Index of Ms. Bristol’s Historical Articles

By John S. Frum | October 27, 2020

One of our subscribers has asked that we provide an index to Ms. Bristol’s Milton historical articles. (I do try to connect her articles to each other through internal links). There is a bit of a problem in that her sequence of articles is an ongoing one.

Be that as it may, here you may find an index of sorts of her articles to date in a roughly chronological order.

Milton Mills’ Asa Fox & Son General Store

By Muriel Bristol | October 25, 2020

Asa Fox (1809-1887)

Asa Fox was born in Shapleigh, ME, October 23, 1809, son of Daniel Jr. and Mary (Roberts) Fox.

Daniel Fox [Jr.] headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-25 years [himself], one female aged 16-25 years [Mary (Roberts) Fox], and one male aged under-10 years [Asa Fox].

Asa Fox married, probably in Maine, circa 1832, Harriet Wood. She was born in Shapleigh, ME, March 8, 1807, daughter of Enoch and Dorothy (Heard) Wood.

Eldest son Charles D. Fox was born, probably in Acton, ME, circa 1833, prior to the family’s arrival in Milton Mills.

“He moved to Milton Mills, New Hampshire and opened a general store in 1834.” Middle son Elbridge W. Fox was born in Milton, December 3, 1834.

Captain Asa Fox was born in Acton, and settled at Milton Mills in 1834. He established himself in trade and carried on a thriving general business until his death, which occurred in 1887, at the age of seventy eight years. At first a Whig, he followed the majority of that party into the ranks of the Republicans. He was for many years identified with local affairs, and he served with ability as a Selectman, Town Treasurer, and legislative Representative. Prominent in military affairs, he held the commission of Captain in State militia. His wife, Harriet, who was a daughter of Enoch Wood, a well known resident of Acton in his day, became the mother of three sons. These were Charles, who died in 1852, Elbridge W., the subject of this sketch, and Asa A., who is residing in Milton Mills. Mrs. Asa Fox died in 1882 (Biographical Review, 1927).

Youngest son Asa Augustus Fox was born in Milton, February 3, 1837.

Asa Fox headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 [Asa Fox], one female aged 20-29 years [Harriet W. Fox], two males aged 5-9 [Charles D. Fox and Elbridge W. Fox], and one male aged under-5 years [Asa A. Fox]. One member of the household was engaged in commerce, presumably Asa Fox himself. The Fox household appeared in the enumeration between those of Bray Simes, who was also engaged in commerce, and [Dr.] John L. Swinerton, who was engaged in a learned profession.

In the boundary descriptions of the properties devised in Fox’s 1887 will, we learn that his “homestead lot” was a half-acre lot beside or behind his store.

… my homestead lot, with the dwelling house, barn and shed standing thereon, bounded as follows, Beginning at the road leading to Fox’s store and in the center of the passway between my house and store, thence running northerly to the northerly end of the store, thence northeasterly to the southwesterly end of the store-house, thence northerly by said store-house thirty-two feet, thence northeasterly ten feet, thence northerly to the land of Henry H. Townsend, thence westerly by said Townsend’s land to land of the late Bray U. Simes, thence by said Simes’ land to the aforesaid road, thence southerly and easterly by said road to the bounds begun at, containing one half acre more or less, with all the privileges and appurtenances thereunto belonging … together with the right of passing and repassing to and from the said house, shed and back lot at all times, said passway to remain open and free for passing and repassing as now used.

Asa Fox & Son - 1856It is apparent from this Milton Mills map of 1856 that both Asa Fox’s house and store (marked here in red) stood on what is now termed Main Street, across the street from what would later be Ira Miller’s store. (Note that the Milton Mills school house (“S.H”) was not then situated where it would be later in 1875).

Asa Fox was one of three Milton selectmen in 1843-46, 1851-52, and 1858 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Asa Fox, a trader, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Harriet W. Fox, aged forty years (b. ME), Charles D. Fox, a carpenter, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Enoch E.W. Fox, a trader, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Asa A. Fox, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Asa Fox had real estate valued at $2,000. His three sons had all attended school within the last year.

Eldest son Charles Daniel Fox died of typhoid fever in New York, October 4, 1852.

Asa Fox, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH [SIC]), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Harriet W. Fox, aged forty-six years (b. NH [SIC]). Asa Fox had real estate valued at $3,000, and personal estate valued at $2,000. His household appeared next to that of his son, A.A. Fox, a carpenter, aged twenty-three years (b. NH).

(The NH Historical Society has an ambrotype photograph “showing horse and wagon in front of the Asa Fox and Son general store in Milton Mills,” which was taken in November 1860).

Asa Fox was presumably the author of the Vulpes letter of February 1864, vulpes being Latin for fox. He paid a $10 tax on his Class B retail dealer’s license in the U.S. Excise Tax of May 1864.

The firm of Asa Fox & Son of Milton Mills paid a $10 tax on their retail dealer’s license in the US Excise Tax of 1866. Asa Fox paid personally a $1 tax on his carriage.

The Milton Mills mercantile firm of Asa Fox & Son appeared in the Milton business directories of 1867-68, 1868, and 1869-70. They sold dry goods and groceries. Son Elbridge W. Fox appeared also as a justice of the peace, as postmaster and, in 1869, as selectman.

Asa Fox, a retail grocer, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet W. Fox, keeping house, aged sixty-two years (b. ME). Asa Fox had real estate valued at $5,000, and personal estate valued at $7,050. His household appeared next to that of his son, Elbridge W. Fox, a retail grocer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH).

The Milton Mills mercantile firm of Asa Fox & Son appeared in the Milton business directories of 1871, 1875, 1876, 1877, and 1880.

NEW ENGLAND BY MAIL. Milton Mills, N.H. The store of Augustus Fox at Milton Mills, was destroyed by fire Tuesday night. Loss $6000; insured in the Home, New York, for $4300. The second story was occupied by the Old Fellows, who lost everything (Boston Globe, March 9, 1876).

(Ira Miller sold his Central House hotel and opened a competing general store at Milton Mills at about this time).

Asa Fox, a farmer & trader, aged seventy years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Village of Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet W. Fox, aged seventy-two years (b. ME).

The Milton Mills mercantile firm of Asa Fox & Son appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, 1882, 1884, and 1887.

Harriet (Wood) Fox died July 3, 1882.

Asa Fox of Milton, merchant, made out his last will, June 22, 1887. He devised his homestead to his grandson, Charles D. Fox. This bequest included also all the household goods, provisions, hay and wood on hand, as well as his money on deposit at the Strafford County Savings Bank at Dover, NH. He devised his store to his son, Elbridge W. Fox, and grandson, Everett F. Fox, as well as his 9-acre field near the Miller Brook. He devised his 12-acre “further field” to his son, Asa A. Fox, as well as half of the money deposited at the Somersworth Savings Bank. He devised all the rest and residue to his sons, Elbridge W. Fox and Asa A. Fox, in equal shares, and named them as joint executors. Abbie S. Hayes, Mary L. Hayes, and Charles Hayes signed as witnesses. (The will was proved in Rochester, NH, October 18, 1887) (Strafford County Probate, 89:141).

Asa Fox sold land in Milton to his son, Asa A. Fox, for $1,500 (Farmington News, July 1, 1887). Asa Fox sold land in Milton to his son, E.W. Fox, for $1,500 (Farmington News, July 22, 1887).

Asa Fox died in Milton, September 29, 1887, aged seventy-seven years, eleven months, and six days.

Elbridge W. Fox (1834-1912)

Elbridge Enoch Wood Fox was born in Milton, December 3, 1834, son of Asa and Harriet (Wood) Fox. Though he was a namesake for his maternal grandfather, Enoch Wood, he seems to have rarely used the “Enoch” part of his name.

Elbridge Wood Fox continued the family business of operating a general store. His father’s last will had requested that the firm name of Asa Fox & Son not be changed “for a time,” and it would seem that Elbridge W. Fox never did change it.

(His surviving brother, Asa A. Fox, and his son, Charles D. Fox [II], pursued business interests of their own).

ELBRIDGE W. FOX, a prosperous general merchant of Milton Mills, was born in this town, December 3, 1834, son of Captain Asa and Harriet (Wood) Fox. … After attending the Wakefield Academy for a time, Elbridge W Fox completed schooling at the New Hampton Literary Institute. He began his mercantile career in father’s store. With the exception of a year spent in the grocery business in Boston, he has been connected with his present business ever since. After the death of his father he and his son, Everett F., became the proprietors of the store but the business is still carried on under the firm name of Asa Fox & Son. In the capacity of Justice of the Peace he transacts a large amount of legal business. He is widely known as a reliable and upright man. Since his first Presidential vote was cast for John C. Fremont in 1856, he has been an active supporter of the Republican party. He served as a Selectman and as Town Treasurer for a number of terms and he was Postmaster from 1865 to 1885. He was elected for two years to the legislature in 1876 [1873], but his duties as Postmaster obliged him to resign. He was elected again in 1891, and afterward served for two years. He was one of the incorporators of the Rochester Savings Bank, is Vice President and Trustee of the Nute High School and Library of Milton, and he has been the statistical correspondent of the county or the United States Agricultural Department for the past quarter of a century. He was both State and United States Delegate to the World’s Sunday-school Convention held in London, England, in July, 1889, and he later made a tour of the continent of Europe, prolonging his visit in the principal centres of France, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy. He has been Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of the Check List since the enactment of the law creating such office in 1878, and he has held, almost without exception, all the courts in Milton for the trial of criminal action, for many years. His confidential counsel is constantly sought by those in need of advice in regard to financial and matters, and for years he has been the manager and investor of trust funds, both large and small, for neighbors, townspeople and others. Mr. Fox married Miss Sarah E. Buck, daughter of Dr. Reuben Buck, a physician of Acton. Mrs. Fox is the mother of one son, Everett F., who is now connected in business with his father as previously mentioned. Mr. Fox is a Deacon of the Congregational church, and has been superintendent of the Sunday-school for the past twenty years (Biographical Review, 1927).

Elbridge W. Fox of Milton Mills attended the New Hampton Academical and Literary Institution, at New Hampton, NH, with its Class of 1851. He was an active member of its Literary Adelphi library society in 1852.

THE LITERARY ADELPHI. The Literary Adelphi was founded A.D., 1827. Its object is to develop the mind. It has a spacious and convenient Reading-Room, containing a cabinet of minerals, and a valuable library. By the liberality of its patrons it is furnished with about twenty newspapers from various sections of the country. Besides this the society received several valuable periodicals. To those who have aided, by the contribution of books, newspapers, periodicals, & c., we tender out heartfelt thanks. Additions are made to the library, from time to time, as the state of the funds of the society will permit.

Elbridge W. Fox married in Milton, November 5, 1855, Sarah E. Buck, he of Milton and she of neighboring Acton, ME. He was twenty-one years of age and she was twenty-eight years of age Rev. James Doldt performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, in June 1825, daughter of Dr. Rueben and Alice (Jacquith) Buck.

Son Everett Fremont Fox was born in Milton, August 17, 1856. His middle name was given in honor of the Republican party’s initial (1856) presidential candidate, John C. Fremont. (The party’s second presidential candidate, Abraham Lincoln, would win his 1860 presidential race).

Elbridge W. Fox, a farmer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah E. Fox, aged thirty-one years (b. NH [SIC]), and Everett F. Fox, aged three years (b. NH [SIC]). His household appeared next to that of B.U. Simes, a merchant, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH).

President Andrew Johnson appointed Elbridge W. Fox as postmaster of Milton Mills, July 13, 1865. (He succeeded Henry S. Swasey, who had been appointed early in the Lincoln administration). He received $220 in salary in the year 1872. Republicans Joseph Plumer and Elbridge Fox were elected as Milton’s state representatives in the election of March 11, 1873 (Vermont Journal (St. Johnsbury, VT), March 22, 1873). (This would be the term from which he resigned). His son, Everett F. Fox, replaced him as postmaster briefly, March 28, 1873, but he was reappointed April 4, 1873, and held that position into 1885.

Elbridge W. Fox of Milton Mills paid a $10 tax on his lawyer’s license and a $4 tax on his piano in the US Excise Tax of 1866.

Elbridge W. Fox, a retail grocer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah E. Fox, keeping house, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), and Everett F. Fox, at school, aged thirteen years (b. ME). His household appeared next to that of [his father,] Asa Fox, a retail grocer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH).

ELBRIDGE W. FOX, / CONVEYANCER, CLAIM, COLLECTION, REPORTING, AND NEWS AGENT. / SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO PROBATE, PENSION, NOTARY AND JUSTICE BUSINESS, MAKING OF WILLS, LEGAL & OFFICIAL INSTRUMENTS, EXAMINATION OF RECORDS, TITLES, ACCOUNTS, &c. / TICKET AGENT CUNARD LINE MAIL STEAMERS. / BILLS OF EXCHANGE ISSUED ON LIVERPOOL, LONDON, DUBLIN & GLASGOW. / AGENCY FOR THE PRINCIPAL NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES, PERIODICALS, &c. / P.O. BLOCK, CENTRAL SQ. Milton Mills, Strafford Co. N.H. (NH Historical Society, 2004).

Cunard-to-EW Fox, 1875Elbridge W. Fox, a storekeeper, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah Fox, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. ME). They occupied a two-family dwelling, which they shared with the household of [their son,] Everett F. Fox, a storekeeper, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his wife, Carrie B. Fox, keeping house, aged twenty-one years (b. NH).

SUMMER RESORTS. SUMMER BOARDERS can have first-class accommodations at Tamaline Heights Cottage, Milton Mills. N.H. Pleasant situation; splendid views; fine drives; pure air; trout, bass and other fishing near; three minutes’ walk to post office, churches, stores, etc.; house newly refinished and furnished; no pains will be spared to make it comfortable and attractive; reference, Elbridge Fox, P.M., Milton Mills, N.H. Apply through box 113, Milton Mills. N.H. 5t* jy3 (Boston Globe, July 7, 1884).

THEIR ANNUAL CONVENTION. New Hampshire Young Men’s Christian Association Meet at Dover. Dover, N.H., October 1. – The annual convention of the Young Men’s Christian Association of New Hampshire commenced here last evening, 200 delegates being in attendance. Last night’s proceedings were wholly informal. A consecration meeting this morning was led by Rev. R.K. Remington of Fall River. The convention organized with Colonel Howard L. Porter of Concord as president, Elbridge Fox of Milton Mills, secretary. The president, after offering a few pertinent remarks, introduced Walter C. Douglass of New York, secretary of the international committee, who addressed the convention. After the presentation of various reports, remarks were made by Secretary Folger and R.K. Remington, and a paper was read from Secretary Symonds of the Keene association. In the afternoon Secretary Folger read the report of the State executive committee, and there were several addresses. This evening the speakers were Rev. R.K. Remington and Rev. D.C. Knowles. The session continues tomorrow (Boston Globe, October 2, 1886).

SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS. Twelfth Annual Convention of the Strafford County Association. DOVER, N.H., June 2. – The twelfth annual convention of the Strafford County Sunday School Association met in this city today. President Rev. F.K. Chase presided and made an address of welcome. One hundred and twenty-five delegates, representing every Sunday school in the county were present. Revs. C.W. Bradlee, Frank Haley, T. Spooner and W. Beard discussed the relation of the Sunday school to Christian life. Revs. J.M. Dutton, C.B. Turner, C.W. Purington and G.A. Mills discussed the question, how may the influence of the Sabbath at home be made helpful in Sunday school work. Rev. H.F. Wood discussed the practical teaching of the Sunday school. Revs. A.L. Gerrish, F.A. Holden, J.E. Dame and J.B. Davis discussed teachers’ week-day influence. The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: President, Rev. George E. Hall of Dover; secretary and treasurer, Elbridge W. Fox of Milton Mills (Boston Globe, June 3, 1887).

Elbridge W. Fox of Milton Milton made his last will, June 12, 1889. He devised his homestead lot and dwelling house to his wife, Sarah E. Fox. He devised to her also his savings bank accounts, railroad bonds, stocks and certificates. He suggested, “without any desire to enforce compliance,” that she pay $12 per annum to the Sunday School of which he had so long been Superintendent for the purchase of good, sizeable religious books, which were to be labeled the Elbridge W. Fox Memorial Books. He devised to his son, Everett F. Fox, all the rest and residue of the estate and the firm of Asa Fox & Son, after the payment of any debts. He advised his son, “in honor of God, who has so richly and bountifully bestowed His blessing upon us both,” to set aside from his income a reasonable annual sum for the support of God’s cause. He named his son as executor. G.S. Lovering, Edward S. Simes, and Hiram G. Burrows signed as witnesses.

Elbridge W. Fox was one of the original trustees of the Nute High School and Library in April 1889.

The local branch of the Boot & Shoe Workers’ International Union met at Fox’s Hall in Milton Mills, on the evening of Sunday, November 17, 1889. (See Milton Mills Shoe Strike of 1889).

Milton Mills mercantile firm of Asa Fox & Son appeared in the Milton business directories of 1889, 1892, 1894, and 1898.

Archemedian Green Bone Cutter Co, 1896Elbridge W. Fox represented Milton (then a part of NH Senate District 12) in the NH State Senate during the 1899-00 biennium. He received 2,305 (59.7%) votes, while his Democrat opponent, Archibald A. Noble, received 1,544 (40.0%) votes, and “scattering” received 11 votes (0.3%). He served on the Judiciary, Railroad, and Claims committees. He voted against a bill allowing owners of budding fruit trees to shoot partridges out of season (the bill failed).

Elbridge W. Fox, a storekeeper, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-five years), Sarah Fox, aged seventy-four years (b. ME), his son, Everett F. Fox, a storekeeper (and postman), aged forty-three years (b. ME), his daughter-in-law (of twenty-two years), Carrie Fox, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and his granddaughter, Helen G. Fox, at school, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Elbridge W. Fox owned their house, free-and-clear.

Asa Fox & Son - 1907The Milton Mills mercantile firm of Asa Fox & Son appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909.

Elbridge W. Fox, a general store proprietor, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-four years), Sarah Fox, aged eighty-four years (b. ME), his son, Everett F. Fox, a general store proprietor, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), his daughter-in-law (of thirty years), Carrie Fox, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and his granddaughter, Helen G. Fox, at school, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH). Elbridge W. Fox owned their house, free-and-clear.

The Milton Mills mercantile firm of Asa Fox & Son appeared in the Milton business directory of 1912.

Elbridge W. Fox died in Milton April 6, 1912, aged seventy-seven years. Sarah E. (Buck) Fox died in Milton, May 21, 1914.

Everett F. Fox (1856-1927)

Everett Fremont Fox was born in Acton, ME, August 17, 1856, son of Elbridge W. and Sarah E. (Buck) Fox.

Everett F. Fox and his cousin, Charles D. Fox [II], both of Milton Mills, were students at the Gorham Seminary, in Gorham, ME, during the 1874-75 academic year. They were both pursuing the Normal Course of studies. (Other options included the Commercial, Classical, Collegiate, and Preparatory courses).

Everett F. Fox married in Milton, January 1, 1879, Caroline Belle “Carrie” Ricker, both of Milton. He was a clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. Milton), and she was aged twenty years. She was born in Somersworth, NH, July 2, 1858, daughter of Stephen and Sarah A. (Clements) Ricker.

Elbridge W. Fox, a storekeeper, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah Fox, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. ME). They occupied a two-family dwelling, which they shared with the household of [their son,] Everett F. Fox, a storekeeper, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his wife, Carrie B. Fox, keeping house, aged twenty-one years (b. NH).

Daughter Helen Gertrude Fox was born in Milton, September 19, 1881.

Elbridge W. Fox, a storekeeper, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-five years), Sarah Fox, aged seventy-four years (b. ME), his son, Everett F. Fox, a storekeeper (and postman), aged forty-three years (b. ME), his daughter-in-law (of twenty-two years), Carrie Fox, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and his granddaughter, Helen G. Fox, at school, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Elbridge W. Fox owned their house, free-and-clear.

Daughter Helen G. Fox graduated from Wellesley College in 1904.

Elbridge W. Fox, a general store proprietor, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-four years), Sarah Fox, aged eighty-four years (b. ME), his son, Everett F. Fox, a general store proprietor, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), his daughter-in-law (of thirty years), Carrie Fox, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and his granddaughter, Helen G. Fox, at school, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH). Elbridge W. Fox owned their house, free-and-clear.

Daughter Helen Gertrude Fox married in Milton, December 25, 1912, George Edgar Carmichael, she of Milton and he of Greenwich, CT. He was a teacher, aged thirty-seven years, and she was aged thirty-one years. Rev. Myron P. Dickey, then of Kennebunk, ME, performed the ceremony. Carmichael was born in Rockville, MA, circa 1875, son of James T. and Susan (Roberts) Carmichael.

Everett F. Fox, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie B. Fox, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and his servant, Jennie H. Poole, a private family servant, aged seventy-eight years (b. MA). Everett F. Fox owned their house on Main Street, free-and-clear.

Everett F. Fox of Milton made out his last will, December 24, 1912. He devised a life estate in all his real and personal estate to his wife, Carrie B. Fox, with the rest and residue to his daughter, Helen G. Fox, upon the condition that each would provide proper care and support for his mother, Sarah E. Fox, during her lifetime. (She died in 1914). Robert S. Pike, Eugene E. Runnels, and H. Pavers Robbins signed as witnesses. (The will was proved in Dover, NH, March 10, 1927) (Strafford County Probate, 161:302).

Everett F. Fox died in Milton, March 7, 1927. Caroline B. (Ricker) Fox died in Milton, August 2, 1941.


References:

Biographical Review. (1927). Biographical Review: Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Strafford and Belknap Counties, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=C2sjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA366

Ebay. (2020, October 24). Archemedian Green Bone Cutter, Milford, MA, 1896, to Asa Fox, Milton Mills, NH, Cover. Retrieved from https://www.ebay.com/itm/Archemedian-Green-Bone-Cutter-Milford-MA-1896-Asa-Fox-Milton-Mills-NH-Cover-H-/311647086191

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Asa Fox. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114673689/asa-fox

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Elbridge Wood Fox. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114673509/elbridge-wood-fox

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Everett Fremont Fox. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114891790/everett-fremont-fox

NH Historical Society. (2004). Box. Retrieved from www.nhhistory.org/object/226949/box

NH Historical Society. (2004). Cash Register. Retrieved from www.nhhistory.org/object/226933/register-cash

NH Historical Society. (2004). Fox Family Papers, 1834-1912. Retrieved from www.nhhistory.org/finding_aids/finding_aids/Fox_Family_Papers.pdf

NH Historical Society. (1860). General Store, Milton Mills, New Hampshire. Retrieved from www.nhhistory.org/object/260270/general-store-milton-mills-new-hampshire

NH Historical Society. (2004). Marking Stamp. Retrieved from www.nhhistory.org/object/226945/stamp-marking

NH Historical Society. (2004). Trade Sign. Retrieved from www.nhhistory.org/object/226947/sign-trade

Siegel Auctions. (2016, February 9). Cunard Stub. Retrieved from siegelauctions.com/ph/pdf/064.pdf

Milton Versus the Yeggmen – 1923

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | October 18, 2020

Milton suffered nighttime burglaries by “yeggmen” or “yeggs,” i.e., safecrackers, in both 1894 and 1914.

During the night of Monday, July 16, 1923, yeggs broke into four establishments in neighboring Farmington, NH, and on the following night, Tuesday, July 17, 1923, they visited the Union village of neighboring Wakefield, NH.

All of which suggested that Milton should post an armed guard or guards to patrol the Main Street block between the post office and Milton’s B&M Railroad station, during the night of Wednesday, July 18, 1923. (See Milton Businesses in 1922). He or they had orders to shoot suspicious persons on sight. (What could possibly go wrong?)

CITIZENS ARM WITH SHOT GUNS AGAINST DARING YEGG BAND. Guards Patrol Postoffice and Station at Milton. Rochester, July 18. – Residents of nearby towns slept tonight with shot guns and rifles handy, while in places armed guards were stationed near postoffices following a series of breaks at Union, north of here, last night, when yeggs swept down on the town and broke into six places – the B.&M. railroad station, the postoffice, garage, a blacksmith shop, a barber shop and a marble shop. The night before four places at Farmington were entered and people in other localities, terrorized at the action of the gang, were arming themselves today, not knowing where the thieves would appear next.

Few of these smaller towns had their own banks. Valuables might be stored in the safes of their local post offices or B&M Railroad stations. Other places, such as the blacksmith and the marble shop were likely sources of heavy duty tools.

It was stated at Milton tonight that an armed guard was to patrol the section near the postoffice, with orders to shoot any person acting in a suspicious manner near the building. Postmasters and station agents in other places made hurried trips to Rochester and deposited their surplus cash in banks. When the B.&M. station at Union was opened this morning. Agent Howard A. Beacham discovered that the safe had been blown and $35 taken. From the manner in which the safe was “soaped” and nitro used, the police believe it to be the work of professionals. Entrance was gained by forcing a window.

Howard A. Beacham, a railroad station agent, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield (“Union Village), NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hattie F. [(Haines)] Beacham, aged forty-eight years (b. NH). Howard A. Beacham owned their house free-and-clear.

To “soap” a safe was to form a soap repository in the crack or seam where the safe’s door closed into the body of the safe. About an ounce of liquid nitroglycerine would be poured into the soap repository and then set off with a blasting cap connected – hopefully with wires of some length – to a battery.

The postoffice diagonally across the street was next visited. The thieves went in through a cellar window, and, after ascending the stairs, forced the door leading to the office. Postmaster James Reed had taken the money, with the exception of some small change, home, so the yeggs did not get much for their trouble. The postage stamps were pulled out and left on the floor.

James A. Reed, a railroad telegrapher, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), headed a Wakefield (“Union Village”), NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, May A. [(McCallum)] Reed, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Blanche L. Reed, aged eight years (b. NH), James A. Reed, aged seven years (b. NH), and Gladys M. Reed, aged three years (b. NH). James A. Reed rented their house.

At the garage of Howard Atherton, $275 in money and a diamond ring valued at $175 were taken from the cash drawer in the office. Reuben Trafton’s barber shop over the postoffice was visited but nothing of value taken. Tools with which it is believed the yeggs forced an entrance into the station were taken from the garage of Samuel Reynolds after they evidently did not find tools to their liking when they entered the marble shop of Myron Johnson.

Isaac H. [“Howard”] Atherton, a widowed garage proprietor, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield (“Union Village”), NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his sister, Laura [(Atherton)] Emery, aged forty-five years (b. NH). Isaac H. Atherton rented their house.

Reuben Trafton, a barber, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield (“Union Village”), NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Iva M. [(Ham)] Trafton, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and his children, Norman Trafton, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Esther Trafton, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Katheryn Trafton, aged twelve years (b. NH), Helen Trafton, aged six years (b. NH), and Parker Trafton, aged two years (b. NH), and his grandson, Donald M. Trafton, aged four years (b. NH). Reuben Trafton owned their house free-and-clear. (Reuben Buck Trafton was a namesake for Dr. Reuben Buck).

Samuel Runnells, a blacksmith, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield (“Union Village”), NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary R. [(Knox)] Runnells, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), his children, Elizabeth F. Runnells, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Martha P. Runnells, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his father, Alva Runnells, a widower, aged ninety-four years (b. ME). Samuel Runnells owned their house free-and-clear.

The only clue which Chief of Police Myron Johnson of Union had tonight was that on Saturday afternoon a large touring car with Massachusetts plates stood on Main street for hours. It was occupied by two men who did not leave the car, nor was any one seen to visit the car. It is believed they looked over the situation. It is considered significant that none of the stores were visited as families occupy the. second floor in each (Portsmouth Herald, July 19, 1923).

Myron L. Johnson, a marble works marble cutter, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield (“Union Village”), NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Winifred [(Gile)] Johnson, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH). Myron L. Johnson owned their house free-and-clear.

Naturally, the unidentified touring car with the two suspicious men – seen three days earlier – had Massachusetts plates.

As in the Milton safecracking thefts of 1894 and 1914, subsequent newspapers mentioned no capture of the yeggmen or recovery of the stolen property.

References:

O’Connor, Patricia, and Kellerman, Stewart. (2015, June 19). A Bad Yegg. Retrieved from www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2015/06/yegg.html

Valdes, Robert. (n.d.). How Safecracking Works. Retrieved from home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/household-safety/safecracking5.htm

Milton Grammar School Teachers, 1908-30

By Muriel Bristol | October 11, 2020

Milton Elementary School
Milton Elementary School

A Roll of Honor – the honor being diligent attendance – published for the Milton Grammar school in March 1909, identified its teachers for the 1908-09 academic year as being Laura H. Williams, Grades 1-2; Grace Harwood, Grades 3-4; Bessie A. Gushee, Grades 5-6; and Robert M. Looney, Grades 7-8 and Principal (Farmington News, March 26, 1909).

The original Milton Grammar School burned to the ground on Saturday morning, April 4, 1914. (It was replaced in its same location by a new brick building (see above), which was also called the Milton Grammar school, but which is currently known as the Milton Elementary School).

Plans were set in motion to reconstruct the Milton Grammar School within a month of its destruction.

West Milton. The west side of the town was well represented at the special town meeting held at the town house last Saturday afternoon for the purpose of voting an appropriation for the erection of a new school building to replace the one recently destroyed by fire. It was voted to hire the sum of $20,000 and also to apply the $8,000 insurance received on the loss of the old building to erect an imposing new brick structure on the site of the former grammar school building (Farmington News, May 1, 1914).

Meanwhile, the displaced Milton Grammar School students set up in the Exhibition Hall of the Nute High School.

West Milton. Miss Lula V. Grace, who, by the courtesy of Mr. Looney, principal of the Milton village grammar school, acting in conjunction with the school board and superintendent, participated in the exercises and received her diploma with Mr. Looney’s class at Milton last Friday evening, is the first pupil to receive this distinction since the school has become graded. A delegation of the scholars, accompanied by their teacher and many friends from this part of town, witnessed the exercises, which have gained a well-deserved prominence under Mr. Looney’s efficient instruction. The exhibition hall at the Nute high school building, where the grammar school has been in session since the burning of the schoolhouse, was occupied to the last available inch. The execution of some of the most difficult subjects of original composition and essay by members of the graduating class was truly wonderful for pupils of this grade, while choral and orchestral numbers from the leading operas were very cleverly rendered and were accorded unanimous acclamation of favor. Miss Hazel Perkins of this district was a member of the graduating class at Milton, having attended that school the past year (Farmington News, June 26, 1914).

The Milton directory of 1917 identified Milton Grammar school teachers Laura H. Williams, Grades I and II; Grace E. Harwood, Grades III and IV; Bessie E. Gushee, Grades V and VI; and Robert M. Looney, Grades VII and VIII. While not identified as such, Robert M. Looney was the “principal” teacher. (These were the same teachers, teaching the same grades, as those in the pre-fire Milton directory of 1909).

More consistent personnel information becomes available in the annual Milton Town Reports of the 1920s and thereafter.

Robert M. Looney – Grades 7-8, Principal – 1902-14

Robert Miller Looney was born in Milton, June 10, 1880, son of Charles H. and Emily E. (Miller) Looney.

(A fuller account of his life and career may be found in Milton Grammar School Principals – 1893-14).

Robert M. Looney died in Newtonville, Newton, MA, July 22, 1932, aged fifty-two years, one month, and twelve days.

Laura H. Williams – Grades 1-2 – c1908-31

Laura H. Williams was born in Bowdoinham, ME, circa September 1869, daughter of Hiram and Eliza (Toothaker) Williams. Her mother died when she was but three years of age, and her father when she was thirteen years of age.

John H. Stuart, a sea captain, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Richmond, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary J. Stuart, aged sixty-nine years (b. ME), and his niece, Laura Williams, a school teacher, aged thirty years (b. ME). John H. Stuart owned their house, free-and-clear.

The officers of the Lewis W. Nute Grange in 1907 were Mrs. Annie O. Willey, Master; Mrs. Cora A. Hodgdon, Lecturer; and Miss Laura H. Williams, Secretary (Annual Reports of the State of New Hampshire, 1908).

The officers of the Lewis W. Nute Grange in 1910 were Mrs. Annie O. Willey, Master; Mrs. Cora A. Hodgdon, Lecturer; and Miss Laura H. Williams, Secretary (Annual Reports of the State of New Hampshire, 1911).

Ralph M. Kimball, a hen farmer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Carrie E. Kimball, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his son, Walter Kimball, aged eleven years (b. NH), and his lodgers, Grace E. Harwood, a town school teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), Bessie A. Gushie, a town school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), and Laura H. Williams, a town school teacher, aged forty-one years (b. ME). Ralph M. Kimball owned the farm free-and-clear. Carrie E. Kimball was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Laura H. Williams appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as teacher of grades 1-2, at the M. Grammar school, boarding at 6 Kimball street.

Charles L. Burke, a barber, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lillian M. Burke, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and his roomer, Laura H. Williams, a grammar school teacher, aged fifty years (b. ME). Charles L. Burke rented their house on Upper Main Street, in Milton Village.

Laura H. Williams appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as a teacher, with her house on Main street.

Ellsworth Hodgdon, a shoe factory operator, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-five years), Cora Hodgdon, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), his servant, Sarah Roberts, a boarding house housewife, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), and his boarders, Laura Williams, a grammar school teacher, aged sixty years (b. ME), and Harold Carpenter, a fibre mill bookkeeper, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Ellsworth Hodgdon rented their house on South Main Street, for $16 per month. They had a radio set.

Laura H. Williams retired after either the 1930-31 (or 1931-32) academic year. According to her entry in the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census, she returned for a time to her original home in Richmond, ME, where she was residing in April 1935. However, she was living in Laconia, NH, by 1940.

Amy W. Churchill, a widow, aged seventy-one years (b. MA), headed a Laconia, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her lodger, Laura H. Williams, aged seventy years (b. ME). Amy W. Churchill rented their house at 124A Church Street, for $30 per month. Amy W. Churchill had resided in Nashua, NH, in April 1935, and Laura H. Williams had resided in Richmond, ME, in 1935.

Laura H. Williams appeared in the Laconia directory of 1941, as residing at 124A Church street. (Amy Churchill, wid. Edgar, had her house at 124A Church street).

Laura H. Williams died in 1950.

Grace E. Harwood – Grades 3-4 – c1908-18

Grace Emma Harwood was born in Dorchester, Boston, MA, March 1, 1883, daughter of Walter H. and Joanna M. “Anna” (Bresnahan) Harwood. She was baptized in Dorchester, April 3, 1883.

Anna Harwood, a widow, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Scituate, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Here household included her daughters, Dora Harwood, aged twenty-three years (b. MA), Elisabeth Harwood, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and Grace Harwood, at school, aged seventeen years (b. MA). Anna Harwood owned their house, free-and-clear. She was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

Grace E. Harwood, a town school teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), lodged in the Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household of Ralph M. Kimball, a hen farmer, aged fifty years (b. NH), at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Bessie A. Gushie, a town school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), and Laura H. Williams, a town school teacher, aged forty-one years (b. ME), lodged there too (see Laura H. Williams above).

Grace E. Harwood appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as teacher of grades 3-4, at the M. Grammar school, boarding at 6 Kimball street.

Grace E. Harwood married in East Rochester, NH, May 21, 1918, William A. Dickson, both of Milton. She was a teacher, aged thirty-five years (b. Boston, MA), and he was superintendent of a leather-board mill, aged forty-three years (b. Lunenburg, MA). He was born in Lunenburg, MA, September 6, 1874, son of William F. and Matilda (Lancy) Dickson.

William A. Dickson, a leather-board superintendent, aged forty-five years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace E. Dickson, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), his daughters, Marion I. Dickson, a grammar school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), Hazel M. Dickson, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Carlyne P. Dickson, aged eleven years (b. NH), and his servant, Elizabeth H. Mansfield, a private family servant, aged fifty-four (b. ME). William A. Dickson rented their house on the Wakefield Road.

William A. Dickson, a fibre mill superintendent, aged fifty-five years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Grace Dickson, aged forty-three years (b. MA), and his servant, Mabel Hayes, a private family housewife, aged thirty-two years (b. ME). William A. Dickson rented their house on the Wakefield Road, for $25 per month. They had a radio set.

Elizabeth A. “Bessie” Gushee – Grades 5-6 – 1906-17

Elizabeth Adella “Bessie” Gushee was born in Salisbury, MA, October 10, 1885, daughter of George W. and Mary E. (Hardenbrook) Gushee.

Miss Bessie A. Gushee appears to have replaced Miss E. Maud Garland, who resigned as the teacher of Milton Grammar school Grades 5-6 in March 1906.

LOCAL. Miss E. Maude Garland has resigned her position in the fifth and sixth grades of the Milton grammar school, where she has been a very successful teacher for nearly three years (Farmington News, March 2, 1906).

Bessie A. Gushee appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as teacher of grades 5-6, at the M. Grammar school, boarding at 6 Kimball street.

UNION. Schools in the village began Monday with the same teachers as last year, Miss Carpenter of Mountain View [Ossipee] in the [primary and Miss Gushee of Maine in the grammar (Farmington News, April 1, 1910).

Bessie A. Gushie, a town school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), lodged in the Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household of Ralph M. Kimball, a hen farmer, aged fifty years (b. NH), at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Laura H. Williams, a town school teacher, aged forty-one years (b. ME), and Grace E. Harwood, a town school teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), lodged there too (see Laura H. Williams above).

Bessie A. Gushee appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as teacher of grades 5-6, at the M. Grammar school, boarding at 6 Kimball street.

Frank Waterman, aged sixty-seven years (b. RI), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Abbie J. Waterman, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), his sister-in-law, Amandy Clark, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), and his lodgers, Charles W. Philbrick, a department store clerk, aged seventy-six years (b. NH), Nina E. Browne, aged fifty-nine years (b. MA), Bessie A. Gushee, an insurance company clerk, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), Ermina A. Gushee, an insurance company clerk, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), Alice M. Teele, a chemist assistant, aged thirty-nine years (b. MA), Israel Blaisdell, a department store clerk, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), Glen R. Blaisdell, aged twenty-three years (b. MA, Etta Yerdon, a packer, aged fifty-six years (b. NY) and Charles S. Brown, a publishing company clerk, aged fifty-six years (b. MA).  Frank Waterman rented their house at 44 Pinckney Street.

Her sister, Ermina Adelaide Gushee, died November 26, 1920.

Elizabeth A. Gushee married in the Greenwich Presbyterian Church, in New York, NY, June 27, 1925, Walter E. Looney, she of 61 Hancock Street, Boston, MA, and he of Milton, NH. He was a government official, aged forty-seven years, and she was aged thirty-nine years.

While not contained in the June 1925 church record of their marriage, Walter Eugene Looney was born in Milton, May 14, 1878, son of Charles H. and Emily E. (Miller) Looney. (Milton Grammar school principal Robert M. Looney was his brother). Their time together was brief, as he died in Portsmouth, NH, October 1, 1928, aged fifty years, four months, and seventeen days.

IN MEMORIAM. Walter E. Looney. Many local friends and acquaintances were shocked to learn of the sudden death of Walter E. Looney, deputy collector of customs, at Portsmouth, which occurred in his room on October first. Apparently, Mr. Looney was preparing for work when he was stricken with a heart attack, from which affliction he had been a sufferer for some time. He was at his post and in his usual health on the Saturday previous. He was fifty years old, a native of Milton, and a son of the late Charles E. and Emma (Miller) Looney. In the early nineteen hundreds he became deputy collector of customs, with offices at the Custom House in Portsmouth, succeeding his father, who was collector of customs, but at the time his son took the position the office had been reduced to a deputy-ship by reason of a decline in shipping from Portsmouth. He was a Blue Lodge and Chapter Mason, a Knight Templar, a member of Rektash Temple, Mystic Shrine, of Concord, and was affiliated with the Piscataqua Pioneers, a historical organization, and the Warwick club of Portsmouth (Farmington News, October 5, 1928).

Elizabeth Looney, a manufacturer’s clerk, aged forty-four years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her boarder, Susan D. Moorers, a banking clerk, aged thirty-five years (b. ME). Elizabeth Looney rented their apartment at 44 South Russell Street, for $55 per month. They did not have a radio set.

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. Papers have gone to record at the Suffolk Registry of Deeds, whereby the Wallace L. Conant estate conveys to John A. McNamara, and the latter to Elizabeth G. Looney, 51 Garden st., West End. The property is taxed for $6500, with $2500 on the 675 sq. ft. of land. There is a 3½-story brick building (Boston Globe, November 23, 1932).

Eliz. G. Looney, wid. of Walter E., appeared in the Boston directories of 1938, 1941, and 1943, as a clerk, with her house at 51 Garden street.

Elizabeth Looney, a general clerical worker (for a wholesale and retail wood preservative company), aged fifty-four years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her lodger, Ethel M. Matthews, a traveling saleslady (for a retail men’s’ and women’s stocking firm), aged sixty-five years (b. MA). Elizabeth Looney owned their house at 51 Garden street, which was valued at $2,100. Both women were high school graduates.

Elizabeth A. (Gushee) Looney died in Salisbury, MA, in 1985.

Grace C. Fletcher – Grades ?-? – 1917-18

Grace Constance Fletcher was born in Cape Neddick, ME, April 19, 1896, daughter of Rev. William and Winnifred E. (Roundy) Fletcher.

In the 1916-17 academic year, Grace Constance Fletcher, of Waterville, ME, was a senior class student at Colby College. She resided at 167 College Ave., with students [brother] Herbert Henry Fletcher, of Waterville, ME, a sophomore class student, and Pearl Estelle Mitchell, of Haynesville, ME, a special or unclassified student (Colby College, 1917).

Grace Constance Fletcher received an A.B. degree from Colby College, with its class of 1917. She was a teacher in Milton, during the 1917-18 academic year. She was principal of the high school at Jefferson, NH, during the 1918-19 academic year (Colby College, 1920).

Grace Constance Fletcher married in Waterville, ME, January 4, 1919, James Herbert Willey, she of Waterville and he of Milton. She was a teacher, aged twenty-two years, and he was a druggist, aged forty-three years. (See Milton in the News – 1913). Her father, Rev. William Fletcher, of Waterville, ME, performed the ceremony. James Herbert Willey was born in Rollinsford, NH, May 27, 1875, son of James P. and Frances P. (Davis) Willey.

James Herbert Willey, a druggist (0wner), aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace F. Willey, aged twenty-three years (b. ME). James Herbert Willey rented their house on Upper Main Street (at its intersection with Silver Street). The household of Joseph D. Willey, a retail merchant (groceries), aged sixty-six years (b. NH),  appeared just after them in the enumeration, i.e., he was their neighbor.

James H. Willey, a druggist (drug store), aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Grace F. Willey, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), his children, Herbert F. Willey, aged nine years (b. NH), and Frances E. Willey, aged four years (b. NH), and his parents, James P. Willey, retired, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), and Frances P. Willey, aged seventy-six years (b. ME). James H. Willey owned their house on North Main Street, which was valued at $2,500. The household of J.D. Willey, a retail merchant (general store), aged seventy-six years (b. NH),  appeared just before them in the enumeration, i.e., he was their neighbor.

James H. Willey, a druggist (drug store), aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace F. Willey, aged forty-four years (b. ME), and his children, Herbert F. Willey, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Frances Willey, aged fourteen years (b. NH). James H. Willey owned their house in the “Milton Community,” which was valued at $2,000. James H. and Grace F. Willey had each attended four years of college, Herbert F. Willey had attended one year of college, and Frances Willey had attended one year of high school.

James Herbert Willey died in Milton, April 27, 1946, aged seventy years.

IN MEMORIAM. James H. Willey. Several fraternal members attended the funeral services of James H. Willey, 70, well known drug store owner of Milton, held at the Community church in that town, Tuesday afternoon. He was a member of Columbian Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and Fraternal Chapter, O.E.S., of Farmington. His wife, Mrs. Grace Willey, is worthy matron of the O.E.S. this town (Farmington News, May 3, 1946).

Grace C. (Fletcher) Willey died in Hickory, NC, February 13, 1986, aged eighty-nine years.

HICKORY. Mrs. Grace Fletcher Willey, 89, homemaker, died Feb. 13, 1986. Memorial service will be at a later date in New Hampshire. Survivors are her son, Herbert Willey, of Sherborn, Mass.; daughter, Mrs. Frances Rippere; sister, Mrs. Harriet Lockwood, of Port St. Lucia, Fla. Bass-Smith is in charge (Charlotte Observer, February 18, 1986).

Marion I. Dixon – Grades 4-5 – 1918-20

Marion Irene Dickson was born in Shirley, MA, August 1, 1895, daughter of William A. and Hattie M. (Newell) Dickson.

Marion I. Dickson taught at Milton’s Hare Road school during the 1917-18 academic year.

WEST MILTON. Miss Marion Dixon, teacher at the Hare Road school, gave her pupils a delightful Hallowe’en party, Wednesday afternoon (Farmington News, November 2, 1917).

WEST MILTON. William Dixon and family of Milton recently spent an evening with his daughter Miss Marion, at Garland farm (April 19, 1918).

WEST MILTON. Miss Marion Dickson of South Milton, who closed a very successful school year here in June, is to teach the 4th and 5th grades in the Milton Grammar school (Farmington News, August 23, 1918).

Here may be found the only indication that the Milton Grammar School at least closed for a time during the so-called Spanish Influenza pandemic of 1918. Thus freed from her normal duties, Miss Dickson visited her former Hare Road school and the Nute Ridge school, which appear to have remained open.

WEST MILTON. Miss Marion Dickson of South Milton, who has been having an enforced vacation from her duties in the Milton grammar school, because of the prevailing epidemic, visited the Nute Ridge and Hare Road schools Friday (Farmington News, November 1, 1918).

William A. Dickson, a leather-board superintendent, aged forty-five years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace E. Dickson, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), his daughters, Marion I. Dickson, a grammar school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), Hazel M. Dickson, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Carlyne P. Dickson, aged eleven years (b. NH), and his servant, Elizabeth H. Mansfield, a private family servant, aged fifty-four (b. ME). William A. Dickson rented their house on the Wakefield Road.

Harriet Jones, a widow, aged seventy-three years (b. ME), headed a Scituate, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her niece, M. Alice Lincoln, a widow, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), and her boarder, Marion I. Dickson, a public school teacher, aged thirty-four years (b. MA). Harriet Jones owned their house on First Parish Road, which was valued at $1.800. They did not have a radio set. (Part of this household were enumerated on different pages).

Marion I. Dickson married in Northfield, NH, May 2, 1941, James H. Sanderson, both of Boscawen, NH. She was a teacher, aged forty-five years, and he was a widowed leather worker, aged fifty-four years. He was born in Columbia, NH, circa 1887, son of Gilbert D. and Lillie (Prince) Sanderson.

Marion I. (Dickson) Sanderson died in Boscawen, NH, in 1969. James H. Sanderson died in Boscawen, NH, January 27, 1977.

Zilpha A. Capron – Grades 3-4 – c1926-27

Zilpha Capron was born in Belmont, MA, July 8, 1906, daughter of Seth A. “Alton” and Edna (Corson) Capron.

Seth A. Capron, a foundry assistant superintendent, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), headed a Westfield, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of four years), Edna C. Capron, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his daughters, Zilpha Capron, aged three years (b. MA), and Alma Capron, aged one year (b. MA). Seth A. Capron rented their house at 25 Mill Street. Edna C. Capron was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Seth A. Capron died in Westfield, MA, January 1, 1918. Edna (Corson) Capron brought her children to live at her parents farm in Rochester, NH.

James Corson, a farmer (own farm), aged seventy-four years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. Corson, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), his daughters, Edna R. Capron, a widow, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and  Bertha L. Corson, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), his [grand] daughters, Ziltha Capron, aged thirteen years (b. MA), and Alma Capron, aged eleven years (b. MA), and his sister-in-law, Delia Corson, a widow, aged seventy years (b. NH). James Corson owned their farm on Portland Street.

SANBORNVILLE. Visitors from this village were in attendance at the Hallowe’en party of the third and fourth grades at the grammar school building in Milton. The program showed great patience and originality on the part of the teacher, Miss Zilpha Capron (Farmington News, November 5, 1926).

Mary E. Corson, a widow, aged seventy-seven (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Edna Capron, a widow, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), her granddaughters, Zilpha Capron, a public school teacher (b. MA), aged twenty-three years, and Alma Capron, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and her daughter, Bertha L. Corson, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH). Mary E. Corson owned their farm on Portland Street, which was valued at $5,000. They had a radio set.

Zilpha Capron married in East Rochester, NH, July 29, 1937, Ralph W. Braids, she of Rochester and he of Providence, RI. She was a teacher, aged thirty years, and he was a chiropractor, aged forty-seven years. He was born in Providence, RI, May 7, 1890, the son of J. Frank and Evelyn (Wilbur) Braids.

Ralph W. Braids, a private practice chiropractor, aged forty-nine years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Zilpha Braids, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), his son, Olin C. [Orin C.] Braids, aged one year (b. RI), his mother, Evelyn W. Braids, aged seventy-six years (b. RI), and his aunt, Emma E. Whiting, aged eighty-seven years (b. RI). Ralph W. Braids owned their house on Hope Street, which was valued at $7,500. The adults had all lived in Connecticut, RI, in 1935, except for Zilpha Braids, who had lived in Rochester, NH.

Ralph W. Braids died in Warwick, RI, in May 1971. Zilpha A. (Capron) Braids died in Newburyport, MA, April 13, 2003, aged ninety-six years.

Grace A. Flanders – Grades 5-6 – 1926-27

Grace Annie Flanders was born in Bradford, NH, August 31, 1906, daughter of Walter H. and Cleora (Sargent) Flanders.

Elnore Flanders, a boarding-house keeper, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Plymouth, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Helen C. Flanders, an insurance company bookkeeper, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Grace A. Flanders, a grade school teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Caroline Flanders, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Frank H. Flanders, an A&P store clerk, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Richard A. Flanders, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Mildred E. Flanders, aged twelve years (b. NH), and her boarder, Hattie M. Bagley, a widow, aged eighty-three years (b. NH). Elnore Flanders rented their house on Langton Street, for $19 per month. They had a radio set.

She married in Clinton Heights, NY, December 25, 1939, LeRoy Brown. He was born in NY, circa 1881. He died in 1967.

Grace A. (Flanders) Brown died in Delanson, NY, April 17, 1995.

Charles E. Glover – Grades 7-8, Principal – 1926-28

Charles Edwin Glover was born in Hebron, ME, January 2, 1897, son of Edwin M. and Gertrude L. (Bridgham) Glover.

Edwin M. Glover, a farmer (own farm), aged sixty-two years (b. ME), headed a Hebron, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Gertrude L. Glover, aged fifty-six years, his children, Charles E. Glover, a private practice law student, aged twenty-two years, and George G. Glover, a laborer (at home), aged twenty-one years, and his mother-in-law, Mary A. Bridgham, aged eighty-three years. Edwin M. Glover owned their farm in Hebron Village, free-and-clear.

Charles Glover appeared in the Milton directory of 1927, as principal of the Milton grammar school, resident in Milton.

Charles E. Glover received a $3 tax abatement in Hebron, ME, in 1928, due to his having already paid in Milton, NH (Hebron, ME, Town Report for the Year Ending February 9, 1928).

Augustus W. Thompson, a gas engines machinist, aged fifty-four years (b. NY), headed a Groton, CT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eleven years), Edna E. Thompson, at home boarders, aged forty-six years (b. NY), and his lodgers, Charles E. Glover, a grade school teacher, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), and Myles C. Comstock, aged forty-six years (b. NY). Augustus W. Thompson owned their house on Main Street, which was valued at $6,000. They had a radio set.

Charles E. Glover died in Pensacola, FL, December 25, 1974.

GLOVER. Mr. Charles E. Glover, 78, of 25 Horsehoe Ct., died Wednesday morning in a local hospital. Mr. Glover was a native of Maine and had resided in Pensacola for the past 30 years. He was a member of the East Brent Baptist Church, a retired postal clerk and a veteran of World War I. Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Stella Glover of Pensacola, and a brother, George Glover of South Portland, Maine, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be 10 a.m. Friday from the East Brent Baptist Church with the Rev. Joe Haigler officiating. The body will be placed in the church one hour prior to services. Active pallbearers will be Gerald Adcox, J.W. Turk, A.R. Kunselman, David Melton, Dan Bares, and Keitz Habburay. Honorary pallbearers will be members of the Barrancas Sunday School Class of the East Brent Baptist Church. Burial will be in the Bayview Memorial Park Cemetery with McNeil-Keyes Funeral Home directing (Pensacola News (Pensacola, FL), December 26, 1974).

Helen A. (Bliss) Chamberlain – Grades 3-4 – 1927-33, Grade 4 – 1934-36

Helen Agnes Bliss was born in Berlin, MA, July 19, 1875, daughter of C.H. and Augusta (Staples) Bliss.

Helen A. Bliss married in Berlin, MA, October 30, 1895, Clifton R. Chamberlain, she of Berlin and he of Marlboro, NH. She was at home, aged twenty years, and he was a shoe cutter, aged twenty-one years. He was born in Marlboro, MA, August 28, 1874, son of Arthur R. and Caroline E. (Rice) Chamberlain.

Clifton R. Chamberlain, a shoe clerk, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), headed a Norwich, CT, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Helen A. Chamberlain, a school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. MA). Clifton R. Chamberlain rented their house on Rogers Avenue.

Clifton R. Chamberlain, a dentist (own shop), aged thirty-five years (b. MA), headed a Norwich, CT, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Helen A. Chamberlain, aged thirty-four years (b. MA). Clifton R. Chamberlain rented their house on Laurel Hill Avenue.

Clifton R. Chamberlain, a practical dentist, aged forty-five years (b. MA), headed a Norwich, CT, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Helen A. Chamberlain, aged forty-four years (b. MA). Clifton R. Chamberlain owned their house at 239 Laurel Hill Avenue, with a mortgage.

Peter J. Lover, a fibre mill laborer, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Alice M. Lover, aged forty years (b. NH), his children, Valna I. Lover, a grammar school teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and Wilbur C. Lover, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Helen Chamberlain, a [divorced] grammar school teacher, aged fifty-four years (b. MA). Peter J. Lover owned their house on Church Street, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set.

Mrs. Helen Chamberlain was succeeded by Miss Louise Sayward, who is a graduate of Keene Teachers’ College, with experience (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report, 1936).

Clifton R. Chamberlain died January 26, 1940. Helen A. Chamberlain died in Pinellas, FL, February 29, 1952, aged seventy-six years.

OBITUARIES. Mrs. Helen A. Chamberlain. Mrs. Helen A. Chamberlain, retired public school teacher, died yesterday morning at her home, 844 Third Avenue South. She was 76 years old. Born in Berlin, Mass., Mrs. Chamberlain came to St. Petersburg two weeks ago from Melrose, Mass. She is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Fred G. Bliss, Connecticut, and Mrs. Clifton Walcott, Barre, Mass.; a nephew, Ronald H. Winde, Melrose, and a niece, Mrs. George Beckwith, Connecticut. Friends may call this afternoon and evening at Baynard’s Chapel (Tampa Bay Times, March 1, 1952).

Sarah L. Jenness – Grades 5-6 – 1927-28

Sarah L. Jenness was born in Rochester, NH, in 1906, daughter of James G. and Edith M. (Lord) Jenness.

James G. Jenness, a shoe factory treer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edith M. Jenness, aged forty-one years (b. NH), his children, Sarah L. Jenness, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Edith M. Jenness, aged eleven years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Albert C. Lord, a steam railroad fireman, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). James G. Jenness rented their house at 97 Main Street.

Sarah L. Jenness appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1928, as a teacher, resident at 25 Academy street. James G. Jenness appeared also, as being employed at 21 Hanson street, with his house at 25 Academy street.

Sarah L. Jenness married in Rochester, NH, November 3, 1928, Thomas W. Axon, both of Rochester. She was a teacher, aged twenty-two years, and he was a salesman, aged forty-two years. He was born in South Boston, MA, November 17, 1885, son of Emmanuel and Sarah (Russell) Axon.

Thomas Axon, a wholesale fish salesman, aged forty-three years (b. MA), headed a Weymouth, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Sarah L. Axon, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), his child, Thomas G. Axon, aged one year, three months (b. NH), and his nephew-in-law, J. Robert Grant, aged twenty years (b. NH). Thomas Axon owned their house at 11 Upland Road, which was valued at $3,600. They had a radio set.

NEWTON. Arthur English, 4, of 286 River st., West Newton, was slightly injured when struck by a truck near his home yesterday. The child, according to the police report, ran out from behind a parked truck and was hit by the right front fender of a truck driven by Thomas Axon, 11 Upland road, South Weymouth (Boston Globe, October 9, 1931).

Thomas Axon, a wholesale smoked fish salesman, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), headed a Hanover, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Sarah L. Axon, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), his child, Thomas G. Axon, aged eleven years (b. NH). Thomas Axon rented their house on North Street, for $20 per month. They had resided in Pembroke, MA, in 1935.

Thomas Axon died in North Hanover, MA, July 9, 1953, aged fifty-nine years.

DEATH NOTICES. AXON – In North Hanover, suddenly, July 8. Thomas Axon of 999 Mam St., in his 60th [68th] year. Funeral service at the North Hanover Baptist Church on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Interment in Hanover Center Cemetery. Friends may call at the Rice Funeral Home. IS Webster st., Rockland, Friday from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. (Boston Globe, July 9, 1953).

Sarah L. (Jenness) Axon died in 1987.

Martha W. (White) Griffin – Grades 5 -6 – 1928-29

Martha E. White was born in Woodsville, NH, in 1905, daughter of Charles E, and Elizabeth (Guthrie) White.

Martha R. White married in Woodsville, NH, July 23, 1927, Archibald L. “Archie” Griffin, both of Woodsville. She was a teacher, aged twenty-two years, and he was a railroad clerk, aged twenty-seven years. He was born in Natick, MA, circa 1900, son of Fred S. and Amelia (Rowden) Griffin.

Emerald T. Halgrin, a landscape gardener, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Nashua, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Laura M. Halgrin, aged twenty-five years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and his lodger, Martha R. Griffin, a public school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Emerald T. Halgrin rented their house at 4 Main Street, for $35 per month.

Archibald L. Griffin died in Amherst, NH, October 2, 1935.  Martha R. (White) Griffin died in Holyoke, MA, July 28, 1973, aged sixty-eight years.

DEATHS. MRS. MARTHA R. WHITE. WINDSOR LOCKS – Mrs. Martha R. White, 68, of 125 S. Center St. died Saturday in Holyoke Hospital, Holyoke, Mass. Born in Woodsville, N.H., she formerly lived in Westfield and Enfield before moving to Windsor Locks four years ago. She taught Grade 5 in South Street School for 12 years, retiring last year. She was a member of the Senior Citizens Club and the Retired Teachers Association. She was a past officer of the Windsor Locks Teacher Association. She leaves a son, James White of Westfield and a sister, Mrs. Mabel Wilbur of Lebanon. The funeral is Monday at 2 p.m. in Windsor Locks Funeral Home, 41 Spring St. Burial will be at the convenience of the family Calling hours are today from 7 to 9 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the Martha White Scholarship Fund, care of the superintendent of Whie Schools here (Hartford Courant, [Sunday,] July 29, 1973).

William S. Nagle – Grades 7-8, Principal – 1928-29

William Stephen Nagle was born in Gloucester, MA, December 9, 1892, son of John J. and Catherine E. “Kate” (Geary) Nagle.

John Nagle, manager of a fish concern, aged sixty years (b. Ireland), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Catherine E. Nagle, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), and his children, Alice Nagle, an insurance co. stenographer, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), Elizabeth Nagle, a school teacher, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), and William S. Nagle, a meat business salesman, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA). John Nagle owned their house at 22 Coolidge Street, free-and-clear. He immigrated in 1871, and became a naturalized citizen in 1885.

William Stephen Nagle married in Brookline, MA, August 4, 1924, Ida May Rice. She was born in Guilford, ME, circa 1896, daughter of Selden D. Rice.

MISS IDA M. RICE BECOMES BRIDE OF WILLIAM S. NAGLE. A pretty wedding was solemnized last evening at St. Aidan’s Church, Brookline, when Miss Ida M. Rice, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Selden D. Rice of Guilford. Me., became the bride of William S. Nagle, son of Mrs. Katherine E. Nagle of 92 Coolidge st., Brookline. The marriage was performed by Rev. Dr. John T. Creagh. pastor of the church. The bride was attended by her sister, Miss Dorothea Rice of Boston. The groom was attended by his brother-in-law, John S.K. Hunt of Brookline. The bride was graduated from the Guilford High School and the Boston School of Domestic Science, and for the past five years has been, dietitian at Lasell Seminary, Auburndale. The groom was graduated from Dartmouth in 1916, and is a prominent Boston business man. He is a member of the D.K.E. fraternity and Dragon Society, and served two years with the British forces in Palestine. Mr. and Mrs. Nagle left immediately for New York, and tomorrow will sail for an extended European tour. They will be at home after Oct. 15 at their Brookline residence (Boston Globe, August 5, 1924).

William S. Nagel, a high school French teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), headed a Bourne, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Ida R. Nagel, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), and his child, Joan Nagel, aged two years (b. ME). William S. Nagle rented their house on the “Road Off Country Road [from] Bourne to Falmouth,” for $25 per month. They did not have a radio set.

William S. Nagle died in Belmont, MA, in 1965. Ida M. (Rice) Nagle died in Belmont, MA, December 15, 1968.

LATE DEATH NOTICES. NAGLE – Of Belmont. December 15. Ida M. (Rice) of 86 Creeley rd., wife of the late William S. Nagle, and roomer oi Mrs. Joanne McCandless. of Lincoln, Neb., also survived by 3 grandchildren Melinda, Margaret, and Robin McCandless. Services at the Short. Williamson, and Diamond Funeral Home, 52 Trapelo Rd., BELMONT, Wednesday, December 18, at 10 a.m. Friends may call at the funeral home, Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 (Boston Globe, December 17, 1968).

References:

Colby College. (1917). Ninety-Seventh Annual Catalog of Colby College, For the Year 1916-17. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=CK1IAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA20

Colby College. (1920). General Catalogue of Officers, Graduates and Former Students of Colby College, Centennial Edition, 1820-1920. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=7Z5AAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA238

Find a Grave. (2018, April 27). Sarah L. Jenness Axon. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/189215601/sarah-l-axon

Find a Grave. (2019, August 16). Zilpha Braids. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/202205295/zilpha-braids

Find a Grave. (2012, August 9). Grace Constance Fletcher Willey. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115184125/grace-constance-willey

Find a Grave. (2015, October 18). Marion I. Dickson Sanderson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/153918052/marion-i_-sanderson

Find a Grave. (2011, February 8). Laura Williams. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/65360008/laura-williams

Farmington Recipes of 1879

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | October 7, 2020

The Farmington News, whose circulation included West Milton and Milton at any rate, published the following five recipes in its weekly issue of Friday, June 20, 1879. The cook was not credited.

CORN MUFFINS – Three cupfuls of corn meal, one cupful flour, one egg, one-half cupful of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of cream tartar and one of soda; add a piece of butter, size of an English walnut, and enough milk to moisten. Bake quickly.

Lemon juice, at double the cream of tartar amount, is regarded as a substitute for cream of tartar. For example, four teaspoons of lemon juice might be substituted for the two tablespoons of cream of tartar mentioned here.

Reference sources describe English walnuts as having a slightly oval shape and measuring 1½–2″ in diameter.

A “quick” oven temperature would be about 375-400º Fahrenheit. Modern recipes suggest 400º for the first ten minutes, followed by 375º for an additional ten to fifteen minutes or so. (Until a toothpick comes out clean).

SCOTCH SHORTBREAD – Rub together into a stiff short paste two pounds flour, one pound of butter and six ounces loaf sugar, make it into square cakes, about a half inch thick, pinch them all along the edge at the top; over the whole surface of the cakes sprinkle some white comfits; put the cakes on tins so as to touch each other on their edges, and bake in a slow oven.

Strictly speaking, Scotch is a drink, as in Scotch Whisky (uisge beatha), and Scottish would be the descriptive adjective attached to shortbread.

Loaf sugar was merely refined sugar that had been formed into a conical loaf in a mold. A comfit is a confection consisting of dried fruits, nuts, seeds or spices coated with sugar.

A “slow” oven temperature would be about 300º Fahrenheit. Modern recipes suggest 325º for 20-25 minutes. (Until the surface is lightly browned).

PICKLED CAULIFLOWER – Tear off the leaves from a head of cauliflower and cut the head apart at every stalk. Put the pieces into strong brine and let them stand twenty-four hours. Boil two ounces of mixed spices in a quart of cider vinegar; drain the cauliflower, put in jars and pour on the vinegar boiling hot. When cold, cover, and put away two weeks before using.

One modern recipe suggests teaspoons of coriander seeds and mustard seeds, and a ½ teaspoon of cumin seeds, for the mixed spices. Another suggests a spicier mix of jalapeño or habanero pepper, garlic, and lime juice.

The result might be preserved long-term through canning or bottling. Alternatively, the pickled cauliflower mix should steep for a couple of days in a refrigerator, and be eaten up from there within two weeks. Some suggest the addition of a few other vegetables, chosen for a pleasing mix of colors.

PICCALILLI – Soak a peck of green tomatoes for twenty-four hours in salt water. Chop them up quite fine, adding three or four green peppers, chopped, after removing the seed; mix them with a teacup of white mustard seed. Scald enough good vinegar to cover them, spicing it with pepper, cloves and allspice in a thin bag. Pour the vinegar upon the tomatoes. Tie up the mouth of the jar in which it is put away.

My father is quite fond of piccalilli as a condiment, although he uses “store-bought” piccalilli. This version might be canned or bottled, but its final step implies that it was expected to be used up quite quickly. I believe that is called “refrigerator canning,” i.e., it is expected to be used in the near future, rather than to sit on a shelf for an extended time.

A peck of tomatoes would be a quarter-bushel (or eight quarts) of them. That is the makings of a lot of piccalilli, unless one is an aficionado such as my father. One might reasonably halve or even quarter the amounts given.

CURRY OF COLD MEAT – Cut thin slices of cold roast beef into rather small pieces; slice thinly and fry an onion in about two tablespoonfuls of butter until nicely browned; then pour in as much good broth as required for the gravy; add a little salt and a tablespoonful of curry powder; let boil up and add the beef; stir constantly for ten minutes; make a border or wall of boiled rice around a dish and pour the meat and gravy in the center.

The beef broth might be thickened with a tablespoon of flour. Some modern recipes include also a small amount – say a ½ cup – of tomato sauce, or to substitute noodles for the rice. Others add in also small amounts of cloves, garlic, cinnamon, ginger, and red pepper.

References:

Food. (2020). Oven Temperature. Retrieved from www.food.com/about/oven-temperature-528

Milton Businesses in 1930

By Muriel Bristol | October 4, 2020

The Milton business entries gathered from the Milton, Milton Mills & Wakefield, Sanbornville, N.H., Union, New Hampshire Directory, Including a Directory of Lebanon, Me., 1930. (The category headings are not original).


MILTON. Population, 1428. On Northern Division, B.&M. Railroad. Milton Mills is reached from Union Station, 4 miles. A live manufacturing and agricultural town. Eight miles from Rochester and 20 Miles from Dover.


Automobile Garages

Burke, Charles L. (Lillian M.), garage, hairdresser, Main, M.
CHASE, Addie H., store, filling sta., Main, Milton.
KNIGHT, WILBUR C. (Sarah B.), garage, Main, Milton.
RINES, LAFAYETTE A., filling sta., Main, Milton.
STEVENS, FRANK D. (Marguerite), garage, M.M.
TANNER BROS. (George L. and S.C.), garage, Main.
York, Frank (Alice S.), filling sta., Milton.

Barber

Burke, Charles L. (Lillian M.), garage, hairdresser, Main, M.
PAGE, ROBERT (Ida S.), barber, Milton Mills.
Tanner, Hervey C., barber, Mill, Milton.

Clergymen

Ervin, G. Clifton (Elizabeth T.), pastor, Community Church, Milton.
Poelman, Theodore J. (Helen F.), clergyman, Farmington, R.D.

Clothing Dealers

McINTOSH, ROBERT A., clothing, shoes, Main, Milton.

Coal Dealers (See Wood Dealers)

PLUMMER, HAZEN (Grace F.), coal, Silver, Milton.

Contractors

ARCHIBALD, MOTT L., contractor, Milton Mills.

Druggists

WILLEY, J. HERBERT (Grace F.), druggist, Main, M.

Dry Goods

AVERY & ROBERTS, dry goods, wood and lumber, Main, Milton.

Electric

Lord, J. Edwin (Ruth W.), electrician, Milton.
Twin State Gas & Electric Co., Milton.

Engineers

Bryant, Harlan M., civil engineer, h. Main, Milton.
JONES, IRA W. & Co., consulting engineers, Main, M.
SPENCER, FRANK F. (Ramona W.), undertaker, civil engineer, Milton Mills.

Feed and Grain

DREW, Samuel E., grain, milk, Main, Milton.

General Stores

CHASE, Addie H., store, filling sta., Main, Milton.
HORNE, JOHN E. (Gertrude C.), general store, M.M.
HUNT, JAMES G. (Emma F.), store, Union R.D.

Government Officials

BLAISDELL, SAMUEL G. Flora R.), postmaster, Charles, Milton.
Chamberlain, Fred M., selectman, Milton.
Reynolds, Willis L. (Almira M.), sheriff, Milton Mills.

Grocers

Caswell, Fred E. (Frances), fruit, etc., Milton Mills.
DOWNS, Annette F., Main, Milton.
Horne, Charles A., market, Milton.
Howard, Fred (Colista S.), Market, Milton.
Lawson, Colistia M., grocer, Main, Milton.
LORD, HARRIET A., Main, Milton.
MILTON FRUIT CO., James Mitchell, Main, Milton.
Milton Spa, Thomas Voudomas, Main, Milton.
PIKE, PHILIP G. (Rosamond P.), market, M.M.
Voudomas, Thomas (Luetta), Milton Spa, Main, Milton.

Hardware

BRAGG, P.W., hardware, H.D. Coles, mgr., Main, M.

Hotels

DOWNS, Fred (Ina), Main, Milton.
Ford, Abbie J., boarding house, Lebanon side, Milton.
HODGDON, ELLSWORTH A. (Cora), hotel, Milton.
MAPLE COTTAGE, A.L. Percy, prop., Main, Milton.
PERCY, ARTHUR L. (Marion F.), prop. Maple Cottage, Main, Milton.

Hotels (Summer)

DORR, HERVEY W. (Catherine M.), Lake View Farm, summer boarders, Union R.D.

Ice Dealers

Porter-Milton Ice Co., wholesale ice, Milton.

Insurance

FINEGAN, Herbert F. (Clara B.), insurance, Milton.

Laundries

ELLIS, George W. (Ida M.), laundry, Union R.D.

Lumber Dealers

AVERY & ROBERTS, dry goods, wood and lumber, Main, Milton.
Chamberlin, Moses G. (Arthie E.), lumber, M.M.
PLUMMER, JOSEPH L., lumber, Union, R.D.
ROBERTS, FRED B. (Mary J.), lumber, Main, Milton.

Manufacturers

KENNEBUNK MFG. CO., W.S. Lougee, Supt., mfrs. of fibre products, Charles, Milton.
MILTON LEATHER BOARD Co., Seth F. Dawson, Mgr., mfrs. leatherboard, Milton.
Simes, Fred H. (Mary A.), supt. Townsend’s, M.M.
SPAULDING FIBRE CO. INC, leatherboard, N.R.
TOWNSEND, HENRY A. (Ingeborg V.), blanket mfg., Milton Mills.

News Dealers

Pinkham, James D. (Sarah), newsdealer, Main, Milton.

Painter

Ayer, Richard E., stage, mail and express, painter, M.M.
Connolly, Timothy, painter, Milton Mills.
Libby, Aubrey D. (Florence), painter, Milton Mills.
Witham, Perley D., painter, Milton Mills.

Physicians

Hart, Malcolm A.H. (Estelle L.), physician, Milton.
Bragdon, Laura F., emp. Dr. Hart, Milton.

Restaurants

Webber, Nellie B., [widow Royal K.,] Blue Bird Tea Room, Milton.

Sand and Gravel

Main Sand & Gravel Co., C.W. Wilson, Milton.

Teachers

Beaton, Gladys M., teacher, h. H.A. Beaton, Main, M.
Chamberlain, Helen A., teacher, Church, Milton.
Dickson, Marion I., teacher, h. W.A. do., Milton.
Hayes, Helen F., teacher, Main, Milton.
Judkins, Eshburn O. (Lena E.), Headmaster N.H.S., Main, Milton.
McGregor, Ferne C., teacher, Farmington, R.D.
Newell, Alvin A. (Winona), Prin. Gram. sch’l, Silver, M.
Page, Norma M., teacher, h. Robert do., Milton Mills.
Southwick, Ruth A., teacher, Main, Milton.
Williams, Laura H., teacher, Main, Milton.

Telephone

Jones, Edith E., agt. N.E.T. & T. Co., Main, Milton.
Levi D. (Edith E.), telephone exchange, Main, M.

Transport

Ayer, Richard E., stage, mail and express, painter, M.M.
Columbus, Arthur N., truckman, Milton.
Ham, James J. (Blanche C.), trucking, Milton.
Laskey, Allie J. (Lizzie A.), trucking, Union.
Piper, Charles E. (Helen), teamster, Union, R.D.
Pippin, Victor J., trucking, Milton Mills.
Staples, Harry W., trucking, Union, R.D.

Undertakers

Haines, Calvin S. (Cora H.), undertaker, Milton Mills.
SPENCER, FRANK F. (Ramona W.), undertaker, civil engineer, Milton Mills.

Wood Dealers (See Coal Dealers)

Place, George M. (Addie R.), wood, Church, Milton.


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1927;


References:

Shaw, W.E. (1930). Milton, Milton Mills & Wakefield, Sanbornville, N.H., Union, New Hampshire Directory, Including a Directory of Lebanon, Me., 1930, Embracing a General Directory of the Inhabitants. Boston, MA: W.E. Shaw, Publisher.