Milton’s Phoenix House, c1880-1908

By Muriel Bristol | November 14, 2021

The name “Phoenix” might suggest an establishment reborn after a fire. On the other hand, the Phoenix House might have been named in imitation of one of the many existing Phoenix houses, hotels, and halls both in New Hampshire and elsewhere. The most prominent was the Phoenix Hall in Concord, NH.

The available information seems to suggest that Milton’s Glendale House (c1879-83), Phoenix House (1883-08) and, finally, Chamberlain House (1908-09), might have been all in the same location although under a succession of different names. (Strafford County Deeds might shed further light upon this question).

The identified proprietors of Milton’s Phoenix House during this period were Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr., Ed Grant (and his locum Jacob D. Garland), Mrs. Remick (and her locum John E. Hayes), E. Edgerly (and his locum Horace C. Drew), and Fred M. Chamberlain.

Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr. – c1883-1886

Horatio Gates Wentworth, Jr., was born in Lebanon, ME, July 4, 1841, son of Horatio G. and Esther (Lowell) Wentworth. (He and his father were namesakes for Revolutionary War General Horatio Gates).

Horatio Wentworth, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon (“North Lebanon P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Esther Wentworth, aged forty-five years (b. ME), Horatio Wentworth, [Jr.,] a farm laborer, aged nineteen years (b. ME), Ann M. Wentworth, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Timothy Wentworth, aged eleven years (b. ME), Mary A. Wentworth, aged nine years, and Jerry E. Wentworth, aged four years (b. ME). Horatio Wentworth had real estate valued at $800 and personal estate valued at $150.

Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr., married Susan H. Hersom. She was born in Lebanon, ME, December 10, 1841, daughter of John and Asenath (Shorey) Hersom.

Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr., of Lebanon, ME, registered for the Civil War Class I military draft in York County, ME, in June 1863. He was a laborer, married, aged twenty-two years.

H.G. Wentworth, Jr., a farmer, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan Wentworth, keeping house, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME). H.G. Wentworth, Jr., had read estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $100. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Edmond Grant, a hotel keeper, aged forty-one years (b. ME), and Sylvester Fall, a retail grocer, aged forty-one years (b. ME).

H.G. Wentworth appeared in the Milton directories of 1880, 1881, and 1882, as proprietor of Milton’s Glendale House hotel. (The Glendale House had not appeared in the prior Milton business directory of 1877 nor in those that preceded it).

Horatio G. Wentworth, keeps hotel, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA [SIC]), headed a Milton (“Milton 3 Ponds Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Susan Wentworth, keeping house (hotel), aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), and his boarders, George Babcock, works for ice co., aged twenty-two years (b. MA), Nelson Babcock, works for ice co., aged nineteen years (b. MA), George Ingalls, works for ice co., aged thirty years (b. MA), George B. Knowlton, works for ice co., aged twenty-three years (b. MA), Howard Conkling, works for ice co., aged twenty-eight years (b. VT), and Thomas J. Gile, works for ice co., aged twenty years (b. ME). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of George I. Jordan, works on shoes, aged forty-five years (b. ME), and Albert F. Downs, works on shoes, aged thirty years (b. NH).

MILTON. Horatio Wentworth, proprietor of the Glendale House, has sold out to parties from Dover. We learn that he is going into business at East Rochester (Farmington News, February 25, 1881).

AUCTION SALES. HOTEL AT AUCTION. The well-known Glendale House, situate at Milton “Three Ponds” village, on the banks of a beautiful lake on the Conway division of the Eastern Railroad, will be sold at public auction, THURSDAY, May 25, at 2 o’clock P.M., sharp; situate in a growing manufacturing village, amid beautiful scenery, pure air, on the direct line of White Mountain travel, excellent boating, fishing, etc.; within two minutes walk of the depot, it presents superior advantages as a summer resort for the invalid or pleasure-seeker; terms liberal. Apply to H.A. WORTHEN, carriage manufacturer, or V.H. McDANIEL, Auctioneer, Dover, N.H. (Boston Globe, May 23, 1882).

We may note that the auction advertisement’s highlights seem to have been pitched more towards rusticators, i.e., tourist interests, than the ice industry men that had filled his rooms in 1880.

Despite the report of his intention to pursue other interests, H.G. Wentworth appeared once more in the Milton business directory of 1884, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

Horatio G. Wentworth, a farmer, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA [SIC]), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-nine years), Susan H. Wentworth, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), his mother, Esther Wentworth, aged eighty-four years (b. ME), and his boarders, Freeman A. Peacock, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA), and Daniel Tate, a day laborer, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME). Horatio G. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear. Esther Wentworth was the mother of seven children, of whom four were still living.

Horatio G. Wentworth, a general farm farmer, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA [SIC]), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-six years), Susan H. Wentworth, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), Simeon Streeter, a farm laborer (home farm), aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Freeman A. Peacock, own income, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA). Horatio G. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear. Susan H. Wentworth was the mother of no children.

Susan (Hersom) Wentworth died of chronic interstitial nephritis in Lebanon, ME, December 11, 1917, aged seventy-six years, and one day. She had resided in Lebanon, ME, for thirty years, i.e., since about 1886-87, having moved there from her previous residence in Milton, NH. H.E. Anderson, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Nathaniel S. Carll, a general farm farmer, aged forty-six years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alta M. Carll, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and his boarder, Horatio G. Wentworth, a widower, aged seventy-eight years (b. MA [SIC]). Nathaniel S. Carll owned their farm on the Milton North Road, free-and-clear.

Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr., died in 1925.

Jacob D. Garland – 1886-1889

Jacob Dudley “Dudley” Garland was born in Middleton, NH, in 1833, son of Alfred and Abigail (Horne) Garland.

Jacob D. Garland married (1st) in Farmington, NH, April 13, 1852, Caroline W. Henline, he of Farmington, NH, and she of Somerville, NH.

Jacob D. Garland married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, January 9, 1855, Ann A. Pinkham, he of Farmington, NH, and she of Somerville, NH. She was born in New Durham, NH, September 4, 1837, daughter of Luther and Harriet (Burnham) Pinkham.

Jacob D. Garland, a shoemaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Ann A. Garland, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Llewellen D. Garland, aged five years (b. NH), Eugene A. Garland, aged three years (b. NH), Caroline W. Garland, aged one year (b. NH), and George H. Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged eighteen years (b. NH).

Jacob B. Garland, a landlord, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Anna A. Garland, a landlady, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Loullen B. Garland, at home, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Eugene A. Garland, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Charles Smith, a harness maker, aged thirty years (b. NH), Emma Smith, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Danl. Varney, works in shoe manufactory, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). Jacob B. Garland had personal estate valued at $1,300 and Charles Smith had personal estate valued at $1,000.

Jacob Garland, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ann A. Garland, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and his help, Charles Garland, aged nine years (b. NH). They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of Eugene A. Garland, a farmer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH).

LOCALS. It is reported that J.D. Garland of West Milton has bought Jewell’s Hotel at Bow Lake, Strafford, and will take possession about the first of April (Farmington News, February 29, 1884).

FOR SALE. My farm containing 105 acres. Situated in Milton, two miles from Farmington Village. Good buildings, consisting of a story and half House, with L, containing nine rooms and a good cellar. Nice finished barn, 40×50, built 6 years since. Good shoe shop, hog house, corn house; two good wells of water; good pasture with never failing water and well wooded. Two hundred young apple trees just coming in bearing. Nice garden with a good variety of Pear, Peach and Plum trees. Grapes, Currants, Gooseberries, Strawberries, Raspberries and Blackberries. In a good neighborhood and as pleasant a location as can be found. J.D. GARLAND (Farmington News, March 21, 1884).

LOCALS. The Phoenix Hotel, Milton Three Ponds, J.D. Garland, proprietor, was overhauled by Sheriff Johnson, Saturday, on complaint of C.H. Applebee, of Milton Mills, for the illegal sale of intoxicants. Rum, whiskey and wine were found, and on Monday Mr. Garland appeared before Justice E.W. Fox at Milton and was fined $50 and costs, amounting to $62.80, which was paid (Farmington News, [Friday, November 15, 1885).

Jacob D. Garland was mentioned as an abutter of a property on the Hare Road in West Milton by John H. Hersey, administrator of the estate of Garland’s deceased neighbor, John S. Hersey, in settling the estate in 1886. (Garland’s adjoining land was likely the same that he had advertised for sale in 1884).

… Also another tract of land, in said Milton, containing about 40 acres, and bounded as follows: Northerly by land of Jacob D. Garland, easterly by land of Daniel C. Emery and Ira A. Cook, southerly by land of heirs of Ichabod Hayes, and westerly by land of heirs of Emery Nute, and the hare road, so called (Farmington News, February 5, 1886).

LOCALS. Mrs. Dudley Garland, Milton, met with a painful accident Thursday, cutting her hand severely with a piece of lamp chimney, and in consequence of severe pain had a slight attack of lockjaw. She is now convalescent (May 28, 1886).

J.G. [J.D.] Garland appeared in the Milton business directory of 1887, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

LOCALS. J.D. Garland and wife have taken a tenement in the Newell & Hanson block. They intend to keep a boarding house (Farmington News, December 9, 1887).

A CHAPTER OF ACCIDENTS. … A slight accident broke the monotony of our streets. teams Saturday afternoon, when the teams of J.D. Garland and A.G. Orne collided while both horses were walking moderately along. Orne was in the act of crossing the bead of Central street, when Garland coming down that street attempted to turn the comer by the Boston Clothing Co.’s. The result was they deliberately walked into each other, Garland’s shaft going through one of Orne’s hind wheels, upsetting the latter and throwing him out, but without injuring him. The opposite wheel was knocked out of the hub and one of the perches to the vehicle broken. Garland’s team was uninjured (Farmington News, August 10, 1888).

MILTON. Mr. Garland has thoroughly painted and repaired the Phoenix, and sets one of the cleanest tables to be found (Farmington News, June 21, 1889).

MILTON. It is announced that Mrs. Remick, of Milton Mills, has purchased the Phenix Hotel, owned by Mr. Ed Grant, of Great Falls, and occupied by Mr. Llewellyn [Jacob D.] Garland. It is said that the hotel and stable were sold for the sum of $2,000. Some land on the opposite side of the street, suitable for house lots, were not included in the sale. Mr. Garland has professed to keep a temperance house, which no one will dispute in the least. Mr. and Mrs. Garland, by their genial and kind habits, made many friends, and established the fact, so many times disputed, that a public house could be self-sustaining, if intoxicants could be strictly excluded. It is a pleasure to realize that nothing that can intoxicate can be obtained in or about Milton – not even a glass of ale or cider – nearer than Rochester or Farmington. It is not denied that it is used to some extent, but not as it would be if it were sold here as formerly. Temperance people here recognize the fact, and will make it up hill work for those who attempt its sale here – Cor of Free Press (Farmington News, October 25, 1889).

Dudley Garland appeared in the surviving Veterans’ Schedule of the otherwise destroyed Eleventh (1890) Federal Census. He was said to have enlisted in the 10th Regiment NH Volunteer Infantry, September 28, 1862. He was recorded as a Milton resident served by the Farmington post office, i.e., he was a West Milton resident.

PERSONAL. J.D. Garland and wife would like some children to board. They will, also care for soldiers and invalids. See ad (Farmington News, December 11, 1891).

WANTED. Children to Board. Pension Soldier or Invalids cared for at my home at reasonable prices. MRS. A.A. GARLAND. 10-1m (Farmington News, December 11, 1891).

WEST MILTON. Dudley Garland is dangerously ill (Farmington News, September 10, 1897).

WEST MILTON. Mr. Garland is still critically ill and Mrs. Garland has been ill a few days (Farmington News, September 24, 1897).

Jacob D. Garland died of nervous prostration in Milton, September 22, 1897, aged sixty-six years, five months, and three days. J.S. Elkins, M.D., signed the death certificate.

LOCALS. Miss Gertrude Garland, of the Robinson seminary in Exeter, accompanied by her mother, Mrs. Frank Shapleigh, attended last week the funeral of her grandfather, Dudley B. Garland of West Milton. The deceased leaves a widow and one son, besides his granddaughters, Miss Maud Garland and the young lady before mentioned (Farmington News, October 1, 1897).

LOCALS. Mrs. Dudley Garland lost a valuable horse from colic, on Saturday (Farmington News, December 3, 1897).

PERSONAL. Mrs. Dudley Garland of Milton and Miss Maude Garland of this [Farmington] village went to Exeter Wednesday to attend the commencement exercises and reception at Robinson Female seminary, Exeter, where Miss Gertrude Garland, granddaughter of the former and cousin of the latter, graduates in the class of 98 (Farmington News, June 17, 1898).

WEST MILTON. Miss Gertrude Garland, who has completed her studies at Robinson’s Female seminary at Exeter, is with her grandmother, Mrs. Dudley Garland. Miss Garland expects to enter Mt. Holyoke college in September (Farmington News, June 24, 1898).

Ann A. Garland, a farmer, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her boarders, Andrew Hunt, a capitalist, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA), and Robert McGuire, at school, aged eight years (b. MA). She owned her house, with a mortgage. Ann A. Garland was the mother of three children, of whom one was still living. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Arthur Nute, a farmer, aged forty years (b. NH), and John Cook, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH).

Ann A. Garland, a boarding-house housekeeper, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her boarders, Clifton Pinkham, a shoe factory trimming cutter, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), [his wife (of three years),] Mary Pinkham, a shoe factory folder, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Ella M. Cook, a shoe factory fitter, aged seventeen years (b. NH). She owned her house at 42 Central Street, free-and-clear. Ann A. Garland was the mother of three children, of whom one was still living. Mary Pinkham was the mother of two children, of whom none were still living.

LOCALS. W.D. Henderson of Dedham, Mass., has purchased the Ann Garland place in the north part of the village, and it is to be occupied by his father-in-law, Mr. Nickerson, who will remove here from Dedham (Farmington News, February 11, 1910).

Ann A. Garland, a widow, aged eighty-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her lodger, George D. Garland, a shoe factory odd jobs worker, aged twenty-one years (b. ME). She owned her house on Bunker Street, free-and-clear. (Ann A. Garland’s father and mother were said to have been respectively natives of New Hampshire and Tennessee).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Ann Garland of Farmington has been a recent guest of Mr. and Mrs. L.D. Garland (Farmington News, September 20, 1920).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Ann Garland of Farmington celebrated her eighty-fourth birthday last Saturday at the home of her son, L.D. Garland (Farmington News, September 9, 1921).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Cora Garland is still at Farmington caring for Mrs. Ann Garland. Anna Varney is at the home of L.D. Garland, acting in the capacity of housekeeper in the absence of Mrs. Garland (Farmington News, December 9, 1921).

Ann A. (Pinkham) Garland died of chronic myocarditis on the Hare Road in Milton (four weeks’ residence), December 25, 1921, aged eighty-four years, three months, and twenty-one days. P.H. Greeley, M.D., signed the death certificate.

IN MEMORIAM. Ann A. Garland. In the death of Mrs. Ann A. Garland, which occurred at the home of her son, Llewellyn D. Garland, at West Milton last Sunday night, this locality lost one of its oldest and most useful residents. The end resulted from a complication of diseases at the advanced age of 84 years. The deceased was a native of New Durham, the only daughter by the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Luther Pinkham. Except for a few years spent in Canada during the lifetime of her husband, Dudley Garland, she always resided in Farmington and Milton, 25 years In the latter and over 20 in the former. Being of an industrious and retiring temperament, she never affiliated with any organization and those who knew her best met her most often at her home where she always found time to exercise charities that found their way abroad and into the lives of the unfortunate. She possessed a kindly disposition that manifested itself most favorably in a devotion for children and among them she was always happy. A host of friends unite in sympathy for the son and two granddaughters, Mrs. John Rhodes of Worcester, Mass., and Mrs. John Gilman of Laconia. Funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from the home where death occurred, Rev. J.G. Haigh officiating. Remains were taken to Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, December 30, 1921).

John E. Hayes – 1887-189?

John Elihu Hayes was born in Lancaster, NH, September 18, 1832, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Hersom) Hayes.

James Clark, a farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon (“Lebanon Centre”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Hos household included Betsey Clark, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), Mary E. Fall, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), John Clark, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Carrie W. Fall, aged six years (b. ME), Mary Clark, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), and John Hayes, a farm laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME [SIC]). James Clark had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $200. John Hayes had real estate valued at $625.

John E. Hayes married, circa 1861, Mary E. (Clark) Fall. She was born in Lebanon, ME, April 6, 1833, daughter of James and Betsy (Hayes) Clark.

John E. Hayes, of Lebanon, ME, registered for the Civil War Class I military draft in York County, ME, in June 1863. He was a farmer, married, aged twenty-eight years.

John E. Hayes, a farmer, aged thirty-six years (b. ME [SIC]), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary Hayes, keeping house, aged thirty-six years (b. ME), James H. Hayes, aged eight years (b. ME), Richard Hayes, aged three years (b. ME), John E. Clark, a farmer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Betsey Clark, at home, aged seventy-two years (b. ME), and Carrie W. Fall, aged sixteen years (b. ME). John E. Hayes had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $500. John E. Clark had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $1,000.

John E. Hayes, a butcher and farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. Hayes, keeping house, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, James H. Hayes, at school, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Richard Hayes, at school, aged thirteen years (b. ME), and George P. Hayes, at house, aged five years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles H. Prescott, a farmer, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), and William F. Cutts, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. ME).

LOCALS. A.H. Wiggin, clerk at W.I. Nutter’s meat market, is laid by for a season with what doctors pronounce a felon. J.E. Hayes of the Phenix hotel, Milton, is filling his position at the market. Since the writing above we learn that a New York doctor says the trouble is caused by blood poisoning (Farmington News, July 22, 1887).

(A “felon” in this medical sense is an infection or abscess involving the bulbous distal end of a finger).

J.E. Hayes appeared in the Milton business directory of 1889, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

MILTON. There will be a free ball this evening, with a supper at the Phoenix House (Farmington News, [Friday,] December 25, 1891).

John P. Hayes, butchering, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-nine years), Mary E. Hayes, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and his son, George Hayes, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). John P. Hayes owned their farm, free-and-clear. Mary E. Hayes was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Moses B. Plummer, a farm laborer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and Frank G. Horne, a commercial traveler, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH).

John E. Hayes died of carcinoma of the bowels on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, November 13, 1901, aged sixty-nine years, and two months. He had lived in Milton for twenty-eight years, having previous lived in Lebanon, ME. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Mary E. (Clark) Hayes died of pulmonary tuberculosis in Milton, October 30, 1903, seventy years, six months, and twenty-four days. She had resided in Milton, for thirty years, i.e., since about 1872-73, having moved there from her previous residence in Lebanon, ME. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Horace C. Drew – 189?-1893

Horace C. Drew was born in Eaton, NH, July 17, 1849, son of Thomas and Sarah (Bryant) Drew.

Horace C. Drew married in Ipswich, MA, March 24, 1873, Margaret E. Walker, he of Middleton, NH, and she of Ipswich, MA. He was a farmer, aged twenty-three years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. Thomas Moroney performed the ceremony. She was born in Ireland, May 23, 1853, daughter of John and Elizabeth “Elsy” (Black) Walker.

Horace Drew, a farmer, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Maggie E. Drew, keeping house, aged twenty-seven years (b. Ireland), and his daughter, Elizabeth S. Drew, aged six years (b. NH).

E. Edgerly appeared in the Milton business directory of 1892, as manager of Milton’s Hotel Phœnix. Horace Drew appeared as its manager.

LOCALS. Horace Drew of Middleton has 35 boarders at his home for the summer season (Farmington News, August 12, 1898).

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has quite a large number of summer boarders (Farmington News, July 7, 1899).

Horace Drew, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Middleton, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Margaret E. Drew, aged forty-six years (b. Ireland), Edwin C. Drew, a farm laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), William D. Drew, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Clifton Drew, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), Clifford Drew, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), and John J. Drew, at school, aged six years (b. NH), and his boarders, Calvin Head, a teamster, aged forty years (b. NH), Fannie Head, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and George Willard, a farm laborer, aged seventy years (b. ME). Horace Drew owned their farm, free-and-clear. Margaret E. Drew was the mother of eight children, of whom six were still living. Fannie Head was the mother of one child, of whom none was still living.

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has his usual number of summer boarders (Farmington News, July 27, 1900).

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has had his usual number of guests at Valley Farm but they are now fast returning home (Farmington News, August 31, 1900).

LOCAL. Horace Drew of Middleton is entertaining between thirty and forty summer boarders from Boston and elsewhere (Farmington News, July 26, 1901).

MIDDLETON. George Willard, who has been with Horace Drew for several years, has returned to his old home in Georgia (Farmington News, December 13, 1901).

MIDDLETON. Mrs. Horace Drew has a few summer boarders (Farmington News, June 9, 1905).

Horace Drew, a general farm farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Middleton, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-four years), Margaret M. Drew, aged fifty-four years (b. England [SIC]), Edwin C. Drew, a lumber teamster, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), Clifton T. Drew, a lumber teamster, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Clifford H. Drew, a home farm laborer, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and John J. Drew, a home farm laborer, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Horace Drew owned their farm, with a mortgage. Margaret E. Drew was the mother of nine children, of whom six were still living. She had immigrated in 1860.

MIDDLETON. Mrs. Horace Drew, who is seriously ill with a complication of diseases, is a little more comfortable (Farmington News, April 21, 1911).

Margaret E. (Walker) Drew died of heart disease in Middleton, NH, September 20, 1911, aged fifty-eight years, three months, and twenty-eight days. E.C. Perkins signed the death certificate.

Local. Mrs. Horace Drew of Middleton passed away Wednesday morning. Funeral will be held Friday afternoon at the home (Farmington News, September 22, 1911).

Horace C. Drew died of chronic nephritis in Middleton, NH, September 23, 1911, aged sixty-two years, two months, and five days. J.A. Stevens, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Middleton. Entered in to rest September 20, after a long illness, Mrs. Maggie Drew, wife of Horace Drew, aged 58 years. Services were held at the home Friday under the direction of B.F. Perkins. Rev. Mr. Coleman spoke comforting words to the relatives. Saturday, Mr. Drew passed away and these two dear ones who had passed a long and happy life together were reunited in the “great beyond,” after brief separation. The funeral was held Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Drew were among our best townspeople and they will be sadly missed. One daughter, Mrs. Frank Leighton, and five sons, Edwin C., William D., Clifton, Clifford and John, are left to mourn the loss of father and mother in the short space of three days. There are eight grandchildren also, who grieve for them. The sympathy pf the entire community is with them in their double bereavement. Mr. Drew is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Charles Leighton and Mrs. Frank Woodman, also three brothers, Benjamin, Wesley and Ellsworth, and numerous nephews and nieces. (Farmington News, September 29, 1911).

Fred M. Chamberlin – 1893-1908

Frederick Moody “Fred” Chamberlain was born in Milton, May 29, 1858, son of Samuel G. and Mary E. (Fall) Chamberlain.

Samuel G. Chamberlin, a farmer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. Chamberlin, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), his children, Delia E. Chamberlin, at home, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Fred Chamberlin, a peddler, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), and Moses G. Chamberlin, a farm laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and his sister, Lucy R. Chamberlin, at home, aged sixty-one years (b. NH).

Fred M. Chamberlain was installed in the office of Worshipful Marshal of the Eureka Lodge, No. 56, of the International Organization of Grand Templars (I.O.G.T.) in May 1886. The I.O.G.T. was a fraternal organization devoted to temperance.

UNION. At the regular meeting of Eureka Lodge, No. 56, I.O. of G.T., on Tuesday evening the following officers were installed for the present term by Deputy Grand Worthy Chief Templar, A.H. Chamberlain: W.C.T., Chas. W. Horne; W.V.T., Emma Chamberlain; W.R. Secy. Mary F. Horne; W.F. Secy., Frank Tebbetts; W. Treas., Mrs. J.L. Johnson; W. Chap. Albra P. Hanson; W.A.S., Horace H. Moulton; W. Mar., Fred M. Chamberlain; W.D.M., Mary A. Wadleigh; W.I.G., Ida F. Sanborn; W.O.G., Freeman L. Johnson; W.R.H.S., Chas. H. Prescott; W.L.H.S., Lovie Sanborn; P.W.C.T., A.H. Chamberlain. OCCASIONAL (Farmington News, May 21, 1886).

Fred M. Chamberlain married (1st) in Milton, October 9, 1886, Grace M. Dicey, both of Wakefield, NH. He was a laborer, aged twenty-one years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. Henry E. Allen performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, circa 1865, daughter of George W. Dicey.

Son Guy H. Chamberlain was born in Wakefield, NH, July 22, 1887.

LOCALS. At the track, Saturday, Wes Locke and a Mr. Chamberlain of Milton will try and find out whose horse is a trotter. They will probably succeed to the satisfaction of both parties (Farmington News, June 20, 1890).

Daughter Pearl E. Chamberlain was born in Milton, November 14, 1893.

F.M. Chamberlin appeared in the Milton business directories of 1894, and 1898, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

MILTON NEWS LETTER. SEVERAL LIQUOR RAIDS LAST WEEK. The temperance people scored a point last week against the saloon keepers. All the saloons in town were raided one night, with the result that nothing was found in any of the places. But in a subsequent raid the following night their efforts proved more successful and F.M. Chamberlin of the Phoenix House was obliged to settle in police court (Farmington News, September 3, 1897).

Personally Conducted, By Land and Sea. Mr. Fred M. Chamberlain, proprietor of the Phoenix House at Milton, N.H., is to build a new hotel in that town just north of his present house, which will be modern in every particular, and when finished, one of the best equipped and furnished hotels in that section of the country (Boston Home Journal, January 21, 1899).

The new hotel contemplated here was likely “The Sands” summer hotel, built at Meeting House pond, and which Chamberlain managed in later years.

MILTON. A runaway accident was averted, last week, by the prompt action of George E. Wentworth of this village. A team belonging to F.M. Chamberlin stood in front of his stable and started suddenly on the run over the bridge into Lebanon. Wentworth sprang on behind the hack and remained until ascending the hill on the other side, when he secured the reins and restored the team to the owner unhurt (Farmington News, April 25, 1900).

Chamberlin, Fred M.
Fred M. Chamberlin, and one of his horses, near the Milton train station (Photo: Dianne O’Neill). (Note the still extant railroad freight house behind the horse’s head)

Fred Chamberlin, a hotel keeper, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Grace M. Chamberlin, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), his children, Guy Chamberlin, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Pearl Chamberlin, at school, aged six years (b. NH), his servant, Albert F. Downs, a hotel servant, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his boarder, D.L. Perkins, a paper mill operative, aged forty-six years (b. “unknown”). Fred Chamberlin rented their house. Grace M. Chamberlin was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of George Jordan, a picker stick maker, aged sixty-four years (b. ME), and Frank S. Lee, a house painter, aged fifty-four years (b. NH).

F.M. Chamberlin appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, 1904, and 1905-06, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

The neighbor mentioned in the 1900 Census, George I. Jordan, appeared in the Milton directory of 1901, as a manufacturer of picker sticks at 54 Main street, residing there als0. (Frank S. Lee had removed to Roxbury, MA). Albert F. Downs appeared as a laborer, resident at the Phoenix House.

MILTON. Fred Chamberlain was raided last week. Beer was found (Farmington News, August 30, 1901).

Phoenix - 1905Fred M. Chamberlin, of Milton divorced his first wife, Grace M. (Dicey) Chamberlain, of Roxbury, MA, in Strafford County Superior Court, October 2, 1902. He alleged adultery (one had to allege something); and received custody of a minor child, Guy H. Chamberlin. (She died at the NH State Hospital in Concord, NH, June 15, 1908, aged forty-seven years).

MILTON. Fred Chamberlin, proprietor of the Phoenix house, is in a critical condition from a cut on his hand, which has resulted in blood poisoning (Farmington News, March 4, 1904).

DOGS, CATS, ETC. FOR SALE – 1 extra good rabbit dog, $25; others, not so good, for sale. Write F.M. CHAMBERLAIN, Phœnix house, Milton, N.H. (Boston Globe, October 30, 1904).

Son Guy H. Chamberlain married (1st) in Milton, July 8, 1906, Elizabeth M. Cunningham, he of Milton and she of Sanford, ME. He was a hotel clerk, aged twenty-one years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. R.M. Peacock performed the ceremony. She was born in Kinning Park, Glasgow, Scotland, April 22, 1887, daughter of Alexander A. and Elizabeth (Lumsden) Cunningham.

Fred M. Chamberlain married (2nd) in Milton, February 8, 1907, Caroline E. [(Armstrong)] Reed, he of Milton and she of Houlton, ME. He was a hotel proprietor, aged forty-eight years, and she was a widowed housekeeper, aged thirty-two years. She was born in Glassville, New Brunswick, Canada, circa 1874, daughter of James and Abigail (Thompson) Armstrong.

Chamberlain and his second wife aided the victim of the 1908 Hennessey Kidnapping at their hotel.

Hotel Chamberlin Milton, NH
Hotel Chamberlin Milton, NH

Fred M. Chamberlain was proprietor of Chamberlain House in 1909. He kept also for a time a separate summer hotel (“The Sands”) at Meeting House pond.

UNION. Miss Pearl Chamberlain of Milton visited her aunt, Mrs. Edward Reed, last week (Farmington News, February 25, 1910).

Fred M. Chamberlain, an odd jobs teamster, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife (of three years), Caroline Chamberlain, aged thirty-five years (b. Canada), his [step] children, Myrtle Chamberlain [Armstrong], a dressmaker, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and Elmer Chamberlain [Armstrong], aged thirteen years (b. ME), and his hired man, Mike Sullivan, a stable laborer, aged thirty-five years (b. MA).

In 1912, the erstwhile hotelier was engaged in “teaming,” i.e., working as a teamster, and now resident at 107 North Main street, rather than in his hotel near the depot.

Daughter Pearl E. Chamberlain married in Brockton, MA, April 18, 1915, John H. Madden, both of 69 Fuller Street, Brockton, MA. She was at home, aged twenty-one years, and he was an ice businessman, aged forty-nine years. Rev. Allen Hudson performed the ceremony. Madden was born in Boston, MA, circa 1865, son of Joseph and Mary (Hogan) Madden.

Caroline A. Chamberlin, of Milton, divorced her husband, Fred M. Chamberlain, of Milton, in Strafford County Superior Court, October 15, 1915. She alleged extreme cruelty (one had to allege something)

By 1917, Fred M. Chamberlain was employed by the Boston Ice Company, and still resident at 107 North Main street.

Daughter-in-law Elizabeth Cunningham died of pneumonia in Milton, October 4, 1918, aged thirty-three years, ten months, and nine days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate. (See Milton in the News – 1918).

Fred M. Chamberlain, ice cutter laborer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his son, Guy H. Chamberlain, an ice cutter laborer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and his grandchildren, Marion G. Chamberlain, aged eleven years (b. MA), Gardner M. Chamberlain, aged ten years (b NH), Madeline L. Chamberlain, aged eight years (b. MA), Howard R. Chamberlain, aged six years (b. MA), Pearl E. Chamberlain, aged four years (b. MA), and Muriel Chamberlain, aged two years (b. NH).

WEST MILTON. Town meeting was held on Saturday, and the following were elected selectmen: Fred M. Chamberlain, Charles S. Philbrick, Joseph H. Avery (Farmington News, March 19, 1920).

Son Guy H. Chamberlain married (2nd) in Dover, NH, August 27, 1921, Verna M. Woodman, he of Milton and she of Ossipee, NH. He was an iceman, aged thirty-four years, and she was a domestic, aged seventeen years. Rev. Leon Morse performed the ceremony. She was born in Ossipee, NH, circa 1903, daughter of Fred and Etta M. (Colby) Woodman.

WEST MILTON. We are sorry to learn that Fred Chamberlain had the misfortune to break his leg one day last week, and was taken to a hospital (Farmington News, March 6, 1925).

Son Guy H. Chamberlain owned in 1926 the Milton dance pavilion that would later be named Frolic Haven.

Fred Chamberlain, a road commissioner (state road), aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his grandchildren, Howard Chamberlain, aged fifteen years (b. MA), Pearl Chamberlain, aged thirteen years (b. MA), and Muriel Chamberlain, aged twelve years (b. ME). Fred Chamberlain owned their house on North Main Street, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set.

Daughter-in-law Verna W. Chamberlain divorced son Guy H. Chamberlain, both of Wakefield, NH, in Carroll County Superior Court, July 3, 1931. She alleged abandonment.

TO SUPERVISE ROAD WORK. The work of the State Highway located in Division 7 has been allocated to 15 district patrolmen. With this new system N. Sherman Rand road agent in Rye for a number of years has supervision of construction and repair of the state highways in New Castle, Newington, North Hampton, Portsmouth, and Rye and Earl Caswell of Greenland has charge of the main state highways in Greenland and Stratham and the back roads in Newington and Portsmouth. These men will have charge of construction, repairs, hiring of men and other work connected with the state highways and in towns where their work overlaps they will work jointly, one man taking the main roads and the other the less travelled back road. The 15 district patrolmen appointed for District 7 are: J.P Garvin, Sanbornville; F.M. Chamberlain, Milton; A.F. Emerson, Farmington; Arthur Jalbot, Somersworth; M.T. Malone, Dover; Lewis Walker, Newmarket; Earl Caswell, Greenland; N. Sherman Rand, Rye; Earl Spear, North Hampton; Fred Gallant, Exeter; James Eaton, Seabrook; John Hilliard, East Kingston; Clarence Green, Plaistow; Eugene Kimball, East Kingston; John Dudley, Exeter (Boston Globe, April 20, 1933).

Daughter Pearl E. (Chamberlain) Madden died in Boston, MA, April 28, 1933, aged thirty-nine years.

DEATHS. MADDEN – In South Boston, April 28, Pearle E. (Chamberline), beloved wife of John H. Madden. Funeral from her late home, 764 East Sixth st., Monday, May 1, at 8 a.m. Requiem high mass at St. Eulalia’s Church at 9. Relatives and friends invited (Boston Globe, April 29, 1933).

Frederick M. Chamberlain died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Union, Wakefield, NH, May 30, 1935, aged seventy-seven years, and one day. P.A. Kimball, M.D., signed the death certificate.

IN MEMORIAM. Fred Chamberlain. Fred Chamberlain of Milton, aged 77, passed away at Union last Thursday evening. The deceased was a native of Milton Mills, the son of Samuel G. and Mary E. (Fall) Chamberlain. He was well known in this section where he served as state road patrolman between Milton and Sanbornville. He is survived by one son, Guy Chamberlain; a sister, Mrs. Charles Lowes of Union, a brother, Moses Chamberlain of Milton Mills, and twelve grandchildren living in Milton and Boston. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at the Congregational church. Bearers were Fred Foster, Ed Jordan, Charles Tanner and Martin Eaton (Farmington News, June 7, 1935).


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Frederick Moody “Fred” Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114673086/frederick-moody-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2011, February 28). Grace M. Dicey Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/66263737/grace-m.-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2013, August 13). Samuel Gardner Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115369940/samuel-gardner-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2014, September 14). Jacob Dudley Garland. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/135906165/jacob-dudley-garland

Find a Grave. (2017, August 5). John E. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/182087952/john-e-hayes

Find a Grave. (2019, April 28). Pearl Evangeline Chamberlain Madden. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/198723156/pearl-evangeline-madden

Find a Grave. (2012, November 24). Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/101246605/horatio-g.-wentworth

Wikipedia. (2021, September 13). Horatio Gates. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatio_Gates

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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