Skies Over Milton, April Edition

By Peter Forrester | April 2, 2019

Greetings on this fine sunny day! (I wish I could call it “warm”!)

Here are your monthly skywatching events, including one that already occurred. Note: all times are in US Eastern Daylight Savings Time (EDT) unless otherwise noted, which is 4 hours less than Universal Time (UT). Note: not all of these events occur at a time where the sky in Milton will be dark enough to see them.

Tuesday, April 2: Moon near Venus, 3:00 am EDT. Also Moon near Mercury, 10:00 PM.

Friday, April 5: New Moon at 4:51 AM. This is the start of “Lunation 1191” (a lunation is about 29.53 days, or the time between one new moon and the next. The exact length of a lunation varies a little bit, see the reference on “New moon” for more information).

Monday, April 8: Moon near the Pleiades at 7 pm.

Tuesday, April 9: Moon near Mars at 6 am (evening sky). Moon near Aldebaran (brightest star in constellation Taurus) at noon (in evening sky).

Friday, April 12: First Quarter Moon at 3:05 PM.

Sunday, April 14: Mars near Aldebaran at 9 pm.

Friday, April 19: Full Moon at 7:11 AM.

Monday, April 22, Lyrid Meteor Shower peaks at 8 pm. It is visible from the 14th to the 30th. 10 – 20 fast, bright meteors per hour during the peak, unfortunately the Moon’s brightness well make these meteors harder to see. The meteors can be seen all over the sky, but the radiant (point of origin) is between the constellations Lyra and Hercules.

Tuesday, April 23: Moon near Jupiter, 9:00 AM.

Thursday, April 25: Moon near Saturn at 9:00 AM (occultation, which means the nearer object passing in front of the other and therefore blocking light from it, will occur. In this case, the occultation will only be visible in parts of Australia, New Zealand, and South America).

Friday, April 26: Last Quarter Moon at 6:18 PM.

For more of these events, or to check out other skywatching tips, be sure to visit skymaps.com.

Until my next, enjoy the skies, and this glorious spring which is now upon us (at least in the Northern Hemisphere)!


Previous in series: Skies Over Milton, March Edition


References:

Thalassoudis, Kym. (2000-19). Skymaps. Retrieved April 2, 2019 from skymaps.com.

Wikipedia. (2019, March 25). Lyrids. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyrids.

Wikipedia. (2019, January 10). New moon. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_moon.

Wikipedia. (2019, March 10). Occultation. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occultation.

Author: Peter Forrester

I have been interested in astronomy and stargazing for many years, and now delight to offer some of my learning to others through my weekly blog posts.

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