Some Milton Three-Ponds Grocers, c1850-1923

By Muriel Bristol | June 27, 2021

Here is presented a sequence of Milton grocers active during the period 1850-1923. These were not the only grocers, grocery and general stores active in Milton during this period, nor are any Milton Mills grocers represented here. The Milton grocers are grouped together here because they form a sequence, in which each grocer appears to have succeeded another in time, although not always in the same buildings. (There were fires along the way).

The apparent succession of grocers included here are: Ezra H. Twombly, John E. Twombly, Looney & Avery, Looney & Downes, Amos M. Roberts, Looney & Roberts, Sunset Grocery (Carl E. Pinkham), and Sunset Grocery (Louis O. Stetson).

EZRA H. TWOMBLY – c1850-1867

Ezra H. Twombly was born in Milton, January 6, 1830, son of James M. and Eunice (Burrows) Twombly.

James Twombly, a farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eunice Twombly, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), Ezra Twombly, a trader, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Mary A. Twombly, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and John E.B. Twombly, aged fourteen years (b. NH). James Twombly had real estate valued at $3,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of George Worster, a machinist, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and Stephen Downs, a farmer, aged forty-one years (b. NH).

Ezra H. Twombly married in Dover, NH, March 5, 1855, Lucinda K. Hanson, he of Milton and she of Dover, NH. Rev. Lewis Howard performed the ceremony. She was born in Dover, NH, December 29, 1828, daughter of Israel and Eunice (Twombly) Hanson.

E.H. Twombly, a merchant, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (Milton P.O.) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Lucinda K. Twombly, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Isabel Twombly, aged four years (b. NH), and Susan A. Twombly, aged two years (b. NH), and, apparently, George A. Randall, aged ten years (b. NH), Charles E. Randall, aged nine years (b. NH), and E.F. Randall, aged six years (b. NH). E.H. Twombly had real estate valued at $3,500 and personal estate valued at $2,500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Benjamin Randall, a farm laborer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and W. Laskey, a laborer, aged thirty years (b. NH). (The household of Twombly’s father appeared further down the same page).

Ezra H. Twombly replaced James R. Palmer as Milton postmaster, April 12, 1861. (This was the same day that Fort Sumpter was attacked in Charleston harbor, which is generally regarded as the start of the Civil War).

Ezra H. Twombly was assessed for the wartime U.S. Excise Tax in 1862, 1863, and 1864.

E.H. Twombly of Milton was assessed $10.00 for being a retail dealer in the wartime U.S. Excise Tax of 1865. He was assessed also $1.00 for his gold watch. (A marginal note indicates that he paid the tax on August 29, 1865).

Ezra H. Twombly had received $178.43 in salary in 1865, with $195.88 due him.

E.H. Twombly of Milton was assessed $10.00 for being a retail dealer in the wartime U.S. Excise Tax of 1866. He was assessed also $1 for his gold watch, and $4.17 for being a five-twelfths of lawyer. One might take this to mean that he spent five-twelfths of his time being a lawyer, and seven-twelfths of his time operating in other fields of endeavor, such as being postmaster and a retail dealer.

Ezra H. Twombly, post-master, aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lucinda K. Twombly, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), Isabella Twombly, at home, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Susan A. Twombly, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). Ezra H. Twombly had real estate valued at $3,500 and personal estate valued at $385. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), and Charles L. Lord, a shoe cutter, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME).

Charles H. Looney succeeded Ezra H. Twombly as Milton postmaster, January 17, 1872.

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES. Strafford Co., N.H. The annual meeting was held at Dover, Dec. 22, when the following officers were elected: President, Luther Hayes of Milton; Vice Presidents, Elisha Lock of Barrington, and Joseph Nutter of Farmington; Treasurer, Stephen S. Chick of Great Falls; Secretary, Ezra H. Twombly of Dover (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), January 9, 1875).

NEW HAMPSHIRE. At the Strafford County Convention, holden at Rochester, Ezra H. Twombly of Dover was nominated tor register of deeds, John H. Leighton of Dover for county treasurer, and Colton H. Foss of Strafford for county commissioner (Boston Evening Transcript, January 21, 1875).

Ezra H. Twombly, a laborer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucinda K. Twombly, keeping house, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and his children, Isabel N. Twombly, works in millinery store, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Annette S. Twombly, a schoolteacher, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). They resided on Portland Street.

Ezra H. Twombly died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Dover, N.H., December 19, 1883, aged fifty-four years.

Death of Ezra A. Twombly of Dover. (Special Despatch to The Boston Globe.) Dover, N.H., December 13 – Ezra A. Twombly, clerk of the Common Council, was suddenly stricken down with apoplexy yesterday at 11.30 and died this morning. He was 56 years old, a greatly esteemed citizen, and a member of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias. He belonged to the mutual benefit societies of both and had other insurances, amounting in all to $5,000. He leaves a widow and one married daughter (Boston Globe, December 13, 1883).

Lucinda K. Twombly, a widow, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Helen I. Moulton, a widow, aged forty-four years (b. NH), and her grandchildren, Grace A. Moulton, at school, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Elizabeth A. Moulton, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Helen F. Moulton, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). Lucinda K. Twombly owned their house at 79 Portland Street, free-and-clear. Lucinda K. Twombly was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living; Hazel I. Moulton was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Helen I. Moulton, a widow, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Elizabeth Moulton, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), Helen F Moulton, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and her mother, Lucinda K Twombly, a widow, aged eighty-one years (b. NH). Helen I. Moulton rented their house at 79 Portland Street. Hazel I. Moulton was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living; Lucinda K. Twombly was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living.

Lucinda K. (Hanson) Twombly died of cardiac disease in Dover, NH, July 19, 1910, aged eighty-two years, six months, and twenty days.

DOVER DOINGS. Dover, July 20. – Mrs. Lucinda K. Twombly, one of the oldest residents of Dover, died on Tuesday at her home at 79 Portland street, aged 82 years, 6 months, 20 days. The deceased was the widow of the late Ezra Twombly. She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Helen L. Moulton of Dover; and three granddaughters, Miss Beth and Miss Helen Moulton also of this city, and Mrs. Samuel Smiley of Lowell, Mass. Mrs. Twombly had been a resident of Dover sixty-five years.

JOHN E. TWOMBLY – 1866-71

John E.B. Twombly was born in Milton, January 3, 1836, son of James M. and Eunice (Burrows) Twombly.

John E. Twombly of Milton was assessed $1.00 for his gold watch in the wartime U.S. Excise Tax of 1865. (A marginal note indicates that he paid the tax on September 11, 1865).

John E. Twombly of Milton was assessed $10.00 for being a retail dealer in the wartime U.S. Excise Tax of 1866. He was assessed also $1 for his gold watch.

John E. Twombly appeared in the Milton directories of 1867-68, 1868, and 1869-70, as a Milton merchant. His elder brother, Ezra H. Twombly, was postmaster and a justice-of-the-peace. (This is the period in which Charles H. Looney (see below) had his first grocery store experience working in “Twombly’s store” for two years).

John E. Twombly married in Somersworth, NH, July 29, 1868, Lydia Ann “Annie” Waterhouse, he of Milton and she of Dover, NH. He was a merchant, aged thirty-two years, and she was a lady, aged twenty-eight years. Rev. O. Jasper performed the ceremony. She was born in Strafford, NH, January 4, 1843, daughter of Benjamin F. and Lydia M. (Tuttle) Waterhouse.

John E. Twombly, a retail grocer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lydia A. Twombly, keeping house, aged thirty years (b. NH), Clarence E. Twombly, aged eleven months (b. NH), and Ora J. Downs, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). John E. Twombly had personal estate valued at $2,335. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of James W. Nutter, works in shoe factory, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and George W. Peavey, a physician, aged thirty-one years (b. NH).

John E. Twombly’s store (and his brother’s post-office within it) burned to the ground on Christmas Eve, December 24, 1870.

JE Twombly Store and POABOUT eleven o’clock P.M., December 24th, a fire broke out at Milton Three Ponds, N.H., in the store occupied by John E. Twombly as a grocery and dry goods store and post and telegraph offices, which was entirely destroyed (The Telegrapher, January 7, 1871).

Twombly’s house may be seen on the same 1871 map detail (prepared before the fire), six houses further north on the same river or pond side of the street as his store (indicated by a red arrow). He lived more or less across the street from the Academy, i.e., the Milton Classical Institute. Note too that the original train station (lower right) is on the other side of the river from the store. (The one depicted in the postcards would not be built until 1873).

John E. Twombly continued to appear in the Milton directories of 1871, and 1873, as a Milton merchant. (That might be true, but it is also true that it sometimes took a little while for directory publishers to awaken to realities on the ground). His elder brother, Ezra H. Twombly, was postmaster and a justice-of-the-peace.

John E. Twombly, a clerk in grocer’s store, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Lydia A. Twombly, keeping house, aged forty years (b. NH), Clarence E. Twombly, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), James F. Twombly, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), Mary F. Twombly, at school, aged six years (b. NH), Benjamin F. Twombly, aged two years (b. NH), and Edith G. Twombly, aged ten months (b. NH). They resided on Silver Street.

John E. Twombly died of a gastric tumor in Dover, NH, August 24, 1888, aged fifty-two years.

Lydia A. (Waterhouse) Twombly died in Roslindale, MA, July 16, 1916.

DEATHS. TWOMBLY – In Roslindale, July 16, Lydia A., widow of John E. Twombly. Funeral from her late residence, 205 Belgrade av., Roslindale, Tuesday, July 18, at 3 p.m. Burial at Dover, N.H. Dover, N.H., papers please copy (Boston Globe, July 17, 1916).

LOONEY & AVERY – 1871-81

Charles H. Looney replaced Ezra H. Twombly, as Milton postmaster, January 17, 1872.

In 1871 he engaged in the grocery business upon his own account in Milton, there conducted a flourishing trade until 1889, when he was appointed Deputy Collector of Customs for the Portsmouth district (Biographical Review, 1897). 

Looney & Avery appeared in the Milton directories of 1874, and 1875, as Milton merchants.

A more complete sketch Charles H. Looney may be found in Milton’s Collector Charles H. Looney (1849-1902). There were several Averys in town at the time, and little evidence with which to identify Looney’s partner. (He might have been best acquainted with Brackett F. Avery (1828-1911)).

LOONEY & DOWNS – 1881-89

Charles H. Looney and Hazen W. “Wesley” Downs formed a grocery partnership on Main Street in Milton in April 1881. (Competitor Joseph Willey planned to expand his offerings).

MILTON. Mr. Charles Looney has moved his goods and post office into Wentworth’s Block on Main St., with Mr. Wesley Downs, formerly of this [Farmington] place, and has put in a large lot of groceries and crockery ware, and is now ready to do business on the square. Joseph Willey is about to put in a stock of boots and shoes in connection with groceries and dry goods (Farmington News, April 29, 1881).

MILTON. W. Jones has opened a Watch and Jewelry Store on Main Street, formerly occupied by Charles Looney as Post-office (Farmington News, May 20, 1881).

Looney & Downes appeared in the Milton directories of 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, and 1889, as Milton merchants.

A more complete sketch Charles H. Looney may be found in Milton’s Collector Charles H. Looney (1849-1902); and a more complete sketch of Hazen W. “Wesley” Downs may be found in Milton Policemen – c1891-1914.

AMOS M. ROBERTS – 1889-93

Amos M. Roberts was born in Dover, NH, December 19, 1835, son of James C. and Lydia J. (Scates) Roberts.

Amos M. Roberts married in Milton, November 1, 1863, Clara M. Mathes, both of Milton. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-eight years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-four years. Rev. James Doldt performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, July 12, 1839, daughter of Robert and Mary (Moulton) Mathes.

Amos M. Roberts, works in shoe shop, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and his wife, Clara M. Roberts, boarding, aged forty years (b. NH), were boarders in the Farmington, NH, household of Daniel P. Cilley, a clergyman, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census.

Other Local Matter. Mr. Amos Roberts of this place has just been relieved of a dangerous cancer in the face (Farmington News, February 15, 1884).

LOCALS. Rev. W.E. Darling and wife, Mrs. Isaac Glidden, Mrs. G.N. Eastman, Mrs. Amos Roberts of Milton and Miss Lillian Wingate are spending a few days at Kennebunk, Me , enjoying the sea breezes (Farmington News, June 10, 1887).

LOCALS. Amos Roberts, of Milton, who formerly worked in [Farmington] town, has, with a Mr. Barrows, purchased the grocery business of Looney & Downs, and will attempt to scale the giddy heights of fortune from behind a counter (Farmington News, April 12, 1889).

Amos Roberts appeared in the Milton directories of 1892, and 1894, as a Milton grocer or merchant.

LOONEY & ROBERTS – 1893-02

Prior to leaving his Deputy Collector post at the U.S. Customs House in 1894, Charles H. Looney had entered into new a grocery partnership with Amos M. Roberts (the same grocer who had bought out Looney & Downs in April 1889) in 1893.

MILTON. Repairs are being made on the house lately purchased by Looney & Avery [Avery & Roberts] of Albert Downes (Farmington News, September 15, 1893).

This property had become available when Dorothy M. “Dora” (Tuttle) Downs divorced her husband, Albert F. Downs, March 8, 1893. At the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census, they had been enumerated in Milton 3-Ponds, next door to Horatio G. Wentworth’s hotel.

Here and There. Mrs. Amos Roberts, formerly resident in this [Farmington] village, is recovering at her home in Milton, from a sharp seizure of illness (Farmington News, October 26, 1894).

Charles H. Looney is here identified as being a partner in the grocery business, now called Looney & Roberts, and as being home sick with La Grippe, i.e., influenza.

MILTON. C.H. Looney of the firm Looney & Roberts, was confined to the house with an attack of the grip last week, and this week his partner A.M. Roberts is taking his turn (Farmington News, February 15, 1895).

MILTON NEWS LETTER. Mrs. A.O. Mathes and daughter, Miss Lura Mathes, of Dover, are visiting at the home of Amos Roberts (Farmington News, July 16, 1897).

Looney & Roberts appeared in the Milton directory of 1898 as Milton merchants.

MILTON. Mrs. James Gardner and Miss Hattie Moulton of Roxbury have been visiting their cousin, Mrs. Amos Roberts of this town, during the past week (Farmington News, April 7, 1899).

Amos M. Roberts, a storekeeper, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Clara M. Roberts, aged sixty years (b. NH), his mother-in-law, Mary S. Mathes, a widow, aged eighty-three years (b. NH), his aunt, Abby D. Jones, a widow, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), and his boarder, Thomas Kelly, a salesman in store, aged thirty-three years (b. MA). Amos M. Roberts owned their house in Milton Village, free-and-clear. Mary S. Mathes was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

AMOS M. ROBERTS – 1902-07

Amos M. Robert appeared in the Milton directories of 1901, and 1904, as a Milton merchant.

PERSONAL. Mrs. Amos Roberts of Milton and Mrs. Emmons Plummer of Concord and Milton were in [Farmington] town Friday of last week (Farmington News, August 9, 1901).

PERSONAL. Mrs. Amos Roberts of Milton and Miss Lura Mathes of Dover were in [Farmington] town Wednesday (Farmington News, July 18, 1902).

Clara M. (Mathes) Roberts’ brother, Albert O. Mathes, featured in the Milton Centennial celebration of August 1902. (See him also in Milton in the News – 1903).

Amos B. Roberts, a grocer, died of exhaustion in Milton, August 10, 1907, aged seventy-two years, two months, and three days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Clara M. Roberts, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her boarder, Ralph Frobisher, an engineering office draughtsman, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and his wife (of six months), Elva Frobisher, a private family servant, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Clara M. Roberts owned their house.

Malcolm A.H. Hart, a physician, aged fifty-eight years (B. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Estell L. Hart, aged fifty-six years (b. VT), his son, Ezra D. Hart, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his boarder, Clara M. Roberts, a widow, aged eighty years (b. NH). He owned his house on Lower Main Street, in Milton Village, free-and-clear. They appeared in the census enumeration between the households of Natt E. Young, a draftsman, aged forty-three years (b. ME), and Fred C. Downs, an ice company laborer, aged forty-two years (b. NH).

Harriet A. Lord, aged fifty-five years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Ernest A. Lord, aged seventeen years, and her boarder, Clara A. Roberts, aged ninety-two years. Harriet A. Lord rented their house on North Main Street, for $10 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Clara M. (Mathes) Roberts died of a cerebral hemorrhage on Main Street in Milton, June 8, 1931, aged ninety-one years, ten months, and twenty-six days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

LOCAL. Many friends of this community learn with deep regret of the death of Mrs. Clara Mathes Roberts of Milton. Mrs. Roberts, who was the widow of Amos Roberts, passed away at her home in that village a week ago last Sunday at the venerable age of nearly 92 years. She was the last of one of Milton’s oldest and most respected families and herself a generous and helpful contributor to every interest of the town and its general welfare. She will be fondly remembered as “Aunt Clara” by all who had the pleasure of her acquaintance. Especially active in church work since she was 16 years of age, in this institution she leaves imperishable monuments to her memory (Farmington News, [Friday,] June 19, 1931).

CARL EDWIN PINKHAM – c1908-16

Carl Edwin Pinkham was born in Milton, August 22, 1886, son of James D. and Sarah A. (McGonigle) Pinkham.

Carl E. Pinkham appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a groceries merchant on Main street, in the P.O. building, boarding at 6 Silver street. His father, James D. Pinkham, appeared as a newsdealer on Main street, with his house at 6 Silver street. Carl’s younger brother, Harold Pinkham, appeared as clerk at J.D. Pinkham’s, boarding at 6 Silver street.

Pinkham, CE - 1909

The Sunset Grocery Co. franchise in Lynn, MA, was organized March 30, 1910, and incorporated April 6, 1910. It issued 80 shares of stock at $25 apiece, raising a total of $2,000 (Wright & Potter, 1911).

James D. Pinkham, a newsdealer, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3 Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Sarah Pinkham, aged forty-five years (b. Ireland (Eng.)), and his children, Carl Pinkham, a grocery store merchant, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Harold Pinkham, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Sarah Pinkham was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. James D. Pinkham owned their house free-and-clear. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Fred Hartford, a barber (own shop), aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and Natt E. Young, an engineering office draughtsman, aged thirty-three years (b. ME) (he likely worked for Milton’s Hydraulic Engineer: I.W. Jones).

C.E. Pinkham appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as having a grocery store on Main street, near the post office.

In December 1912, Carl E. Pinkham added a Farmington, NH, store to his “chain” of existing grocery stores in Lynn, MA, and Milton. The description of his Farmington store and the goods on offer there likely serves to describe also his Milton store.

SUNSET GROCERY CO. This is the corner grocery store recently purchased from L.B. Foster by the above company and added to their rapidly growing chain of stores. Under the direction of the enterprising new proprietor, C.E. Pinkham of Milton, this store has assumed a most orderly and attractive interior. The goods are very neatly and artistically displayed and the new store is receiving a liberal and highly appreciated share of patronage. Many Christmas specials are being offered here at low prices. Among these are the famous “Angelus Brand” of canned goods, celery, cranberries, pop corn, nuts, fancy biscuit crackers, figs, dates and grapes. This is also the exclusive agency for the well-known “Meadow Gold” butter and eggs. The store is neatly kept and handsomely decorated and should not be forgotten when you make up the Christmas dinner list (Farmington News, [Friday,] December 20, 1912).

Personal. C.B. Tarbell, C.E. Pinkham, Herbert Willey, all of Milton, were in town Monday night and attended the regular meeting of Fraternal lodge, A.F. and A.M. (Farmington News, March 7, 1913).

Carl E. Pinkham joined with other Milton merchants, J.H. Willey and Fred B. Roberts, in organizing the Milton Factory Company, August 5, 1913. We might suppose that they intended to purchase a Milton factory.

Milton Factory Company – Principal place of business, Milton; incorporated, August 5, 1913; capital authorized, $5,000; par value, $50; capital issued, $4,950; debts due from corporation, $31.25; assets, debts due corporation, $173.97; description of assets, factory; treasurer, Carl E. Pinkham; directors signing return, Carl E. Pinkham, J.H. Willey, Fred B. Roberts (NH General Court, 1915).

Carl Edwin Pinkham married (1st) in Boston, MA, October 25, 1913, Maud Malpas Carter, he of Milton and she of Lebanon, ME. He was a merchant, aged twenty-seven years, and she was aged thirty-two years. Rev. Herbert S. Johnson performed the ceremony. She was born in Wilmington, MA, circa 1880, daughter of Fred M. and Barbara E. (Cole) Carter.

HONEYMOON ALL PLANNED. But Carl Pinkham of Milton, N.H., and Maud Carter of Maine Had Trying Time With Five-Day Law. Carl E. Pinkham’s experience in trying to be married Saturday night to Maud M. Carter became known at the Courthouse yesterday. He came from Milton, N.H., she from Lebanon, Me. They filed their marriage intention in the office of the Town Clerk at Milton, N.H., and thought that sufficed for them to be married in Boston. They came here Saturday afternoon with the purpose of being married by Rev. Herbert S. Johnson but they struck a snag in the law requiring them to live here five days before they could be married. Their honeymoon was all planned. It was suggested that a judge of the Probate Court might permit a waiver of the statutory provision relating to five days. They saw Edward McGlenen, city registrar, but he could not help them save by way of suggestion as to what they could do. They went to the home of Judge Grant of the Probate Court in the Back Bay. He told them that if Arthur W. Dolan, register of probate, could be found and they filed a petition asking for a waiver of the five-day period in a legal manner, he would issue a decree thereon. They then went in search of Mr. Dolan and found him at his home in Charlestown. In the pouring rain he came to the Courthouse at 8:30, accepted the petition which was made out in his office, and then the couple went back to Judge Grant, who issued the necessary decree. They then went to a minister and were married (Boston Globe, [Wednesday,] October 29, 1913).

West Milton. C.E. Pinkham and motor party from Milton village called on C.B. Canney last Sunday (Farmington News, September 18, 1914).

The Sunset Grocery Co. franchise in Lynn, MA, filed for bankruptcy in October 1914.

Business Troubles. Francis I. Folkins, treasurer of the Sunset Grocery Company, Lynn, has filed a petition in bankruptcy on behalf of the company. Liabilities, $4306; assets $2450 (Boston Globe, October 6, 1914).

GROCERIES AND FIXTURES. Will sell at public auction TUESDAY, Dec. 8, at 10:30 a.m., at 509 Essex st., Lynn (City Hall sq.), known as Sunset Grocery Co, large stock of groceries of best quality, Nat. cash register, tape attachment, 4-tub butter chest, McCaskey fleet register, meat refrigerator, computing, counter and platform scales, oak shelving and bins, oak and marble top counters, large safe, oil tank, lot of marble top meat tables, baskets, showcases, etc. lunch served at noon. By CHAS. A. LYONS, Auctioneer, Boston. Tel 1212 Brookline (Boston Globe, December 9, 1914).

LOCAL. E.W. Goodwin has concluded his duties in the Nutter market and went to Milton Saturday where he has a similar position in the Pinkham market (Farmington News, December 12, 1914).

Carl E. Pinkham appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as having “moved to Laconia.” Sunset Grocery Co. appeared as being at 45 Main street, with L.O. Stetson as its manager.

Carl Edwin Pinkham of 65 Lincoln street, Laconia, NH, registered for the WW I military draft in Laconia, NH, June 5, 1917. He was thirty years of age (b. Milton, August 21, 1886), married, and self-employed as a wholesale grocer (for which he claimed an exemption). He was tall, with a slender build, blue eyes, brown hair (slightly balding).

The Sunset Grocery Co. of Milton appeared in a New England business directory of 1920.

C.E. Pinkham, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Laconia, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Maude Pinkham, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA). C.E. Pinkham rented their house at 130 Pleasant Street.

Carl E. Pinkham and Maude M. (Carter) Pinkham divorced sometime between 1920 and 1924. Carl E. Pinkham of Boston, MA, sailed on the S.S. Governor Cobb from Havana Cuba, to Key West, FL, December 26, 1924. He is said to have moved to Miami, FL, in or around 1924.

Carl E. Pinkham married (2nd) in Broward County, FL, June 6, 1930, Emma Louise “Louise” Gillette. She was born in Jersey City, NJ, October 15, 1897, daughter of Arthur C. and Alida (Crampton) Gillette.

SPECIALIST HERE AT BEAUTY SALON. Mrs. Louise Pinkham, trained nurse who has studied with skin specialists in New York city during the past 10 years, is now connected with Mrs. Le-Lian Krumm’s Marinello beauty parlor, 147 N.E. First st., to give individual attention to the needs of patrons. Mrs. Pinkham is introducing the Rudemar line of cosmetics. She gives personal interviews and advice to patrons of the beauty parlor (Miami News (Miami, FL), January 22, 1931).

Pinkham, Louise - MN310125Carl E. (E. Louise) Pinkham appeared in the Miami Beach, FL, directory of 1934, as manager of M.B. Grocery Co., with his house at 1611 Michigan avenue, Apartment 23. The Miami Beach Grocery Co., Carl E. Pinkham, manager, operated at 1129-31 Lincoln road.

Personal Mention. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Pinkham are visiting his parents in Milton, N.H. (Miami Herald (Miami, FL), November 2, 1937).

Carl Pinkham, a realtor, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Miami, FL, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma Louise Pinkham, aged forty-two years (b. NJ). Carl Pinkham owned their house at 239 N.E. 14th Terrace, which was valued at $5,000.

Leave City. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Pinkham were guests at the Hotel President, New York, for a few days en route to Mt. Washington, N.H., for a summer vacation (Miami Herald (Miami, FL), July 26, 1940).

Personally Speaking. After an early summer sojourn in Bar Harbor Me., Mr. and Mrs. Carl E. Pinkham, 239 N.E. 14th ter., are visiting in Cleveland, Ohio. They plan to be gone until next month and will return home by airplane (Miami Herald (Miami, FL), 1946).

Miami Couple Buy Hampton Landmark. HAMPTON BEACH – Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Moulton announced today that they have sold the Ashworth Hotel here to a Miami, Fla., couple. The Moultons, who have owned and operated .the hotel for eight years, sold the 36-year-old structure to Mr. and Mrs. Carl Pinkham for $150,000. Formerly owned by the late George Ashworth, the hotel has 65 rooms, a dining room, banquet and a coffee shop. Pinkham is a former New Hampshire resident who has been a estate broker in Florida. The management of the hotel will change Sept. 15 (Portsmouth Herald, September 9, 1952).

HOOSIER BUYS GABLES APARTMENT Above six unit apartment house, located at 334 Madeira, in Coral Gables, was sold by Dave Friedlander to Orion E. Henderson, of Indianapolis, Ind. Building contains four two bedroom apartments and two efficiencies. Price was given as $57,500. Sale was handled by Harry Scoonover, of the Carl E. Pinkham real estate office. Financing was arranged through R. K. Cooper, Inc., mortgage bankers (Miami News (Miami, FL), May 3, 1953).

Carl Edwin Pinkham married (2nd) – again – in Hanover, NH, September 28, 1961, Emma Louise Gillette, both of 823 Capri Street, Coral Gables, FL. He was a divorced realtor, aged seventy-five years, and she was a registered nurse, aged sixty-three years. She was born in Jersey City, NJ, October 15, 1897, daughter of Arthur C. and Alida (Crampton) Gillette.

Carl E. Pinkham died in Milton, July 3, 1971, aged eighty-four years.

Death Notices. PINKHAM, CARL E., 84, of 629 Navarre Ave. July 3. Came to Miami in 1924 from Laconia, New Hampshire. He retired in 1969 as a Real Estate Broker, both in Coral Gables and Miami. A 32nd Degree Mason and a Shriner. Survived by his wife E. Louise Pinkham and a brother Harold B. of Milton, N.H. Repose 4.9 PM Mon. Services 3:30 PM Tues. VAN ORSDEL CORAL GABLES CHAPEL (Miami News (Miami, FL), July 5, 1971).

OBITUARIES. Carl E. Pinkham. MILTON – Committal services for Carl E. Pinkham of Coral Gables, Florida, were conducted at Prospect Hill Cemetery, Lebanon, Me., last Thursday, July 22. Pinkham, 76 [84], had died at his home in Milton, July 3. A former Milton resident and former owner of the Ashworth Hotel at Hampton Beach, Pinkham was a realtor and president of C.E. Pinkham and Co., Coral Gables. His family includes his wife, Mrs. Louise Pinkham of Cora Gables, and a brother Harold Pinkham of Milton. The Wilkinson-Beane Funeral Home of Laconia was in charge of local arrangements (Farmington News, July 29, 1971).

LOUIS O. STETSON – 1917-23

Louis O. Stetson was born in Piermont, NH, February 3, 1878, son of Henry F. and Jane A. (Goodwin) Stetson.

Piermont. Broad Road. We notice an account in the Evening Press of Laconia of the narrow escape of Louis O. Stetson, son of H.T. Stetson, of this town. He is employed as salesman in the store of O’Shea Brothers in that city and during a severe thunder storm went to the roof of the building to take in the flag, he secured it and scarcely a moment had passed when a deafening peal of thunder and a flash of lightning came splitting the flag pole from top to bottom and tearing up several feet of the slate roofing where he had stood but a few seconds before. He was a little weakened but not perceptibly stunned. Everyone is glad to hear of his escape from harm as he is a genial young man and a favorite in town (United Opinion (Bradford, VT), July 30, 1897).

Louis O. Stetson married in Piermont, NH, May 2, 1902, Bessie M. Drury, he of Piermont, NH, and she of Orford, NH. He was a butcher, aged twenty-four years, and she was a houseworker, aged eighteen years. Rev. W.S. Emery performed the ceremony. She was born in Worcester, MA, circa 1884, daughter of S.C. and Abbie (Evans) Drury,

Sunset Grocery Co. appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as being at 45 Main street, near the Milton depot, with L.O. Stetson as its proprietor. Louis O. Stetson appeared as proprietor of Sunshine Grocery Co. at 45 Main street, with his house at 8 Silver street.

Stetson, LO - 1917Louis Orin Stetson of Milton registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was forty years of age (b. February 3, 1878), married, and general manager of Sunset Grocery Co. of Milton. His nearest relative was [his wife] Bessie D. Stetson of Milton. He was of a medium height, with a medium build, gray eyes, and brown hair.

WOMAN’S CLUB NOTES. The newly elected officers of the Milton Woman’s club are as follows: President, Mrs. Ina W. Drew; first vice president, Mrs. Ruth Fall Plummer; second vice president, Mrs. Estelle Hart; recording secretary, Mrs. Gladys Huse; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Grace Dickson; treasurer, Sallie C. Avery; executive committee, Annie Hayes, Bessie Stetson, Mabel Burke; auditor, Mrs. Lucia C. Jones (Farmington News, May 2, 1919).

Louis O. Stetson, a retail grocer (owner), aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Bessie D. Stetson, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), and his son, Louis D. Stetson, aged fifteen years (b. NH). Louis O. Stetson rented their house on Silver Street in Milton Village. Their residence was enumerated between those of James D. Pinkham, a newstand owner, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and Frank L. Downs, the grammar school janitor, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH).

PIERMONT. Mrs. Louis Stetson left for her home in Milton Monday morning (United Opinion (Bradford, VT), March 4, 1921).

LOCAL. A fire at Milton village last week destroyed one of the old […], formerly the Amos Roberts store, now owned and occupied by Mr. Stetson, who at one time was connected with the [People’s] market of this village (Farmington News, July 20, 1923).

PIERMONT. Mrs. Louis Stetson of Milton is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.C. Drury (United Opinion (Bradford, VT), May 23, 1924)

Louis Stetson, a hotel room manager, aged sixty-two years (b. MA [SIC]), and Elizabeth Stetson, aged fifty-six years (b. MA), were two of the thirteen lodgers residing in the Boston, MA, household of William Bradford, a life insurance salesman, aged forty-one years (b. ME),at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. The Stetsons had resided in the “same place,” i.e., Boston, MA, in 1935.

Louis O. Stetson died in Woodsville, NH, November 18, 1963, aged eighty-five years.

Louis O. Stetson. Louis O. Stetson, 85, of Piermont, died at the Cottage Hospital in Woodsvllle, Monday evening, Nov. 18. He had been a patient at the hospital for the past four weeks. Mr. Stetson was born Feb. 3, 1878, son of Henry and Mary’ (Hooper) Stetson. Survivors include his wife, Bessie; son, Dale of New York City; a brother, Ernest of New London, N.H.; two grandchildren, Jerome and Nancy, and five great-grandchildren, also a nephew, Richard of New London, and cousins. Funeral services were held at his late home on Thursday, Nov. 21, at 1:30 p.m., with Rev. Theodore Ball of Piermont officiating. Interment was in Southlawn Cemetery in Piermont (United Opinion (Bradford, VT), November 22, 1963).

References:

Find a Grave. (2010, October 8). Louis Orin Stetson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/59780248/louis-orin-stetson

Find a Grave. (2017, February 12). Ezra H. Twombly. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/176270653/ezra-h-twombley

Find a Grave. (2017, September 17). John E. Twombly. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/183480194

Historic Kitchen. (n.d.). 1906: Tid-Bits from Town Talk. Retrieved from historiccookingschool.com/town-talk-flour-recipes/

NH General Court. (1915). Annual Returns of Corporations. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=_EcbAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA53

Sampson & Murdock. (1920). New England Business Directory & Gazetteer for 1920. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=AHQ1AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA374

Wright & Potter. (1911). Abstract of the Certificates of Corporations Organized Under the General Laws of Massachusetts, For the Year Ending November 30, 1910. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Wn9RAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA47

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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