Milton’s West Milton Teachers, 1885-23

By Muriel Bristol | April 17, 2020

The West Milton school house was located in its final period on what is now called Governor’s Road, apparently at its intersection with what is now called Mason Road (near Gould’s Pond).

West Milton PO - 1892
The intersection of what are now Governor’s and Thurston roads appeared in 1892 at the center of the West Milton P.O. district. The West Milton school is indicated with an arrow further down the road to the northwest.

A generation earlier it had been located also on Governor’s Road, but further to the southeast (further to the right on the map). Mrs. Nettie E. (Hersey) Varney (1860-1944) and Mrs. Addie B. (Hatch) Canney (1855-1939) were said to have been pupils at the West Milton school when it was located at its original location on what was then the George Goodwin farm. The ladies in question would have been pupils at the earlier location between the 1860s up to about 1870.

LOCAL. Mrs. Frank Varney of Haverhill, Mass., who is a former West Milton resident, visited her sisters-in-law, Mrs. Ellen Haynes and Miss Anna Varney, last week. She also called on her old friend and schoolmate, Mrs. Addie Canney. Mrs. Varney and Mrs. Canney are the last two surviving pupils of the West Milton school during its original location at the schoolhouse lot on the George Goodwin farm, now the Samuel Belinsky property (Farmington News, November 18, 1932).

(Mrs. Addie B. (Hatch) Canney was for a time also the mother-in-law of West Milton school teacher Alice M. (Brownell) Canney).

The West Milton school teachers identified in this 1885-1923 period were Emma A. Reynolds, Lillian V. Wallace, Annie J. Horne, Nellie F. Nute, Daisy A. Davis, Orinda S. Dickey, Ruby I. Houston, Mabel L. Fall, Alice M. Brownell, and Ethel T. Downs. Several of these teachers taught also in other Milton school districts in other years.

(The dates given for them in their headings are the dates they are thought to have taught at the West Milton school).

Emma A. Reynolds – 1885-86, 1888

Emma A. Reynolds was born in Dover, NH, May 29, 1864, daughter of James O. and Myra J. (Hill) Reynolds. (Another Milton teacher, Lena B. Reynolds, was her younger sister).

James O. Reynolds, a shoe manufacturer, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Myra J. Reynolds, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Idella M. Reynolds, at home, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Emma Reynolds, at home, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Arthur Reynolds, at home, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Fred Reynolds, at home, aged twelve years (b. NH), Bertha Reynolds, aged eight years (b. NH), and Lena Reynolds, aged five years (b. NH). They shared a two-family residence with his parents, Paul Reynolds, a farmer, aged eighty years (b. NH), and his wife, Sally Reynolds, keeping house, aged eighty-two years (b. NH).

WEST MILTON. The school in district No. 4 in West Milton, taught by Miss Emma A. Reynolds, closed Friday. The term has been very successful, and parents and scholars alike are very much pleased with their teacher. This is the third term she has taught in the district. In a word she is a model teacher in every respect (Farmington News, November 13, 1885).

WEST MILTON. Orrie W. Mott, a young lad of only six summers, who attended school at West Milton, is thought to be the smartest boy of his age in the country. He has committed the whole of the multiplication table and can cast the interest on any note at simple interest with perfect ease (Farmington News, November 13, 1885).

WEST MILTON. The term of school has been taught by Miss Emma Reynolds, who has been absent from us three years, during which time she graduated from the Salem Normal school. To say that she is one of the best teachers that is employed in the state is drawing the comparison mildly. She not only has a thorough education, but has the faculty to please her pupils, such as is seldom seen. All unite in congratulating the school board in obtaining such an affable lady and furnishing a first-class boarding house near the school house (Farmington News, July 18, 1888).

Emma A. Reynolds married in Milton, March 5, 1892, Fred P. Meader, she of Milton and he of Durham, NH. She was a school teacher, aged twenty-seven years, and he was a piano tuner, aged nineteen years. Rev. John Manter performed the ceremony. Fred P. Meader was born in Newmarket, NH, September 23, 1872, son of James D. and Emma A. (Perkins) Meader.

Fred P. Meader, a music dealer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Emma R. Meader, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), his children, J. Laurence Meader, at school, aged seven years (b. NH), and Norman D. Meader, at school, aged five years (b. NH), and his sister, Blanche E. Meader, a dressmaker, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). Fred P. Meader rented their house at 49 Broad Street. Emma R. Meader was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Durham Point. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Meader and sons, Lawrence and Norman, of Rochester, are stopping at Mr. and Mrs. James Meader’s, for a week’s vacation. (Portsmouth Herald, August 13, 1902).

Fred P. Meader, a periodicals merchant, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nineteen years), Emma R. Meader, aged thirty-five [forty-five] years (b. NH), and his children, J. Laurence Meader, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Norman D. Meader, aged fourteen years (b. NH). Fred P. Meader owned their house at 22 Knight Street. Emma R. Meader was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

MORE THAN 50 DELEGATES. Quarterly Convention of Strafford County W.C.T.U. Takes Place at East Rochester, N.H. EAST ROCHESTER. N.H. June 28. The quarterly convention of the Strafford County W.C.T.U. was held today with the local union in the Free Baptist Church, and there were more than 50 delegates present. The convention was in charge of Mrs. Granville Grant, president, of Gonic, and Mrs. Gerald Scarr, secretary, of Dover. The program included papers by Miss Annie E. Shapleigh of this place, Mrs. George H. Davis of Dover, Mrs. Fred P. Meader of Rochester, Mrs. John J. Shapleigh of East Rochester and Mrs. E.J. York of Dover. The three pastors, Rev. Leroy S. Goodwin, John A. Wiggin and J. Roy Densmore, each gave 10-minute addresses. Miss Mattie B. James of Northwood. N.H. gave an address. Mrs. Raymond Huse of Dover conducted the dictional. Mrs. Herbert Files of Berwick sang. Mrs. Files and Mrs. Fred Blaisdell sang a duet and Mrs. Garfield Hurd gave a reading (Portsmouth Herald, June 29, 1912).

West Milton. Mr. and Mrs. Fred P. Meader of Rochester, accompanied by a family party, were guests at the home of Mrs. G.H. Plummer last Sunday (Farmington News, September 15, 1916).

Fred P. Meader’s Rochester music store appeared in a regional advertisement for Emerson records.

Emerson Records. LISTEN – it’s an Emerson Record! That is to say, a hit. The song that’s got the A.D.T.’s puckering their lips – the magnetic march that almost lifted you bodily out of your seat, last night at the theatre – caught in all their irresistible melody – for you! – in Emerson Records! Tear out the list of Emerson hits in the column at the left. Take it to any Emerson dealer. Ask him to play these hits. He will accommodate you gladly. Just step in and listen. Emerson Records play on all phonographs – no attachments. Get your Emerson hits from these Emerson dealers:

[Excerpted from a lengthy list of New England dealers:] Fred P. Meader, Rochester.

Emerson Phonograph Company, Inc. Makers of Large-size Gold Seal Records, 75¢ (Boston Globe, April 18, 1919).

The list of Emerson hits in the column to the left were: Dear Old Pal of Mine, a baritone solo sung by Henry Burr, with The Americans Come! on the reverse or “flip” side; How Ya Gonna Keep ‘Em Down on the Farm?, a character song sung by Byron Harlan, with When You See Another Sweetie Hanging Around on the reverse; After All, a baritone solo sung by Arthur Fields, with Kentucky Dream on the reverse; He’s Had No Loving for a Long, Long Time, a baritone solo by Irving Kaufman, with Johnny’s in Town on the reverse; Some Day I’ll Make You Glad, a tenor solo by George Gordon, with The Kiss That Made Me Cry on the reverse; How Are You Goin’ to Wet Your Whistle?, a character song by Billy Murray, with Blue-Eyed, Blonde-Haired, Heart-Breaking Baby Doll on the reverse; Me-ow, a one-step by the Emerson Military Band, with Some One-Step on the reverse; and Heart-Sickness Blues, a foxtrot by the Louisiana Five, with Orange Blossom Rag on the reverse.

IN MEMORIAM. Myra J. Reynolds. Mrs. Myra J. Reynolds died at the home of her daughter at East Barrington on Tuesday, aged 86 years. She was born at Strafford, the daughter of Nicholas and Eliza Johnson Hill. In 1853 she married James O. Reynolds, then a prominent shoe manufacturer at Dover. Later they moved to West Milton where they cared for Mr. Reynolds’ aged parents. Following the death of Mr. Reynolds, the family moved to Wakefield Mass., and a few years later returned to Milton. Mrs. Reynolds accepted the Christian faith early in life and united with the Baptist church In Dover. She was a woman of strong Christian character and [made] a host of friends wherever she moved. She leaves four children, Arthur of Brockton, J. Fred of Milton, Mrs. Fred P. Meader of Rochester and Mrs. E.E. Wiggin of East Barrington, and seven grandchildren. Funeral was held from the home of the last named this Thursday afternoon and was conducted by Rev. F.O. Taylor. Mrs. L.D. Haley sang and the bearers were the two sons and son in law. Burial was made in the family lot at Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, May, 14 1920).

Fred P. Meader, a store merchant, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma R. Meader, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), and his son, Norman D. Meader, a bank teller, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Fred P. Meader owned their house at 22 Knight Street, free-and-clear.

PERSONAL. Fred Reynolds of the West Milton section, who has been spending the past few months with Mr. and Mrs. Fred P. Meader in Rochester, has gone to Greenwood, Mass., for the remainder of the winter (Farmington News, December 10, 1926).

Fred P. (Emma R.) Meader appeared in the Rochester directory of 1929, as keeping a music, sporting goods and stationary store at 5 Hanson street, with his house at 22 Knight street. Norman D. Knight appeared as an insurance agent, residing at 22 Knight street.

Fred P. Meader, a notion store merchant, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Emma R. Meader, aged sixty-four years (b. NH). Fred P. Meader owned their house at 22 Knight Street, which was valued at $5,000. They had a radio set.

Fred P. Meader, a retail music merchant, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Emma R. Meader, aged seventy-four years (b. NH). Fred P. Meader owned their house at 22 Knight Street, which was valued at $3,000. They resided in the same house in 1935. She had attended four years of college, and he had attended four years of high school.

Rochester Personals. The third annual book fair of the Athenian club of the Spaulding High school was held last night the Spaulding High library at 7:30. Miss Mabelle Coleman, head of the English department, and Fred P. Meader furnished the following books for review: “Reveille in Washington” by Margaret Leech, reviewed by Marjorie Varney; “Strange Woman” by Ben Ames William, reviewed by Phyllis Bliss; “Island Patch Shop” by Elinor Early, reviewed by Ann Van Dyke; “The Sun Is My Undoing” by Margaret Steen, reviewed by Ethelyn Jones; “Berlin Diary” by William Shirer, reviewed by Mabelle Coleman (Portsmouth Herald, November 5, 1941).

Lawrence Meader, NY College Head, Named Army Major. Securing a leave of absence for a year from his duties as resident of Russell Sage college at Troy, N.Y., Dr. Lawrence Meader, son of Mr. and and Mrs. Fred P. Meader of 22 Knight street, has accepted a commission as Major in the Ordnance department of the U.S. Army and has been ordered to Washington for duty. Dr. Meader is a graduate of the Rochester High school and also Bates college and is a trustee of the Maine institution. At the time of his appointment as president of Russell Sage college he was the youngest college president in the country (Portsmouth Herald, April 10, 1942).

Emma A. Meader was one of two ladies that found a Knight Street neighbor lying unconscious after having suffered a “shock,” i.e., a stroke.

Thomas J. Dudley, 83, Dies of Shock. Thomas J. Dudley, died early this morning in the Frisbie Memorial hospital. He had been found yesterday afternoon in his home on Knight street where he lived alone, by neighbors who had become worried about his non-appearance during the day. Dr. J.J. Morin, physician, announced that Mr. Dudley had suffered a shock. He had been stricken while dressing and was found unconscious on the floor of his bedroom by Mrs. Fred P. Meader and Mrs. Edward L. Blake. A native of Rochester, member of the Grange, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and the Baptist church. He is survived by a nephew (Portsmouth Herald, June 6, 1942).

Store Roof Blazes As Shoppers Gape. At the height of the Saturday night shopping rush about 7:30 o’clock, a still alarm summoned Engine 2 from the central fire station to Hanson street. In some undetermined manner, a wooden projection, part of the roof covering a display case between the store of Fred P. Meader and the Stevens studio, caught fire. Firemen Ralph W. Dunlap and Frederick Cookson raised a ladder and used a hand chemical to extinguish the blaze which is believed to have been caused by a carelessly thrown clgaret. The small blaze attracted about 200 shoppers to the section to see the firemen in action (Portsmouth Herald, October 16, 1942).

Rochester Notes. Word was received here yesterday that Maj. J. Lawrence Meader, USA, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred P. Meader of Knight street, who is on leave from his duties as president of Russell Sage college, Troy, N.Y., has been promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel. He is now stationed at Los Angeles, Calif. (Portsmouth Herald, March 29, 1943).

Fred P. Meader died in Rochester, NH, January 18, 1944, aged seventy-one years.

Local Deaths and Funerals. Fred Perkins Meader. Fred Perkins Meader, 71, active in civic and religious circles in Rochester for the past 50 years, died Tuesday night at a Rochester hotel where he and his wife were spending the winter. Mr. Meader was the oldest member of the board of trustees of Rochester public library: He was director of the Rochester Building and Loan association, a former member of the OES and of Blue lodge, Masons. He was born in Newmarket, the son of James and Emma (Perkins) Meader, and after attending the local school was graduated from the New England Conservatory of Music. He leaves, besides his wife, two sons, Dr. J. Laurence Meader, president of Russell Sage college, Troy, N.Y., who is on leave serving as a major in the U.S. army, and Norman D. Meader of Lebanon, Me.; two sisters, Mrs. James W. Carney of Hyde Park Mass., and Mrs. Bela Kingman of Newmarket; and a granddaughter, Sarah Meader, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Norman D. Meader (Portsmouth Herald, January 20, 1944).

Honor Woman, 93, As Oldest Teacher of Sunday School. A 93-year-old New Hampshire woman was honored last night as the oldest active Sunday school teacher in New England. Mrs. Emma Meader of Rochester, a teacher for the past 70 years, received the award at the New England Sunday School Convention at Tremont Temple. It was made by Rev. Norman S. Townsend. Mrs. Meader began teaching In 1898 when the Meader Bible Class was organized in the True Memorial Baptist Church, Rochester. She has been teaching there since (Boston Globe, October 19, 1957).

Emma A. (Reynolds) Meader died in Lebanon, ME, March 24, 1963, aged ninety-eight years.

Lillian V. Wallace – 1893

Lillian V. Wallace was born in Middleton, NH, August 14, 1875, daughter of Albert S. and Elovia E. (Whitehouse) Wallace.

WEST MILTON. Miss Lillian V. Wallace closed her school at West Milton last week, She is to attend the Normal school at Salem this winter. Although having had but little experience she has been unusually successful and without doubt will become a teacher of the highest rank (Farmington News, December 22, 1893).

Lillian V. Wallace married in Milton, October 10, 1897, Arthur F. Sager, she of Milton and he of Salem, MA. She was a teacher, aged twenty-two years, and he was a clerk, aged twenty-four years. Rev. R.M. Peacock performed the ceremony. Arthur F. Sager was born in Malden, MA, December 26, 1872, son of Amherst E. “Arnie” and Emma A. (Robinson) Sager.

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Wallace and their family, of the Wallace farm just above this village, have enjoyed in the past week a visit from their elder daughter Lilian Wallace Sager of Salem, Mass., who was accompanied by her husband and their little son (Farmington News, November 17, 1899).

Arthur F. Sager, no occupation listed, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Salem, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Lilian V. Sager, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and his child, Ronand F. Sager, aged one year (b. MA). Arthur F. Sager rented their part of a two-family residence at 21 Southwick Street.

Arthur F. Sager, a clerk in the treasurer’s office of a steam railroad company, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Salem, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household include his wife (of twelve years), Lillian W. Sager, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Ronald F. Sager, a machine co. shipping clerk, aged eleven years (b. MA), Agnes W. Sager, aged seven years (b. MA), and Constance Sager, aged eleven months (b. MA). Arthur F. Sager owned their house at 32 Summit Avenue, with a mortgage. Lillian W. Sager was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Arthur F. Sager, a bank teller, aged forty-six years (b. MA), headed a Salem, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household include his wife, Lillian W. Sager, aged forty-three years (b. NH), and his children, Ronald F. Sager, a machine co. shipping clerk, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Agnes W. Sager, aged sixteen years (b. MA), and Constance Sager, aged ten years (b. MA). Arthur F. Sager owned their two-family house at 17 Messervy Street, with a mortgage.

Arthur F. Sager, a bank clerk, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Salem, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household include his wife, Lillian W. Sager (of thirty-two years), aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and his daughter, Constance Sager, a bank clerk, aged twenty-one years (b. MA). Arthur F. Sager owned their house at 9 Messervy Street, which was valued at $6,000. They did not have a radio set.

Arthur F. Sager, a head bank clerk, aged sixty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Salem, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household include his wife, Lillian Sager, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Agnes Sager, a convalescent home nurse, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), and Constance Sager, a bank clerk, aged thirty-one years (b. MA). Arthur F. Sager owned their house at 9 Messervy Street, which was valued at $4,500. They had all resided in the same house in 1935. Lilian Sager had attended four years of college, Agnes and Constance Sager had each attended two years of college, and Arthur F. Sager had attended four years of high school.

D.A.R. Col. Timothy Pickering Chapter. Col. Timothy Pickering Chapter of Salem will observe its 15th anniversary at the regular meeting at Hotel Hawthorne Thursday at 2 p. m. James Duncan Phillips, author and historian of Salem and Topsfield, will speak on “Col. Timothy Pickering.” Hostesses will be Mrs. Lawrence .A. Carter, chairman; Miss Clarissa A. Bingham, Mrs. G. Carter Chaney, Mrs. Harry R. Ells, Mrs. S. Dustin Perkins, Miss Katherine A. Pond, Mrs. Arthur F. Sager and Miss Sarah A. Todd (Boston Globe, February 7, 1943).

Arthur F. Sager died in Salem, MA, March 13, 1952.

Arthur F. Sager. SALEM, March 13 – Arthur F. Sager, retired manager of the money department of the First National Bank of Boston, died today at his home, 9 Messervy st. Mr. Sager had lived here for more than 50 years. He was a deacon at the First Baptist Church in Salem and a member of the Bank Officers Association of Boston. He leaves a wife, Lillian (Wallace), a son, Ronald F. of Westwood; two daughters, Agnes of this city and Mrs. D.E. Everett of Natick, and a brother, Frederick of Chicago. Services will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at the First Baptist Church (Boston Globe, March 14, 1952).

Lillian V. (Wallace) Sager died in Salem, MA, August 14, 1968.

SAGER – In Salem, August 14. Lillian W., widow of Arthur F. Sager, of 9 Messervy St., Salem. Funeral Services Saturday Aug. 17 at 2 p.m. from the Full Memorial Washington sq., Salem. Relatives and friends invited. Visiting hours at the Full Memorial Friday from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. (Boston Globe, August 16, 1968).

Annie J. Horne – 1897-99

Annie Jean Horne was born in Milton, in October 1879, daughter of Frank G. and Mary C. (Weeks) Horne.

Annie J. Horne graduated from Nute High School with the Class of 1895. Her classmates included future Milton principals Robert M. Looney and Edwin S. Huse (Purple and Gold, 1941).

WEST MILTON. The Misses Horn from Plumer’s Ridge teach in West Milton and Hare road school districts and board with Mrs. John Nute. Miss Nellie Nute drives to Milton high school daily (Farmington News, May 6, 1898).

(The other Miss Horn from Plummer’s Ridge was her cousin, Miss Maude F. Horne, who was also for a time a Milton teacher (see Milton and the Horne Murder – 1939)).

WEST MILTON. Miss Annie Horne, who has taught school here [West Milton] for two years, and previously taught on the Hare road, is much loved by all and has done excellent school work (Farmington News, May 12, 1899).

She married in Bethel, ME, September 15, 1908, Charles Lafayette Beaton, she of Milton and he of Madison, NH. He was a railroad agent, aged twenty-six years, and she was a housekeeper, aged thirty years. He was born in Jefferson, NH, May 3, 1882, son of Charles C. and Allie E. (Hill) Beaton. (He was a brother of Milton’s long-serving B&M Railroad station agent, Hugh A. Beaton).

(A fuller account of her life and career may be found in Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26).

Charles L. Beaton died in Portsmouth, NH, in 1948. Annie J. (Horne) Beaton died in Dover, NH, June 24, 1962.

Nellie F. Nute – 1901-02

Nellie Frances Foss was born in Dover, NH, October 5, 1883, daughter of George H. and Ida B. (Goodwin) Foss.

Nellie’s mother died in Dover, NH, July 3, 1891, when she was seven years of age. At some point, prior to 1898, she took up residence with her uncle and maternal aunt, John A. and Ellen F. (Foss) Nute, of West Milton. Her surname became Nute, and she was called her aunt’s adopted daughter in 1908.

Miss Nellie Nute of Dover, NH, studied at Milton’s Nute High school in 1898, 1899 and 1900. She resided in town during the winter.

WEST MILTON. The Misses Horn from Plumer’s Ridge teach in West Milton and Hare road school districts and board with Mrs. John Nute. Miss Nellie Nute drives to Milton high school daily (Farmington News, May 6, 1898).

LOCALS. The prize speaking contest and graduating exercises of Nute High school, Milton, occurred Tuesday evening, June 14. The essays, taken as a whole, were treated with an exactness worthy of much more mature writers, and demanded for complete understanding, the careful attention of the audience, which was received. In the speaking contest the prizes were awarded to Misses Elfrida Mabel Peacock and Nellie Frances Nute. Owing to the illness of Hon. Joshua G. Hall, president of the board of trustees, the diplomas were presented and the prizes awarded by Hon. Henry K. Cobb of Newton, Mass. The judges were Burton T. Scales of Dover, Eugene P. Nute of Farmington and Hon. Henry K. Cobb of Newton, Mass (Farmington News, June 24, 1898).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. John A. Nute, the Misses Horne, and W. Ramsay Dodge of Chicago, nephew of Mrs. Nute, attended the graduating exercises at Nute high school Tuesday evening, June 14. Miss Nellie Frances Nute, one of the prize speaking contestants, received a prize of two handsomely bound volumes of Taine’s English literature (Farmington News, June 24, 1898).

WEST MILTON. Miss Nellie Nute is living at Milton through the unsettled weather (Farmington News, January 20, 1899).

Nellie Frances Nute was one of the three students who shared a three-way tie for public speaking at the Nute High School graduation ceremony for the Class of 1899. (She was then a junior).

LOCALS. Many Farmington friends of pupils in the Nute high school in MIlton will be interested in knowing that Miss Nellie Frances Nute of West Milton, Miss Elfrida M. Peacock of Nute Ridge and Carl Percy of Union are the three speakers at the graduating exercises of the class of ’99 who were decided upon as too nearly equal in the merit of their work for any distinction in rank to be made in the award of the three prizes offered. Miss Pansy E. Wallace, formerly of this village, is another of the speakers in whom readers of the News have a special interest. It is to be remembered that all the speaking was so high in character that it was difficult even to choose any as best. The judges are congratulated upon their impartiality and their appreciation of the exercises (Farmington News, June 23, 1899).

WEST MILTON. Miss Nellie Nute is still boarding at Mrs. A. Wentworth, to attend Nute High school (Farmington News, March 16, 1900).

John A. Nute, a farmer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Ellen [(Foss)] Nute, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his daughter, Nellie Nute, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his brother, Samuel T. Nute, aged fifty-two years (b. NH). John A. Nute owned their farm, free-and-clear. Ellen Nute was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

(Meanwhile, three of her sisters were living with their maternal grandmother. Ann M. [(Roberts)] Goodwin, a widow, aged seventy years (b. ME), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her granddaughters, Grace E. Foss, a print works operative, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Alice M. Foss, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Ruby L. Foss, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH). Ann M. Goodwin rented their house at 53 Grove Street. She was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living. Another sister, Edith G. Foss, a servant, aged seventeen years (b. NH), resided in Strafford, NH).

LOCALS. A remarkably pretty wedding took place on the 4th instant at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John I. Cook of West Milton, when their daughter Miss Mary J. Cook was united in marriage to Thomas F. Longley of Boston. Miss Nellie F. Nute acted as bridesmaid and F.J. Alford of Boston as best man. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. R.M. Peacock of West Milton. The bride, gowned in a handsome traveling dress, carried bride roses, while the bridesmaid carried white chrysanthemums. The house was very prettily decorated with potted plants and flowers. After the ceremony a collation was served. The guests present were, beside the parents of the bride, her sister Mrs. Dell McPhail, Mrs. Fred Alford and son, Mrs. J.A. Nute and family, Mrs. George Foss, Mrs. Annie Cook, Mrs. Peacock and daughter. The bride and groom will enjoy a tour of Washington, Mt. Vernon, Richmond, Va., and other points in the South, after which they will reside in Somerville, Mass. The couple departed amid a shower of good wishes and old shoes (Farmington News, September 14, 1900).

WEST MILTON. The friends of Miss Nellie F. Nute spent a very pleasant evening at her home, Saturday, Oct. 5, the occasion being her eighteenth birthday. The house was prettily decorated with autumn leaves and flowers, and one feature which added much to the beauty of the decorations was a table banked with evergreen, on which was placed the birthday cake bearing the year 1883 in chocolate on a white background, and surrounded by eighteen lighted tapers. Various games were played after which a light collation, consisting of cake and chocolate, was served. Miss Nute was presented with a beautiful gold watch chain, a very pleasant surprise, to which she responded with many thanks to her guests (Farmington News, October 11, 1901).

WEST MILTON. Miss Alice Kimball of Middleton was the guest of her teacher Miss Nellie F. Nute over Sunday. I take this means of thanking all my friends who so kindly contributed toward the beautiful gift given me at my birthday party on Saturday evening Oct. 5 (Farmington News, October 18, 1901).

Miss Nute’s thanking her party-goers directly in the West Milton column, as opposed to through a “Card of Thanks” advertisement, might suggest that she wrote the West Milton column at this time.

WEST MILTON. Miss Helen M. Cook of Middleton has been a guest of her teacher, Miss Nellie F. Nute (Farmington News, November 8, 1901).

WEST MILTON. Miss Nellie Nute is teaching the Spring term at the West Milton school (Farmington News, April 11, 1902).

WEST MILTON. Miss Nellie Nute has gone to the beach at South Harpswell, Me., for the summer (Farmington News, July 4, 1902).

Nellie F. Nute went next as a teaching student to the New Hampshire Normal school at Plymouth, NH.

PERSONAL. Miss Nellie Nute of West Milton has gone to Plymouth to pursue a course of study at the state normal school (Farmington News, September 12, 1902).

WEST MILTON. Miss Nellie Nute has returned to school at Plymouth (Farmington News, January 9, 1903).

PERSONAL. Miss Nora C. Roberts, Miss Jessie Harmon and Miss Nellie Nute have returned to their studies at the Plymouth normal school (Farmington News, January 16, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Miss Grace Foss of Dover spent a few days last week with her aunt, Mrs. John Nute, and her father, George Foss (Farmington News, April 8, 1904).

WEST MILTON. Miss Grace Foss of Dover spent Fast Day with her sister, Miss Nellie Nute (Farmington News, April 29, 1904).

Nellie F. Nute graduated from the Plymouth Normal school with the Class of 1904. She took a teaching position in the Woodsville village or district of Haverhill, NH.

A Pretty Wedding. A very pretty wedding occurred at Maplewilde, the home of the bride’s aunt, Mrs. John Nute, the afternoon of September 3, 1901, when Miss Alice M. Foss of Dover and Mr. Frederick Kirby of Berwick, Me., were united in the bonds of matrimony by the Rev. Mr. Davis, pastor of the Baptist church at Somersworth, in the presence of the immediate relatives and friends. The room in which the ceremony was performed was prettily decorated with ferns and cut flowers. The bride was becomingly attired in brown silk with white lace trimmings and carried a bouquet of white roses. She was attended by her sisters, Miss Grace Foss and Miss Nellie Nute. At the close of the ceremony a dainty wedding lunch was served. The happy couple left on the afternoon train amid a shower of rice for a wedding trip through Massachusetts. That their future may be one of much happiness and prosperity is the wish of their many friends (Farmington News, September 9, 1904).

WEST MILTON. Miss Nellie Nute has been entertaining company from Woodsville where she bas been a successful teacher in the public schools for two years (Farmington News, August 6, 1906).

WEST MILTON. Miss Grace Fogg [Foss] of Dover is spending her vacation with her sister, Miss Nellie Nute, at Maplewild (Farmington News, August 17, 1906).

WEST MILTON. Miss Nellie Nute and a friend from Woodsville spent Thanksgiving at the former’s home with Mr. and Mrs. John Nute (Farmington News, December 7, 1906).

WEST MILTON. Miss Grace Foss of Dover spent Christmas with her sister, Miss Nellie Nute (Farmington News, December 28, 1906).

WEST MILTON. Miss Nellie Nute has gone to Woodsville, to take up her school duties (Farmington News, January 4, 1907).

LOCAL. Mr. and Mrs. John A. Nute of West Milton announce the engagement of their niece, Nellie Frances Nute, to Grover C. Aldrich of Woodsville (Farmington News, April 19. 1907).

LOCAL. Very handsome invitations have been sent out by Mr. and Mrs. John A. Nute of West Milton requesting the presence of friends at the marriage of their niece, Nellie Frances Nute to Mr. G. Cleveland Aldrich of Woodsviile, on Wednesday morning, July 17, at 10 o’clock at Nuto Chapel (Farmington News, July 12, 1907).

Nellie F. Nute married (1st) at Nute Chapel in Milton, July 17, 1907, Grover C. Aldrich, she of Farmington, NH, and he of Haverhill, NH. She was a teacher, aged twenty-three years, and he was a freight office cashier, aged twenty-two years. Rev. R.M. Peacock performed the ceremony. Grover C. Aldrich was born in Lisbon, NH, son of Henry V. and Lydia (Corey) Aldrich.

Mr. [George H.] Foss is identified here as being Nellie F. (Nute) Aldrich’s father, his daughter, Grace Foss, as being her sister, and Mrs. J.A. Nute [Ellen (Foss) Nute] as being her aunt.

WEST MILTON. Mr. John Nute and Mrs. Aldrich had the pleasure of a visit from the latter’s father and sister, Mr. Foss and Miss Grace of Dover over Sunday. Mrs. Grover Aldrich of Woodsville will spend the summer with her aunt, Mrs. J.A. Nute. The many friends of Mrs. Nute will be glad to know she is improving. She is in the Carney hospital in South Boston (Farmington News, July 3, 1908).

Mrs. Ellen F. (Foss) Nute is identified here as having been Nellie (Nute) Aldrich’s adoptive mother.

IN MEMORIAM. MRS. NUTE. The funeral services of Mrs. Ellen F. Nute, who passed away November 10, were held at her home on Nute’s Ridge, Friday morning at ten o’clock. The remains were carried to Dover on the 12:44 train for interment in Pine Hill cemetery. The services were conducted by Rev. R.M. Peacock, with B.F. Perkins in charge. Three selections were sung by Rev. J.H. Wilkins, assisted by Mrs. Hanson and Mrs. Peavey. The bearers were Fred Giles, Henry Hayes, L.D. Garland, and W.F. Thayer of Farmington. The floral tributes were numerous and beautiful, testifying to the love and esteem in which the’ departed was held by friends and associates. Mrs. Nute was born in Roxbury, Mass, May 20, 1S52. She was the daughter of the late Ivory and Harriet Quimby Foss of Dover She is survived by her husband, John A. Nute, and an adopted daughter, Mrs G.C. Aldrich of Woodsville; also three brothers and one sister who reside in Dover. While Mrs. Nute was a member of the Baptist church of Milton she was more closely connected with the work at Nute chapel, having been an efficient helper in that church, and for the past year president of the Inasmuch society, whose members feel in her decease a personal loss. All who have been associated with Mrs. Nute will miss sincerely one whose excellence of character, and happy temperament made her a valued companion. She never forgot to adapt herself to her surroundings and made cheer wherever she went. As a neighbor and friend she was everything kind and helpful; and in her home, only those who have mourned one like her can understand her virtues (Farmington News, November 20, 1908).

CARD OF THANKS. To all friends and neighbors whose sympathies and services were so kindly tendered in our time of bereavement, we extend our sincere thanks. JOHN A. NUTE, MRS. G.C. ALDRICH (Farmington News, November 20, 1908).

Nellie Nute Aldrich of Haverhill, NH, divorced Grover C. Aldrich, also of Haverhill, NH, in Grafton County court, May 27, 1910. She alleged adultery. The [Plymouth] New Hampshire Normal School’s publication, The Prospect, reported in its December 1910 issue that “Nellie Nute Aldrich is teaching in Passaic, N.J.” She had been a member of the Class of ’04.

(Meanwhile, two of her sisters were living with their maternal uncle and grandmother. William H. Goodwin, a shoe factory cutter, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Brockton, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his mother, Annie M. [(Roberts)] Goodwin, a widow, aged eighty-one years (b. ME), and his nieces, Alice Kirby, a retail meat market saleslady, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Ruby L. Foss, a wholesale produce bookkeeper, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). William H. Goodwin owned their house at 119 Division Street, with a mortgage).

Nellie F. Nute (mn Foss) married (2nd) in Boston, MA, April 23, 1911, Harold J. Taylor, both of Boston. She was a school teacher, aged twenty-six years, and he was a traveling salesman, aged twenty-five years. He was born in Boston, MA, May 3, 1887, son of Joseph F. and Emma F. (Thayer) Taylor. (He died in Savannah, GA, April 24, 1961).

She married (3rd), circa 1913-14, Henry Wilson Ross. He was born in Newton, MA, September 14, 1872, son of Charles W. and Ella R. (Gould) Ross.

West Milton. Mr. and Mrs. H. Wilson Ross of Newton Center, Mass., were in town last Friday visiting friends. Mrs. Ross was formerly Miss Nellie Nute of this community (Farmington News, June 29, 1917).

H. Wilson Ross, the Newton Cemetery manager and superintendent, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Newton, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife, Nellie Ross, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and his children, Gertrude G. Ross, aged eighteen years (b. MA), and Gladys W. Ross, aged seventeen years (b. MA). H. Wilson Ross rented their house at 765 Walnut Street.

Wilson H. Ross, a cemetery superintendent, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Newton, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife (of seventeen years), Nellie N. Ross, aged forty-six years (b. NH), and his daughter, Gertrude G. Ross, a summer camp stenographer, aged twenty-eight years (b. MA). H. Wilson Ross rented their house at 765 Walnut Street, for $40 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Henry W. Ross, a cemetery general superintendent, aged sixty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Newton, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife, Nellie N. Ross, aged fifty-six years (b. NH). H. Wilson Ross rented their house at 765 Walnut Street. Henry W. Ross had attended three years of high school, and Nellie N. Ross had attended two years of college.

H. Wilson Ross died in Newton, MA, April 16, 1941, aged sixty-eight years.

H. Wilson Ross. NEWTON, April 17 – H. Wilson Ross, 68, of 75 Walnut st., former superintendent of the Newton Cemetery, died yesterday at his home. He was born in Newton, the son of Charles W. and Ellen R. (Gould) Ross. He leaves a wife. The funeral will be held Friday (Boston Globe, April 18, 1941).

Nellie F. (Nute) Ross died May 21, 1965.

Daisy A. Davis – 1902-03, Spring 1904, 1904-05

Daisy Aura Davis was born in Rochester, NH, July 18, 1882, daughter of Seth W. and Martha A. (Downs) Davis.

Seth W. Davis, a shoe laster, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Martha A. Davis, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), his daughter, Daisy A. Davis, at school, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Albert S. Emmerson, a shoe laster, aged fifty-one years (b. NH). Seth W. Davis rented their house at 198 Main Street. Martha A. Davis was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living.

WEST MILTON. Schools began Monday. Miss Hattie Campnell has her same school at Nute Ridge. Miss Jessie Butler of Berwick teaches on the Hare road and Miss Daisy Davis of Rochester the West Milton school (Farmington News, September 12, 1902).

WEST MILTON. The West Milton school taught by Miss Daisy Davis closed Tuesday (Farmington News, January 30, 1903).

WEST MILTON. The school at Nute Ridge began this week with the same teacher, Miss Campbell. The Hare road school will begin next Monday. Miss Pratt from Bow Pond will teach. The West Milton school will be discontinued, the scholars being conveyed to Nute Ridge (Farmington News, April 3, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Miss McCrillis and Miss Davis spent a few days at their homes in Rochester last week (Farmington News, April 29, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Memorial exercises were held at the West Milton school. They showed long, earnest work by the teachers and pupils and were much appreciated by the twenty visitors (Farmington News, June 3, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Misses Daisy Davis and Blanche McCrellis spent the Memorial recess at their homes in Rochester (Farmington News, June 3, 1904).

WEST MILTON. School in this section closed last Friday. Miss McCrellis, teacher of the Hare road school, returned to her home Wednesday. Miss Davis of the West Milton school will remain with her aunt, Mrs. Annie Cook, over the Fourth (Farmington News, July 1, 1904).

Daisy A. Davis appeared in the Rochester directory of 1905, as a teacher, boarding at 198 Main street. Seth W. Davis, a shoe laster, at W [E.G. & E. Wallace], had his house at 198 Main street.

WEST MILTON. Miss Daisy Davis of the West Milton school, was given a surprise by her pupils and friends by the gift of a manicure set at the home of Mrs. Jacob Swinerton. Refreshments were served by the hostess (Farmington News, February 3, 1905).

Daisy A. Davis appeared in the Rochester directory of 1909, as a teacher, boarding at 14 Park street. Seth W. Davis, a shoe laster, at W [E.G. & E. Wallace], had his house at 14 Park street.

Daisy A. Davis appeared in the Rochester directory of 1912, as a teacher, boarding at 14 Park street. Seth W. Davis, a shoe laster, at W [E.G. & E. Wallace], had his house at 14 Park street.

She married in Rochester, NH, August 23, 1915, John W. Dorr, both of Rochester. She was a school teacher, aged thirty-three years, and he was a painter, aged forty-eight years. He was born in Rochester, NH, in 1867, son of Samuel E. and Abbie M. (Jackson) Dorr.

Seth W. Davis, a cobbler shoemaker, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Martha A. Davis, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), his daughter, Daisy A. Dorr, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), his granddaughter, Athelia G. Dorr, aged four years, and six months (b. NH), and his lodger, Harry W. Dorr, aged four years, and six months (b. NH). Seth W. Davis rented their house at 14 Park street.

John W. Dorr, a house painter, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Daisy A. Dorr, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Ethelyn G. Dorr, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Harry W. Dorr, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Samuel T. Dorr, aged eight years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Seth W. Davis, a widower, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH). John W. Dorr owned their house at 171 North Main Street, which was valued at $8,000. They did not have a radio set.

John W. Dorr, a contract painter, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Daisy A. Dorr, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and his children, Ethelyn G. Dorr, vocational guidance, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Harry W. Dorr, a Fuller brush salesman, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Samuel T. Dorr, a pastry department assistant for a bakery company, aged eighteen years (b. NH). John W. Dorr owned their house at 171 North Main Street (“Right Side”), which was valued at $8,000. They had all lived in the same house in 1935. All had high school educations, except Ethelyn G. Dorr, who had two years of college.

John W. Dorr died in Rochester, NH, in 1947. Daisy A. (Davis) Dorr died in Portsmouth, VA, February 3, 1977.

Orinda S. “Ora” Dickey – 1903

Orinda Sophia “Ora” Dickey was born in Ludlow, MA, June 22, 1883, daughter of Rev. Myron P. and Louisa J. (Shumway) Dickey.

MILTON. Miss Elsie Wallace of Plaistow spent Sunday with her friend, Miss Ora Dickey (Farmington News, March 3, 1899).

Miss Elsye M. Wallace (1884-1953) was a Milton native, daughter of a Milton physician who had gone on to practice at this time in Plaistow, NH. The teenage friends likely attended school together when both lived in Milton. (Miss Wallace would become in future years proprietor of Ye Ragged Robin Tea Shop at Plummer’s Ridge in Milton).

Myron P. Dickey, a clergyman, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Louisa Dickey, aged fifty-six years (b. MA), Morris Dickey, a grocery store salesman, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Ora Dickey, at school, aged sixteen years (b. MA), and Mark Dickey, aged fourteen years. Louisa Dickey was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

WEST MILTON. School began Monday with the following teachers: Miss Ora Dickey at West Milton; Miss Hattie Campbell, Nute Ridge school. Mr. Doughty convoys the students from Downingville and the Hare road to the West Milton school (Farmington News, September 18, 1903).

She married in Milton, November 15, 1906, Arthur T. “Thad” Smith. He was born in Silver City, ID, May 1, 1875, son of Arthur N. and Mary H. (McCann) Smith.

(A fuller account of her life and career may be found in Nute High School Principals, 1891-21).

Arthur T. Smith died at South Station in Boston, MA, January 1, 1940. Orinda S. (Dickey) Smith died in Greenwich, CT, August 15, 1952.

Ruby I. Houston – 1903-04

Ruby Inez Houston was born in Kennebunk, ME, December 12, 1884, daughter of James L. and Mary G. (Hamilton) Houston.

James S. Houston, a shoe welter, aged forty-two years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Mary G. Houston, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), his children, Ruby I. Houston, at school, aged fifteen years (b. ME), Susie M. Houston, at school, aged twelve years (b. ME), Celia F. Houston, at school, aged eight years (b. ME), and Nettie H. Houston, aged four years (b. ME), his mother [in=law], Annie M. Hamilton, a widow, aged sixty-three (b. ME), and his boarder, Orrin T. Hill, an iron machinist, aged seventy-five (b. NH). James S. Houston rented their house at 85 Portland Street. Mary G. Houston was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

WEST MILTON. Miss Ora Dickey has resigned from the West Milton school, and Miss Rubie Houston of Rochester, a student of Bates College, is her successor (Farmington News, December 11, 1903).

WEST MILTON. The West Milton school, taught by Miss Ruble Huston of Rochester, closed last week. Miss Huston has resumed her studies at Bates college (Farmington News, February 19, 1904).

LOCAL. The class of 1908, R.H.S. [Rochester High School], enjoyed a barge ride to Farmington one evening recently. Light refreshments were served. Those present were Albion Weeks, Ruby Houston, Edwin Young, Alice Billings, Blanche Dame and Edith Ball (Farmington News, September 23, 1904).

Ruby I. Houstin married in Rochester, NH, July 24, 1906, Clarence C. Hanson, she of Rochester and he of Somersworth, NH. She was at home, aged twenty-one years, and he was a collector, aged twenty years. He was born in Somersworth, NH, March 2, 1886, son of John S. and Annie O. (Cooper) Hanson.

John S. Hanson, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Annie C. Hanson, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his son, Clarence C. Hanson, a cattle dealer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law (of four years), Ruby I. Hanson, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), and his grandson, John R. Hanson, aged two years (b. NH). John S. Hanson owned their house on Rochester Hill Road, free-and-clear. Annie C. Hanson was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Ruby I. Hanson was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Clarence C. Hanson, a garage owner, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ruby I. Hanson, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), and his children, Robert J. Hanson, aged twelve years (b. NH), Richard J. Hanson, aged seven years (b. NH), Conrad E. Hanson, aged two years, ten months (b. NH), and David S. Hanson, aged ten months (b. NH). Clarence C. Hanson rented their part of their two-family dwelling on Rochester Hill Road, from his parents, John S. Hanson, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and Annie C. Hanson, aged fifty-six years (b. NH).

John S. Hanson, a farmer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-four years), Annie C. Hanson, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), his son, Clarence C. Hanson, an automobile salesman, aged forty-two years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law (of twenty-two years), Ruby I. Hanson, aged forty-three years (b. ME), and his grandchildren, Richard J. Hanson, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Conrad C. Hanson, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Davis S. Hanson, aged eleven years (b. NH), George F. Hanson, aged eight years (b. NH), and Charles H. Hanson, aged five years (b. CA). John S. Hanson owned their house on West High Street (RFD #1), which was valued at $6,000. They had a radio set.

Ruby I. Hanson, a private family housekeeper, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her children, George F. Hanson, a bobbin boy, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Charles H, Hanson, aged fifteen years (b. NH). Ruby I. Hanson owned their house on the Rochester Road, which was valued at $3,000. Charles H. Hanson had attended eight years of school, George F. Hanson had attended three years of high school, and Ruby I. Hanson had attended one year of college. Meanwhile, Clarence C. Cooper, a retail automobile salesman, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), was a lodger in the South Berwick, ME, household of Lillian M. Jackson, a shoe factory presser, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), which included her mother and children.

Ruby I. (Houston) Hanson died in Los Angeles, CA, March 13, 1955. Clarence C. Hanson died in Sanford, ME, September 27, 1963, aged seventy-seven years.

Mabel L. Fall – 1905-06

Mabel Louise Fall was born in Somersworth, NH, February 10, 1871, daughter of John A. and Susan A. (Lord) Fall.

John A. Fall, a confectionary manufacturer, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Susan A. Fall, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), and his children, Mabel L. Fall, a teacher, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Harry W. Fall, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), John A. Fall, a drug store clerk, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Gilbert H. Fall, at school, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Barbara Fall, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), and Catherine Fall, at school, aged eight years (b. NH). John A. Fall owned their house at 5 Prospect Street, free-and-clear. Susan A. Fall was the mother of seven children, of whom six were still living.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Tucker of Milton, formerly Miss Calkings, is substituting at the West Milton school for Miss Fall, who is spending two weeks in Washington, D.C. (Farmington News, November 24, 1905).

(A fuller account of Mrs. Edna N. (Calkins) Tucker’s life and career may be found in Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26).

WEST MILTON. Miss Fall closed her school at West Milton last Friday (Farmington News, March 2, 1906).

Mabel L. Fall married in Somersworth, NH, June 28, 1907, Charles H. Elwell, she of Somersworth and he of Bridgeton, NJ. They were both teachers, she aged thirty-six years and he aged thirty-five years. He was born in Bridgeton, NJ, May 13, 1873, son of William and Emily (Stiles) Elwell.

James L. Patterson, a professor, aged sixty years (b. OH), headed a Philadelphia, PA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his children, John L. Patterson, an insurance co. clerk, aged twenty-five years (b. NJ), and Alice D. Patterson, aged eighteen years (b. NJ), his aunt, Mary E. Leavitt, aged seventy-two years (b. NY), his cousin, Maud Noble, aged forty-three years (b. PA), and his boarders, Charles H. Elwell, a private school teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. NJ), [his wife (of three years)] Mabel L. Elwell, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), Edward C. Durfee, a private school teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. NY), [his wife (of eleven years)] Margarete Durfee, aged thirty-six years (b. NY), John R. Durfee, aged eight years (b. NY), Joseph V. Blanchet, a private school teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. Canada (Fr.)), [his wife (of three years)] Alice Blanchet, aged twenty-seven years (b. Canada (Fr.)), and Clara Harper, a private school housekeeper, aged fifty years (b. MD). James L. Patterson rented their house at Wedgewood Avenue.

James L. Patterson, headmaster, aged seventy years (b. OH), headed a Philadelphia, PA, household (“The Chestnut Hill Academy”) at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included thirty-three people, including a cook, two housekeepers, three waitresses, three maids, a matron, two janitors, a bellboy, eleven teachers, the families of the preceding, and four foreign students. Other students resided in other buildings. Charles H. Elwell, a school teacher, aged forty-six (b. NJ), and Mabel F. Elwell, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), were among those living there, as were Mabel’s yonger brother, Gilbert H. Fall, a school teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), his wife, Ethel B. [(Bernier)] Fall, aged thirty-four years (b. NH, and his son, Gilbert H. Fall, Jr., aged seven years (b. PA).

Chestnut Hill Academy - 1903Dr. James L. Patterson was headmaster of Chestnut Hill Academy. He retired in 1923, and was succeeded as headmaster by Theophilus R. Hyde.

OBITUARY. DR. JAMES LAWSON PATTERSON, for 25 years headmaster at Chestnut Hill academy at Philadelphia and former mathematics instructor at Lawrenceville, died yesterday at Burlington, N.J. He was 87 years old and had been president of Union college, Schenectady, N.Y., before going to Chestnut Hill academy (Chicago Tribune, June 1, 1937).

Theophilus R. Hyde, headmaster, aged thirty-nine years (b. CT), headed a Philadelphia, PA, household (“The Chestnut Hill Academy”) at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included thirty-four people, including a dean, a matron, a secretary, six maids, a chauffeur, eleven teachers, and the families of the preceding. Other students resided in other buildings. Charles H. Elwell, a private school teacher, aged fifty-six (b. NJ), and his wife (of twenty-three years) Mabel F. Elwell, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), were among those living there, as were Mabel’s younger brother, Gilbert H. Fall, a private school teacher, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his wife (of twenty years), Ethel B. [(Bernier)] Fall, aged forty-five years (b. NH, and his son, Gilbert H. Fall, Jr., aged seventeen years (b. PA). They had a radio set.

Charles H. Elwell, aged sixty-eight years (b. NJ), headed a Bridgeton, NJ, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Maybell Elwell, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), and his step-mother, Anna E. Elwell, a widow, aged ninety-two years (b. NJ). Charles H. Elwell rented their house at 122 Vine Street, for $37per month. They had resided in Philadelphia, PA, in 1935. Maybell Elwell had attended two years of college, Charles H. Elwell had attended four years of high school, and Anna E. Elwell had attended eight years of grammar school.

Charles H. Elwell died in Bridgeton, NJ, March 2, 1958, aged eighty-four years.

Injured Driver, 84, Dies. BRIDGETON. Charles H. Elwell, 84, died in Bridgeton Hospital yesterday of injuries suffered when his car collided with another auto here Thursday (Herald News (Passaic, NJ), [Monday,] March 3, 1958).

Mabel L. (Fall) Elwell died June 16, 1961.

Alice M. Brownell – 1906-17

Alice May Brownell was born in Dover, NH, November 2, 1886, daughter of William A. and Sarah S. (Brown) Brownell.

Brownell, Alice M - Detail
Alice M. Brownell

William A .Brownell, a police officer, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Sarah S. Brownell, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), his children, Grace C. Brownell, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Alice M. Brownell, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Harold R. Brownell, at school, aged seven years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Catherine S. Brown, a widow, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH). William A. Brownell rented their house at 16 Central Avenue. Sarah S. Brownell was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. Catherine S. Brown was the mother of seven children, of whom four were still living.

Alice M. Brownell appeared in the Dover directory of 1905, as having her home at 16 Central av. William A. Brownell, a policeman, had his house at 16 Central av.

Alice M. Brownell appeared in the Dover directory of 1909, as a teacher, having her home at 16 Central av. William A. Brownell, a police officer, had his house at 16 Central av.; Harold Brownell, a clerk at 434 Central av., boarded at 16 Central av.

WEST MILTON. Miss Brownell of Dover is teaching the West Milton school this spring (Farmington News, April 20, 1906).

WEST MILTON. Miss Brownell, teacher of the West Milton school, spent Sunday at her home in Dover (Farmington News, September 21, 1906).

WEST MILTON. School closes at West Milton this week Friday, taught by Miss Brownell of Dover (Farmington News, November 23, 1906).

WEST MILTON. The West Milton school was opened last Monday morning, with Miss Brownell of Dover as teacher (Farmington News, October 11, 1907).

WEST MILTON. Miss Brownell, teacher at West Milton school, went to Dover last Friday to visit her parents over Sunday (Farmington News, May 21, 1909).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Brownell of Dover made a visit to her daughter, Miss Alice, who is a teacher at West Milton school. The mother was accompanied by an old school friend of Miss Brownell’s (Farmington News, July 2, 1909).

Annie Cook, a farmer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her boarder, Allise Brownell, a town school teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Annie Cook owned her farm, free-and-clear. (In 1912, Mrs. Cook lived on the Middleton road, so called, in the second house north of the Farmington road. That is to say, she lived on what is now called Governor’s road, two houses from its intersection with what is now NH Rte. 75).

WEST MILTON. The West Milton school has again opened after the usual Christmas recess of two week[s], Miss Brownell having resumed her duties as teacher (Farmington News, January 6, 1911).

Alice M. Brownell married (1st) in Dover, NH, June 28, 1911, Carl B. Canney, she of Dover, and he of Milton. She was a teacher, aged twenty-four years, and he was a salesman, aged twenty-six years. He was born in Milton, July 11, 1884, son of George D. and Addie B. (Hatch) Canney.

LOCAL. Carl B. Canney, son of Mr. and Mrs. George D. Canney of West Milton, and Miss Alice M. Brownell, daughter of Police Officer and Mrs. Brownell of Dover, were married at the home of the bride, Wednesday, June 28, at high noon the Rev. Hitchcock performing the ceremony in the presence of relatives and intimate friends. The house was prettily decorated for the occasion and a wedding lunch was served The happy couple left, amid a shower of rice and old shoes, on a week’s trip in Massachusetts. Upon their return they will be “at home,” for a time at least, in West Milton. Mr. and Mrs. Canney have many friends in Farmington who join in extending good wishes and congratulations. Mrs. Canney has been a successful teacher in West Milton for several terms (Farmington News, June 30, 1911).

Thereafter, Mrs. Alice M. (Brownell) Canney received relatively fulsome press coverage, as her new husband was an editor at the newspaper.

West Milton. Mrs. C.B. Canney has resumed her duties as teacher at the West Milton school, with the same number of pupils as on the previous year (Farmington News, September 15, 1911).

West Milton. At the close of the West Milton school for the Xmas holidays, the annual Christmas tree and exercises were held in the presence of a large number of parents and friends. The decorations were extremely tasty and appropriate and the tree presented a very beautiful spectacle with its trimmings and loads of presents that made many happy little hearts. At the close of the program and distribution of presents, hot chocolate and fancy cakes were served. Mrs. C.B. Canney, the teacher, is spending the holidays with her parents in Dover (Farmington News, December 29, 1911).

WEST MILTON. By the courtesy of the school board and of Mr. Looney, principal of the grammar school at Milton, the organ that had been in use there previous to the installing of the new piano has been loaned to the West Milton school for an indefinite period. Primarily, the idea was suggested by Mrs. A.E. Cook, who deserves much credit for this new addition to the schoolroom (Farmington News, March 8, 1912).

Mrs. Elizabeth L. “Lizzie” (Place) Banfield (1823-1915) resided in West Milton with John S. and Ellen E. (Varney) Haynes, to whom she was an aunt. She was a widow, who survived her husband, Enoch Banfield, by sixty-six years. At the time she brought the schoolchildren their treats, she would have been eighty-nine years of age.

WEST MILTON. The West Milton school closed last Friday for a period of three weeks. At the close of the afternoon session, Mrs. Canney, the teacher, gave her pupils a chafing dish party. A special treat was also furnished the teacher and pupils by “Aunt” Lizzie Banfield who takes a very keen interest in children and the schools. It consisted of delicious oranges, assorted candies and nuts. “Aunt” Lizzie holds a place in the hearts of the school children second to none, and the treat was enjoyed with a hearty relish (Farmington News, March 8, 1912).

Chafing dish parties were all the rage at this time. While one can not know exactly what Mrs. Canney served in hers, these chafing dish recipes from Fannie Farmer’s Boston Cooking-School Cookbook (1918) might suggest something.

WEST MILTON. A very artistic and ornamental new book case has been placed in the West Milton school. It is the result of a very energetic canvass by the pupils for a Larkin Co. order. That the enterprise met with the hearty co-operation of parents and friends the generous contributions go to prove. The teacher and pupils wish to extend their sincere thanks to all patrons (Farmington News, March 22, 1912).

WEST MILTON. The West Milton school closed last Friday for a two weeks’ vacation. The teacher, Mrs. Canney, is spending the holidays with her parents in Dover. … Mr. and Mrs. John Grace of Wakefield spent the week-end in town and attended the school tree and Christmas exercises held at the West Milton school house last Friday evening (Farmington News, December 26, 1913).

West Milton. The West Milton school will reopen next Monday, March 31, after a four weeks’ recess (Farmington News, March 27, 1914).

West Milton. The election of officers for the Spring term of the West Milton school government took place among the pupils at the schoolhouse last Tuesday at the close of the morning session (Farmington News, April 10, 1914).

West Milton. Miss Lula V. Grace will be the only pupil to graduate from the West Milton school this June. She will participate in the exercises and receive her diploma with the class of the Milton grammar school (Farmington News, June 12, 1914).

West Milton. Mrs. C.B. Canney, who has been spending the summer with her parents in Dover, was home the latter part of the week making preparations for the reopening of the West Milton school on Tuesday, September, 8 (Farmington News, September 4, 1914).

West Milton. The annual election of officers of the West Milton school government was held on the opening date, Tuesday, September 8 (Farmington News, September 18, 1914).

West Milton. A very pleasant afternoon was passed at the West Milton school house Monday where several neighbors and friends gathered to observe the birthday of Mrs. Carl B. Canney and her mother, Mrs. Sarah Brownell of Dover, who has been visiting her for a few days and whose birth-day occurs on the same date. The ladies brought birthday cakes which were served with hot cocoa (Farmington News, November 6, 1914).

West Milton. Mrs. Alice Canney, teacher of the West Milton school, had a Christmas tree at the schoolhouse for the children, inviting the neighbors and friends. The children did themselves great credit in the program, the exercises being excellent. Coffee, cocoa and assorted cake were served to guests and pupils by the teacher. The decorations were very handsome and evidenced a great deal of thought and work on the part of the teacher (Farmington News, December 25, 1914).

West Milton. John Newman of New York spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Baxter and his little daughters, Flora and Lula. On Tuesday Mr. Newman returned home, accompanied by his children who will be much missed by the teacher and their associates at the West Milton school (Farmington News, November 5, 1915).

West Milton. The West Milton school will close this Friday for the annual two weeks’ Christmas recess. A Christmas tree and appropriate exercises will be held at the schoolhouse on Friday evening (Farmington News, December 17, 1915).

West Milton. The teacher, pupils and friends of the West Milton school held an entertainment, fair and sale at the schoolhouse last Saturday evening. Over 60 people wee present, including visitors from Farmington, Milton, Middleton, Rochester, Dover and Barrington. The program by the pupils of the West Milton and Nute Ridge schools with pleasing contributions of reading and music by members of the community, furnished a delightful hour. Handsomely decorated booths for the sale of fruit, ice cream, confectionary and mystery boxes found a brisk and ready patronage. A neat sum was netted which will be used for school improvements. The booths were presided over by the children and former pupils. The affair was in every way one of the most successful and pleasing efforts which the school has ever made and was unanimously supported by the community (Farmington News, May 5, 1916).

West Milton. The Commencement exercises of West Milton school took place at the schoolhouse last Friday afternoon, as announced. Unfavorable weather conditions unfortunately prevented the staging of the play, “Cinderella and the Flowers,” in the Swinerton grove as bad been arranged and the piece was very creditably played in the schoolroom. The fact of the cramped quarters and the loss of Nature’s own setting so admirably suited to the piece robbed it of much of its juvenile romance and beauty However, the costumes were no less admired, as the Impersonation of the most gorgeous flowers by the girls of the school won loud applause. Reginald Swinerton as Prince Sunshine, wearing the purple robes of royalty, made a charming nobleman, while Estella Swinerton as the Meadow Daisy and later as Princess Marguerite, featured the heroine part in a captivating manner. The supporting cast, composed of Flora Grace as Mother Nature, Evelyn Swinerton as The Rose, Margaret Swinerton as The Tiger Lily, Carrie Grace as The Violet, Ulfrida Ray as The Pansy, and Hazel Grace as Sweet Briar, made an artistic chorus. Raymond Borne as The Robin, a messenger of the Prince, and Richard Swinerton, Jolly Butterfly, and Emery Nute as Bonnie Bee, the mettlesome chargers which drew the Princess’ chariot, furnished a juvenile comedy that was unsurpassed. Jacob Swinerton as The Summer Shower was the real villain of the piece but his mischief in breaking up the May ball was soon forgotten as the brilliant Sunbeam, in the person of Ada Barsantee, appeared and subdued him into sparkling dew which fawned at her dainty feet. In response to its unanimous reception, it is planned to present the play as originally arranged, in the Swinerton grove, at a late date, for the benefit of the I.A.M. society. At the close of the play the graduates, Miss Margaret Swinerton and Miss Carrie Grace, took their places on the platform which was handsomely decorated with evergreen boughs and ferns. In the absence of Rev. D.A. Gammon, who was to present the diplomas, the young ladies received the awards from C.B. Canney, who in a few words made the presentation. A social hour was enjoyed, during which ice cream and cake were served (Farmington News, June 23, 1916).

West Milton. The West Milton school opened last Monday with Miss Blanche Hayes of this town as teacher. Miss Hayes is filling the vacancy made by the illness of the regular teacher, Mrs. Canney, who is regaining her health in a very encouraging manner (September 15, 1916).

Teacher and students attended the funeral of Mrs. Mary P. (Hayes) Plummer, aged seventy-three years, widow of George H. Plummer. Mrs. Plummer had been a teacher herself in Milton, Farmington, Wakefield, and Dover, for eleven years before her marriage to Mr. Plummer in 1876.

West Milton. There was no session of the West Milton school Monday owing to the attendance of the pupils and teacher at the funeral of Mrs. Plummer (Farmington News, November 10, 1916).

Mrs. C.B. Canney, i.e., the West Milton teacher, and Mrs. Annie Cook sang two favorite selections, “Beautiful Isle of Somewhere” and “Home at Last,” at the funeral, at which Rev. D.A. Gammon officiated.

West Milton. There was only one session of the West Milton school on Monday, owing to the severe snow storm and blizzard. Last Saturday furnished the coldest morning of the season with various thermometers in this vicinity registering from 18 to 22 below zero (Farmington News, [Friday,] February 9, 1917).

West Milton. After the annual three weeks’ vacation, the West Milton school reopened Monday, for the spring term. A patriotic course prepared by the teacher for the pupils of all the grades will be a part of the work this spring (Farmington News, March 30, 1917).

President Woodrow Wilson asked a joint session of Congress for a declaration of war against Germany on April 2, 1917. Congress so declared on April 6, 1917.

West Milton. Pupils at the West Milton school are enthusiastic over the patriotic exercises which the teacher has instituted as part of the daily program (Farmington News, April 6, 1917).

The Hare Road school was without a teacher for the 1917 Spring term so, due to its relatively smaller size, the West Milton school was closed and its teacher and students transferred to the Hare Road school.

West Milton. Owing to the small enrollment of pupils at the West Milton school and the demands of parents on the Hare road for a school in that district, the former school will be closed temporarily and the teacher and pupils transferred to the latter district. The change will take place next Monday (Farmington News, April 13, 1917).

West Milton. The Hare Road school was reopened last Monday with Mrs. Alice Canney as teacher and an initial enrollment of eight pupils. Mrs. John Grace will transport the pupils from the West Milton district (Farmington News, April 20, 1917).

West Milton. The Hare road and Nute Ridge schools close this Friday for the summer vacation (Farmington News, June 15, 1917).

Carl B. Canney, a newspaper editor, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice M. Canney, a bakery shop saleslady, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). He rented their part of a two-family house, which they shared with the household of John W. Averill, a shoe factory vamper, aged forty-seven years (b. NH).

Alice M. Canney of Dover, NH, divorced Carl B. Canney of Farmington, NH, in Strafford County Superior Court, October 16, 1926. Alice M. Brownell married (2nd) in Dover, NH, March 12, 1927, William Marbel Pierce, she of Dover and he of Malden, MA. He was an architectural draughtsman, aged forty-four years; she was aged forty years. He was born in Malden, MA, September 23, 1883, son of Edward P. and Ellen F. (Marbel) Pierce.

William M. Pierce, a building concern architect, aged forty-six years (b. MA), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Alice M. Pierce, a hardware store salesgirl, aged forty years (b. NH). William M. Pierce owned their house at 79 Fellsmere Road, which was valued at $10,000. They had a radio set.

William M. Pierce, an architect, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Alice M. Pierce, aged fifty-three years (b. NH). William M. Pierce owned their house at 79 Fellsmere Road, which was valued at $8,000.

Alice M. (Brownell) Pierce died in Malden, MA, August 13, 1946. William M. Pierce died in Hanson, MA, February 21, 1966.

Deaths and Funerals. Mrs. Alice Pierce. MALDEN, Aug. 15 – Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 for Mrs. Alice May (Brownell) Pierce, 59, wife of William M. Pierce, architect, at the family home at 79 Fellsmere road. Burial will be in Forest Dale Cemetery (Boston Globe, August 15, 1946).

Ethel T. Downs – 1918

Ethel T. Downs was born in Milton, August 26, 1894, daughter of Frank L. and Augusta O. (Kimball) Downs.

MILTON. Milton public school closed last Friday for a two weeks vacation. The roll of honor in the first primary grade is: Sumner Luke Evans, Ezra Hart, Frances Bonochle, Dana Bean, Scott Dore, Oscar Marchand, Roy Downs, Alta Chipman, Ethel Downs, Blanche Hayes, Alice Howland, Eva Lessard, Doris Page, Catherine Willey, Lydia Kimball (Farmington News, November 22, 1901).

Frank L. Downs, an odd jobs laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nineteen years), Augusta O. Downs, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and his children, Chester R. Downs, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Ethel T. Downs, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Margret G. Downs, aged six years (b. NH). Frank L. Downs owned their house, free-and-clear. Augusta O. Downs was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

CONCORD LETTER. The most excitement of the week at the state house was caused by the burning out of the motor driving the elevator in the south corridor. This filled the building with smoke and left the elevator stopped between the first and second floors. The only passenger was Henry J. Van Vliet of Manchester, well known as the blind member of the legislature. He was taken out through the top of the car by means of a ladder aud was not in the least disturbed by his trying situation (Farmington News, July 31, 1914).

Ethel T. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a teacher in Middleton, NH, with her home with J.L.D., 12 Silver street. Frank L. Downs, a shoe operative, had his house at 12 Silver street.

WEST MILTON. The West Milton school opened Monday with Miss Downs of Milton as teacher. About the usual number of pupils are enrolled (April 19, 1918).

West Milton. Miss Ethel Downs of Milton spent the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. L.D. Garland (Farmington News, January 3, 1919).

Ethel T. Downs married in Manchester, NH, August 12, 1919, Henry J. Van Vliet, she of Milton and he of Manchester, NH. He was born in Long Island City, NY, August 30, 1885, son of John and Henrietta (Stonecome) Van Vliet. Both were teachers; she was aged twenty-four years, and he was aged thirty-three years.

Henrietta J. Van Vliet, a widow, aged sixty-four years (b. Holland), headed a Manchester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Henrik J. Van Vliet, instructor at a broom factory for the blind, aged thirty-six years (b. NY), Peter Van Vliet, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), Martin H. Van Vliet, a cotton mill slasher, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Gertrude E. Hoyt, aged twenty years (b. NH), and her daughter-in-law, Ethel Van Vliet, a district school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). Henrietta J. Van Vliet owned their house at 98 Boynton Street, with a mortgage.

Henry J. (Ethel) Van Vliet appeared in the Manchester, NH, directory of 1921, as a teacher, boarding at 98 Boynton street.

Henry J. (Ethel) Van Vliet appeared in the Manchester, NH, directory of 1923, as a teacher, with his house at 21 Hillside avenue. Ethel Van Vliet appeared as a teacher, residing at 21 Hillside aveneue.

Henry J. Van Vliet, a craftwork instructor, aged forty-four years (b. NY), headed a Manchester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Census. His household included his wife (of eleven years), Ethel B. Van Vliet, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and his children, Harold H. Van Vliet, aged eight years (b. NH), Franklin E. Van Vliet, aged seven years (b. NH), and John M. Van Vliet, aged eighteen months (b. NH). Henry J. Van Vliet rented their house at 73 B Street, for $25 per month. They had a radio set.

WOULD INCREASE RELIEF MONEY FOR N.H. BLIND. The measure to aid the blind, sponsored by Rep. Van Vliet of Manchester, was among a small list of bills endorsed by the representatives on Wednesday. Under this act, relief would be increased from $12.50 to $30.00 a month and provisions are made for acceptance of federal aid up to 50 percent. This last is contingent on the enactment of a federal social security act.(Portsmouth Herald, June 13, 1935)

Ethel T. (Downs) Van Vliet died in the Hillsborough County General Hospital in Goffstown, NH, June 28, 1935, aged forty years, ten months, and two days. Henry J. Van Vliet died in Goffstown, NH, July 9, 1939.

???? – 1922-23

LOCAL. The Hare Road school opened last Monday for the Fall term. The Nute Ridge school will open next Monday and it is expected that the West Milton school will open later (Farmington News, September 22, 1922).

No information has come to hand as yet regarding the West Milton teacher, if any there was, after the 1922-23 academic year.

Dissolution of the West Milton School

The Milton School District warrant for the 1933 town election included the following article regarding the South Milton school and the West Milton school.

9. To see if the district will vote to authorize the School Board to sell the school buildings at South Milton and West Milton either at auction or at private sale (Annual Report for the Town of Milton, for the Year Ending January 31, 1933).


See also Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26, Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47, Milton’s South Milton Teachers, 1886-29. and Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1875-11


References:

Find a Grave. (2012, June 18). Daisy A. Davis Dorr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92139205

Find a Grave. (2013, September 3). Elizabeth L. Place Banfield. Retrieved from https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/116484957

Find a Grave. (2014, April 28). Mabel Louisa Fall Elwell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/128718321

Find a Grave. (2016, September 8). Nellie N. Foss Ross. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169614932/nellie-n_-ross

Find a Grave. (2013. March 12). Ruby Inez Houston Hanson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/106615457

Wikipedia. (2020, January 13). Chestnut Hill Academy. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chestnut_Hill_Academy

Wikipedia. (2020, May 7). Hippolyte Taine. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippolyte_Taine

Wikipedia. (2020, May 9). Plymouth State University. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plymouth_State_University

Wikipedia. (2020, March 29). Woodsville,New Hampshire. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodsville,_New_Hampshire

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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