. They resided on the Waterboro road.

FIRST TIME IN PROBATE COURT PRAYER IS HEARD. When the Probate Court for York County opened at Alfred today in the new county courthouse, prayer was offered by Rev. Danville A. Gammon, retired Baptist preacher. This is the first time in the history of Maine, as far as known, that this branch of a county court has listened to a preacher of any denomination (Portsmouth Herald, October 10, 1934).

ODD ITEMS from EVERYWHERE. Every couple married by the Rev. Danville A. Gammon of Alfred, Me., stand on “the wedding rug,” which has been in constant use for 45 years now. Mrs. Gammon confesses that between ceremonies it is kept wrong side up on the floor to preserve its beauty (Boston Globe, March 31, 1938).

Danville A. Gammon died December 26, 1940. Carrie A. (Locke) Gammon died July 4, 1950.

Sanford Woman’s Will Probated. (Special Dispatch). Alfred, Sept. 13 – The will of Carrie A. Gammon, widow of Rev. Danville A. Gammon who died in Sanford on July 14, was also allowed Tuesday. The Gammons had lived at Alfred many years after their retirement as pastors of Baptist churches in several Maine and New Hampshire towns including Alfred. Mrs. Gammon bequeathed $1,000 to the Rev. Lawrence N. Selfridge of the First Baptist Church, West Boylston, Mass., and the residue of her estate to the American Baptist Foreign Missionary Society, the American Home Mission, and the Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board, all of the Northern Baptist Convention, 182 Madison Avenue, New York City (Portland Press Herald, September 14, 1950).


Rev. George Alfred Bennett – 1920-21

George A. Bennett was born in Groton, MA, October 11, 1852, son of Alfred L. and Mary R. (Nutting) Bennett. (His father died in 1853 and his mother married (2nd) Thomas E. Bennett).

George A. Bennett married (1st) in Ashby, MA, September 25, 1879, Ella S. Robbins, he of Ashby and she of Pepperell, MA. She was born in Lynborough, NH, circa 1856-57, daughter of Milo and Lavinia [D. (Bailey)] Robbins. She died in Pepperell, MA, October 14, 1882, aged twenty-six years, two months, and three days.

Thomas E. Bennett, a farmer, aged fifty-five years, headed an Ashby, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary A. Bennett, keeping house, aged fifty-six years, his children, George A. Bennett, a shoe shop worker, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), Lizzie A. Richardson, at home, aged twenty years, Lewis R. Bennett, works on farm, aged sixteen years, and his daughter-in-law, Ella Bennett, at home, aged twenty-three years.

George A. Bennett married (2nd) in Brockton, MA, September 20, 1884, Abbie V. Hartland, both of Brockton. He was a confectionary dealer, aged thirty-one years; she was at home, aged twenty years. She was born in Sandwich, MA, September 20, 1863, daughter of Charles and Hannah Hartland.

BENNETT, GEORGE ALFRED, son of Alfred L. and Mary A. (Nutting) Bennett, was born at Groton, Mass., Oct. 11, 1852. He attended Wilbraham Academy. Was ordained to the Congregational ministry at Acworth, N.H., July 3, 1900. Pastorates: Ripton, Vt., 1895-8; Acworth, N.H., 1899-1903; Brookline, N.H., 1903-8; Fremont, N.H., 1908-11; Wakefield, N.H., 1911-18; Acworth, N.H., 1918-20. Supply work: Green Hill Chapel, Barrington, N.H., 1920; Nute’s Chapel, Milton, N.H., 1920-21. He was married (first) Sept. 25, 1878, at Pepperell, Mass., to Ella S. Robbins, who is deceased. He was married (second) Sept. 20, 1884, at Brockton, Mass., to Abbie V. Hartford, who survives. Three children living. He died Oct. 12, 1921, at Milton, N.H., of heart failure (National Council, 1921). 

George A. Bennett, a clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Langdon, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Abby Bennett, aged thirty-six years (b. MA) and his children, Gladys H. Bennett, aged ten years (b. MA), and Charles A. Bennett, aged three years (b. VT). Abby Bennett was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. They resided in a rented house.

BROOKLINE. Rev. George A. Bennett of Ackworth has accepted a call to the Cong’l church here to take effect the first of March (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), January 30, 1903).

BROOKLINE. Pleasant Reception Held. A reception was tendered to Rev. and Mrs. George A. Bennett at the Cong’l church vestries on Friday evening, about eighty being present. Piano selections were rendered by Misses Goldie Swett and Grace Whitcomb. Remarks were made by Rev. George Bennett and Dr. C.H. Holcombe. Cake and cocoa were served and a general good time enjoyed. (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), March 20, 1903). 

BROOKLINE. Rev. George Bennett, pastor of the Congregational church, has read his resignation and will soon remove to Fremont where he has accepted a call. Many friends are sorry to have him go and wish him and family success in the new field (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), October 9, 1908).

George A. Bennett, a church clergyman, aged fifty-six years (b. MA), headed a Fremont, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Abbie V. Bennett, aged forty-six years (b. MA) and his children, Gladys H. Bennett, aged twenty years (b. MA), and Charles A. Bennett, aged thirteen years (b. VT). Abbie V. Bennett was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. They resided in a rented house on Sundance Street.

In early January 1911, Mr. Baker preached his last sermon. He did not resign but just severed connection with the [Wakefield, NH, First Congregational] church. In February, Rev. Mr. Smith, the Home Missionary Secretary, came to confer with the people of the church, and promised to send a candidate when he could. With the exception of one Sunday, when many were sick, Sabbath School was held and Christian Endeavor meetings were also held on Sunday evenings. Rev. George A. Bennet of Tremont [Fremont] supplied the pulpit, both morning and evening, and proved to be very acceptable to the congregation. He served for seven years (Banks, 1985). 

Pepperell Locals. Rev. George Bennett of Wakefield,. N.H., was in town Tuesday, being on his way to Brookline to officiate at the funeral of Mrs. Henry Shattuck (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), February 18, 1916).

Pepperell Locals. After being in Wakefield, N.H., at the home of her father, Rev. George Bennett, for several weeks, Mrs. James Hill returned Tuesday. Her son Lester, who has been there very ill, was sufficiently recovered to return with her (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), July 7, 1916).

Pepperell. Double Funeral. Lester James Hill, eldest son of James and Etta L. (Bennett) Hill, died in Boston at the Massachusetts General hospital on Monday, Nov. 19, and when the death message reached town that day, his mother was at the bedside of his sister, Violet Etta, who was holding to life by a frail thread at the St. Joseph hospital in Nashua, where on Wednesday, Nov. 21, she passed away about 1 a.m., nearly at the same hour of her brother’s death. The entire community is affected by the unusual and doubly sad occurrence and the heartfelt sympathy of all goes out to the grief-stricken parents. Both were born in Brookline, N.H. Lester, the elder, was born Aug. 18, 1899 and died at the age of 18 years, 3 months, 1 day. He was a bright, energetic lad and nearly everybody knew him. He was the paper boy for some time, delivering the morning papers, and this last summer assisted F.J. Dunlap at his automobile supply shop, when his health permitted him to do so. He has not been well for about two years. He suffered from a nervous trouble and since an attack of rheumatic fever his heart has been badly affected. Endocarditis, a form of heart trouble, was the cause of his death. He had been in the hospital several weeks. His illness interfered with his school work, but be was an interested member of the M.E. Sunday school, also of Pepperell Boy Scouts. Both he and his sister were members of the Congregational church in Brookline, where their grandfather, Rev. George Bennett, was formerly pastor. Violet, aged 14 years, 8 months and 3 days, was taken sick two or three weeks ago also with a nervous trouble and complications, and last Thursday night a decided change for the worse developed. She was removed Friday morning to the St. Joseph hospital. She was a member of the Babbatassett Camp Fire and the M.E. Sunday school, and had many friends among the young people. She was devoted to her brother and was a regular little mother. While her mother has been employed in the Nashua River Paper Co. mills she has shouldered quite a little of the work in the home, caring for her little sister. Violet’s death was doubtless hastened by worry over her brother, as she has also bad a heart trouble with her nervous disease. The two children now surviving are George, aged 11 and Gladys, 6 years of age., A double funeral was held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church, conducted by Rev. W.H. Beers, assisted by Rev. J.B. Lewis, pastor of the Congregational church A quartet composed of Mrs. Alice Bartlett, Miss Eva Shepardson and Messers. Spurgeon Cuthbertson and Ralph W. Buck, sang with sympathy, “One by One” and “Beautiful Isle of Somewhere.” The Boy Scouts and Junior Camp Fire attended in a body, while the Boy Scouts acted as bearers, Harold. Copp, Barrett Jacobs, Leon Winch and Glen Parker bearing the remains of their young comrade, and Vernon Bancroft, Leonard Dow, Alfred Parker, Charlie Dennen, were bearers for his sister. Large numbers attended, and it was the most affecting service probably ever held here. There was a profusion of beautiful flowers. The two bodies were placed side by side in one grave in Woodlawn cemetery (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), November 23, 1917).

Pepperell Locals. Rev. George Bennett of Wakefield was in town the last of the week to be present at the double funeral of his two grandchildren, Lester James Hill and Violet Etta Hill, who were buried from the Methodist church Friday afternoon (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), November 30, 1917).

George A. Bennett, a clergyman, aged sixty-six years (b. MA), headed an Acworth, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Abbie V. Bennett, aged fifty-six years (b. MA). They resided in a rented house.

George A. Bennett died in Milton, NH, October 12, 1921, aged sixty-eight years and one day.

REV. GEORGE A. BENNETT. Sunday, Oct. 16, the funeral of Rev. George A. Bennett was held in the Nute Ridge Chapel, West Milton, N.H., of which he had been pastor for the past year. Seemingly in usual health he had passed away peacefully in his sleep just as his 68th year began. The burial was at Lee. He had been in the settled ministry since 1894 after a year as an evangelist. He was pastor at Ripton, Vt., and in New Hampshire at (twice) Brookline, Fremont, Wakefield and Nute Ridge. His faithful, warm-hearted, ministries in pulpit and parish, his love of children, his cheerfulness under illness and trying circumstances were strongly marked, endearing him to all. His ministerial brethren held him in high esteem. He is survived by his widow, one son, two daughters, and several grand-children (Congregational Publishing, 1921).

Abbie V. (Hartland) Bennett died in Miami, FL, February 27, 1950.

GREATER MIAMI DEATHS. Mrs. Abbie Bennett, 86, Dies at Home of Son. Mrs. Abbie Victoria Bennett, 86, died early today at the home of her son, Charles A. Bennett, 1825 NW 21st st. A native of Sandwich, Mass., she came to Dade county 21 years ago. Surviving, besides the son, are two daughters, Mrs. A.F. Weeks, Somersworth, N.H., and Mrs. Jane Hill, East Pepperell, Mass., 10 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Services will be conducted by Dr. Nevin H. Schaaf, pastor of the First Presbyterian church in! Coral Gables, at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the Glass funeral chapel. Burial will be in Lee, N.H. (Miami News, February 27, 1950).


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Pilgrim Press. (1907, June 15). The Congregationalist and Christian World. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=HMG-PlpPYckC&pg=PA810

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire, and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA516

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Wikipedia. (2019, September 22). Charles Sumner. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Sumner

Wikipedia. (2019, August 23). Edward Payson. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Payson

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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