Milton’s Hotel Milton, 1890-1915

By Muriel Bristol | December 12, 2021

The Milton Hotel stood on Toppan Street (now Tappan Court), at its then corner with Charles Street. It initially took its names from those of its proprietors or landlords and was known in succession as Drew’s, Ward’s, and Bodwell’s hotel. Later it would be known as either the Milton Hotel or the Hotel Milton.

Hotel Milton

The hotel was a many-gabled clapboard structure with a veranda on the second story as well as the first, and many shuttered windows. It must have seemed enormous to Louise [Bogan], with its endless rooms and stories and stairs, with chambermaids and waitresses and guests coming and going. Her memories begin with Bodwell’s and Milton (Frank, 1986).

The identified proprietors of the Hotel Milton during this period were Horace C. Drew, John E. Ward, Charles L. Bodwell, Harry C. Grover, and Charles A. Jeffery.

Horace C. Drew – 1890-1892

Horace C. Drew was born in Eaton, NH, July 17, 1849, son of Thomas and Sarah (Bryant) Drew.

Thomas Drew, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Middleton, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah Drew, keeping house, aged forty years (b. NH), Horace Drew, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. NH), Lucy A Drew, at home, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Benjamin Drew, a farm laborer, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Leander Drew, a farm laborer, aged twelve years (b. NH), Westley Drew, at home, aged eight years (b. NH), Livona Drew, at home, aged six years (b. NH), and Ellsworth Drew, aged six months (b. NH). Thomas Drew had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $632.

Horace C. Drew married in Ipswich, MA, March 24, 1873, Margaret E. Walker, he of Middleton, NH, and she of Ipswich, MA. He was a farmer, aged twenty-three years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. Thomas Moroney performed the ceremony. She was born in Ireland, May 23, 1853, daughter of John and Elizabeth “Elsy” (Black) Walker.

Horace Drew, a farmer, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Middleton, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Maggie E. Drew, keeping house, aged twenty-seven years (b. Ireland), and his child, Elizabeth S. Drew, aged six years (b. NH).

Horace Drew was identified as having been the builder of the Milton Hotel, circa 1890 (Farmington News, November 19, 1915).

MILTON. Geo. L. Plummer has sold his place on Toppan street to John H. Maddox. … Everett Webber’s house is well under way, the brick work completed, and operations are in progress on the frame. With this house, the one just being completed by Chas. Dyer, repairs on J.H. Maddox’s, grading around several buildings, including Drew’s hotel, and the work on the new road, the lower end of our village presents a busy appearance (Farmington News, May 23, 1890).

Twin sons Clifford T. and Clifton H. Drew were born in Milton, July 10, 1890. (Their father was said to be a Milton hotel proprietor).

MILTON. J.M. Carricabe and family are at Drew’s Hotel for a few weeks (Farmington News, August 1, 1890).

H. Drew - Milton 1892 (Detail)
Milton in 1892 (Detail). “H. Drew” on Toppan Street is indicated by the red arrow. “J.H. Maddox” was across the street, and the “Milton Mnfg. Co.” was along the river, just above the red arrow.

Horace Drew appeared in an 1891 State list of Milton hotels as landlord or proprietor of the Hotel Drew, i.e., the Hotel Milton. The Hotel Drew could accommodate up to eighty guests. It had a daily rate of $1 and a weekly rate of $5 (NH State Board of Agriculture, 1892).

Horace Drew apparently turned his hotel over to John E. Ward prior to February 1892 and instead took on the management of the Phoenix House hotel. E. Edgerly appeared in the Milton business directory of 1892, as proprietor of Milton’s Hotel Phœnix. Horace Drew appeared as its manager. (See also Milton’s Phoenix House, c1880-1908).

Subsequently, Horace C. Drew kept a farm in Middleton, NH – called the “Valley Farm” – from which he ran also a summer boarding house. (He appears to have catered there primarily to rusticators). Son John J. Drew were born in Middleton, December 18, 1893. (Their father was said to be a Middleton farmer).

LOCALS. Leslie Hurd was before Judge Tuttle Wednesday charged with shooting a Newfoundland dog belonging to Horace Drew. Hurd claimed that the shooting was done in self-defense. A fine with costs was found against Hurd, amounting to $16.82 (Farmington News, December 21, 1894).

(A Walter Leslie Hurd of Farmington, NH, died in Durham, NH, August 24, 1896, aged twenty-six years, when he was thrown from the seat of a heavy stone-laden wagon, which then ran over him).

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew, at his pleasant home on Silver street, has his usual number of summer boarders (Farmington News, August 27, 1897).

LOCALS. Horace Drew of Middleton has 33 boarders at his house for the summer season (Farmington News, August 12, 1898).

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has quite a large number of summer boarders (Farmington News, July 7, 1899).

MIDDLETON. Christmas trees were held at the homes of Horace Drew and J.M. Tufts. All report a good time (Farmington News, December 29, 1899).

MIDDLETON. Mrs. Horace Drew is sick with pneumonia, and other members of the family are reported ill (Farmington News, April 20, 1900).

Horace Drew, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Middleton, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Margaret E. Drew, aged forty-six years (b. Ireland), his children, Edwin C. Drew, a farm laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), William D. Drew, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Clifton Drew, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), Clifford Drew, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), John J. Drew, at school, aged six years (b. NH), and his boarders, Calvin Head, a teamster, aged forty years (b. NH), Fannie Head, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and George Willard, a farm laborer, aged seventy years (b. ME). Horace Drew owned their farm, free-and-clear. Margaret E. Drew was the mother of eight children, of whom six were still living.

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has his usual number of summer boarders (Farmington News, July 27, 1900).

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has had his usual number of guests at Valley Farm but they are now fast returning home (Farmington News, August 31, 1900).

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has returned from visit to Boston in very poor health. His son Edwin is suffering from a painful abscess on his arm and Willie from a lame hand. Much sympathy is felt for the family (Farmington News, November 13, 1903).

MIDDLETON. A number of Massachusetts people are boarding at Horace Drew’s (Farmington News, July 22, 1904).

MIDDLETON. Mrs. Horace Drew has a few summer boarders (Farmington News, June 9, 1905).

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew is confined to the house by illness. … Annual town meeting passed off quietly, republicans winning. Town clerk, Hiram S. Stevens; selectmen, Eli S. Moore, Charles Whitehouse, Horace Drew. Our opponents, after balloting for town clerk, realized they were defeated and quietly withdrew (Farmington News, March 12, 1909).

Horace Drew, a general farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Middleton, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Margaret M. Drew, aged fifty-four years (b. Ireland), and his children, Edwin C. Drew, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), Clifton T. Drew, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Clifton H. Drew, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and John J. Drew, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Horace Drew owned their farm, with a mortgage. Margaret E. Drew was the mother of nine children, of whom six were still living.

Margaret E. (Walker) Drew died of heart disease in Middleton, NH, September 20, 1911, aged fifty-eight years, three months, and twenty-eight days. E.C. Perkins signed the death certificate.

Local. Mrs. Horace Drew of Middleton passed away Wednesday morning. Funeral will be held Friday afternoon at the home (Farmington News, September 22, 1911).

Horace C. Drew died of chronic nephritis in Middleton, NH, September 23, 1911, aged sixty-two years, two months, and five days. J.A. Stevens, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Middleton. Entered in to rest September 20, after a long illness, Mrs. Maggie Drew, wife of Horace Drew, aged 58 years. Services were held at the home Friday under the direction of B.F. Perkins. Rev. Mr. Coleman spoke comforting words to the relatives. Saturday, Mr. Drew passed away and these two dear ones who had passed a long and happy life together were reunited in the “great beyond,” after brief separation. The funeral was held Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Drew were among our best townspeople and they will be sadly missed. One daughter, Mrs. Frank Leighton, and five sons, Edwin C., William D., Clifton, Clifford and John, are left to mourn the loss of father and mother in the short space of three days. There are eight grandchildren also, who grieve for them. The sympathy of the entire community is with them in their double bereavement. Mr. Drew is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Charles Leighton and Mrs. Frank Woodman, also three brothers, Benjamin, Wesley and Ellsworth, and numerous nephews and nieces. (Farmington News, September 29, 1911).

John E. Ward – 1892

John E. Ward was born in Calais, ME, June 27, 1843. His early life remains somewhat obscure.

John E. Ward married Charlotte Eva “Lottie” Todd. She was born in Topsfield, ME, May 25, 1852, daughter of Benjamin F. and Irene (Parker) Todd.

John E. Ward and his wife Eva left their home in nearby Barnstead, NH, to manage a Milton hotel in February 1892.

NORTH BARNSTEAD. We are sorry to learn of the departure of our neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. John Ward, who have gone to Milton to take charge of a hotel (Farmington News, February 12, 1892).

The new landlord became ensnared fairly quickly in New Hampshire’s “Healey System” of liquor enforcement. (See Milton Under “Semi-Prohibition” – 1855-02).

MILTON. Officer Rines made a raid last Saturday night on Mr. Ward’s hotel, and found evidence enough to convict him of selling liquor without a license. Mr. Ward was taken to the jail and kept there until Monday, when he had his trial. He was bound over to the superior court, which will meet at Dover in September, and held in $200 bonds (Farmington News, April 15, 1892).

Milton’s police department had been only recently established; this would have been one of their very first arrests. (See Milton Policemen – c1891-1914).

MILTON. A raid was made on Ward’s hotel some time ago and he was held under bonds for the September court. Mr. Ward continued the sale of liquor without a license and last week Thursday the state took the case in hand and carried Ward to Dover, where his trial was held. He paid a large fine and returned home (Farmington News, May 6, 1892).

SUPERIOR COURT. The grand jury in the United States court reported on Wednesday of last week a short list of indictments – John Ward, Milton; John Granger, Derry; W.J. Reynolds and B.F. Howard, Plaistow, all for selling liquor without paying special tax. Ward and Granger plead guilty and were fined $25 and costs. Maggie Morse of Hanover for sending a threatening postal card through the mails was also indicted. The balance of the indictments were not given out as the parties had not been arrested. The court was busy listening to arguments on various cases (Farmington News, May 20, 1892).

MILTON. Mr. Ward has closed the Drew hotel and has started a private boarding house (Farmington News, September 16, 1892).

John E. Ward appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1895, as a teamster, with his house on Main street, at its corner with Indigo Hill road.

Thomas F. Seward, a manufacturer, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a Barnstead, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Mary A. Seward, aged forty-five years (b. NH), his child, Alice M. Seward, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), his father-in-law, Orrin F. Chesley, a shoe laster, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), his mother-in-law (Chesley’s wife of forty-seven years), Lidean A. Chesley, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), his boarder, John Ward, a day laborer, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), and his servant (Ward’s wife of eighteen years), Eva Ward, a servant, aged forty-eight years (b. ME). Thomas F. Seward owned their farm, with a mortgage. They shared a two-family residence with the household of Harry F. Seward, a manufacturer, aged twenty-six years (b. NH).

John W. Cater, a general farm farmer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), May E. Cater, aged forty-six years (b. NH), and his servants, John E. Ward, a farm laborer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), and (Ward’s wife of thirty-one years,) Lottie E. Ward, a private family housekeeper, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME).

John E. Ward appeared in the Farmington, NH, directory of 1917, as keeping a lunch room at 8 Mechanic street, with his house there too. His was one of four lunch rooms listed in town that year.

John E. Ward, aged seventy-eight years (b. ME), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lottie E. Ward, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME). John E. Ward rented their house on Main Street.

John E. Ward appeared in the Farmington, NH, directories of 1921 and 1924, as having his house at 22 North Main street.

John E. and Lottie E. Ward resided finally at the Strafford County Farm, both moving there on February 29, 1924. They appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1924, as boarding at the County Farm.

John E. Ward of Farmington, NH, died of apoplexy, i.e., a stroke, on the Strafford County Farm, in Dover, NH, June 13, 1926, aged eighty-three years.

Dies in Dover. DOVER, N.H., June 15 – John E. Ward, 84, a native of Calais, Me., who came here in 1923 from Farmington, is dead. He leaves his wife (Boston Globe, June 15, 1926).

Lottie E. (Todd) Ward of Farmington, NH, died of chronic endocarditis on the Strafford County Farm in Dover, NH, January 5, 1932, aged seventy-nine years, seven months, and ten days.

Charles L. Bodwell – 1892-1904

Charles Linwood Bodwell was born in Acton, ME, April 26, 1858, son of John E. and Louisa J. (Goodwin) Bodwell.

Charles L. Bodwell married, probably in Sanford, ME, circa 1876, Etta Murray. She was born in Sanford, ME, May 17, 1857, only child of Edmund G. and Dorothy A. (Quimby) Murray. (During the Civil War her father had risen in the ranks from corporal to captain of the Eighth ME Volunteer Infantry. Later he was a York County deputy sheriff for twenty-eight years from 1870).

Edmond G. Murray, livery stable proprietor, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Sanford, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Dorcas [Dorothy] Murray, keeping house, aged forty-five years (b. ME), his son-in-law, Charles L. Bodwell, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), his daughter, Etta Bodwell, at home, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), his granddaughter, Mabel Bodwell, aged one year (b. ME), and his servants, George Russell, a servant, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), James Bean, a servant, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and Willie Merrill, a servant, aged seventeen years (b. ME). They shared a two-family residence with the household of Eliza Ricker, works in clothing house, aged forty-eight years (b. ME).

Charles L. Bodwell kept a billiards parlor and, evidently, a “drinking house” or saloon, in Sanford, ME, in the 1880s. He paid $108.28 in fines in York County, ME, in 1883 for being a “common seller,” i.e., a common seller of liquor; and he paid $174.59 in fines for maintaining a “drinking house” (ME Attorney General, 1883). These would have been violations of the so-called “Maine Law.”(See Milton Under “Semi-Prohibition” – 1855-02).

Father John E. Bodwell died in Acton, ME, December 28, 1884, aged sixty years.

C.L. Bodwell lost his billiards tables and furniture in one of a series of serious arson fires perpetrated in Sanford, ME, in April 1887.

Fire History. … 1887. April 16. Shortly before midnight a fire was discovered in the old bowling alley just below Hotel Hanson. The dwelling-house, stable and carriage-house adjoining were burned to the ground. Total loss, nearly 5,000. The house, owned by Mrs. David Welch, of Beverly, was only partially insured. William Merrill and Charles Ricker, occupants, lost considerable furniture. Captain Murray was also a loser by the destruction of the carriage-house. C.L. Bodwell lost billiard tables and other furniture (Emery, 1901).

The Captain Murray that lost his carriage house was Bodwell’s father-in-law. (Murray was also the local York County deputy sheriff). One might suppose that the Bodwell’s billiards tables occupied part of his father-in-law’s carriage house, which was proximate to Sanford’s Hotel Hanson.

AFTER THE FIRE BUGS. The Excitement Worked by Incendiaries in a Maine Town. Sanford, Me., April 25. The recent incendiary fires in this vicinity are causing widespread alarm. On the morning of the 16th inst., fire was discovered in Wilson’s skating rink building at Kennebunkport, spreading rapidly and resulting in the destruction of thirteen buildings. Prominent citizens have asked for an investigation of the cause of the lire, and a fire inquest will be held this week. The same evening fire broke out in the rear portion of Liberty Hall at Springvale, two miles distant from Sanford. Springvale has no fire apparatus. The Sanford Volunteer Fire Department quickly responded, but too late to be of any value. Liberty Hall, a two-story house, owned by Mrs. David Welch of Beverly, Mass., and a large barn, with almost the entire contents, besides a carriage house, were totally destroyed, while the Hotel Hanson, the fine residence of Mrs. Lewis B. Weeks and a large livery stable in the rear of Liberty Hall were all badly scorched. On Thursday at midnight the newly-erected buildings of Fred Sargent were laid in ashes. Parties returning from Sargent’s saw two men run away from the rear of Lewis Farwell’s buildings near the centre of the village, and it was found that an attempt to fire these buildings had been made. Friday morning J.F. Brooks found the woodshed adjoining his residence on Main street saturated with kerosene oil and a pile of shavings in close proximity. A committee appointed at a citizens’ meeting held in the Town Hall last Thursday evening have succeeded in raising about $800, and a hand engine will be purchased at once. It is proposed to send to Portland for a state detective to hunt up the rascally villains who have been the cause of so much devastation, and if caught they will be summarily dealt with (Boston Globe, April 26, 1887).

Daughter Flossie Bodwell was born in Somersworth, NH, February 4, 1890. (Her father was said to be a Somersworth hotel keeper). She died of cholera infantum in Somersworth, NH, September 16, 1890, aged seven months, eleven days. J.A. Hayes, M.D., signed the death certificate. (Her father was said to be a Somersworth landlord).

Charles L. Bodwell appeared in the Great Falls, [Somersworth,] NH, directory of 1892, as proprietor of the Granite State House hotel, on High street, [corner of Washington street,] with his residence there too. The Granite State House charged 40¢ per night or $1.50 per week in that year. The somewhat grander Great Falls Hotel charged 75¢ per night or $2.00 per week (B&M Railroad Co., 1892).

The Bodwells appear to have taken over the Hotel Milton in or after September 1892. E.M. Bodwell appeared in the Milton business directories of 1894, and 1898, as proprietress of the Milton Hotel. She advertised for a cook in 1896, and 1898.

Female Help Wanted. WANTED – First-class woman cook, will pay $1 per day if satisfactory. Milton Hotel, Milton, N.H. SuM (Boston Globe, June 21, 1896).

Daughter Mabel M. Bodwell married in Milton, November 25, 1896, Jesse W. Berry, he of Springvale, [Sanford,] ME, and she of Milton. He was a railroad brakeman, aged nineteen years, and she was a lady, aged eighteen years. Rev. F.E. Carver performed the ceremony. (Her father was said to be a Milton hotel proprietor).

MILTON NEWS-LETTER. A clam bake was given at Lake View cottage by Charles Bodwell of the Milton House, Sunday (Farmington News, August 20, 1897).

Female Help Wanted. WANTED – First-class cook at once, dollar a day. Milton Hotel, Milton, N.H. 2t Jy20 (Boston Globe, July 20, 1898).

Charles Bodwell, a hotel keeper, aged forty-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Etta M. Bodwell, aged forty-two years (b. ME), and his son, Linwood C. Bodwell, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). Charles Bodwell rented their house; Etta M. Bodwell owned their farm, free-and-clear.

The resident staff were Cecil Fritts, house cook, aged twenty-five years (b. MI), Alice Donahue, table girl, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), Annie Marshall, kitchen girl, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Daniel Lockhart, hostler, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), William Perkins, teamster, aged forty-four years (b. NH), Frank Pray, farm laborer, aged forty-five years (b. MA), and Jonas L. Smith, a house painter, aged forty-three years (b. NH).

(The house cook, Miss Cecil Fritts, appeared next in the Durham directory of 1902, as the resident housekeeper at the University of New Hampshire’s Demeritt Hall).

The hotel boarders were Agnes Smith, [immigrated in 1875, wife of house painter Jonas L. Smith (for eleven years), and mother of one child, of whom one was still living,] aged thirty-nine years (b. Ireland), John L. Smith, aged two years (b. NH), John Pass, a house painter, aged fifty-four years (b. England (immigrated 1850)), Herman Dyer, a leather-board operative, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Thomas B. Smith, a day laborer, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and Charles H. King, a paper mill operative, aged forty-four years (b. Canada (Fr.)).

(Hotel guest Herman C. Dyer would die in Rochester, NH, in 1904 in a fall from a train).

Future Poet Laureate Louise B. Bogan (1897-1970), lived as a child in the Hotel Milton for two or three years from 1901.

Here, in The Hotel Milton, run by Charles Bodwell and his two sons, and familiarly known as Bodwell’s – a name that fascinated the four-year-old Louise – the Bogan family spent the next two or three years. Louise shared a room with her mother, while Daniel and Charles presumably shared another. The hotel faced both the Caricade [Carricabe] Paper Mill and the old flume, a mile-long stretch of very rapid white water dropping nearly a hundred feet over a rocky series of falls.
B&M RR Station - 1905 - AJ Cate (Detail)The Hotel Milton sent a horse-drawn carriage to meet passengers at the train station, and Louise remembered riding in this carriage the day she and her mother arrived, and seeing the name of the town set in coleus and begonia beds as they rode into Milton. In the distance she saw a “long high blue mass … above the trees.” “Is it the sea?” she asked her mother. “No, it is the mountains” (Frank, 1986).

E.M. Bodwell appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, and 1904, as proprietress of the Milton Hotel.

MILTON. Caleb Page, clerk at the Milton House, has moved into the house on Main street owned by Charles Wentworth. Charles Bodwell, proprietor of the Milton Hotel, has made an addition to his house. He is also making repairs on his stables (Farmington News, September 27, 1901).

(Charles H. Page had appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a clerk at the Phoenix House hotel, on Main street, with his house in Matthews court. In the Milton directory of 1902, he appeared as a clerk at the Milton House hotel, with his house at Lower Main street).

Milton Hotel - Adv - Bodwell - 1902Charles L. Bodwell, had a Class 1 State liquor license for the Milton Hotel in 1903. A Class 1 license permitted sales to hotel guests only. (See Milton Under “Local Option” – 1903-18).

Police Court. Sheriff George W. Parker of Dover arrived in town Saturday noon, having in charge John A. Riley and John Comer of Lynn, Mass., who were accused of the larceny of thirty dollars or more from George Duprey of Milton. It is alleged that the two men under arrest, employed for a short time in Milton, and boarding at the Milton hotel, learned that Duprey had some money secreted in his room, and that as soon as he left the room, Wednesday of last week, they entered it, broke open his trunk, and took from it one of the little bank safes given to bank depositors, in which Duprey had put savings amounting to about fifty dollars, inclusive of three ten-dollar bills. The accused left Milton on the next train and were found in Pittsfield, Friday, by the sheriff. They were taken to Dover for the night, and were taken to Farmington the next morning, this being the police court nearest to Milton. The accused were arraigned Saturday afternoon Saturday afternoon before Judge Waldron, with Frank E. Blackburn, Esq., of Dover, attorney for the state. Witnesses examined were George Duprey, Charles L. Bodwell of the Milton hotel, and Stephen G.C. Wentworth of Rochester, and Riley and Comer spoke for themselves. The arrested men were held for hearing at the forthcoming term of the superior court at Dover, with bonds of $1000. No sureties appearing, they were taken to Dover to await the third Tuesday of September. It is said, in the evidence presented in the local court, that whereas Comer was destitute upon his arrival in Milton, he showed a roll of bills, among which were three tens, as he was about to leave town, yet there was given no reasonable explanation as to how he became possessed of such a sum of money in so short a time. Much sympathy has been expressed for Mr. Duprey in his loss of his savings (Farmington News, August 14, 1903).

The Bodwells advertised for an experienced hotel waitress in both 1903, and 1904.

FEMALE HELP WANTED. TABLE GIRL – Wanted, experienced table girl; permanent position and good wages. Milton hotel, Milton, N.H. (Boston Globe, December 27, 1903).

MILTON. Landlord Bodwell served an oyster supper to an out-of-town sleighing party last Tuesday night (Farmington News, January 29, 1904). (See Milton Mills Oyster Fritters Recipe of 1895).

FEMALE HELP WANTED. Wanted – Experienced table girl; permanent position and good wages. Milton Hotel, Milton, N.H. (Boston Globe, March 13, 1904).

MILTON. Julius Smith has moved from Church street into one of the houses owned by C.L. Bodwell, in Charles street (Farmington News, April 1, 1904).

(Julius L. Smith had appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a painter at the Milton Hotel, with his house on Mill street, near South Main street).

Son Edward M. Bodwell married in Portsmouth, NH, April 12, 1904, Flora Miner, both of Portsmouth, NH. He was aged eighteen years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. Thomas Whiteside performed the ceremony. (His father was said to be a Milton hotel proprietor).

The Bodwells appear to have sold out in or around 1904. C.L. Bodwell appeared still in the Milton business directory of 1905-06 as proprietor of the Milton Hotel. (This was likely no longer the case).

Mother Louisa J. (Goodwin) Bodwell died in Springvale, [Sanford,] ME, April 29, 1908, aged seventy-eight years.

Charles L. Bodwell appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a farmer, with his house on South Main street, near Toppan street. Mrs. Etta M. Bodwell appeared at the same address, as did their son, Linwood C. Bodwell, a paper mill employee, who boarded with them.

Son Linwood C. Bodwell married (1st) in Milton, February 5, 1910, Myrtle G. Schofield, both of Milton. He was a laborer, aged twenty-one years, and she was aged fifteen years. Rev. John T. Clow performed the ceremony. (His father was said to be a Milton farmer).

Charles Bodwell, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-three years), Etta M. Bodwell, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), and his servant, Frank Pray, a shoe factory bottomer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH). Charles Bodwell owned their farm, free-and-clear. Etta M. Bodwell was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

Mother-in-law Dorothy A. (Quimby) Murray died of apoplexy, i.e., a stroke, in Springvale, [Sanford,] ME, September 20, 1912, aged seventy-seven years, and twenty-one days.

Charles L. Bodwell died of chronic nephritis in Milton, May 5, 1913, aged fifty-five years, and nine days. He had been a Milton resident for twenty years. His occupation was given as “hotel,” i.e., a hotel keeper or hotelier. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Murray, EG - BG010218Edward G. [Edmund G.] Murray, a boarding stable liveryman, aged eighty-six years (b. ME), headed a Sanford, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Etta M. Bodwell, a widow, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), and his lodger, William Temple, a worsted mill weaver, aged fifty-one years (b. ME). Edward G. Murray owned their house, with a mortgage.

Edmund G. Murray died in Springvale, [Sanford,] ME, September 28, 1925.

Etta M. (Murray) Bodwell died in Springvale, [Sanford,] ME, December 30, 1928.

Harry C. Grover – 1904-1909

Harry Curtis Grover was born in Barrington, NH, May 5, 1872, son of Walter and Fannie S. (Young) Grover.

Harry C. Grover married (1st) in North Berwick, ME, December 28, 1898, Augusta B. Grover, he of Barrington, NH, and she of North Berwick, ME. He was a traveling man, aged twenty-five years, and she was aged twenty-five years. Rev. Fred W. Keene performed the ceremony. She was born in North Berwick, ME, February 8, 1872, daughter of Charles H. and Jennie M. (Littlefield) Grover.

Charles Grover, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. ME), headed a North Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-six years), Jennie Grover, aged sixty years (b. ME), his daughter, Augusta B. Grover, (married two years), aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), his son-in-law, Harry C. Grover, a painter, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his boarders, Walter S. Grover, a shoemaker, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), Gertrude E. Cate, at school, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Christopher Buffum, aged ninety-one years (b. ME). Charles Grover owned their farm, free-and-clear. Jennie Grover was the mother of four children, of whom one was still living.

Augusta B. (Grover) Grover died of consumption in North Berwick, ME, November 26, 1902, aged thirty years, eight months, and sixteen days.

Harry Grover married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, March 23, 1904, Mary F. (Emerson) Wilbur, he of North Berwick, ME, and she of Rochester, NH. He was a widowed painter, aged thirty years, and she was also widowed, and at home, aged thirty-two years. Rev. Henry A. Blake performed the ceremony. She was born in North Wakefield, NH, circa 1874, daughter of Daniel and Adelia (Suggell) Emerson.

The Milton Hotel passed to the proprietorship of Harry C. Grover and his second wife, Mary F. ((Emerson) Wilbur) Grover, sometime after their March 1904 wedding. (The newspapers of 1915 seemed to think that it was she that owned the hotel). Harry C. Grover had both Class 1 and Class 3 State liquor licenses for the Milton Hotel in 1905-06, and in 1906-07.

Dr. M.A.H. Hart had the victim of a slashing attack brought by improvised stretcher to a room in the Milton Hotel in June 1907. (See Milton’s Murderous Lover – 1907).

NEW DURHAM RIDGE. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Grover of Milton were at Edwin Young’s Sunday (Farmington News, July 19, 1907).

(Edwin R. Young was Harry C. Grover’s cousin on his mother’s side. In 1910, Young and his wife owned a farm on the Ridge Road in New Durham, NH).

Hotel Milton - 1909
Milton Hotel Advertisement – 1909

The Milton business directory of 1909 located the Milton Hotel at Toppan street, corner of Charles. (The H.C. Brown in the advertisement of that year was an error for H.C. Grover). Grover’s father, Walter S. Grover, was employed and resident there too.

NEW DURHAM RIDGE. Walter Grover and Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Grover of Berwick have been guests at E.R. Young’s (Farmington News, June 25, 1909).

The Grovers seem to have been omitted from the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census.

Harry C. Grover appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1912, as a purveyor of automobiles, supplies and repairs at 264 Central avenue, with his residence at 30 Sixth street. He was manager or owner of Wentworth’s Automobile Station.

Wentworth's Automobile Station - Dover - 1912His father, Walter S. Grover, appeared also in the 1912 directory, as an auto repairer, boarding at 30 Sixth street. He died of a cerebral hemorrhage at 30 Sixth Street in Dover, NH, September 26, 1912, aged sixty-seven years, one month, and eleven days. J.H. Richards, M.D. signed the death certificate.

Many Autoists Fined at Newburyport. NEWBURYPORT, Sept. 13 – Harry C. Grover of Dover, N.H., E.H. Penobscot of Topsfield, W.A. Morse and Herbert S. King of Lynn, William S. Hall of Methuen and H.E. Tobyne of Haverhill, automobilists, were each fined $5 in Police Court here today on complaints charging that they neglected to give proper warning in approaching intersecting streets in Rowley, where the view is obstructed. Seventeen others charged with the same offense were called and defaulted. A complaint against John S. Suckling of Boston was filed (Boston Globe, September 14, 1916).

Harry Curtis Grover, of 534 Central Avenue, Dover, NH, aged forty-five years, registered for the WW I military draft there, September 12, 1918. By way of occupation, he kept a public auto. Mary F. Grover was his nearest relation. He was tall, with a medium build, and had blue eyes and brown hair.

Harry C. Grover, runs auto, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary F. Grover, aged fifty years (b. NH), and his roomers, James Garmon, a druggist, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Agnes Garmon, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Shermon Avery, a navy yard laborer, aged twenty-one years (b. RI), Peter Johnson, a railroad brakeman, aged twenty-five years (b. US), Helen Johnson, a navy yard bookkeeper, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), David Snow, a shoe shop cutter, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Harry Bodgers, a shoe shop foreman, aged thirty years (b. NH), and Lestley Wilkins, a barber, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Harry C. Grover rented their house at 534 Central Avenue.

BUILDING UNDER WAY AT YORK. York Beach, Me., July 3 – Considerable building is now under way and has been completed in York. A number of important real estate deals have also been closed and considerable valuable property has changed hands. The Andover and Lawrence property on Long Beach has been purchased by Harry C. Grover of Dover from Mrs. Marietta Perkins. Mr. Grover has also purchased the Sea View property. He has made a of improvements on the Andover, [and] Lawrence property, which is located on the Ocean front on Long Beach (Portsmouth Herald, July 3, 1928).

Harry C. Grover, an antique furniture dealer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a York (“York Beach Village”), ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary F. Grover, aged fifty [sixty] years (b. NH), and his servant, Louise Vigent, a housemaid, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME). Harry C. Grover owned their house on Long Beach Avenue, which was valued at $30,000. They had a radio set.

PERSONALS. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Grover of York Beach are among the Maine visitors in St. Petersburg, Fla. (Portsmouth Herald, April 18, 1931).

YORK NEWS. York, May 1 – Mr. and Mrs. Harry Grover have returned to their home, “The Andover & Lawrence,” at Long Beach avenue (Portsmouth Herald, May 2, 1933).

YORK. The family of Harry Grover of York Beach has gone to St. Petersburg, Fla., for the winter months (Portsmouth Herald, December 11, 1933).

C. Harry Grover, a boarding house owner-manager, aged sixty-seven years, headed a York, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary F. Grover, aged seventy-two years. C. Harry Grover rented their apartment.

Mrs. Mary F. ((Emerson) Wilbur) Grover died in Coatesville, PA, November 1, 1940, aged seventy-three years.

York Beach Woman Dies In Pennsylvania. Coatesville, Pa., Nov. 1 (AP) – Mrs. Mary F. Grover, 73, of York Me., died in Coatesville hospital today of injuries suffered in an automobile accident a week ago while she was en route to Florida with husband, Harry. The husband, a patient in the hospital, is recovering from his injuries. The Grover car and an ice truck were in collision (Portsmouth Herald, November 1, 1940).

Harry C. Grover died in Berwick, ME, January 3, 1951, aged seventy-eight years.

Deaths and Funerals. Harry C. Grover. Harry C. Grover, 78, of York Beach died yesterday in a Berwick home for the aged where he been a patient for the past two months. He was born in Barrington, May 5, 1872, the son of Walter S. Grover and Fannie Young Grover. Mr. Grover had been in business in Dover for 20 years and in Florida. He is survived by six cousins, Perley Kenniston of Dover, Mrs. Mertie Mattox of Rollinsford, Charles S. Young of Rollinsford, Fred L. Young of Manchester, Herman E. Young of Haverhill, Mass., and Mrs. Helen Stein of Massachusetts (Portsmouth Herald, January 4, 1951).

Charles A. Jeffery – 1910-1913

Charles Ashburn Jeffery was born in Port Maitland, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada, May 30, 1871, son of John N. and Eunice (Frost) Jeffery.

John N. Jeffery, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. N.S.), headed a Salmon River, Digby, Nova Scotia, household at the time of the Canadian Census of 1891. His household included his wife, Eunice Jeffery, aged fifty-five years (b. N.S.), and his children, Charles Jeffery, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. N.S.), and Blanche Jeffery, aged twelve years (b. N.S.). They were Baptists.

Mother Eunice (Frost) Jeffrey died in Maitland, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada, August 12, 1893. Father John N. Jeffrey died in Maitland, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada, December 10, 1902.

Charles A. Jeffery appeared in the Somerville, MA, directory of 1905, as a painter at 1 Union sq., boarding at the Union sq. hotel. The Union Square Hotel was situated at 45 Union square.

Charles A. Jeffre appeared in the Somerville, MA, directory of 1907, as proprietor of the Union Square Hotel, residing there too. Son Charles A. Jaffery, Jr., was born in Boston, MA, March 26, 1908. (His father was said to be a Boston hotel keeper).

Charles A. Jeffery married in Boston, February 9, 1909, Leona G. “Leonora” Coyne. He was a painter, aged thirty-five years, resident at the Hotel Bowdoin; and she was a waitress, aged twenty-three years, resident at 45 Bowdoin Street. Rev. J.M. Foster performed the ceremony. She was born in St. Paul, MN, November 20, 1889, daughter of Patrick J. and Delia B. “Bridget” (King) Coyne.

The Jeffreys relocated to Milton prior to August 1909. Son Robert E. Jaffery was born in Milton, NH, August 7, 1909. (His father was said to be a Milton hotel keeper).

Charles A. Jeffery, a hotel landlord, aged thirty-seven years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census (April 1910). His household included his wife (of three years), Leona G. Jeffery, aged twenty-one years (b. MN), his children, Charles Jeffery, aged two years (b. MA), and Robert Jeffery, aged eight months (b. NH). Charles A. Jeffery was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated to the U.S. in 1893. Leona G. Jeffery was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

The resident staff were Harry Morgan, a hotel coachman, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Patrick Grimes, a hotel bartender, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), James DeRosa, a hotel laborer, aged seventy-two years (b. CT), and Mary Berry, a hotel servant, aged twenty-two years (b. Ireland (Eng.)). The cook likely lived offsite.

The hotel boarders were Albert LaChance, a leather-board mill helper, aged twenty-seven years (b. Canada (Eng.)), Russell Scruton, a leather-board mill laborer, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Fred Cumpston [?], a leather-board mill laborer, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), and George [Greek surname not listed], a shoe shop buttoner, aged thirty years (b. Greece).

The census taker enumerated the hotel and its occupants between the households of Louis J. Marshall, Jr., a leather-board mill laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and Arthur Marshall, a barber, aged thirty-seven years (b. Canada (Eng.)).

News articles from several years later mention the head-shaking detail that the Hotel Milton had been undercut economically around 1910-11 by a Town “No-License” vote, i.e., a vote cancelling all the town hotel liquor licenses. That would have closed its saloon bar, making it more difficult at the margin, if not impossible, for the hotel to sustain itself. Poor Jeffery had owned the hotel outright in 1910, but he would have now had to take on debt in order to stay afloat. (See also Milton Under “Local Option” – 1903-18).

Jessie B. Jeffrey was born in Newton, MA, August 27, 1910. (Her father was said to be a Milton hotel keeper).

Chas. A. Jeffrey appeared in the Milton business directory of 1912, as proprietor of the Milton Hotel, at Toppan, cor. Charles. But not for long: he would have soon to lay off its staff and close its doors.

Charles A. Jefferies tried to sell the Hotel Milton in May 1913. He claimed it was still paying, but he said also that he had the customary “good reasons” to sell.

BUSINESS CHANCES. HOTEL FOR SALE. 35 ROOMS with all modern improvements, livery connected, doing a paying business; good reasons for selling. Apply to CHAS. A. JEFFRIES, Hotel Milton, Milton, N.H. (Boston Globe, May 25, 1913).

The Milton Hotel thereupon closed and remained unoccupied for over a year, i.e., from 1913 or 1914. The Jeffreys moved away. Son Richard T. Jeffrey was born in Hudson, MA, October 26, 1914. (His father was said then to be a Hudson hotel keeper). The Milton Hotel passed into the hands of the Strafford National Bank of Dover, NH.

Charles A. Jeffrey appeared in the Hudson, MA, directory of 1915, as proprietor of the Sherman House hotel at 144 Main street, with his residence there too.

Charles A. Jeffery appeared belatedly in the Milton directory of 1917, as having “moved to Mass.” Son Arthur E. Jeffery was born in Somerville, MA, October 10, 1917.

Charles Jeffery, a painter, aged forty-eight years (b. Nova Scotia), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lenora Jeffery, aged thirty-one years (b. MN), and his children, Charles A. Jeffery, aged eleven years, nine months (b. MA), Robert E. Jeffery, aged ten years, three months (b. NH), Jessie F. Jeffery, aged nine years, three months (b. MA), Richard T. Jeffery, aged five years, two months (b. MA), Arthur E. Jeffery, aged two years, two months (b. MA), and Alice G. Jeffery, aged two months (b. MA). Charles Jeffrey rented their house at 147 Albion Street. He was an alien, i.e., a resident alien, having immigrated in 1892; she too was classed as an alien, evidently due to her marriage to an alien, as she was a native of Minnesota.

Jeffrey, CA and Lenora - SomervilleCharles A. Jeffray, a master house painter, aged fifty-eight years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Leonora G. Jeffray, aged forty-one years (b. MN), and his children, Charles A. Jeffray, a house painter, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), Robert E. Jeffray, a meat market salesman, aged twenty years (b. NH), Jessie F. Jeffray, a safety razor factory inspector, aged nineteen years (b. MA), Richard T. Jeffray, a telegraph office messenger, aged fifteen years (b. MA), Arthur E. Jeffray, aged twelve years (b. MA), Alice G. Jeffray, aged ten years, Eunice E. Jeffray, aged six years (b. MA), Donald W. Jeffray, aged two years (b. MA), and John D. Jeffray, aged five months (b. MA). Charles A. Jeffray owned their house at 129 Albion Street, which was valued at $12,500. They had a radio set.

Leonora Gertrude Jeffrey (nee Coyne) petitioned for naturalization in Boston, MA, September 28, 1938. She gave her own birth information – St. Paul, MN, November 20, 1889 – and that of her eight children. She noted that “I have not acquired any other nationality by affirmative act.” Her petition was granted and she took an oath of allegiance May 29, 1939.

Charles A. Jeffrey, aged sixty-eight years (b. Nova Scotia), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Leonora G. Jeffray, aged fifty-one years (b. MN), and his children, Arthur E. Jeffray, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), Alice G. Jeffray, aged twenty years, Eunice E. Jeffray, aged sixteen years (b. MA), Donald W. Jeffray, aged twelve years (b. MA), and John D. Jeffray, aged twn years (b. MA). Charles A. Jeffrey owned their house at 129 Albion Street, which was valued at $3,000.

Charles A. Jeffrey died in Somerville, MA, July 19, 1942.

DEATHS. JEFFREY – In Somerville, July 19, Charles A., husband of Leonora (Coyne) Jeffrey. Services at the residence, 129 Albion St., Somerville, Wednesday, July 22, at 2:30 p.m. (Boston Globe, July 17, 1942).

Mother-in-law Delia B. (King) Coyne died in Cambridge, MA, April 4, 1944.

Leonora G. (Coyne) Jeffery died in Somerville, MA, April 1, 1978.

DEATHS. JEFFREY – In Somerville, April 1, Leonora G. (Coyne) Jeffrey, wife of the late Charles A. Jeffrey, Sr. Mother of Arthur E. of Somerville, Alice G. McLellan and Eunice Stockbridge of Stoneham, Donald W. of Holliston, John D. of Woburn and the late Charles A., Jr., Robert E. and Richard T. Jeffrey and Jessie Spencer, also survived by 20 grandchildren and 8 great grandchildren. Funeral from the Daniel F. O’Brien Funeral Home, 2 Benton Rd., at Summer St., SOMERVILLE, Tuesday at 9 a.m. Funeral Mass at St. Catherine’s Church at 10 a.m. Relatives and friends invited. Visiting hours Sunday 7-9, Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. (Boston Globe, April 3, 1978).

Strafford National Bank – 1914-1915

Here endeth the Hotel Milton, burnt in a multi-building fire that originated in a neighbor’s barn. The whole southern end of town was threatened, until the fire crew from the Dawson Manufacturing Company, i.e., the Milton Leather-Board Company, and their “force pump” contained the fire. Their “force pump” was likely a horse-drawn hand-tub fire engine.

MILTON, N H. LOSS $10,000. Hotel and Dwelling Go – Others Damaged – Doors of Barn in Which Fire Started Found Locked. Special Dispatch to the Globe. MILTON, N.H., Nov. 11 – The large Hotel Milton, its outbuildings, including a commodious stable, the home of Charles Ricker and a barn owned by Edward Bodwell were destroyed by fire and several houses damaged early this evening. The town was threatened with one of the worst fires for years and at one time the entire lower part of the town was in danger. Milton has no fire protection and it was only through the kindness of the Dawson Manufacturing Company in extending the use of its force pump, also the absence of wind, that the flames were controlled. The fire originated in Edward Bodwell’s barn on Charles st. near the hotel, and was discovered about 6 p.m. by James Miller and Thomas Pinkham. The cause of the fire is a mystery, as the doors were locked and no one had been in the building during the day. The hotel is one of the oldest landmarks in town, formerly owned by Mrs. Harry Grover of Dover, but now by the Strafford National Bank of Dover. It was unoccupied, having been so since the town voted no-license, four years ago. Scott Dore, a fire fighter, fell 25 feet from the roof of Stephen Dixon’s residence to the ground, receiving many bruises and a bad shaking. The total damage is estimated at about $10,000. The loss on the hotel property is about $9000, insured; on Bodwell barn, $200, insured; Charles Ricker’s residence, $200, insured: Stephen Dixon’s house, $100, insured; houses of George Greenwood and Fred Welch, $100, insured. Charles Varney lost $100 worth of hay in Bodwell barn. The hotel will not be rebuilt (Boston Globe, November 12, 1915).

Strafford National Bank - 1912NEWS IN BRIEF. The Milton House, a hotel at Milton, N.H., which has been unoccupied for a year, was burned. The loss is $40,000 (Fitchburg Sentinel, November 12, 1915).

MILTON HOUSE BURNED. The Milton House, at Milton, a two story and a half, 50 room, wooden structure, untenanted during the past year, was burned to the ground last Thursday night, entailing a loss estimated at $10,000. The fire started at about six o’clock in a nearby shed and spread quickly to a barn and then to the hotel. The structure was soon a mass of flames, Hand tubs soon drained nearby wells and but for the assistance of two lines of hose from the Dawson mills, it is said that the flames might have spread to nearby dwellings. The Milton House was built some 25 years ago by the late Horace Drew of Middleton (Farmington News, November 19, 1915).

The Milton directory of 1917 listed the Milton Hotel, at Toppan, corner of Charles, as having been “(closed),” which sounds like a bit of an anticlimax when compared with the 1915 newspaper reports of its having been “destroyed.”


References:

B&M Railroad Co. (1892). Summer Excursions to the White Mountains, Mt. Desert, Montreal and Quebec, Winnipesaukee, Memphremagog, Rangeley and Moosehead Lakes, and the New England Beaches. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=QiJptJyBWv0C&pg=PA49

Emery, Edwin. (1901). The History of Sanford, Maine, 1661-1900. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=0nUUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA323

Find a Grave. (2013, July 7). Charles Linwood Bodwell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/113448151/charles-linwood-bodwell

Find a Grave. (2004, December 6). Louise Bogan. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/10044239/louise-bogan

Find a Grave. (2012, September 25). Harry C. Grover. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/97761851/harry-c.-grover

Frank, Elizabeth. (1986). Louise Bogan: A Portrait. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=SSsaOu2w85UC&pg=PA6

ME Attorney General. (1883). Report of the Attorney General of the State of Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=XH5CAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA29

NH State Board of Agriculture. (1892). Lakes and Summer Resorts in New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=85Y-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA74

Wikipedia. (2021, February 14). Louise Bogan. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Bogan

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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