Spaulding Fibre Company, 1925-57

By Muriel Bristol | June 6, 2021

Continued from J. Spaulding & Sons Co., 1894-24.


Huntley N. Spaulding appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1925, as president of International Leather Company, at 89 Beach street, Room 203B, with his house at both the Hotel Somerset and at Rochester, NH. (The Hotel Somerset was at Commonwealth Avenue and Charlesgate in Boston, MA). Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre boards, with addresses at 89 Beach Street, Room 203B [in Boston, MA], and 15 Elkins Street in South Boston.Hotel Somerset

Huntley N. Spaulding appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1926, as treasurer of Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., at 89 Beach Street, Room 203B, and president of International Leather Co., same address, with his house at Rochester, NH. Rolland H. Spaulding appeared as president of Spaulding Fibre Co., same address, with his house at Rochester, NH. Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre board, with addresses at 89 Beach Street, Room 203B [in Boston, MA], 15 Elkins Street in South Boston, and in New Hampshire. – See p 391. International Leather Company dealt in leatherboard at the same Beach Street address.

Spaulding Ad - BD1926Huntley N. Spaulding ran for and won the office of Governor of New Hampshire for the 1927-28 biennium.

Odd Items From Everywhere. Wakefield st., Rochester, N.H., might be called Governors’ Row, for on it live Rolland H. Spaulding, Governor in 1915 and 1916, Ex-Gov Samuel D. Felker, and Huntley N. Spaulding, just elected. (Boston Globe, November 27, 1926).

Huntley N. Spaulding and his younger brother, Rolland H. Spaulding were both characterized as being “Progressive” Republicans.

Archilles G. [“Archie”] Marcoux, a millwright at the Spaulding plant in Milton, died in the Rochester Hospital, May 29, 1927, aged fifty-six years, six months, and twenty-three days. He had sustained severe burns “from boiler live steam” over 98% of his body three hours before his death (and he died one hour after being admitted to the hospital).

MARCOUX DEAD OF BURNS RECEIVED IN MILL BOILER. ROCHESTER, N.H., May 3 – Archie Marcoux, 60, employed in the Spaulding mill at South Milton, died this afternoon at the Rochester Hospital from severe burns sustained today, while inspecting a boiler at the plant. The three boilers had just been inspected, and Mr. Marcoux opened the manhole and entered one of the boilers, unbeknown to other employes. Fireman George Chalmers started a fire in the boiler and soon heard Marcoux shouting, whom he released and sent to the hospital. Mr. Marcoux was a native of Canada and had worked at the plant for several years. A wife and several children survive him (Boston Globe, May 31, 1927).

Huntley N. (Harriet) Spaulding appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1929, as president of Spaulding Fibre Co., with his house at 78 Wakefield street. Rolland H. (Vera G.) Spaulding appeared as treasurer of Spaulding Fibre Co., and vice president of the Rochester Trust Co., with his house at 76 Wakefield street. Spaulding Fibre Co. (Inc.) appeared as manufacturers of fibre products, president Huntly N. Spaulding and vice president-treasurer Rolland H. Spaulding, with addresses at 100 N. Main street [in Rochester], and Spaulding avenue in North Rochester.

Spaulding Fibre Company appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as being based in North Rochester, NH.

Spaulding, Huntley N
Huntley Nowell Spaulding (1869-1955)

Huntley N. Spaulding, a fibre manufacturer, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet M. Spaulding, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), his sister-in-law, Nannie G. Mason, aged forty-five years (b. KS), and his lodger, Mabel A. Futes, aged forty-one years (b. New Brunswick (American citizen)). Roland H. Spaulding owned their house on Wakefield Street (corner of Union Street), which was valued at $40,000. They had a radio set.

Spaulding, Rolland H
Rolland Harty Spaulding (1873-1942)

Roland H. Spaulding, president of a leatherboard factory, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eleven years), Vera G. Spaulding, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), his children, Virginia P. Spaulding, aged nine years (b. MA), and Betty L. Spaulding, aged seven years (b. MA), and his servants, Mary Wakefield, a private family cook, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), and Rachael Houle, a private family maid, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Roland H. Spaulding owned their house at 76 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $200,000. They had a radio set.

Walter A. Potter, aged sixty-five years (b. RI), headed a Greenwich, CT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Marion S. Potter, aged forty years (b. NY), and his servants, Stewart Walker, a private family butler, aged thirty-one years (b. PA), and Ethel Walker, a private family cook, aged thirty-one years (b. PA). Walter A. Potter owned their house, which was valued at $70,000. They had a radio set.

Walter A. Potter died of heart disease in Greenwich, CT, January 4, 1932, aged sixty-six years.

Townsend Center. The body of Walter A. Potter, aged 66 years, who died of heart trouble at his home in Greenwich, Conn., was brought here today for burial in the Jonas Spaulding family lot at Hillside cemetery. Mr. Potter is survived by his wife, Mrs. Marion (Spaulding) Potter. Mrs. Spaulding [Mrs. Potter] is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Spaulding, late of Townsend Harbor (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), January 7, 1932).

The Spaulding family donated a new school building to the town of Townsend, MA, in June 1932.

1750 Visitors at Townsend School … The families of Huntley N. and Rolland H. Spaulding attended the banquet at 6 o’clock in the playroom the new school at which 425 townspeople and former residents were present. A brief speaking program was presented at the close of dinner by Mr. Flarity, toastmaster. The speakers included Senator Charles A. Stevens of Lowell, Rep. James E. Kendall of Dunstable and Rev. Dr. Leo A. Nies of New London, Conn., whose first child was born in Townsend where he began his service in the ministry. Among those at the banquet Mrs. Rolland H. Spaulding and daughters, Virginia P. and Betty L., and their guest, Miss Cynthia Bond; Mrs. Huntley N. Spaulding, Mrs. Marion S. Potter, Greenwich, Conn., sister of the Spaulding brothers; and Mrs. C. Wesley Going and children Reginald, Mildred and Dorothy of Amherst, N.H. Mrs. Dorothy Spaulding of East Sebago, Me, widow of Leon C. Spaulding, was unable to attend because of a death in the family. Huntley N. Spaulding was born Oct 30, 1868, and served as governor of New Hampshire in 1927 [1927-28] and Rolland H. Spaulding was born March 13, 1873, and was governor of New Hampshire in 1914-15 [1915-16]. They are the sons of the late Jonas and Emeline (Cummings) Spaulding, the father being the founder of a leather-board industry in this town (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), June 30, 1932).

TOWNSEND CENTER. Given Trees For Cemetery. Hillside cemetery on Highland street, has been beautified recently by a gift of 27 trees from Mrs. Marion Spaulding Potter, of New York city. Mrs. Potter is a native of Townsend, the daughter of the late Jonas and Emeline (Cummings) Spaulding and sister of Huntley and Roland Spaulding, former governors of New Hampshire, donors of the new Spaulding memorial school in Townsend. Twenty of the trees, which are maple and linden, have been set out bordering both sides of the fifth avenue in the cemetery, where the Spaulding family lot is located. The remaining seven trees have been get out on the sixth avenue. Two of the seven, which are willow trees, have been placed at the sixth avenue entrance of the cemetery. The trees were planted under the direction of a landscape gardener, sent by Mrs. Potter, with Fredrick J. Piper, local cemetery commissioner, and Turner Goodwin, assisting. Azalea and other shrubs have been placed on the Spaulding lot, groups of dwarf evergreen have been planted in the triangular plots at the four corners of the lot, and running vines at the base of the Spaulding monument (Fitchburg Sentinel  (Fitchburg, MA), October 29, 1932).

New York. Mrs. Marion S. Potter, of Greenwich has taken an apartment at Ten Park Avenue (Hartford Courant (Hartford, CT), January 7, 1934).

SPAULDING FIBRE COMPANY ENTERTAINS EMPLOYES. More than 250 employes of the counter department of the Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., operated by Ex Governors Rolland and Huntley Spaulding, were given a banquet last Saturday for operating the factory six months without a lost time accident. The Spaulding Company hired a theatre and all employes enjoyed the program until noon when the banquet was served in Masonic hall by women of the Christian church. Ex Governor Rolland H. Spaulding spoke and the employes furnished a program. Later at the Wolfeboro Casino there was a program of sports (Farmington News, October 12, 1934).

MILTON. The Salem Shoe Co. of Salem, Mass., have definitely decided to locate in Milton, the building formerly occupied by the Kennebunk Mfg. Co., is being made ready for occupancy. Walls are being white-washed, floors repaired and new benches erected. The new concern expects to start cutting and stitching operations in about two weeks and attain full production in about a month. A few experienced men will be brought to Milton, but the greatest number of workers will be recruited locally. Officers of the company state that they will train a large number of local inexperienced men to meet their own requirements. The Spaulding Fibre Co., which has occupied the building, has aided the new concern materially by contributing several costly improvements recently made, among which Is a new dust laying system Repairs will be ma do on Charles street which will make access to the factory easier, while Steve Dixon has given the field near the factory as a parking space for cars (Farmington News, January 18, 1935).

New England in general, including the Salmon Falls River running through Milton and Rochester, experienced severe flooding from snow and ice melt and a sequence of four severe rain storms in March 1936. It was said to have been the worst floods since those of 1896. The flood waters crested here March 19, 1936.

N.H. DROWNING VICTIM’S BODY IS RECOVERED. MILTON, N.H., March 16 (IP). A searching party recovered today the body of [Aldrige] Edward Custeau, 60, who drowned in the Salmon Falls river Friday while removing flashboards from a dam. The body was caught on a plank of an old dam a quarter mile below the spot Custeau fell from a rowboat. He leaves a widow and three children (Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, VT), [Tuesday,] March 17, 1936).

The unfortunate millhand, Aldridge E. Custeau, was father of Emma P. (Custeau) Ramsey (for whom the “Emma Ramsey Center” is named). At the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census, Custeau had lived in Lebanon, ME, right next door to Spaulding’s hydraulic engineer Ira W. Jones.

U.S. Geological Survey reports of the 1936 floods placed the two Milton Leatherboard Company dams at between 34.9 and 34.8 miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua River, and the two Twin State Gas & Electric Company Milton dams at between 34.7 and 34.6 miles above. The J. Spaulding & Sons Co.’s two Milton “Upper” dams were between 34.5 and 34.4 miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua River, and their Milton “Lower” mill dam was at 34.1 miles above the river mouth. Their five North Rochester mill dams were 32.6, 32.5, and 32.0 miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua River (U.S. Geological Survey, 1937).

Spauldings Offer Rochester $360,000 Toward School. TOWNSEND, Nov. 11 – The Spaulding brothers, donors of the Spaulding Memorial high school in this town, have offered Rochester, N.H., $360,000 for the construction of a new high school in that city. While Huntley N. Spaulding was governor of New Hampshire he built at his own expense a $150,000 gymnasium for the Keene (N.H.) normal school. Roland H. Spaulding, a brother and also a former governor, has made several gifts for educational causes. The Rochester city council voted yesterday to accept the Spaulding offer, in which Mrs. Marion (Spaulding) Potter of Greenwich, Conn., joins with her brothers and her sister-in-law, Mrs. Dorothy H. Spaulding, widow of Leon Spaulding (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), November 11, 1936).

Napoleon E. “Paul” Marcoux, a [Spaulding] fibre mill operative, died of a fractured skull in an auto accident on the road from Milton to Rochester, NH, April 2, 1937, aged thirty-eight years, eleven months, and eighteen days.

FATHER OF NINE DIES IN AUTO CRASH. MILTON, N.H., April 2 (AP). Paul Marcoux, 39, mill worker and father of nine children, was instantly killed late today when his auto and a heavy truck collided during a snow storm (Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, VT), April 3, 1937).

Rolland H. Spaulding had his right kidney removed at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA, in 1937.

R.H. SPAULDING BACK AT WORK. Rochester, Sept. 24 – Ex-Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, who has been confined to the Phillips House of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and later to his home on Wakefield street with a severe illness, is able to be out again and has returned to his desk in the office of the Spaulding Fibre Company (Portsmouth Herald, September 24, 1937).

MILTON NEIGHBORS AID WIDOW. Milton, Nov. 13. – This little community has once again demonstrated the remarkable spirit of charity and cooperation for which it has been noted in the past, and, as a result, Mrs. Hazel [(Downs)] Marcoux, mother of nine children, who was widowed last April when her husband was killed in an automobile accident, is happy. The woman’s modest home, badly in need of repairs, has been completely renovated as a community project. With material furnished by the Spaulding Fibre company, by which her husband was employed for 15 years, 44 Milton men recently pooled their efforts to shingle the roof and walls, attach 11 storm windows with frames and install a new door. This done, they then cut nine cords of wood – enough for the entire winter – and piled it neatly in the shed (Portsmouth Herald, November 13, 1937).

Here and There. Because they have worked six months without a “lost time” accident, employes of the South Rochester and North Rochester plants of the Spaulding Fibre Co., will be given a safety outing Saturday at Wolfeboro. The program include baseball, swimming, bowling, billiards, boat riding, other athletic events and a turkey dinner (Portsmouth Herald, August 4, 1939).

New Rochester School Dedicated. Rochester, Sept. 11.-The city of Rochester’s new $1,000,000 Spaulding High School was dedicated Saturday afternoon in the presence of educators and representatives of the state and city Governments. Ex-Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding represented the Spaulding families, whose donations of nearly a half-million dollars made the building possible. The invocation was by the Rev. Dr. Marion E. Hall. Commissioner James M. Pringle brought greetings from the State Department of Education. The building was accepted for the city by Mayor John F. Conrad. Supt. of Schools Arthur S. Rollins expressed appreciation of the School Committee. The principal speaker was Dr. Nicholas L. Engelhardt of Teachers’ College, Columbia University. Rev. Joseph H. Cormier, pastor of Holy Rosary Church, gave the benediction. Flags for the auditorium and outside the building were presented by the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion. Besides ex-Gov. and Mrs. Huntley L. Spaulding other donors of the family were: Ex-Gov. and Mrs. Rolland L. [H.] Spaulding, Mrs. Marion Spaulding Potter, a sister, Mrs. Leon G. [C.] Spaulding, widow of the brother to whom the building dedicated (Portsmouth Herald, September 12, 1939).

Spaulding Fibre Company gave its employees a Christmas bonus in December 1939.

Police Hunt Clues After Series Of Burglaries. Dover, May 27 – Police today were continuing to press their hunt for clues that might lead to the capture of thieves responsible for a series of breaks and thefts here and in Milton. At Milton, where an $187 payroll was stolen sometime Thursday night from the Spaulding Fibre Co.’s office, another break was discovered Saturday at the garage of Charles R. Whitehouse, trucker. Meanwhile Atty. Clyde Keefe of Dover, Democratic candidate for governor of New Hampshire, and operators of My Lady beauty salon discovered their offices had been entered and sums of money were taken. Mr. Whitehouse estimated about $150 worth of tools, dies, gasoline, oil and a truck battery were stolen sometime early Saturday morning. Breaking the lock on the door, thieves worked quickly and in their haste they had to hacksaw a cable to remove the battery from the truck. At Dover, Mrs. Retta C. Bowles estimated the sum of $17 was from her office after the door to the salon had been forced. The money had been hidden in a cupboard where Mrs. Bowles, believed it was safe (Portsmouth Herald, May 27, 1940).

Huntley Spaulding, a fibre manufacturer, aged seventy years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet Spaulding, aged sixty-three years (b. MA), and his servants, Iva Wood, a a private family cook, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and Wendall Wood, a a private family chauffeur, aged forty-five years (b. MA). Huntley Spaulding owned their house at 78 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $35,000. He had resided in the same house in 1935.

Spaulding - 76 and 78 Wakefield Street
Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding’s Wakefield Street house (left) and Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding’s neighboring house (right) are both now owned by The Governor’s Inn in Rochester, NH

Rolland Spaulding, a fibre manufacturer, aged sixty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Vera G. Spaulding, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), his children, Virginia Spaulding, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and Betty Spaulding, aged seventeen years (b. MA), and his servants, Alice Beckingham, a private family maid, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Eleanor Higgins, a private family cook, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH). Rolland Spaulding owned their house at 76 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $45,000. He had resided in the same house in 1935.

Marion S. Potter, a widow, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Greenwich, CT, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her servant, Lillie Mae Allison, a housemaid, aged thirty-eight years. Marion S. Potter owned their house at Alden Park (no valuation recorded); she had resided in the same house in 1935.

Rolland H. (Vera G.) Spaulding appeared in the Rochester directory of 1941, as president of the Spaulding Fibre Co., president of the Rochester Trust Co., and vice-president of the First National Bank of Rochester, with his house at 76 Wakefield street. Bette Spaulding appeared as a student, with her residence at 76 Wakefield street. Huntley N. (Harriet) Spaulding appeared as treasurer of the Spaulding Fibre Co., with his house at 78 Wakefield street. The Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., appeared with R.H. Spaulding as president, Huntley N. Spaulding as treasurer, and Cecil M. Pike as secretary and assistant treasurer (and a co-proprietor of [Spaulding-owned] Three Line Counter Co.), with offices at 100 N. Main street, in Rochester, and Spaulding avenue, in North Rochester.

Virginia P. Spaulding married at 76 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, June 10, 1941, William H. Champlin, Jr., she of 76 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, and he of Rochester Hill Road, Rochester, NH. She was a student, aged twenty years, and he was a flying school manager, aged twenty-four years. Rev. George E. Gilcrest of Quincy, MA, performed the ceremony. Champlin was born in Boston, MA, September 7, 1916, son of William H. and Helen M. (Hussey) Champlin.

Champlin-Spaulding. Virginia Pauline Spaulding, oldest daughter of former Governor and Mrs. Rolland H. Spaulding and prominent member of Manchester’s younger set, was married to William Hilton Champlin, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Champlin, Sr., of Rochester Hill road, Manchester [Rochester], on Tuesday afternoon at 4 o’clock. In the garden at the home of bride, the ceremony was performed by the Rev. George W. Gilchrist, pastor of the Bethany Congregational church, Quincy, Mass. Wearing an heirloom rosepoint lace gown, combined with net, and a six-yard train of net, ivory illusion and a Juliet cap with clusters of orange blossoms, the bride was escorted to the altar by her father. She carried a spray of white and orange blossoms. Betty Spaulding, sister of the bride, served as maid of honor, the Misses Natalie Foss, Madelyn Mitchell, Lucille Marchand,, Mrs. Robert Feineman and Mrs. Richard Cooper, all of Rochester, and Mrs. Francis Maquire of Stonington, Me., serving as bridesmaids. John B. Nichols of Rochester best man and the ushers were Wallace H. Hussey, Charles Clark, James Nixon, Richard Cooper and Harold Dawson. Music was furnished by Mrs. Dorothy Dean Monroe, organist of the First church (Congregational). Following the ceremony, a reception for the 300 guests was held in the garden (Portsmouth Herald, June 11, 1941).

Rolland H. Spaulding of 76 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, a fibre manufacturer, died of acute uremia in Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NH, March 14, 1942, at 3:13 AM, aged sixty-eight years, eleven months, and twenty-seven days.

Ex-Gov. R.H. Spaulding Succumbs in Rochester. Former Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, public benefactor and president of the Spaulding Fibre company, died early this morning from heart trouble, after several days’ illness in the $300,000 Frisbee Memorial hospital which his family gave to the city. Had he lived until tomorrow he would have been 69 years old. He was born in Townsend, Mass., son of Jonas and Emeline (Cummings) Spaulding. He attended the Townsend Grammar schools and was graduated from Phillips Exeter academy in 1893. Then he started working in his father’s fibre mill in Rochester so that he might learn the business of the international concern which he eventually headed. He came to Rochester in the late 1890’s and had made his home here ever since. At the time of death he was living at 76 Wakefield street. Mr. Spaulding was president and director of the First National Bank of Rochester, director of the Rochester Chamber of Commerce, a past officer of the Rochester Kiwanis and director of the United Life and Accident association. In 1912 he served as a delegate to the Republican national convention. In 1916 to 1917 he was governor of New Hampshire. He was also vice chairman of the executive committee of the New Hampshire Committee of Safety and chairman of the New Hampshire Defense League in the same period. Several years ago he was appointed by the governors of the New England states to act as general chairman of the New England Railway commission. He was a member of the Congregational church. He was donor of the Spaulding Memorial swimming pool at Dartmouth College. He and his brother, former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding, built a high school in their home of Townsend, Mass. in memory of their parents and had given more than one-half a million dollars towards the building of the Rochester High school. In 1915 Dartmouth college awarded him with an MA degree and in 1916, the University of New Hampshire honored him with an LLD. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Vera Spaulding, [and] two daughters, Mrs. William H. Champlin of Rochester and Miss Betty Spaulding, student at Harcum Junior college, Bryn Mawr (Portsmouth Herald, March 14, 1942).

Death Notices. SPAULDING – Rolland Harty Spaulding died March 14 in Rochester, NH. Born March 15, 1873, at Townsend, Mass., son of Jonas and Emeline (Cumming) Spaulding. Services Tuesday, March 17, at 2 p.m. at the First Church, Congregational, Rochester, N.H. Interment in Townsend (Boston Globe, March 17, 1942).

LOCAL. Robert Bickford, who has just completed his duties with the Farmington Motor Car Co., has accepted employment as chauffeur for Mrs. Rolland H. Spaulding in Rochester and will commence his duties next Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Bickford will live in Rochester (Farmington News, April 3, 1942).

The late Rolland H. Spaulding’s younger daughter, Bette L. Spaulding, became engaged to Wilson E. Haas in January 1943.

New Hampshire Heiress to Live in California. New York, Jan. 18 – Just as soon as the wedding bells sound off for Bette Louise Spaulding and Wilson Edwin Haas, he will take his heiress-bride out to live in California. Although this sounds simple enough it will be a complicated enough move, for Bette hails from the hills of New Hampshire. As the daughter of the late Governor Rolland Spaulding of New Hampshire, Bette inherited a nice big nest-egg and has been one of the country’s most sought-after post-debs. She attended the House in the Pines, Beaver School and was graduated from Harcum Junior College last June. Bette was the belle of her schools and extremely popular with the brothers of her classmates. After the death of her grandfather, Jonas Spaulding, Bette’s father became president of Spaulding Fibre Company of Rochester, N.H., and Tonawanda. Later, he was made director of Spaulding, Ltd., of London, director of the United Life and Accident Insurance Company, New England Public Service Corporation, St. Maurice Paper Company of Canada, and the Public Service Corporation of New Hampshire. The future bride’s uncle, Hartley [Huntley] N. Spaulding, was one-time governor of New Hampshire. Bette’s only sister is married to William H. Champlin, Jr. Wilson hails from Glendale, Cal. After being graduated from the University of California, he enrolled in the Harvard Business School (Buffalo Courier (Buffalo, NY), January 19, 1943).

Bette Louise Spaulding married at Camp Robinson, in Pulaski County, AK, June 13, 1943, Wilson E. Haas, she of Rochester, NH, and he of Glendale, CA. She was aged twenty years, and he was a soldier in Co. B, 62nd Battalion, 13th Regiment, aged twenty-seven years. He was born in Silverton, CO, May 19, 1916, son of Edwin C. and Minnie A. (Wilson) Haas.

Spaulding Ad - FN430820
Spaulding Fibre Advertisement (August 1943)

Daughter of Late N.H. Governor, Bride. ROCHESTER, N.H., June 17 -Announcement was made today of the marriage of Bette L. Spaulding, daughter of Mrs. Vera G. Spaulding and the late Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, of Rochester, and private Wilson E. Haas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin C. Haas of Glendale, Calif. The ceremony was performed last Sunday morning in the chapel at Camp Robinson, Ark., by Army Chaplain John D. Clyde. Mary Lyons of Brighton, Mass., was maid of honor and Capt. Lassie McMann of Magnolia, Ark., was best man. Private and Mrs. Haas are on a honey moon trip to Hot Springs, Ark., and will reside at 2620 East Washington av., Little Rock, Ark. Private Haas was graduated from the University of California and the Harvard School of Business Administration. Before entering the service he was employed in Washington (Boston Globe, June 18, 1943).

Spaulding Fibre Company’s North Rochester mill burned in the early hours of Wednesday, October 4, 1944. One Spaulding employee, Earle O. Wheeler, died “of some form of heart disease and overexertion” during the fire (about 1 AM), aged fifty-four years, eleven months, and fourteen days.

$750,000 Fire Razes Mill In Rochester. A fire, believed to have started in a dryer room, destroyed the Spaulding Fibre company mill yesterday, causing the death of one man and damage estimated at $750,000. Earle O. Wheeler of Rochester, was found dead near a steam pump in the boiler room. Mr. Wheeler, night fireman of the plant, is believed to have died of heart attack while operating the plant fire control system after discovering the fire at about 1 am. Mr. Wheeler and six other night employes of the mill called the Rochester and Milton fire departments and manned the plant apparatus, but the wooden frame structure gave way before the flames, and the main building with thousands of dollars worth of machinery and stock, was destroyed. The company records and office equipment were saved and the power plant received only slight damage to machinery. Approximately 180 persons are out of work due to the loss of the mill, which manufactured shoe counters and other fiber equipment for military use. Supt. Elmer Waitt of Milton was one of the few executives present, as most of the others, including the owner, former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding, production manager Cecil M. Pike and treasurer S. Ellsworth Clow, were at their Tonawanda, N.Y., plant (Portsmouth Herald, October 5, 1944).

Plan to Rebuild Razed Fiber Mill In Rochester. The Spaulding Fiber Company plant at North Rochester, destroyed Wednesday morning in a $750,000 fire will be rebuilt as soon as priorities for materials needed to construct a modern fireproof building can be secured, Maj. Ernest C. Blackwell, general manager of the company, said last night. The decision was announced after a telephone conversation with former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding, who is at the Tonawanda, N.Y., plant with other executives of the concern. Since the Spaulding plant was engaged in war work, it is expected that the necessary construction materials for the rebuilding will be secured with a minimum of difficulty. Some of the employes left jobless by Wednesday’s fire have been given work at the company’s South Milton plant, and others are expected to be used by a plant in Dover (Portsmouth Herald, October 6, 1944).

Bonus Checks. Twenty-five employes of the Spaulding Fibre Board plant at Townsend Harbor received Christmas bonus checks of S50 each Monday and other employes received lesser amounts in accordance with their length of service with the company. The 25 who received the $50 checks have been with company for terms of one year longer. Ernest J. Hamel is the superintendent (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), December 21, 1944).

Strikers Will Picket Homes of Executives. TONAWANDA, N.Y., July 18 (AP) – About 300 striking employes of the Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., have voted unanimously to picket homes of company executives, including that of Huntley N. Spaulding, former Governor of New Hampshire at North Rochester, N.H. A statement released yesterday by Herman Stadler, president of Local 306. United Radio, Electrical and Machine Workers, Congress of Industrial Organizations,’ and Sheridan Creekmore, chairman of the local’s strike committee, said the action was taken last night after weeks of unsuccessful negotiation with the company (Patterson News, Patterson, NJ), July 18, 1946).

An Ill Wind. ROCHESTER, April 6 (API) – The Spaulding Fibre company obtained permission to burn tall grass to prevent possible accidental destruction of one of its buildings by sparks from passing trains. The wind shifted during the operation and the storage bay the company was protecting caught fire. It burned to the ground (Portsmouth Herald, April 6, 1949).

Lumber Company To Sell Twelve Houses. Rochester, N.H., Aug. 12. Twelve six-room homes, owned the Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., on the Lebanon, Me., side of North Rochester, are for sale. Two have been purchased. Elmer F. Waitt, Milton, executive of the firm, said the houses are being sold for $2,200. They have running water and electricity but no baths (Portland Press Herald, August 13, 1949).

Huntley N. (Harriet) Spaulding appeared in the Rochester directory of 1950, as treasurer of Spaulding Fibre Co., with his house at 78 Wakefield street. Vera G. Spaulding appeared as the widow of Rolland H. Spaulding, with her house at 76 Wakefield street. Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre products, with their plant at Spaulding avenue in North Rochester. Its chairman was Huntley N. Spaulding; president C.C. Steck, of Tonawanda, NY; vice-president and secretary, Cecil M. Pike; and treasurer Stephen E. Clow.

Rochester Fire Threatens Woods. State police were asked to help combat a fire in a stock shed at the Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., plant in North Rochester this afternoon. Rochester fire officials asked the state police to alert town fire departments in the area because they feared a high wind might create forest fire. The main mill, according to Rochester sources, was not in the immediate path of the flames (Portsmouth Herald, May 2, 1951).

Harriet M. (Mason) Spaulding of 78 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, died of a coronary occlusion in North Hampton, NH, July 30, 1954, aged seventy-seven years.

Deaths and Funerals. Mrs. Huntley Spaulding. NORTH HAMPTON – Funeral services are being planned for Mrs. Harriet M. Spaulding, wife of former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding of Rochester, who died Saturday at her summer home on Boar’s Head. A native of Boston, Mass., Mrs. Spaulding was the daughter of the late James and Lillian Mason, and was about 80. Death attributed to a heart attack (Portsmouth Herald, August 2, 1954).

Huntley N. Spaulding of 78 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, , a fibre products manufacturer, died of prostate carcinoma in Rochester, NH, November 14, 1955, at 10 AM, aged eighty-six years. (His sister, Mrs. Marion S. Potter, supplied information for the death certificate).

Huntley Spaulding, Ex-N.H. Governor, Native of Townsend. ROCHESTER, N.H., Nov. 14 (UP). Former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding died at his home here today. He was 86. Spaulding, the grand old patriarch of the G.O.P. in New Hampshire, served as Governor in 1927 and 1928. A brother, Rolland H., was Governor from 1915 to 1917. Huntley Spaulding was a wealthy leather manufacturer and philanthropist. In 1941 he gave the city of Rochester a $1,000,000 high school which bore his name. A native of Townsend, Mass., he was a leader in civic and state affairs here for more than half a century. He was president of the International Leather Company and the Atlas Leather Company. He was treasurer of the Spaulding Fiber Company, which has plants at Rochester, Dover and Tonawanda, N.Y. Spaulding was past chairman of the New Hampshire Board of Education and State Food Administrator and trustee of Lawrence Academy in Groton, Mass. He leaves a sister, Mrs. Marion Potter of Rochester (Boston Globe, November 14, 1955).

Vera G. Spaulding appeared in the Rochester directory of 1956, as the widow of Rolland H. Spaulding, with her house at 76 Wakefield street. Mrs. Marion Potter appeared as having her house at 78 Wakefield Street (i.e., the former Huntley N. Spaulding residence). Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre products, with their plant at Spaulding avenue in North Rochester. Its chairman and president was Charles C. Steck, of Tonawanda, NY; vice-president and secretary, Cecil M. Pike; vice-president and  treasurer Stephen E. Clow; and vice-president Ellis C. Knoblock.

At this time the Spaulding Fibre Company became part of a charitable trust Huntley and his only sister Marion S. Potter had set up to disperse their remaining wealth within 15 years of the last to die (Snyder, 2008).

Marion S. (Spaulding) Potter, last of the Spaulding siblings, died in Greenwich, CT, September 27, 1957, aged seventy-nine years.

Boston Woman Leaves $1 Million to U.S. Charities. Mrs. Marion S. Potter, Beacon Hill widow, left more than $1,000,000 to charity, according to a will filed in Suffolk Probate Court yesterday. Mrs. Potter, sister of two New Hampshire Governors (the Spauldings), died last Sept. 27 at the age of 79. The will, disposing of an estate estimated at several million dollars, included outright bequests of $745,000 to charities, and an additional $90,000 to relatives and the remainder will be held in to benefit United States organizations established exclusively for charitable, scientific, literary and educational purposes, according to the will. Largest single bequest was $250,000 to the Frisbie Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.H. (Boston Globe, October 4, 1957).

Spaulding Fibre Company outlived the Spauldings and continued under the management of their charitable trust.


References:

Anderson, Kendall (2021). Spaulding Fibre [Photographs]. Retrieved from www.invisiblethreads.com/galleries/spaulding-fibre/

Cusano, Tom. (2011, October 8). Spaulding Ave. Hydro Project, 2011. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTvpIDWcTtY

Find a Grave. (2017, January 2). Aldridge Custeau. Retrieved from https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/174776130/aldridge-custeau

Find a Grave. (2018, August 23). Marion Lucy Spaulding Potter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192498207/marion-lucy-potter

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Huntley Nowell Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42230637/huntley-nowell-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Rolland Harty Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42231184/rolland-harty-spaulding

Governor’s Inn. (2021). The Governor’s Inn. Retrieved from www.governorsinn.com//History.cfm

Harvard University. (2021). Remick v. J. Spaulding & Sons Co., 82 N.H. 182 (1926). Retrieved from cite.case.law/nh/82/182/

Smithsonian Institution. (2006). J. Spaulding & Sons Co. Retrieved from americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_1344802

Snyder, James M. (2016, April 23). Spaulding’s Fibre Counters (1915). Retrieved from www.paperboardpro.com/files/Spaulding_Fibre_Counters_Booklet.pdf

Snyder, James M. (2016, April 23). Spaulding Products for Industry (1953). Retrieved from www.paperboardpro.com/files/SpauldingProductsforIndustrycirca1953.pdf

U.S. Geological Survey. (1937). The Floods of March 1936: Part 1. New England Rivers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=YDiShfgiuP8C&pg=PA390

Wikipedia. (2020, June 13). Huntley N. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntley_N._Spaulding

Wikipedia. (2021, April 23). North Rochester, New Hampshire. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Rochester,_New_Hampshire

Wikipedia. (2021, March 3). Rolland H. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolland_H._Spaulding

Wikipedia. (2020, December 2). Spaulding High School (New Hampshire). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaulding_High_School_(New_Hampshire)

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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