Milton’s Railroad Station Agents

By Muriel Bristol | February 17, 2021

Milton’s original railroad station stood on the other side of the Salmon Falls River. It was within Milton still, but on that side of the river that was called the “Lebanon side.” The Portsmouth, Great Falls & Conway Railroad (PGF&C) corporation ran things initially from that original station that stood on the Lebanon side. (See Milton’s Railroad Line).

The railroad station depicted in the picture postcards, i.e., Milton’s second railroad station, was built on the Milton side over twenty years later in 1873.

B&M RR Station - 1905 - AJ Cate (Detail)
Milton’s B&M Railroad Station, circa 1905 (Per A.J. Cate). Note the floral “Milton” letters to the left, as remembered from childhood by poet laureate Louise Bogan, and the weathervane atop the station

There seems to have been a career progression, at least in later years, from telegrapher to freight agent and, finally, to station agent. At least some of those working “on the ground,” as opposed in the train crews, seem to have been managed by the station agent. These might include baggage handlers, flagmen, freight agent, telegrapher, and, possibly, section hands.

The Milton railroad station agents (or depot masters) of this period or, at least, those that have been identified so far were: Charles A. Sawyer, Daniel Corkery, John E. Fox, and Hugh A. Beaton. (Whoever replaced Hugh A. Beaton, after his 1940 death and until the station closed, has not yet been identified).

Charles A. Sawyer – 185?-1874

Charles Augustine Sawyer was born in Wakefield, NH, March 1, 1825, son of William and Mehitable “Hettie” (Richards) Sawyer.

Charles A. Sawyer married in Farmington, NH, May 1, 1853, Amanda M.F. Horne, he of Wakefield, NH, and she of Farmington. Rev. D.D. Tappan performed the ceremony. She was born in Dover, NH, July 24, 1834, daughter of John and Tryphena (Perkins) Horne.

Son George E. Sawyer was born in Milton, in March 1858.

Charles A. Sawyer, a R.R. agent, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included A.M. [Amanda M.] Sawyer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), E.A. [Ella A.] Sawyer, aged five years (b. NH), and George E. Sawyer, aged two years (b. NH). Charles A. Sawyer had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $500. His household was enumerated between those of Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), and Stephen W. Dearborn, a box maker, aged forty-five years (b. NH).

Charles A. Sawyer of Milton registered for the Class II military draft, June 30, 1863. He was a depot master, aged forty-one years.

Daughter Ella A. Sawyer died in Milton, April 30, 1866, aged eleven years. (She is buried in Portland, ME).

PGF&C Lantern - 1869
PGF&C Railroad Whale Oil Lantern, 1869 (Willis Henry Auctions)

Charles A. Sawyer, a R.R. station agent, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Amanda M. Sawyer, keeping house, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Anna M. Sawyer, at school, aged twelve years (b. MA), and George E. Sawyer, at school, aged ten years (b. NH). Charles A. Sawyer had real estate valued at $800 and personal estate valued at $650. His household was enumerated between those of William H. Jones, a shoe factory worker, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and Robert Miller, a shoe factory worker, aged thirty-six years (b. MA).

Son John G. Sawyer was born in Milton, August 19, 1870, the third child of Charles A. and Amanda Sawyer. Charles A. Sawyer was a station agent.

Charles A. and Amanda M. (Horne) Sawyer, and family, left Milton for Portland, ME, circa 1874.

Chas. A. Sawyer, a confectioner, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), headed a Portland, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Amanda M. Sawyer, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. NH), his children, George E. Sawyer, a confectioner, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Anna M. Sawyer, at home, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), and John G. Sawyer, aged nine years (b. NH), his servant, Costella Ashlund, a servant, aged nineteen years (b. ME), and his boarders, Fred Sawyer, a confectioner, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Elmer Spinney, an apprentice, aged nineteen years (b. ME). They resided at 321 Congress Street.

Sawyer, GE, ConfectionerCharles A. Sawyer appeared in the Portland, ME, directory of 1883, as a confectioner at 419 Congress street, with his house at 321 Congress street. George E. Sawyer appeared as running a wholesale and retail confectionary at 309 and 315 Congress street, and 419 Congress street, with his house at 311 Congress street.

Charles A. Sawyer appeared in the Portland, ME, directory of 1886, as a confectioner at 419 Congress street, with his house at 11 Fessenden street, D. [Deering]. George E. Sawyer appeared as running a wholesale and retail confectionary at 309 and 315 Congress street, and 419 Congress street, with his house at 15 Fessenden street.

Charles A. Sawyer died of chronic nephritis in Deering, ME, February 11, 1893, aged sixty-seven years, eleven months, and eleven days.

Amanda M. Sawyer appeared in the Portland, ME, directory of 1897, as the widow of Charles A.,, with her house at 11 Fessenden street, Oakdale. George E. Sawyer appeared as a wholesale and retail confectioner, at 309 to 323 Congress street, and 465 Congress street, with his house at 14 Wilmot street. John G. Sawyer appeared as a salesman, at 315 Congress street, with his house at 11 Fessenden street, O [Oakdale].

Amanda M. (Horne) Sawyer died of chronic nephritis at 33 Fessenden Street in Portland, ME, March 14, 1916.

Daniel Corkery – 1874-189?

Daniel Corkery was born in St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, December 1842, son of Daniel and Mary (Blake) Corkery. (His parents were natives of Ireland).

Daniel Corkery came to the Milton area from California, in or around 1865. He married Martha E. “Lizzie” Felch. She was born in Reading, MA, circa 1848.

Daniel Corkery, a sawmill laborer, aged twenty-eight years (b. New Brunswick), headed a Wakefield (“Union P.O”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lizzie Corkery, at home, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and his child, Annie I. Corkery, at home, aged four years (b. NH).

RAILROAD NOTES. The extension of the Portsmouth, Great Falls & Conway Railroad to connect with the Portland & Ogdensburg road, has been completed, and the cars are now run to Upper Bartlett. More than a thousand men are at work on the mountain near the Willey House (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), January 16, 1875).

Daniel Corkery, depot master, aged thirty-nine years (b. New Brunswick), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lizzie A. Corkery, keeping house, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), Annie J. Corkery, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Daisy A. Corkery, aged four months (b. NH (January)), and his helper, William T. Wallace, assistant station agent, aged nineteen years (b. NH). His household was enumerated between those of George Blake, a day laborer, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and Huon L. French, a shoe worker, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH).

Daughter Annie J. Corkery died in Milton, December 29, 1883, aged seventeen years, ten months, and twenty-three days. (She is buried in the Prospect Hill Cemetery, in Lebanon, ME).

Some Railroad Literature. CONCORD. N.H., June 9. – The secretary of state has received for record in the office, a copy of the proceedings of the meeting of stockholders of the Boston & Maine railroad relating to the purchase of the roads, franchises and properties of the Eastern, and of the Portsmouth, Great Falls & Conway railroad, together with certificates of sale (Boston Globe, June 10, 1890).

Daniel Corkery appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a shoe beater out, with his house on Main street, near the Post Office. (A shoe “beater out” was one that tended a shoe leveling machine. It shaped and smoothed leather insoles and outsoles, especially imperfections arising out of other assembly operations). Daughter Daisy G. Corkery appeared also as a milliner on Main street, near the Post Office, boarding at the same location.

MILTON. Daniel Corkery who has been on a trip to Roxbury, Mass., has returned home (Farmington News, April 6, 1900).

Daniel Corkery, a shoe shop hand, aged fifty-seven years (Canada (Eng.)), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Martha Corkery, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), and his children, Daisy G. Corkery, a milliner, aged twenty years (b. NH), and Katy D. Corkery, aged seventeen years (b. NH). Daniel Corkery owned their house, free-and-clear.

MILTON. Miss Daisy Corkery is remodelling her house. The upper rooms will be used for millinery. A large bay window is to be added to the lower part for the display of goods (Farmington News, September 27, 1901).

Daniel Corkery died of pyaemia in Milton, September 15, 1902, aged fifty-nine years, eight months, and sixteen days. He was then a flagman (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate).

John E. Fox – 1891-1904

John E. Fox was born in Tuftonborough, NH, May 30, 1845, son of George and Drusilla E. (Hersey) Fox.

John E. Fox married in Brooklyn, NY, December 25, 1872, Abbie Frances “Frances” Woodman, he of Tuftonborough, NH, and she of Brooklyn. The ceremony took place “at her Father’s house.” John L. Page and N. Hubbard Woodman, Jr., appeared as witnesses. She was born in Tamworth, NH, circa 1847.

George Fox, a farmer, aged seventy-three years, headed a Tuftonborough, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Drusilla E. Fox, keeping house, aged sixty-nine years, his son, John E. Fox, works on farm, aged thirty-five years, his daughter-in-law, Abbie F. Fox, works in house, aged twenty-six years, and his grandchildren, Alice E. Fox, aged three years, George N. Fox, aged two years, and Sadie M. Fox, aged three months.

John E. Fox was a Tuftonborough, NH, Selectman in the years 1880-85.

MILTON. Station Agent John E. Fox is proving a very popular man in that capacity (Farmington New, September 4, 1891).

Daughter Lillian E. Fox was born in Milton, July 13, 1893, fourth child of John E. Fox (station agent, aged forty-three years (b. Tuftonborough, NH) and Abby F. Woodman (aged forty-one years, b. Tamworth, NH).

NEWS AND NOTES. Mr. John E. Fox, station agent at Milton, who had his leg broken two or three months ago, has had to have it amputated (Farmington News, September 14, 1894).

MILTON. Men are at work on the railroad repairing damages done by the freshet. No trains went north of here for two days. The track was a foot under water and washed away in some places. The smaller dam at the shoe shops was blown up to prevent the water from rushing through the shop. It was a question whether even that would keep the shop from being washed away (Farmington News, April 26, 1895).

John E. Fox, a R.R. station agent, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Frances A. Fox, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Alice E. Fox, a teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Sadie N. Fox, a milliner, aged twenty years (b. NH), and Lillian E. Fox, aged six years (b. NH), and his brother, Henry L. Fox, a paper mill laborer, aged sixty-four years (b. NH). John E. Fox owned their house, but with a mortgage. Frances A. Fox was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

MILTON. The New England Telephone Company is to place long distance telephones at the store of Avery, Jones & Roberts, and the meat market of G.E. Wentworth, and the residences of H.B. Amey, Hazen Plummer, D.A. Whitehouse, H.F. Whitehouse, Station Agent J.E. Fox, and D.W. Beede the miller. This will make an appreciable addition to the Milton exchange (Farmington News, October 25, 1901). (See also Milton Gets the Telephone).

MILTON. John E. Fox has returned to his duties as station agent, after a vacation of two months (Farmington News, March 4, 1904).

MILTON. John E. Fox sold his house to Mrs. Belle Penney, and is to move to Derry (Farmington News, May 6, 1904).

John E. Fox was a Wolfeboro Selectman in the years 1906-08.

John E. Fox, a home farm farmer, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Frances A. Fox, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Alice E. Fox, a day school teacher, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Sadie M. Fox, a bedding company bookkeeper, aged thirty years (b. NH), Lillian J.E. Fox, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Julia C. Dore, aged seventy-one years (b. NH). John E. Fox owned their house on North Main Street. Frances A. Fox was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living. Julia C. Dore was the mother of five children, of whom three were still living.

Abbie F. (Woodman) Fox died June 15, 1915, aged sixty-two years.

John E. Fox, a widower, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), headed an East Kingston, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. He rented his house on Depot Road.

John E. Fox died October 3, 1923, aged seventy-eight years.

Hugh A. Beaton – 1904-40

Hugh Arthur Beaton was born in Jefferson, OH, October 8, 1873, son of Charles and Eliza A. (Hill) Beaton.

Hugh A. Beaton married in Lancaster, NH, August 19, 1894, Myrtle F. Hartshorn, both of Whitefield, NH. Rev. R.T. Wolcott performed the ceremony. Beaton was a laborer, aged twenty-one years, and she was a domestic, aged nineteen years. She was born in Lunenburg, VT, circa 1875, daughter of Vernon E. and Edith (Tyler) Hartshorn.

Daughter Ione Edith Beaton was born in Lunenburg, VT, December 30, 1894, daughter of Hugh Arthur Beaton, a telegraph operator, aged twenty-one years, and Florence Myrtle Hartshorn, aged nineteen years. (The record was amended in 1952 to correct the mother’s name from “Abbie” Beaton to Florence Myrtle Hartshorn).

Hugh A. Beaton, a telegrapher, aged twenty-six years (b. OH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Myrtle Beaton, aged twenty-five years (b. VT), and his children, Ione Beaton, at school, aged five years (b. VT), and Hazel L. Beaton, aged three months (b. NH). Hugh A. Beaton rented their house in Milton Village. Myrtle Beaton was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Daughter Hazel Leola Beaton was born in Milton, February 4, 1900. She died of cholera infantum in Milton, September 21, 1900, aged seven months, and seventeen days. (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate).

FITZDALE. Mrs. Hugh Beaton of Milton, N.H., is visiting her mother, Mrs. V.E. Hartshorn (St. Johnsbury Republican, February 25, 1903).

Daughter [Gladys Marjorie] Beaton was born in Milton, June 17, 1903, daughter of Hugh A. Beaton (telegraph operator, aged twenty-nine years, born Jefferson, OH) and Myrtle Hartshorne (aged twenty-seven years, born Lunenburg, VT).

MILTON. Mrs. Hugh Beaton started Monday for a visit to her old home in Vermont (Farmington News, April 8, 1904).

H.A. Beaton appeared in the Milton business directories of 1905-06, and 1909, as agent for the American Express Company.

RAILROAD NOTES. An extra eastbound freight passed through here [Portsmouth, NH] on Tuesday with fifty empty cars for the Conway branch, to be used for ice shipments (Portsmouth Herald, May 23, 1906).

B&M RR Station from Maine Side - 1909Hugh Beaton, a B&M Railroad station agent, aged thirty-six years (b. OH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Mirtle F. Beaton, aged thirty-six years (b. VT), his children, Iona Beaton, aged fourteen years (b. VT), and Gladis Beaton, aged five [six] years (b. NH), and his boarder, James Hayes, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Hugh Beaton owned their house, free-and-clear. Mirtle F. Beaton was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joseph Avery, postmaster, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), and Charles Houston, a B&M freight agent, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH). (Next beyond Houston was The Sampson hotel).

CONCORD. Ione Beaton of Milton, N.H., is visiting Miss Grace Smith (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), July 27, 1910).

Rochester Div., No. 65. Bro. H.A. Beaton, agent at Milton, has just recovered from a severe attack of blood poisoning. He was relieved by Bro. C.L. Beaton, while incapacitated for duty (Order, 1910).

Union brother C.L. Beaton was Hugh A. Beaton’s actual brother, Charles L. Beaton of Portsmouth, NH.

The case of Myrtle G. Bodwell vs. the Boston and Maine railroad, which was tried at the February term and resulted in an $1800 verdict for the plaintiff, then opened for retrial, the verdict having been set aside because of newly, discovered evidence. The plaintiff seeks $5000 damages for injuries alleged to have been sustained from being thrown from a platform at the Milton station through the sudden starting of a crowded train, Aug. 12, 1910 (Portsmouth Herald, October 3, 1911).

H.A. Beaton appeared in the Milton business directories of 1912, and 1917, as agent for the B&M Railroad and the American Express Company.

Rochester Div., No. 65. Bro. H.A. Beaton, Milton, has a new Ford runabout. Wish we all might “of-ford” an auto this year (Order, 1912).

Hugh A. Beaton of Milton had a 22½ horsepower Ford automobile registered (as #2182) between January and August 1912.

WRECKERS BUSY ON RAILROAD. Mixup in Local Yard and Another in Milton on Conway Branch. After working for four hours or more to replace a 125-ton locomotive on the rails near the Green street crossing on Thursday Afternoon, the wrecking crew of the Boston & Maine railroad were ordered to Milton on the Conway branch where they worked all night to clear the tracks of two ice cars, one of which tipped over after leaving the rails. They arrived back at 8.30 this morning (Portsmouth Herald, December 12, 1913).

LOCAL. A fine time was enjoyed at the Thanksgiving ball given under the auspices of Charity Temple No. 44, Pythian Sisters, at A.O.U.W. hall, Milton, Tuesday evening of last week. About 75 couples were in attendance. The grand march was led by Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Hodgdon, the next in order being Mr. and Mrs. E.A. [H.A.] Beaton. Music was furnished by Peerless orchestra of Rochester. A fine supper was served and all in all a good time was enjoyed by everybody. About $64 was cleared, which fund is to be used for the new shoe firm which is to locate in Milton. Ralph Whitehouse was the successful contestant in the silver service contest. The committee of arrangements consisted of Mrs. E.A. Hodgdon, Mrs. H.A. Beaton and Mrs. S.G. Blaisdell (Farmington News, December 4, 1914).

B&M RR Station and Tri-Echo LakeDaughter Ione E. Beaton married in South Berwick, ME, March 18, 1915, Edward A. Connell, she of Milton and he of Littleton, MA. He was an iceman, aged twenty-three years, and she was a house worker, aged twenty years.

Hugh Arthur Beaton of Milton registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was a B&M R.R. station agent & operator, aged forty-four years of age (b. October 8, 1875). (For some reason, he clipped two years off of his age). His nearest relative was Myrtle F. Beaton of Milton. He was of a medium height, with a stout build, blue eyes, and brown hair.

EAST CONCORD. Mr. and Mrs. Vern Hartshorn have returned home from an extended visit with their daughter, Mrs. Hugh Beaton at Milton, N.H. They were accompanied home by Ed. Cornell (Caledonian Record (St. Johnsbury, VT), September 3, 1919).

B&M Station Agent Cap
B&M Station Agent Cap, circa 1915 (Per B&M Railroad Historical Society)

Hugh A. Beaton, a Boston & Maine R.R. station agent, aged forty-six years (b. OH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Myrtle F. Beaton, aged forty-four years (b. VT), and his child, Gladys M. Beaton, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Hugh A. Beaton owned their house on Lower Main Street (at its intersection with Silver Street), free-and-clear.

RUNAWAY HORSE STOPS TRAIN.  Becoming frightened when his heels hit the sleigh behind him, a horse belonging to Edward Hammond of Rochester ran away down the Boston & Maine railway tracks in that city toward Milton yesterday afternoon. At the Milton station a north-bound passenger train was about to start, and word was sent to the engineer to look for the horse and sleigh. The animal had become entangled in a culvert cover however, and had a broken leg, before the train approached it, the engineer stopped the train and the horse was shot (Portsmouth Herald, January 24, 1923).

WEST MILTON. … one hundred dollars was appropriated to beautify the grounds near the railroad station at Milton, the work to be done under the direction of the Womans’ club (Farmington News, March 23, 1923).

PERSONAL. Mrs. H.H. [H.A.] Beaton and family party were in [Farmington] town from Milton Tuesday (Farmington News, August 24, 1923).

WRECKING CREW SENT TO MILTON. The local wrecking crew of the Boston & Maine Railroad were sent to Milton, on the Conway branch, today, to replace a buggy and one freight that became derailed on a siding (Portsmouth Herald, October 4, 1923).

BRING IN TWO B&M WRECKED ENGINES. The two locomotives No. 919 and 1376 which were wrecked in a collision between a snow plow train and a passenger train on the Conway branch near Milton last Wednesday were hauled to Portsmouth by the Portsmouth wrecking train and are now on a side track in the roundhouse yard. They will be held here until orders are received from the motive power department to send them to shop at Billerica, Concord or Somerville. The front end of both engines is badly damaged (Portsmouth Herald, February 24, 1924).

Daughter Gladys M. Beaton appeared in the Portsmouth, NH, directory of 1928, as a teacher at the West Junior High School in Portsmouth, with her residence at Milton. Her paternal uncle, Charles L. (Annie H.) Beaton, appeared as a ticket agent for the B&M R.R., with his house at 50 Orchard street. (In 1930, she resided with her uncle and aunt at 50 Orchard street (See Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26 for a fuller account of Charles L. and Annie J. (Horne) Beaton).

Hugh A. Beaton, a railroad station agent, aged fifty-six years (b. OH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Myrtle F. Beaton, aged fifty-four years (b. VT). Hugh A. Beaton owned their house on South Main Street, which was valued at $1,300. They had a radio set.

Daughter Gladys Marjorie Beaton married in Chocorua [Tamworth], NH, June 27, 1931, Edgar Brown Bruce, she of Milton and he of Lebanon, ME. He was a teacher, aged twenty-four years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-eight years.

Hugh A. Beaton was assessed for Milton property in 1932, which was valued at $1,100, and for which he was taxed $27.52 (Milton Town Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1933). (A mil rate of $25.02 per thousand).

Batch of Smiles - BG330410BATCH OF SMILES. “Aunt Sarah Shapleigh,” a jolly old soul, once well known to Milton people and who resided for some years in the house now owned and occupied by station agent Hugh Beaton, once told this little anecdote: A young girl who was deficient in her orthography was one day studying her spelling lesson and called to her mother in an adjoining room saying, “Marm, what does t-h-e spell?” Her mother impatiently answered, “Dod zounds, Suzette, ain’t I told you a thousand times and more that t-h-e spells feledelfy’?” – Rochester Courier (Boston Globe, April 10, 1933).

The former occupant of Beaton’s residence, “Aunt” Sarah (Bragdon) Shapleigh, widow of Richard Shapleigh, died in Milton, December 26, 1893, aged eighty-seven years, one month, and twenty-six days.

MILTON. Mrs. H.A. Beaton is in Springfield, Mass., visiting her daughter [Ione E. (Beaton) Connell] (Farmington News, November 30, 1934).

Station Agent James A. Reed of Wakefield, NH, received a visit from Station Agent Hugh A. Beaton of Milton.

UNION. Hugh Beaton, station agent at Milton, called on James Reed, Sunday (Farmington News, September 25, 1936).

Hugh A. Beaton, station agent at Milton, NH, appeared in the B&M Railroad employee’s magazine of December 1937, as being on the sick list.

ALTON AND ALTON BAY. Mrs. and Mrs. Charles [Hugh A.] Beaton of Milton are guests this week of their daughter and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Bruce (Farmington News, February 24, 1939).

Hugh A. Beaton died suddenly at the B&M railroad station in Milton, at 3:30 PM, February 12, 1940, aged sixty-six years, four months, and four days.

Strafford County medical examiner Forrest L. Keay, M.D., viewed the body and determined that Beaton had died from “Some form of heart disease. He had walked up the R.R. track about 50 yards from the station and dropped to track and died there.”

Was Brother Of Local Man. Hugh A. Beaton, 67, station agent at Milton for many years, and brother of Charles L. Beaton, agent at the Boston & Maine station in this city, dropped dead Monday while at his work (Portsmouth Herald, [Tuesday,] February 13, 1940).

IN MEMORIUM. Hugh A. Beaton. Announcement of the sudden death of Station Agent Hugh A. Grant at Milton on February 12 brings sorrow to many friends and acquaintances in this locality. Mr. Beaton dropped dead while about his duties in the B&M railroad yard at Milton, Monday afternoon. The deceased was 67 years of age, and had been in the employ of B&M for about 45 years. For nearly 40 years he had held the position of station agent, freight agent and telegraph operator at Milton, and was widely known among his townsmen and to the traveling public. He is survived by his wife, two daughters, a brother Charles Beaton, also a railroad man of Portsmouth, and one sister, for all of whom much sympathy is expressed. Funeral was held Wednesday morning at the Baptist church in Milton, with services in charge of Fraternal Chapter, No. 71, A.F. & A.M., of which he was a member (Farmington, February 16, 1940).

Edward Connell, a paper company beater engineer, aged forty-nine years (b. MA), headed a West Springfield, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ione Connell, aged forty-five years (b. VT), his children, Maynard Connell, a mail clerk for a magazine paper company, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Shirley Connell, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and his lodger [and mother-in-law], Myrtle Beaton, a widow, aged sixty-four years (b. VT). Edward Connell rented their house at 23 Church Street.

Myrtle Florence (Hartshorn) Beaton died in 1955.


See also Milton’s Railroad Line


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, July 25). Hazel L. Beaton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114383725/hazel-l-beaton

Find a Grave. (2013, July 25). Hugh A. Beaton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114383726/hugh-a-beaton

Find a Grave. (2014, April 18). Marjorie G. Bruce. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/128165539/marjorie-g.-bruce

Find a Grave. (2011, July 7). Jane E. [Ione E.] Connell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/72972420/jane-e.-connell

Find a Grave. (2015, January 9). John E. Fox. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/141122102/john-e-fox

Find a Grave. (2013,October 20). Charles Augustine Sawyer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/119019275/charles-augustine-sawyer

Find a Grave. (2011, February 26). Sarah Bragdon Shapleigh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/66176250/sarah-shapleigh

Order of Railroad Telegraphers. (1910). The Railroad Telegrapher. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=6VmjAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA69

Order of Railroad Telegraphers. (1912). The Railroad Telegrapher. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=L44tAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA897

Wikipedia. (2020, November 20). Portsmouth, Great Falls and Conway Railroad. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portsmouth,_Great_Falls_and_Conway_Railroad

Willis Henry Auctions. (2018, December 2). Lot 124A: Historic and Rare Railroad Lantern. Retrieved from www.willishenryauctions.com/catalogs/antiques-estates-auction-sunday-december-2-2018/lot-124a-historic-and-rare-railroad-lantern/

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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