Milton Policemen – 1927-39

By Muriel Bristol | April 25, 2021

In the Town Report of 1928, the Milton Town budget reported having spent $739.05 for the Protection of People and Property in 1927. That was allocated as $400 for Blister Rust, $269.85 for the Police Department, including the care of tramps, and $69.20 for the Fire Department, including Forest Fires. The allocations for 1928 were the same as for 1927 as regards the police and blister rust, but increased by $150 for the fire department.

(Blister rust (Cronartium Ribicola) is an invasive fungus introduced from China some thirty years before that attacks white pine trees).

As in earlier years, being a Milton policeman was very much as part-time job. There seem to have been no more than two part-time policemen (and rarely three) in any one year. There were also on occasion “special” policemen.

Apart from their regular duties, whatever they might have been been, Milton town budgets of this period mention paying policemen extra for traffic duty (now called detail work), rounding up tramps (including feeding them), collecting dog license fees, and even killing dogs, presumably mad or errant ones.

The Milton policemen identified in the Milton Town Reports of 1927-39 were: Fred Downs, Earle L. Walsh, William J. Madden, Fred J. Savoie, Herman J. Horne,  Verney C. Sprague. Phillip D. Pike, and George A. McKeagney.

Fred Downs – 1927-1936

Milton had two contemporary Fred Downs, the one that follows below and Fred C. Downs who, no doubt due to the duplication in names, went often by his middle name of Charles. Both were ice laborers. In the matter of determining which one was the Milton policeman, there is little on which to base a decision, at least with the currently available information. The one described below left for Rochester at the time policeman Fred Downs ceased appearing in the town records.

Fred Downs was born in Milton, December 9, 1880, son of Albert F. and Dorothy M. (Tuttle) Downs.

Fred Downs married in Milton, June 7, 1916, Ina Anna [(Bell)] Come, both of Milton. He was a shoemaker, aged thirty-six years, and she was a shoe stitcher, aged twenty-one years. Rev. John Manter performed the ceremony. She was born in Roxbury, VT, circa 1895, daughter of Joseph and Hattie M. (Gushea) Bell.

Fred Downs of Milton registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was a laborer for the Porter Milton Ice Co., aged thirty-seven years (b. December 9, 1880). His nearest relative was Ina Downs of Milton. He was of medium height, with a medium build, blue eyes, and brown hair.

Fred Downs, a [Porter-] Milton Ice Co. laborer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ina A. Downs, aged twenty-five years (b. VT). Fred Downs rented their house on the Plummer’s Ridge Road.

Fred Downs, an ice house laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Ina A. Downs, aged thirty-four years (b. VT). Fred Downs rented their house on the Plummer’s Ridge Road, for $20 per month. They had a radio set.

BURGLARS ENTER MILTON STORE. Milton, Nov. 5 – Burglars broke into a store here early yesterday and also across the river in Lebanon, Me., and then staged a party with part of the loot. At the store of Nick Sarkes, on Main street here, $90 worth of cigarettes and $10 in cash was taken after the burglars broke in a window and released the door catch. Going into Maine, they removed four cases of beer from the Tanner store, then sat on the steps and drank part of the beer and smoked some of the stolen cigarettes. The break here is being investigated by Chief Fred Downs and Deputy Sheriff Stanley Turner, and in Lebanon Deputy Sheriff H.S. Hall is being assisted by Deputy Tanner (Portsmouth Herald, November 5, 1936).

Fred (Ina) Downs appeared in the Rochester directory of 1938, as proprietor of Ike & Ine’s Tea Room, with his house on the Milton Road, R.D. #3.

Fred Downs, a restaurant proprietor, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“East Rochester”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Ina A. Downs, a restaurant proprietor, aged forty-four years (b. VT),and his helper, Rose Davis, a restaurant kitchen worker, aged fifty years (b. NH). Fred Downs rented their house on the Milton Road. Fred and Ina A. Downs had resided in Milton in 1935, and Rose Davis had resided in Acton, ME, in 1935.

Fred Downs of Milton Road, Rochester, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Rochester, NH, April 27, 1942. He was employed at Ike ‘n’ Ine’s Restaurant, aged sixty years (b. December 9, 1880). His nearest relative was his wife, Ina Downs, of R.F.D. #2, Rochester, NH. He was 5′ 9″ tall, weighed 190 pounds, with gray eyes, and white hair.

Fred (Ina) Downs appeared in the Rochester directory of 1948, as proprietor of Ike & Ine’s Tea Room, and grocery, on the Milton Road, R.D. #2, with his house at the same place.

Ike & Ine’s Tea Room appeared in the Rochester directory of 1950, on the Milton road R.D. #3, with Mrs. Fred Downs as proprietor.

Ina Downs appeared in the Rochester directory of 1953, as the widow of Fred Downs, and proprietor of The Country Store, with her house off the Milton road, R.D. #2. The Country Store, Ina A. Downs, proprietor, was on the Milton road; it sold groceries.

Earle L. Walsh – 1927-1929

Earle Leonard “Leonard” Walsh was born in Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897, son of George L. and Carrie M. (Briggs) Walsh.

Earl Leonard Walsh married in Wolfeboro, NH, April 7, 1917, Jessie Louise Tinker, both of Wolfeboro, NH. He was a machinist, aged nineteen years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-one years. Rev. Carlyle Summerbell performed the ceremony. She was born in Wolfeboro, NH, July 1, 1895, daughter of Charles A. and Elizabeth (Whitworth) Tinker.

Earl Leonard Walsh of Forge Farm, Plymouth, MA, registered for the WW I military draft in Plymouth, MA, June 5, 1918. He was employed by Sherman L. Whipple of Plymouth, MA, and was aged twenty-one years (b. Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897). His nearest relative was his wife, Jessie L. Walsh, of Forge Farm, Plymouth, MA. He was of a medium height, and slender build, with blue eyes, and brown hair.

George L. Walsh, a general farm farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie Walsh, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), his sons, Earle L. Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), Charles B. Walsh, an electric co. electrician, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Ralph W. Walsh, aged thirteen years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Jesse I. Walsh, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), his grandchild, Earling Walsh Jr., aged one year (b. MA), and his boarder, Jeremiah Hodsdon, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH). George L. Walsh owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Jessie L. (Tinker) Walsh taught at the Milton Mills school in the years 1926 to 1935 (See Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1912-52).

Earle Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Jessie Walsh, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), his children, Leonard Walsh, aged eleven years (b. MA), and Marilyn Walsh, born seven years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Charles A. Tinker, a widower, aged seventy-five years (b. ME). Earle Walsh rented their house on Church Street, for $10 per month. They had a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Lucy Marsh, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), and Annie Reynolds, a widow, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME).

MILTON MILLS. Earle Walsh, district deputy grand master, and staff installed the officers of Fidelity Lodge at Wolfeboro last Friday night, October 12 (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

LOCAL. Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., will hold its annual installation of officers this Thursday evening. The ceremonies of installation will be performed by District Deputy Grand Master Earle Walsh of Milton Mills (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

Walsh, EL - FN400419Earle L. Walsh, an undertaker, aged forty-two years (b. ME), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Jessie L Walsh, a public school teacher, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his children, Earle L. Walsh, Jr., aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Marilyn Walsh, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his father, George L. Walsh, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH). Earle L. Walsh owned [rented] their house on North Main Street, for $30 per month.

Earle Leonard Walsh of 23 Pleasant Street, Wolfeboro, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Wolfeboro, NH, February 14, 1942. He was self-employed, aged forty-four years (b. Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897). His telephone number was Wolfeboro 160. His contact was Jessie L. Walsh of Wolfeboro, NH. He was 5′ 9″ tall, weighed 165 pounds, with blue eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion.

1 Soldier Dies, 14 Hurt As Driver Hits Column. BERGENFIELD, N.J., March 27 (AP) – An automobile drove into the rear of a drilling column of 100 soldiers last night, Bergen county prosecutor John J. Breslin said, killing one and injuring 14 others. Breslin said Charles Mordaunt, 35, sales manager for an Englewood. automobile agency, had been booked as driver of the car on a charge of manslaughter by automobile and drunken driving. He said the death charge would be presented to the grand jury Tuesday while the drunken driving complaint would be taken to Bergenfield police court. The dead soldier was Murray Winawer of Brooklyn, N.Y., married. Five soldiers were treated at the scene, while nine others, were taken to Englewood and Holy Name hospitals. The injured, identified by army officers, included Earle Walsh, [Jr.,] 23, Wolfesboro, N.H., possible fractured vertebra, condition fair. He was taken to Englewood hospital (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, NH), March 14, 1942).

Fish and Game Report. Fishermen Act Quickly On Department’s Plea. Pickerel fishermen have responded quickly to the plea issued by the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department for information on large pickerel taken in the state. Recent reports include a 4¼ pound female, 25 inches long, 11 inches in girth, and a 3¼ pound female, 23 inches long, 8 inches in girth, taken Jan. 8, 1965, from Lake Wentworth in Wolfeboro by Earl L. Walsh of East Wolfeboro … (Portsmouth Herald, February 6, 1965).

Jessie L. (Tinker) Walsh died in Wolfeboro, NH, in March 1969.

William J. Madden – 1932, 1940-45

William James Madden was born in Wandsworth, Surrey, England, April 1, 1886, son of Jack and Annie (Otterway) Madden.

William James Madden of Milton Mills registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was an alien, employed as a laborer for the John E. Townsend estate, aged thirty-two years (b. England, April 1, 1886). His nearest relative was Mrs. Susie S. Otterway of Milton Mills. He was of medium height and medium weight, with blue eyes and brown hair.

William J. Madden, a general work mason, aged thirty-three years (b. England), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his maternal aunt, Susan S. Otterway, a widow, aged eighty-seven years (b. NH). William J. Madden rented their house on the Sanbornville Road. William J. Madden was an alien, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1913.

William J. Madden married in Milton Mills, October 2, 1920, Beulah Naomi Marsh, both of Milton. He was a farmer, aged thirty-four years, and she was a blanket finisher, aged twenty-nine years. Rev. Edward J. Canfield performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, March 28, 1891, daughter of Edwin E. and Lucy L. (Earl) Marsh.

William J. Madden appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as a mason, with his house at Milton Mills.

Lucy Marsh, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Leroy Marsh, an odd jobs laborer, aged fifty years (b.ME), her son-in-law, William Madden, a odd jobs mason, aged forty-four years (b. England), her daughter (Madden’s wife of ten years), Beula Madden, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), and her granddaughter, Phyllis Madden, aged six years (b. NH). Lucy Marsh owned their house on Church Street, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Frank Goodwin, a general farming laborer, aged forty-five years (b. ME), and Earle Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-four years (b. NH).

MILTON MILLS. William J. Madden celebrated his birthday Monday, April 1. Wonder if he got fooled? (Farmington News, April 5, 1935).

Willie J. Madden, a painter, aged fifty-four years (b. England), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included Beulah Madden, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), his daughter, Phyllis L. Madden, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Leroy Marsh, aged sixty-two years (b. ME). Willie J. Madden owned their house at Milton Mills Center, which was valued at $1,000. They resided in the same house in 1935.

William James Madden of P.O. Box 25, Milton Mills registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 27, 1942. He was self employed, aged fifty-six years (b. Wandsworth, England, April 1, 1886). His telephone number was Milton Mills 14, and his nearest relative was Mrs. Beulah Madden of the same address. He was 5’7″ tall, weighed 150 pounds, a sallow complexion, and had blue eyes and brown hair. He had two tattoos on his right arm and one on his left arm.

William J. Madden died in South Berwick, ME, October 30, 1963, aged seventy-seven years.

Deaths and Funerals. William J. Madden. SOUTH BERWICK – William J. Madden, 77, of Portland St., died Wednesday at his home after a long illness. He was born in Wandworth, England, April 1, 1886, the son of Jack and Ann (Otterway) Madden. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Beulah (Marsh) Madden; a daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Nelson of South Berwick; and several nieces and nephews (Portsmouth Herald, 1963).

Beulah N. (Marsh) Madden died in South Berwick, ME, in July 1978.

Fred J. Savoie – 1932

Frederick Joseph Savoie was born in Dover, NH, November 29, 1896, son of Joseph W. and Delia (Burns) Savoie.

Fred J. Savoie, a U.S. Army private, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), resided at Fort Bliss, in El Paso, TX, at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. He was in the Eighth U.S. Cavalry.

Fred J. Savoie married in Somersworth, NH, October 7, 1922, Ruby Ellis, both of Milton. He was a laborer, aged twenty-five years, and she was a mill employee, aged seventeen years. She was born in Milton, May 3, 1905, daughter of George E. and Inez G. (Duntley) Ellis.

Fred Savoie, a fibre mill overseer, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Ruby Savoie, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Jacqueline Savoie, aged five years (b. NH), Maurice Savoie, aged three years (b. NH), and Elaine Savoie, aged two years (b. NH). Fred Savoie owned their house on South Main Street, which was valued at $1,600. They did not have a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Malcolm A. Hart, a general practice physician, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and Ralph E. Meserve, a fibre mill bleacher, aged twenty-two years (b. ME).

Fred J Lavoie, a leatherboard mill finisher, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ruby Lavoie, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Jacqueline P. Lavoie, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Maurice M. Lavoie, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Elaine M. Lavoie, aged twelve years (b. NH). Fred J. Savoie owned their house on Main Street in the Milton Community, which was valued at $1,500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Malcolm A.H. Hart, a medical doctor, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), and Arthur A. Jenness, a shoemaker, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Fred Joseph Savoie of Main Street, Milton, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 26, 1942. He was employed by the Spaulding Fibre company. He was forty-five years of age (b. Dover, November 29, 1896). He stood 5′ 3″ tall, weighed 185 pounds, and had grey eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. He had no telephone number. His contact was Mrs. Ruby Savoie, P.O. Box 260, Milton.

Fredrick J. Savoie of Milton died of coronary heart thrombosis in the U.S. Naval Hospital in Kittery, ME, January 22, 1946, aged forty-nine years, one month, and twenty-four days. (He was employed as a fireman at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard).

Fireman Dies In Portsmouth Naval Hospital. Fred J. Savoie of Milton died yesterday at the U. S. naval hospital at the Portsmouth naval base where he had been a patient for eight days suffering from smoke inhalation reportedly received while fighting a blaze aboard a submarine at the base a week ago. A member of the fire department at the base, Mr. Savoie was born in Dover, the son of Joseph W. and Delia Burns Savoie. He had been resident of Milton for the past 20 years. He was 49 years old. He served in World War I and was a member of the Oscar Morehouse post, American Legion, of Milton, the Milton fire department and Rindge lodge, Knights of Pythias, East Rochester. Survivors include his wife. Mrs. Ruby Savoie: two daughters, Jacqueline and Elaine Savoie; a son, Maurice, all of Milton, and a sister, Mrs. Jennie Wentworth of Farmington (Portsmouth Herald, January 24, 1946).

Ruby (Ellis) Savoie died in Milton, September 23, 1996.

Herman J. Horne – 1933-34

Herman Julian “Rip” Horne was born in Milton Mills, October 26, 1905, son of John E. and Olive A. (Moulton) Horne.

(His father owned the Milton Mills shop occupied by blacksmith and policeman, Hiram J. Burrows, when it burned in the early hours of Thursday, November 20, 1924. (See Milton in the News – 1924)).

Herman J. Horne married in Milton Mills, June 23, 1929, Mildred E. Dow, he of Milton Mills and she of Rochester, NH. He was a clerk, aged twenty-three years, and she was a cashier, aged twenty-five years. Rev. Edwin B. Young performed the ceremony. She was born in Dover, NH, circa 1904, daughter of Joseph W. and Charlotte (Haney) Dow.

Herman J. Horne, a dry goods salesman, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mildred D. Horne, aged twenty-six years (b. NH). Herman J. Horne rented their house on School Street, for $9 per month. They did not have a radio set. They shared their two-family dwelling with the household of William Woodbury, a poultry breeder, aged thirty-two years (b. NH).

MILTON MILLS. Mr. and Mrs. Herman J. Horne entertained Mr. and Mrs. Lester Colt of Lowell, Mass., over the weekend (Farmington News, March 1, 1935).

J. Herman Horne, an electric light line foreman, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, D. Mildred Horne, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and his children, A. David Horne, aged eight years (b. NH), O. Patricia Horne, aged six years (b. NH), Pamela Horne, aged three years (b. NH), Peter Horne, aged three years (b. NH), and Robert Horne, aged seven months (b. NH). J. Herman Horne owned their house at 43 Mt. Vernon Street, which was valued at $4,500. Those old enough to have done so had all lived in Milton Mills in 1935.

Herman J. Horne died in Rochester, NH, in June 1978. Mildred E. (Dow) Horne died in Rochester, NH, in September 1980.

Verney C. Sprague – 1935-38

Verney Charles Sprague was born in Shapleigh, ME, March 10, 1893, son of Simon S. and Annie A. (James) Sprague.

Verney Sprague married (1st) in Farmington, NH, July 1, 1914, Ella May Cook, both of Farmington, ME. They were both shoe workers, he was aged twenty-two years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. John T. Clow performed the ceremony. She was born in Meredith, NH, circa 1894, daughter of Nathaniel and Helen (Browne) Cook.

PERSONAL. Mrs. Annie Rand returned Monday from a few days’ visit with her son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Verney Sprague (Farmington News, June 9, 1916).

Verney Charles Sprague of Waterboro, ME, registered for the WW I military draft in Shapleigh, ME, June 5, 1917. He was aged twenty-five years (born Shapleigh, ME, March 10, 1893). He was a fireman for Albert Sanborn of Brownfield, ME. He was tall, with a medium build, blue eyes, and light hair. He claimed an exemption (he was married).

PERSONAL. Mr. and Mrs. Verney Sprague of Brownville, Me., are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Edgerly (Farmington News, June 15, 1917).

Vernie C. Sprague, a sawmill laborer, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Waterboro, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella M. Sprague, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH). Verney Sprague rented their house. They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of [his brother] Willie E. Sprague, a sawmill laborer, aged twenty-six years (b. ME).

Verney Sprague, a medical products salesman, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Ella Sprague, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), and his boarder, George Eastman, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME). Verney Sprague owned their house. They had a radio set.

Verney C. Sprague, a retail grocery store owner, aged forty-eight years, headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella Sprague, aged forty-seven years. Verney C. Sprague owned their house on Main Street, which was valued at $2,800.

Verney Charles Sprague of No. Shapleigh, ME, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton Mills, April 27, 1942. He was aged forty-nine years (born Shapleigh, ME, March 10, 1893). He was self-employed in Milton Mills. He was 5′ 11″ tall, weighed 180 pounds, blue eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. He had scars on his left hand. His telephone number was Milton Mills 37-3. His nearest relative was his wife, Ella M. Sprague, P.O. Box 77, Milton Mills.

Ella M. (Cook) Sprague died in Sanford, ME, July 9, 1960.

Verney C. Sprague married (2nd) in ME, October 1, 1962, Ruth E. Bennett. She was born in Standish, ME, October 24, 1908, daughter of William N. and Almeda B. (Libby) Bennett.

Verney C. Sprague died in Shapleigh, ME, July 11, 1975, aged eighty-three years. Ruth E. Bennett died in Shapleigh, ME, April 24, 1976.

Herbert A. Downs – 1937-38, 1941

Herbert Arthur Downs was born in Barnstead, NH, January 15, 1915, son of Arthur L. and Maud G. (Welch) Downs.

Herbert A. Downs married in Milton, Mat 1, 1936, Wilma F. Warnecke, both of Milton. He was a mill worker, aged twenty-one years, and she was a bookkeeper, aged eighteen years. Rev. E. Lincoln Bigelow performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, circa 1918, daughter of William O.L. and Francina I. (Nutter) Warnecke.

Herbert A. Downs, an inspector, aged twenty-five years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Wilma F. Downs, aged twenty-two years, and his children, Arthur W. Downs, aged three years, and Sharon E. Downs, aged one month. Herbert A. Downs owned their house on the Farmington Road, which was valued at $1,000.

Herbert A. Downs died in Portland, ME, June 3, 1993.

Phillip D. “Damon” Pike – 1938-39

Phillip Damon Pike was born in Milton Mills, January 31, 1915, son of Phillip G. and Rosamond E. (Piper) Pike. (His mother taught at the Milton Mills school (See Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1912-52)).

Philip G. Pike, aged thirty-eight years. His household included his wife, Rosamond E. Pike, aged forty years, and his children, Louise E. Pike, aged seventeen years, and P. Damon Pike, aged fifteen years.

Phillip G. Pike, a retail meat market clerk, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Rosmon E. Pike, aged fifty years (b. NH), his son, Damon Pike, an auto factory mechanic, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Beatrice Pike, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and his grandson, Wayford Pike, aged nine months (b. NH). Phillip H. Pike owned their house on Highland Avenue, which was valued at $700. They had resided in the same house in 1935, excepting Beatrice Pike, who has lived in Rochester, NH, and Wayford Pike, who was not born in 1935.

Phillip Damon Pike of Milton Mills registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, in April 1942. He was an employee of Spaulding Fibre company of North Rochester, NH, aged twenty-five years (b. Milton Mills, January 31, 1915). His nearest relative was his wife, Mrs. Beatrice Louise Pike of the same address. He was 6′ tall, weighed 170 pounds, with a light complexion, and had blue eyes and blonde hair.

Damon Pike went on to become Milton’s fire chief:

N.H. Man, 76, Burns to Death. MILTON MILLS, N.H.. Jan. 14 – A 76-year-old laborer, burned to death when fire swept his two-room house here early this morning. Herbert Goldthwaith was found dead in his bed. Fire Chief Damon Pike said the blaze was believed started by a space heater. The victim leaves a son, Robert of Dover, N.H., and a daughter, Lillian (Boston Globe, January 15, 1961).

Phillip D. Pike died of smoke inhalation while fighting a barn fire in Milton, November 29, 1971.

Fire Chief Dies in Action. MILTON MILLS, N.H. (AP) – Veteran Fire Chief Damon Pike died Monday night after he apparently was overcome by smoke while fighting a barn fire. Death was attributed to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation (Portsmouth Herald, November 30, 1971).

Milton Mills News. And [our sincere sympathy] to the family of Mr. Damon Pike who lost his life fighting a fire here in town Monday evening (Farmington News, December 9, 1971).

George A. McKeagney – 1939

George Albert McKeagney was born in Boston, MA, July 9, 1908, son of Patrick H. and Mary L. (Gibson) McKeagney.

Laura Mckeagney, aged forty-seven years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her children, George Mckeagney, a fibre mill machinist, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Marie Mckeagney, aged eleven years (b. MA), and Robert Mckeagney, aged nine years (b. NH), and her half-brother, Edwin J. Gibson, a shoe shop shoe repairer, aged fifty-three years (b. MA). Laura M. McKeagney owned their house on the Wakefield Road, which was valued at $5,000. Their household was enumerated between those of George Kingston, a fibre mill laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and William A. Dickson, a fibre mill superintendent, aged fifty-five years (b. MA).

Laura M. McKeagney, a fibre mill office clerk, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her children, George A. McKeagney, a garage proprietor, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), and Robert B. McKeagney, an N.Y.A. Project foreman, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and her brother, Edwin J. Gibson, a shoe shop line laborer, aged sixty-one years (b.MA). Laura M. McKeagney owned their house, which was valued at $2,500. They had all lived in the same house in 1935.

George A. McKeagney married in Rochester, NH, July 8, 1941, Thelma M. Wright, he of Milton and she of 204 N. Main Street, Rochester, NH. He was a state trooper, aged thirty-two years, and she was a dietician, aged thirty-three years. She was born in Everett, MA, October 19, 1907, daughter of Frederick and Helen (Durgin) Wright.

George McKeagney appeared in the Rochester directory of 1941, as a state policeman, residing at 6 May street. Thelma M. (Mrs. George) McKeagney appeared as a clerk at F.W. Woolworth Co., with her house at 6 May street.

SOUTH MILTON, N.H., May 18 (AP) — The home of Mrs. Laure McKeagney, mother of State Trooper George A. McKeagney, was destroyed by fire yesterday with damage estimated at $5000. Sparks from the fire caused slight damage to the roof of an adjacent house and also started a brush and grass fire (Newport Express (Newport, VT), May 18, 1943).

George A. McKeagney died in Meredith, NH, February 13, 1987. Thelma M. (Wright) McKeagney died January 16, 1999.


See also Milton Policemen – c1891-1914 and Milton Policemen – 1940-52


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, August 8). Herbert Arthur Downs. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115104102/herbert-arthur-downs

Find a Grave. (2014, April 17). William James Madden. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/128115614/william-james-madden

Find a Grave. (2018, August 6). George A. McKeagney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192028770/george-a-mckeagney

Find a Grave. (2013, August 11). Phillip Damon Pike. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115287603/philip-damon-pike

Wikipedia. (2020, December 29). Cronartium Ribicola. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cronartium_ribicola

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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