Milton Mills’ Methodist Ministers of 1904-24

By Muriel Bristol | September 13, 2020

Continued from Milton Mills’ Methodist Ministers of 1869-1904

Liberty Chapel
Liberty Chapel (formerly Milton Mills Methodist Church)

According to Scale’s History of Strafford County, the Methodist Church of Milton Mills organized itself in June 1869 and erected its “neat and tasty” meeting-house in 1871.

Liberty Chapel, the small Congregational Church on Highland Avenue in Milton Mills, also dates to the 1800s, and claims an unusual distinction: At the top of its spire is [was] a hand pointing a finger toward the sky. The building was originally the Milton Mills Methodist Church, and the original hand atop the steeple was carved from a single block of wood by Erastus Shaw. That hand is now in the collection of the Milton Historical Society (NH Magazine, July 2019).

The Milton Mills Methodist ministers of this period were Willis Holmes, William A. Hudson, Frederick H. Sleep, John H. Vincent, Lester E. Alexander, John E. Taylor, and Edwin B. Young.

Rev. Willis Holmes – 1904-07

Willis Holmes was born in Carroll, NH, September 5, 1855, son of Robert R. and Letitia J. (Phillips) Holmes.

He married, circa 1875, Ella Esmerelda Kimball. She was born in Hollis, ME, circa 1855, daughter of Edward and Joanna (Phillips) Kimball.

Willis Holmes, an engineer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Whitefield, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella Holmes, keeping house, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his children, William H. Holmes, at school, aged four years (b. NH), Clarence Holmes, aged two years (b. NH), and Laurence Holmes, aged nine months (b. NH).

The NH Methodist Conference appointed Willis Holmes as “supply” pastor for South Columbia, NH, in April 1890 (Boston Globe, April 29, 1890).

COLEBROOK, N.H. October 31. We are sorry, but not surprised, to learn that Rev. Willis Holmes is suffering from his too arduous labors in East Colebrook and Columbia, and is obliged to discontinue some of his services (Essex County Herald (Island Pond, VT), November 3, 1893).

AMONG OUR NEIGHBORS. BLOOMFIELD. January 2. Rev. J.H. Winslow was in town Saturday on his way to East Columbia to preach for Rev. Willis Holmes and assist him in holding a watch meeting (Essex County Herald (Island Pond, VT), January 5, 1894).

The NH Methodist Conference appointed Willis Holmes as pastor for Milan and West Milan, NH, in April 1897 (Boston Globe, April 12, 1897).

NORTH MONROE. The Concord District Preachers’ meeting and Epworth League convention will be held at the church next week commencing Monday evening, June 13, with a sermon by Rev. Willis Holmes. Papers on interesting subjects will be read throughout the day Tuesday; sermon in the evening by Rev. R.E. Thompson. Wednesday will be given to the interests of the Epworth League. In the evening there will be an address by Rev. E.N. Jarrett. Dinner and supper will be served at the chapel Tuesday and Wednesday. The meetings are open to all. Every Epworthian is especially urged to be present Wednesday (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), June 8, 1898).

MONROE, N.H. Revival services are to be held at the M.E. church here evenings this week and next. Rev. Willis Holmes of Landaff, N.H., will speak Wednesday, Thursday and Friday evenings of this week (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), June 7, 1899).

Willis Holmes, a clergyman, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Landaff, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included Ella E. Holmes, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Agnes A. Holmes, a schoolteacher, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Nella E. Holmes, attends school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Norris D. Holmes, aged nine years (b. NH), and Evelin Holman, aged three years (b. NH).

W. Holmes appeared in the Milton [Milton Mills] business directory of 1904 and 1905-06, as pastor of the Milton Mills Methodist church.

LUBEC. Rev. Willis Holmes, pastor of the M.E. church will accept a call in the New Hampshire conference and will take up his work in that section at the end of the conference year here. Mr. Holmes is a Christian man through and through and thoroughly alive to do any good work in or out of the church. He has made many friends during his stay here and many will regret to see him go (Bangor Daily News, March 4, 1909).

HAVERHILL. The baccalaureate sermon was preached to the graduating class on Sunday evening by Rev. John Irons assisted by Rev. Willis Holmes, pastor of the Methodist church. The words were clear cut and full of good, sound advice. The church was prettily decorated with white, green, red and gold. The graduating exercises will be held in Pierson’s hall Friday evening, June 18 (United Opinion (Bradford, VT), June 18, 1909).

Willis Holmes, a minister, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella B. Holmes, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), and his daughter, Nellie E. Holmes, aged thirteen years (b. NH). They resided in a rented house on Main Street.

Ella (Kimball) Holmes died in Landaff, NH, November 19, 1918, aged sixty-two years.

ELLA E. HOLMES. Mrs. Ella E. Kimball Holmes was born in Hollis, Me., July 11, 1856. Her parents were Edmund and Joanna Phillips Kimball. When about sixteen years of age she moved with her parents to Madison, N.H., where she resided for several years. She was married to Rev. Willis Holmes of the New Hampshire Conference April 11, 1875, at Carroll, N.H. They took up their residence in Whitefield, N.H., where they remained until Mr. Holmes entered the ministry and was appointed to South Columbia, N.H. Mrs. Holmes dearly loved the work of the pastorate and devoted both time and talents to the extension of the Kingdom. During her residence in Whitefield she united with the Methodist Episcopal Church and always maintained her membership in the Whitefield church. Early in October, 1918, she came with her husband to Landaff, N.H., to spend the winter with their daughter, Mrs. Harry Poore, and on November 19 she passed to her heavenly home. Mrs. Holmes is survived by her husband, three sons, William H., of Lincoln, N.H., Clarence W., of East Douglas, Mass., and Norris D., of Hoosac Tunnel, Mass.; three daughters, Mrs. Agnes Poore of Landaff, Mrs. Nettie Poore of Lincoln, and Mrs. Evelyn Downing of West Thornton, N.H.; and two sisters, Mrs. Etta Gillett of Wichita, Kan., and Mrs. Abbie Wallace of Whitefield, N.H. The funeral was held Nov. 21, and burial was in the Landaff cemetery (ME Church, 1916).

Harry E. Poor, farming, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Landaff, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Agnes A. Poor, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), his children, Dorothy E. Poor, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Winfield W. Poor, aged twelve years (b. NH), Robert W. Poor, aged eleven years (b. NH), Clifton H. Poor, aged eight years (b. NH), Everett H. Poor, aged four years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Willis Holmes, retired, aged sixty-four years (b. NH). Harry E. Poor owned their farm on Kid Avenue, with a mortgage.

Rev. Willis Holmes died in Landaff, NH (three months residence, previous residence, Lincoln, NH), January 6, 1921, aged sixty-five years.

REV. WILLIS HOLMES. Rev. Willis Holmes was born in Carroll, N.H., Sept. 5, 1855, and passed from this life at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harry E. Poor, in Landaff, N.H., Jan. 6, 1921. His parents were Robert R. and Letitia Baker Holmes. His father gave his life for his country in the Civil War. Mr. Holmes was united in marriage with Ella E. Kimball, April 11, 1875, in Carroll, N.H. They resided in Whitefield, N.H., for a number of years, where Mr. Holmes united with the Methodist Episcopal Church in July, 1885. On March 6, 1886, he was granted an exhorter’s license by the Whitefield Quarterly Conference, and in December, 1887, he was licensed a local preacher. At Newport, N.H., in April, 1891, he was received on trial in the New Hampshire Conference and ordained a local deacon by Bishop Foster. He was admitted to full membership in the Conference at Rochester in 1893. In April, 1895, he completed the conference course of study and was ordained elder by Bishop Merrill in Concord. His appointments were all in the New Hampshire Conference, and were as follows: East Columbia and East Colebrook, 1891-95; Milan and West Milan, 1896-97; Milan, West Milan and Dummer, 1898; Landaff and Lyman, 1898-1903; Milton Mills, 1904-07; Conference Evangelist, 1908; Haverhill, 1908-10; Supernumerary, 1911-12; Moultonville and Ossipee Mountain, 1913; Retired 1914-20 (ME Church, 1916).

Rev. William A. Hudson – 1908-09

William Arthur Hudson was born in Chestertown, MD, circa 1871, son of George and Margaret E. (Phoebus) Hudson.

William Arthur Hudson married (1st) in Southwick, MA, December 29, 1894, Emma Martin Hudson, both of Southwick. He was a student, aged 22 years (b. Chestertown, MD); she was a student, aged 20 years (b. Seaford, DE). She was born in Seaford, DE, circa 1874, daughter of Edgar and Emma (Haggard) Hudson).

Emma M. (Hudson) Hudson died of consumption in Lempster, NH, November 19, 1898, aged twenty-three years.

William A. Hudson married (2nd) in Lempster, NH, June 14, 1899, Ella M. Evans, he of Wakefield and she of Lempster. He was a widowed clergyman, aged 26 years (b. Chestertown, MD); she was a housekeeper, aged 29 years (b. Lempster, NH). She was born in Lempster, NH, daughter of James A. and Electa (Fay) Evans).

William A. Hudson, a preacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. MD), headed a Brookfield, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Ella M. Hudson, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his children, Olivia E.S. Hudson, aged five years (b. MA), Grace E.P. Hudson, aged three years (b. NH), and James G. Hudson, aged nine months (b. NH). William A. Hudson rented their house. Ella M. Hudson was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

William A. Hudson, a city missionary clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. MD), was one of seventeen lodgers in the Boston, MA, household of Fred M. Woodworth, at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Woodworth was an express teamster, aged forty-eight years (b. Canada (Eng.)). (His wife and children were either omitted or domiciled elsewhere for a time, perhaps in Laconia, NH).

Rev. William A. Hudson traveled to Laconia, NH, in late August 1913, seeking his teenage daughter, Grace E.P. Hudson, who had eloped with her boyfriend, Leon Deming of Tilton.

FAILS TO FIND DAUGHTER. Rev. William A. Hudson Runs Down a Clew From Laconia, N.H. LACONIA, N.H., Aug. 31 – Rev. William A. Hudson of Morgan Memorial Chapel, Boston, was here this afternoon, investigating a story that his eloping daughter, Grace Hudson was here with Deming. Mr. Hudson was accompanied by City Marshal Charles H. Harvell in his search. He found that apparently the only basis for the report that his daughter was working in a restaurant here was that a new waitress appeared at a local restaurant yesterday. Mr. Hudson has been staying at the home of Rev. A.M. Shattuck, pastor of the Methodist Church (Boston Globe, September 1, 1913).

GRACE HUDSON TWICE LOCATED. In Manchester and Lancaster, N.H. Missing Boston Girl Received Telegram Signed “Leon.” Left Lancaster Monday, Fearing Pursuit. MANCHESTER, N.H., Sept. 2 – Disclosures were made today that Miss Grace Hudson, the missing daughter of Rev. William A. Hudson, head of the Morgan Memorial in Boston and a member of the New Hampshire Conference, was in Manchester for four days last week, registering under her own name at 452 Pine st. It is alleged Leon Deming of Tilton was in this city at the same time and that he disappeared when Miss Hudson left Manchester. The girl, who apparently came to Manchester from her home at 85 Shawmut av., Boston, on Monday, made no effort to conceal her identity. She said, it is claimed, she had left her home because of trouble with her stepmother and was in search of work as a waitress. She was directed to a number of places and, failing to secure employment, finally went to work in the Breen Brothers’ store in Elm st., staying there for one day. Then she left town, after receiving a telegram and numerous telephone calls. The telegram was signed “Leon” and sent from Lancaster Wednesday. It read as follows “Grace, will be there tomorrow. Send answer if this is OK.” It has been learned the girl was seen on Saturday in Lakeport.

SEEN IN LANCASTER. Miss Hudson Engaged Room, Making No Attempt to Hide Identity Disappeared Suddenly. LANCASTER, N.H., Sept. 2 – Miss Grace Hudson, the Boston girl who disappeared from her home last week Monday, was undoubtedly in Lancaster from last Friday until Monday of this week. She engaged a room with Mrs. T.S. Ellis, paying a week’s rent in advance, and remained there quietly until Sunday, when her picture appeared in the Sunday papers. Apparently fearing identification, she left her lodgings and has not been seen since. She gave her name here hesitatingly as Grace Hudson and was without baggage. Miss Hudson left Mrs. Ellis’ home about 7:30 Monday night.

HER FATHER BAFFLED. Rev W.A. Hudson Covered 500 Miles in Search for Daughter in New Hampshire. After learning yesterday that his daughter, Grace, who disappeared a week ago, had been located in Lancaster, N.H., as late as 7:30 o’clock Labor Day night. Rev W.A. Hudson, pastor of the Morgan Memorial, is again completely in the dark as to her whereabouts and does not know what will be his next step in his search for her. Rev. Mr. Hudson covered a 500-mile journey through the country about Tilton, Sunapee, Lakeport, Laconia, The Weirs, Plymouth, Woodsville and other New Hampshire points over Sunday and Monday. “With police officials and lawyers I questioned everyone who claimed to have seen my daughter,” he said, “but in practically every instance they had mistaken someone else for her. I am completely baffled” (Boston Globe, September 3, 1913).

ATTEMPTS AT MARRIAGE FAILS. Couple Turned Down by Two Clergymen. Deming and Grace Hudson May Try Again Today. License Not Returned at Lancaster, N.H. LANCASTER, N.H., Sept. 5 – Several unsuccessful attempts to get married here were made today by Miss Grace Hudson, the 16-year-old Boston girl who disappeared from her home 10 days ago, and Leon Deming, her former employer in a restaurant at Tilton, N.H. Early this morning the couple called on Rev. Mr. Dorr, the local Methodist minister, and asked him to marry them, but he refused. They then visited the Congregationalist clergyman and he likewise refused to perform the ceremony for them. Disappointed, but not disheartened, the couple then called at the rectory of the local Episcopal Church, but the rector was not at home and they did not await his return. As far as could be learned tonight, the young people did not call on any of the local justices of the peace during the day or evening and those who have been following the activities of the couple here believe the marriage has been postponed until tomorrow or some later date until they can get a minister or a Justice of the peace to tie the knot. This belief was strengthened by the fact that the return of the license had not been made to Town Clerk Brown up to a late hour tonight. The license was issued Thursday night. Just before the expiration of the time limit which the couple had for getting it since filing their marriage Intentions. When last seen, which was at noon today, the couple were at the Boston & Maine Railroad Station, but it is not known that they have left town.

Grace Hudson married in Northumberland, NH, September 5, 1913, Leon Deming, she of Boston, MA, and he of Lancaster, NH. He was a laborer, aged twenty-six years, and she was aged nineteen years. (She reported a false age). Justice of the Peace William W. Pike of Northumberland, NH, performed the ceremony, Deming was born in Landaff, NH, son of Ira and Nellie (Brooks) Deming.

REV. MR. HUDSON TOLD. Declares He Does Not Expect to Hear From His Daughter Until After Her Marriage. The news that his daughter Grace and her sweetheart. Leon Deming. had made several vain attempts to get married at Lancaster, N.H. yesterday, was given Rev. William A. Hudson, pastor of Morgan Memorial, last night by the Globe. He refused to express any opinion about their unsuccessful efforts to become man and wife. He stated that the news from Lancaster was the first definite information he had had of his daughter’s actions since last Monday night when he learned she had been seen in Lancaster as late as 7:30 o’clock. He had since heard that the couple had filed intentions of getting married and that later he had been told another story to the effect that his daughter was not present when the Intentions were filed. He preferred to credit the latter story. Pastor Hudson also added that he did not expect to hear from his daughter until after her marriage, saving, how-ever, that this was only his belief (Boston Globe, September 6, 1913).

GRACE HUDSON WEDDED SEPT 5. By Civil Ceremony at Lancaster, N.H. Name of the Person Officiating Is Being Withheld. Her Father Was Sent Copy of the Certificate. TILTON, N.H., Sept. 11 – Word has been received here that Miss Grace Hudson, 16-year-old daughter of Rev. William A. Hudson of the Morgan Memorial Chapel, Boston, and Leon Deming of Tilton have been married at Groveton, the name of the person officiating being withheld. They are boarding at Burt Smith’s in Lancaster, having given ample evidence that they are married. Deming, who was formerly proprietor of a restaurant in Tilton, is now employed on highway work in Lancaster. Two Lancaster clergymen refused to marry them. The license was issued by Town Clerk Rollin J. Brown of Lancaster, who had previously received a message from the girl’s father asking when the marriage intentions had been filed. Mr. Brown replied at once, telling Mr. Hudson to notify him if he had any objections to the issuance of the license. Not receiving any reply the clerk felt obliged to issue the license. The girl gave her age as 19. She was formerly a Tilton Seminal student and left school to work as a waitress in Deming’s restaurant in this town.

FATHER GOT WORD. Rev. Mr. Hudson Refuses to Comment on Marriage Ceremony. Always Welcome Home, He Says. Rev. William A. Hudson, when asked last night if he had heard of the marriage of his daughter Grace to Leon Deming in Groveton, N.H., answered that he had. Deming and Miss Hudson, according to the girl’s father, were married in Groveton, Sept 5, the ceremony being a civil one. “I received a copy of the marriage certificate from the person who performed the ceremony,” said Rev. Mr. Hudson, “and I also received a letter from my daughter stating that she had been married.” Other than saying that the person who married the couple was not a minister, however, Mr. Hudson refused to comment upon the ceremony. When asked if he purposed taking any steps to annul the marriage he said that he understood that under the laws of New Hampshire there was nothing he could do now. “While the relations between my daughter and myself are our own private affair,” continued Rev. Mr. Hudson, “I will state that she will always find a welcome at my home. As regards her husband, I can only say that I do not know anything about him and have never seen him.” Since the marriage the girl and her father have exchanged correspondence frequently (Boston Globe, September 12, 1913).

William Hudson, a church clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. MD), headed a Wawarsing, NY, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella M. Hudson, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and his child, Margaret A.J. Hudson, aged seventeen years (b. NH). William Hudson rented their house on Church Street.

William A. Hudson, an M.E. Church clergyman, aged fifty-seven years (b. MD), headed a North Canaan, CT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-one years), Ella M. Hudson, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH). William A. Hudson owned, i.e., rented, their house, for $30 per month. They had a radio set.

Daughter Grace E.P. (Hudson) Deming divorced her husband, Leon Deming, in or around 1934.

William A. Hudson, a Methodist minister, aged sixty-seven years (b. MD), headed a Woodstock, NY, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella M. Hudson, aged seventy years (b. NH). William A. Hudson rented their house on Route 212, for $0 per month. They had resided in Wapinger’s Falls, NY, in 1935.

Daughter Grace Hudson Deming married (2nd) in Randolph, VT, May 31, 1941, William G. Martin. He was a widowed farmer, aged forty-five years, and she was a divorced housekeeper, aged forty-four years. Rev. F. Wilson Day performed the ceremony. William G. Martin was born in Marshfield, VT, in 1896, son of Harry H. and Ellen (Cate) Martin.

Ella M. (Evans) Hudson died in Kingston, NY, October 12, 1952, aged eighty-two years,

DIED. HUDSON – In this city, Sunday, October 12, 1952, Ella M. Evans in her 83rd year, wife of Rev. William A. Hudson. Funeral service will be held at Perrott’s Funeral Home, Number One Grand Ave., Newburgh, N.Y., on Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. Interment in Woodlawn Cemetery, Newburgh. Friends are invited to call Monday evening from 7 to 9 o clock at Perrott’s Funeral Home, Newburgh (Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, NY), October 13, 1952).

William A. Hudson died in Akron, OH, September 1959, aged eighty-six years.

Rev. William A. Hudson. The Rev. William A. Hudson, 86, a former pastor of the Woodstock Methodist Church, died Monday in Akron, Ohio. The Rev. Mr. Hudson was pastor of the Woodstock church for four years. He retired from active ministry 16 years ago. Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. George Miller of Akron, Mrs. Grace Martin of Randolph, Vt., and Miss Jeanne Bollin of Kerhonkson; a son James Hudson of Geneva; 14 grandchildren and 36 great grandchildren. His wife, Ella, died six years ago in Kingston. Funeral services will be held at the Pcrrott Funeral Homo, Newburgh, Friday at 2 p.m. (Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, NY), [Tuesday,] September 15, 1959).

Rev. Frederick H. Sleep – 1911-12

Frederick Herbert Sleep was  born in Buckfastleigh, Devonshire, England, March 22, 1887, son of Simon and Charlotte (Fogwell) Sleep.

Marshall C. Bowles, a laborer, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Thornton, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his (second) wife (of eighteen years), Lula E Bowles, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his son, Carl M. Bowles, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Frederick H. Sleep, a clergyman, aged twenty-three years (b. England). Marshall C. Bowles rented their house. Lula E. Bowles was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Frederick H. Sleep had immigrated in 1906.

Frederick Herbert Sleep married in Pepperell, MA, August 30, 1911, Louise Whittemore, he of Milton Mills, NH, and she of Framingham, MA. He was a clergyman, aged twenty-four years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-two years. She was born in Framingham, MA, circa 1889, daughter of Henry S. and Mary (Norton) Whittemore.

F.H. Sleep appeared in the Milton business directory of 1912, as pastor of the Methodist church at Milton Mills, resident at 8 Highland street.

Rev. Fredrick H. Sleep appeared in the Laconia, NH, directory of 1913, as minister of St. James Episcopal church, with his house at 68 Fair street.

At the Churches. Christ Church. Lenten service, Monday, 7.30 p.m. Sermon by Rev. Frederick H. Sleep, St. .lames’ Church, Laconia, N.H. (Portsmouth Herald, March 21, 1914).

Business Notices. Rev. Frederick H. Sleep preached a splendid sermon on ‘The power of the cross,’ at Christ church last evening, his text being ‘For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God’ (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), April 7, 1917).

Rev. F.H. Sleep Takes Mission Work. SPRINGFIELD, March 30. Rev. Frederick H. Sleep of Christ Church, Fitchburg. notified Bishop Thomas F. Davies today that he had decided to accept the position of diocesan missionary with headquarters in Lanesboro. The other diocesan missionary is Rev. Archibald S. Winslow of Bayonne, N.J., who is to be rector of St. Andrews Church, Ludlow. These missionaries will have charge of 20 missions in the two districts (Boston Globe, March 31, 1918).

Frederick H. Sleep, a church clergyman, aged thirty-two years (b. England), headed a Fitchburg, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Louise W, Sleep, aged thirty years (b. MA), his children, Mary L. Sleep, aged seven years (b. NH), Charlotte Sleep, aged five years (b. NH), and Dorothia Sleep, aged two years (b. MA), and his boarder, Annie S. Carter, a hospital nurse, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Frederick H. Sleep rented their house “off” Westminster Street. He immigrated in 1907, and became a naturalized citizen in 1912.

Frederick H. Sleep, an Episcopal church clergyman, aged forty-three years (b. England), headed a Fitchburg, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Louise W. Sleep, aged forty-one years (b. MA), his children, Mary L. Sleep, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Charlotte F. Sleep, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Dorothy G. Sleep, aged twelve years (b. MA), and Frederick H. Sleep, aged eight  years (b. MA). Frederick H. Sleep rented their house on Hill Street, for $15 per month. They had a radio set. He immigrated in 1906, and became a naturalized citizen.

Frederick H. Sleep, a clergyman, aged fifty-three years (b. England), headed a Fitchburg, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Louise W. Sleep, aged fifty-one years (b. MA), his children, Charlotte F. Sleep, a hospital lab technician, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Dorothy G. Sleep, a school teacher, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Frederick H. Sleep,  a paper manufacturing company beater man, aged eighteen years (b. MA). Frederick H. Sleep rented their house at 30 Hill Street, for $18 per month. He was a naturalized citizen. They had all lived in the same house in 1935.

Frederick H. Sleep died in Burbank hospital, in Fitchburg, MA, June 20, 1949, aged sixty-three years.

Rev. Fred. H. Sleep, Beloved Clergyman, Here 34 Yrs., Dies. Fitchburg lost one of its most beloved and respected clergymen when Rev. Frederick H. Sleep, 63, of 36 Parsons street, former rector of Church of the Good Shepherd, died of coronary thrombosis at Burbank hospital last night. During 34 years of residence in this city, and 29 years of service to the West Fitchburg church, the warm-hearted humanity and tolerance of Rev. Mr. Sleep had won him city-wide recognition. Esteemed by all faiths, he held record of having spoken in churches of nearly all denominations. For the past several years he had suffered heart ailments which had occasioned his retirement from active duty in 1945. On the advice his physician, he relinquished his responsibilities as rector. He suffered a heart attack in 1936 and a recurrence of the ailment in November 1945. Rev. Mr. Sleep untiringly devoted himself to the service of his parish members and community. During WW II when a First Aid class was held in the parish house of the Church of the Good Shepherd, he was a regular attendant and participant in all the activities of this group. Reluctantly accepting the doctor’s ultimatum, Rev. Mr. Sleep submitted his resignation to a parish he had seen triple in size under his conscientious guidance. It has ben said “Every institution is the lengthened shadow of a man.” The Church of the Good ia the lengthened shadow of Rev, Mr. Sleep, who first came to the West Fitchburg church July 1, 1915, when it was a parochial mission of Christ Episcopal church. He served for three years in charge of the of Church of the Good Shepherd and as assistant at Christ church. Bishop Thomas F. Dayies appointed him diocesan missionary, but he was recalled to the little parish in 1918, by Rev. Arthur J. Gammack, rector of Christ church. When Rev. Mr. Gammack died in 1928 the mission was set apart from Christ church and Rev. Mr. Sleep became its first pastor.  When Mr. Sleep took charge of the church it had 40 communicants. It now has about 200. Born in Buckfastleigh, Devonshire, England, Mr. Sleep came to this country at the age of 18. As soon as the law allowed, he became an American citizen. One of his fondest recollections was a 28-mile trip he made to Concord, N.H., from Laconia, N.H., to cast his first vote, Graduated from Tilton seminary, N.H., in 1911, he studied under the late Rt. Rev. Melville Parker, Episcopal bishop of New Hampshire, and Rev. Howard F. Hill, D.D. He was ordained deacon in 1914 in St. James’ church, in Laconia, of which he was in charge. Ordained to the priesthood at St. Paul’s church in Concord, in 1915, he came to the Fitchburg church in the same year. Because of Rev. Mr, Sleep’s belief in denominational tolerance, representatives of other faiths frequently spoke at the Church of Good Shepherd during his years of leadership. Interest in the welfare of labor prompted him to inaugurate a Labor-Management Forum about decade ago. He likewise served as president of the Fitchburg Ministerial Assn., and was one of the first to join with the Fitchburg Council of church in which he took an active part. On the occasion of a joint celebration of the 25th anniversary of the pastorate of Rev. Sleep and the 40th anniversary of the dedication of the church building, in 1941. Charles Hosea Temple, of Edgewood, R.I., said of him: “During these 25 years his thoughts have not been so much fixed on the eternal things that he has overlooked the present. ”He has taken his place as an outstanding citizen. He has been the friend of labor, not afraid to champion it when it has been right, equally unafraid to reprove it it has been wrong. ” Rev. Mr. Sleep untiringly devoted himself to the service of his parish members and community. Roland group. Reluctantly accepting the cessation of his religious duties, because of poor health, Rev. Mr. Sleep, in his letter of resignation in 1945 said with characteristic unselfishness: “First I ask for my successor the same degree of loyalty and cooperation you have given to me. . . . Surely it will be no kindness to me to insist that the worship and work of this parish be carried on according to present plans solely because I initiated them. “With the acceptance of my resignation I become one of the communicants of this parish and as such I hope to continue to worship and work, as far as I am able, in this church where so much of my happiness has come to me.” Rev. Mr. Sleep was a member of Loyal Progressive lodge of Manchester Unity Odd Fellows and Shakespeare lodge, Sons of St. George. Besides his wife, Mrs. Louise (Whittemore) Sleep, he is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Edgar Bugbee of Stamford, Conn, Mrs. Bradford S. Hubbard of Keene, N.H., Miss Charlotte F. Sleep of this city and Miss Dorothy G. Sleep of Westford, Conn.; a son, Frederick Sleep, Jr., of this city; three grandchildren and one great-grandchild. The funeral will be from the Sawyer funeral home tomorrow morning with a service at 11 o’clock in the Church of the Good Shepherd. The body will be taken to Rural cemetery in Worcester for cremation and burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery (Fitchburg Sentinel, June 21, 1949).

Rev. John H. Vincent – 1913-14

John Henry Vincent was born in Trevarth, Cornwall, England, March 28, 1848. He was baptized in Gwennap, Cornwall, England, March 11, 1849, son of Nicholas and Jane (Trelaggen) Vincent.

Methodism had many adherents in Cornwall. Rev. John Wesley preached eighteen times (between 1762-69) at Gwennap Pit, an earthen amphitheater caused by a subterranean subsidence.

John H. Vincent married in Walpole, MA, May 20, 1879, Annie Gilmore Hutchinson, he of Harwich, MA, and she of Walpole. He was a clergyman, aged thirty years, and she was aged twenty-four years. She was born in Walpole, MA, May 15, 1854, daughter of Aaron and Mary Hutchinson.

John H. Vincent, a minister, aged thirty-two years (b. England), headed a Harwich, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna G. Vincent, keeping house, aged twenty-six years (b. MA).

John Henry Vincent of North Chelmsford, MA, clergyman, aged thirty-four years, petitioned for U.S. citizenship in Boston, MA, March 13, 1882. He had arrived in the U.S. at Castle Garden, NY, September 22, 1867, and submitted his initial intention on Santa Clara County, CA, July 28, 1871. Orien S. Currier of Boston, MA, and Daniel O. Clark of Stoughton, MA, deposed that they had known him for five years past, during which time he had lived in Boston, Duxbury, Falmouth, Harwich, and Chelmsford, all in Massachusetts. Rev. Vincent swore an oath and was admitted as a citizen.

John H. Vincent, a clergyman, aged fifty-two years (b. England), headed a Stratford, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Annie G. Vincent, aged forty-six years (b. MA). John H. Vincent rented their house. He had immigrated into the U.S. in 1869.

John H. Vincent, a Methodist clergyman, aged sixty-two years (b. England), headed a Nelson, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-one years), Annie G. Vincent, aged fifty-five years (b. MA). John H. Vincent rented their house.

George [John] H. Vincent, a Methodist minister, aged seventy-one years (b. England), headed a Salem, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie G. Vincent, aged sixty-five years (b. MA). They resided on the No. Salem Road. John H. Vincent had immigrated into the U.S. in 1867, and become a naturalized citizen in 1875.

Anne G. (Hutchinson) Vincent died in Chichester, NH, November 20, 1924.

Eva Davis, a general farm farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Chichester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her hired man, George Sanborn, a general farm laborer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), and her boarder, John H. Vincent, a widower, aged eighty-two years (b. England). Eva Davis owned their farm on the Canterbury Road, which was valued at $2,500. They had a radio set. John H. Vincent had immigrated into the U.S. in 1867, and become a naturalized citizen.

John H. Vincent died in Chichester, NH, April 12, 1932, aged eighty-four years, and fourteen days. He had resided in Chichester for twelve years, coming there from Salem, NH.

REV. VINCENT DIED AT 84. Concord, N.H., April 12 (AP) – Rev. John Henry Vincent, 84, died today at Chichester, where he had been pastor of the Methodist church from 1920 to 1927. He joined the New England Methodist conference in 1878 and the New Hampshire conference in 1889 and had held several pastorates in the southern areas (Montpelier Evening Argus, (Montpelier, VT),, April 12, 1932).

Rev. Lester E. Alexander – 1917-21

Lester Ellsworth Alexander was born in Fitzwilliam, NH, August 25, 1862, son of Warren F. and Mary F. (Perham) Alexander.

Lester E. Alexander married (1st) in Walpole, NH, June 5, 1884, Carrie Estella Webster. She was born in Walpole, NH, November 1, 1862, daughter of Edwin E. and Emily E. (Upham) Webster.

Lester Alexander, a can finisher, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Keene, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Carrie E. Alexander, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), and his children, Lillian W. Alexander, at school, aged eight years (b. NH), Edwin L. Alexander, at school, aged six years (b. NH), and Mary E. Alexander, aged four years (b. NH). Lester Alexander rented their house on Beaver Street. Carrie E. Alexander was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Lester E. Alexander, an M.E. Church clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Henniker, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Carrie E. Alexander, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Lillian W. Alexander, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Edwin L. Alexander, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Mary E. Alexander, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Emily E. Webster, aged sixty-nine years (b. VT). Lester E. Alexander rented their house on Crescent Street. Carrie E. Alexander was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

L.E. Alexander appeared in the Milton business directory of 1917, as pastor of the Milton Mills Methodist church, at Highland street.

UNION. Walter Chesborough of North Rochester and Miss Gladys Wentworth of this village were married in Milton Mills by Rev. Alexander on Saturday evening, June 16 They will reside here (Farmington News, June 29, 1917).

Lester E. Alexander, a N.H. Conference clergyman, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie E. Alexander, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Emily E. Webster, aged seventy-eight years (b. VT). Lester E. Alexander rented their house.

ALEXANDER, LESTER ELLSWORTH. Milton Mills, 1918-19; Jefferson, 1921-22.

Lester Alexander, a Methodist clergyman, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Hillsborough, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-five years), Carrie Alexander, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Emily Webster, aged eighty-eight years (b. VT). Lester E. Alexander rented their house on Church Street, for $20.

Carrie E. (Webster) Alexander died in Franklin, NH, February 13, 1932, aged sixty-nine years.

Lester E. Alexander married (2nd) in Bethlehem, NH, March 23, 1933, Jennie W. (Withion) Fox, he of Franklin, NH, and she of Boston, MA. He was a clergyman, aged seventy years, and she was at home, aged sixty-eight years. Rev. Charles W. Frye performed the ceremony. Jennie W. (Withion) Fox was born in Nova Scotia, Canada, circa 1864, daughter of David and Sarah (Ellis) Withion

ALEXANDER-FOX. FRANKLIN, N.H., March 23 – Rev. Lester E. Alexander, pastor of the Methodist Church here, and Mrs. Jennie W. Fox of Boston, were married this noon at Bethlehem by the bridegroom’s son-in-law, Rev. C.W. Frye, pastor of the Durrell Memorial Church, Bethlehem. The bridegroom’s grandson attended them. Following a wedding lunch they motored to Franklin. Rev. Mr. Alexander announced recently that he was to retire from active preaching. He and his bride will reside in Franklin (Boston Globe, Match 24, 1933).

Lester E. Alexander died in Laconia, NH, May 22, 1950, aged eighty-seven years.

Rev. John E. Taylor – 1921-22

John Edwin Taylor was born in Carbonear, Newfoundland, Canada, February 9, 1866, son of Richard and Harriet (Waterman) Taylor.

John E. Taylor married in Saugus, MA, August 21, 1901, Hannah E. Terry, he of Somerville, MA, and she of Everett, MA. He was a marketman, aged thirty-five years, and she was a clerk, aged thirty-two years. She was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, circa 1869, daughter of William and Hannah (Garhard) Terry.

J.E. Taylor, an evangelical preacher, aged forty-three years (b. Newfoundland), headed a Kingfield, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Hannah E. Taylor, aged forty-one years (b. Nova Scotia), and his child, Richard E. Taylor, aged seven years (b. MA). J.E. Taylor rented their house on Church Street. Hannah E. Taylor was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. J.E. Taylor had immigrated into the U.S. in 1888; Harriet E. Taylor had immigrated into the U.S. in 1886.

John E Taylor, a shipyard rigger, aged fifty-one years (b. Newfoundland), headed a Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hannah E. Taylor, aged fifty years (b. Nova Scotia), and his child, Richard E. Taylor, aged seventeen years (b. MA). John E. Taylor rented their house on Mill Road. He had become naturalized in 1890; Harriet E. Taylor had immigrated into the U.S. in 1886 and had become naturalized in 1901, i.e., by virtue of her marriage.

RETAINS THREE DISTRICTS. New Hampshire Methodist Conference Decided. Nashua, N.H., April 11. The New Hampshire Methodist Episcopal conference will continue under a three district division, Bishop Ernest W. Richardson decided today. The laymen had voted in favor of two districts while the clergy favored retention of the present arrangement and the presiding bishop was called on to decide. The conference closed with the announcement of the appointments to pastorates which showed the following changes: Concord district E.S. Lasker, superintendent; Laconia, Trinity church, supplied by O.P. Wright; Littleton, C.M. Tibbetts; Milan and Dummer, H.R. Goodwin; Pittsburgh, supplied by A.J. Pierce; Warren, I. Mellor; Weirs and Ashland, E.J. Canfield; West Milan and Stark, supplied by F.J. Griffin; West Thornton, supplied by Lincoln Frye. Dover district Amesbury, M,L. Simpson; Epping, supplied by J.W. McMorris; Exeter, supplied by C.D. Maurier; Greenland, S.B. Enman; Merrimacport, Mass., Paul J. Tilton; Methuen, Mass., Oaklands church, supplied by E.T. Cooke: Milton Mills, supplied by J.E. Taylor; Salisbury. E.F. Newell. Manchester district Brookline, R.V. Ebbett; Hillsboro and Hillsboro Center, supplied by J.G. Joyce; Londonderry, supplied by George Thomas; Milford. O.J. Beardsley; Newport, C.F. Libby (Barre Daily Times (Barre, VT), April 11, 1921).

J.E. Taylor appeared in the New England business directory of 1922, as pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at Milton Mills.

John E. Taylor returned to Hampton, NH, which seems to have been his home base, circa 1922-23.

EPISCOPAL ORDINATION. Trinity Church Scene of Solemn Ceremonies As Candidates Are Raised. George W. Ferguson of Lenox, a Fellow of the General Theological seminary in New York, and Arthur Rogers of Wilkinsville were ordained to, the deaconate and Rev. J.E. Taylor of Longmeadow and Rev. Hiram Rogers of Wilkinsville were ordained to the priesthood at Trinity church yesterday morning by the Rt. Rev. Thomas F. Davies, bishop of the Episcopal diocese of western Massachusetts (Berkshire County Eagle (Pittsfield, MA), June 11, 1924).

EAST BETHEL. Rev. J.E. Taylor will be at East Bethel Baptist church with Rev. Frank Place Sunday, Feb. 22 (Barre Daily Times (Barre, VT), February 18, 1925).

John E Taylor, a poultry raiser, aged sixty-three years (b. Newfoundland), headed a Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Hannah E. Taylor, aged sixty years (b. Nova Scotia). John E. Taylor owned their house on Mill Road, which was valued at $4,000. They had a radio set. He had immigrated into the U.S. in 1889; Harriet E. Taylor had immigrated into the U.S. in 1887.

Rev. John E. Taylor last worked in his accustomed occupation (minister) in 1935.

John Edwin Taylor died on Mill Road in Hampton, NH, April 18, 1938, aged seventy-two years, two months, and seven days.

Deaths and Funerals. Rev. John Edwin Taylor. Funeral services for Rev. John Taylor, who passed away at his home on Mill road at the age of 72 years, were held at the Methodist Church at 2 o’clock, with the minister, Rev. W. Raymond Pierce, officiating, assisted by Rev. Woodcock of Kingsville, Me., a former parishioner of the deceased. Interment was made in the High Street cemetery, with the committal service at the grave in charge of Rev. Woodcock. The bearers were Myron Blake, Robert Brown, Hartley Kierstead and Herbert Beede. Rev. Taylor, who had been a resident of Hampton for the last 16 years, was a native of Newfoundland and since his retirement from the ministry has been engaged in farming. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Hannah Taylor, and one son, Richard, of Hampton. William Brown was the undertaker in charge (Portsmouth Herald, April 19, 1938).

Hannah E. Taylor, a widow, aged seventy-two years (b. Canada), headed a Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Hannah E. Taylor owned her house on Mill Road, which was valued at $1,500. She had resided in the same place in 1935.

Hannah E. (Terry) Taylor of Hampton, NH, died in the Mitchell Memorial Hospital in Brentwood, NH, March 14, 1959, aged ninety years.

Deaths and Funerals. Mrs. Hannah E. Taylor. HAMPTON — Mrs. Hannah E. Taylor, 90, of 204 Mill Rd., widow of the Rev. John E. Taylor, died Saturday at the Mitchell Memorial Hospital in Brentwood after a long illness. Born in Halifax, N.S., March 23, 1869, she was the daughter William Terry. Mrs. Taylor was a member of the Hampton Methodist Church. Survivors include a son, Robert E. Taylor of Manchester; sisters. Mrs. Herbert Hill of Dudley, Mass., and Mrs. William Girard, Barnstable, Mass.; two brothers. James Terry of Tewksbury, Mass., and Barry Terry of Saugus, Mass.; two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren (Portsmouth Herald, [Monday,] March 16, 1959).

Rev. Edwin B. Young – 1923-24

Edwin Brackett Young was born in Rochester, NH, August 10, 1883, son of John and Emma L. (Lord) Young. (His father was a Scottish immigrant).

Edwin B. Young, a North Wakefield clergyman, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. He rented his house.

Rev. Edwin B. Young married in Derry, NH, June 15, 1910, Florence E. [Ethel] Richardson, he of North Wakefield, NH, and she of Derry. He was a clergyman, aged twenty-seven years, and she was at home, aged twenty-seven years. She was born in Hampstead, NH, January 22, 1883, daughter of Naaman W. and Ella M. (Pavere) Richardson.

Edwin B. Young, a laborer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Goffstown, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ethel Young, aged thirty-six years (b. NH). Edwin B. Young rented their house.

YOUNG, EDWIN BRACKETT. Merrimacport, Mass., 1908; North Wakefield and East Wolfeboro, 1909-10; Laconia Trinity, 1911-12; Henniker and East Deering, 1913-15; Goffstown and Grasmere, 1916-17; Grasmere, 1918-19; Raymond and East Candia, 1920-22; Milton Mills, 1923-24

Edwin B. Young, a Methodist Church clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Florence E. Young, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his son, Edwin B. Young, Jr., aged ten years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Nasman W. Richardson, retired, aged seventy-nine years (b. MA). Edwin B. Young owned their house at 152 North Main Street, which was valued at $10,000. They had a radio set.

Rev. Edwin B. Young, a Methodist Church clergyman, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Hillsborough, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Florence E. Young, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and his son, Edwin B. Young, Jr., aged twenty years (b. NH). Edwin B. Young rented their house on Church Street, for $16 per month. They had resided in Strafford County, NH, in 1935.

Edwin B. Young died in Rochester, NH, December 2, 1949, aged sixty-six years.

Rev. Edwin B. Young Ex-Chaplain, Member of N.H. Legislature. ROCHESTER, N.H., Dec. 3. Rev. Edwin Brackett Young, 66, retired Methodist minister, former chaplain of the Legislature and past grand chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows in New Hampshire, died today at his home, 152 North Main st. Born in Rochester, he was graduated from Rochester High School, studied at the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago in 1904-05, and was graduated from the Boston University School of Theology in 1909. He was married June 15, 1910, to Miss Florence E. Richardson of Derry. He served in the House of Representatives as a member from Henniker in 1915 and from Goffstown in 1919. He was chaplain of the House in 1931 and again in 1941. Rev. Mr. Young was a member of Humane Lodge of Masons, and Custos Morum Lodge of Odd Fellows in Milford. He leaves a wife; a brother. Stanley L. Young of Whittier; a son, Edwin B. Young Jr., of Nashua and two grandchildren. Masonic services will be held Monday at 1:30 p. m. at the First Methodist Church. Rev. Ray H. Cowen of Haverhill, Mass., superintendent for the Southern District of the New Hampshire Methodist Conference, will officiate, assisted by other pastors. Burial will be in Rochester Cemetery (Boston Globe, December 4, 1949).

Florence E. (Richardson) Young died in NH, October 25, 1973.

References:

Carter, Nathan Franklin. (1906). The Native Ministry of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=NXgRAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA447

Find a Grave. (2015, June 16). Rev. Lester Ellsworth Alexander. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147951587/lester-ellsworth-alexander

Find a Grave. (2011, August 16). Willis Holmes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/75019324

Methodist Church (US). (1880). General Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the United Methodist Church in the United States, Territories, and Cuba. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=yr5JAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA75

M.E. Conference. (1894). Official Journal of the Sixty-Fifth Session of the New Hampshire Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Claremont, N.H., April 11-16, 1894. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=zOIpAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA4-PA549

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA517

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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