Celestial Seasonings – August 2020

By Heather Durham | July 30, 2020

Most Jupiter-sized planets orbit the mother star in a highly elliptical orbit. This means they will often cross the orbit of any Earth-like planet and fling it into outer space, making life impossible. But our Jupiter travels in a near-perfect circular orbit preventing a collision with any Earth-like planet, making life possible. – Michio Kaku


August 1. The Moon and Jupiter will rise and appear to travel close to one another.

August 2. The Moon and Saturn will rise and appear to travel close to one another.

August 3. Today, there will be a full Moon.

August 9. The moon and Mars will rise and appear travel close to each other.

August 11. This date, we will have the last quarter of the Moon.

August 12. This will be the best day for viewing the Perseid meteor shower. Venus will be shining brightly.

August 13. Venus will be far away from the sun allowing it to shine brightly in the sky.

August 15. The Moon and Venus will rise and appear to travel close to each other.

August 17. The k-Cygnid meteor shower will be prolific.

August 25. The Moon will be at first quarter.

August 28. The Moon and Jupiter will rise and appear to travel close to each other.

August 29. The Moon and Saturn will rise and appear to travel close to each other.

August 31. The Aurigid meteor shower will put on a display.


References:

BrainyQuote. (2001). Outer Space Quotes. Retrieved from www.brainyquote.com/quotes/michio_kaku_818170?src=t_outer_space

in-the-sky.org. (2020, July 29). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Wikipedia. (2020, April 22). Aurigids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurigids

Wikipedia. (2020, April 22). Kappa Cygnids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kappa_Cygnids

Wikipedia. (2020, July 1). Perseids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseids

Milton Mills’ Miltonia Mill – 1872-14

By Muriel Bristol | July 26, 2020

The Miltonia Mills were built by Henry H. Townsend in 1872. Operations were begun in 1873, Mr. Townsend and his partner, Mr. S.H. Atkins, carrying on the manufacture of felt under the firm name of Townsend & Co. Felt was the output of the mill up to the year 1881, when it was replaced by blankets, and the plant called the Miltonia Mills. The mill with the new factory and additions make up the plant. Mr. Henry Townsend died June 25, 1904, and was succeeded by his son, Mr. John E. Townsend, the present owner. Sixty-five hands are employed, and the industry has grown to extensive proportions (Scales, 1914).

Henry Herbert Townsend – 1872-1904

Henry Herbert Townsend was born in Dorchester, MA, August 12, 1842, son of John and Jane M. (Townsend) Townsend.

Henry Herbert Townsend of Milton, NH, aged seventeen years, graduated from Philips Exeter Academy, in Exeter, NH, with its Class of 1858.

Henry H. Townsend of Milton Mills appeared in a list of First and Second year students at the New Hampton Literary & Biblical Institution, in New Hampton, NH, in 1858 and 1859. (Charles B. Brackett, also of Milton Mills, appeared in the same lists). He appeared also in a list of Middle and Junior year students at the New Hampton Theological School, in 1860. (Charles A. Cutts, also of Milton Mills, and William H. Coffin of West Lebanon, Me., appeared in the same list).

John Townsend, a woolen manufacturer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza A. Townsend, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Jane R. Townsend, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Caroline F. Townsend, aged twenty years (b. NH), Henry H. Townsend, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Ermina [Emma] M. Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Willie B. Townsend, aged ten years (b. NH), and Frank A. Townsend, aged five years (b. NH). John Townsend had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $8,000. His neighbor was [his younger brother,] Joseph Townsend, a woolen manufacturer, aged thirty-seven years (b. England).

John Townsend, a merchant, aged fifty-five years (b. England), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) Massachusetts State Census. His household included his wife, Eliza Townsend, aged forty-two years (b. Milton, ME), Jane R. Townsend, aged twenty-nine years (b. Dorchester), Caroline L. Townsend, aged twenty-five years (b. Dorchester), Henry H. Townsend, a clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. Dorchester), Emma M. Townsend, aged nineteen years (b. Milton, N.H.), William B. Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. Milton, N.H.), Frank A. Townsend, aged ten years (b. Milton, N.H.), and Flora G. Townsend, aged two years (b. Milton, N.H.), and [his servant,] Mary Welsh, aged twenty years (b. Ireland).

John Townsend was a principal owner and treasurer of the Littleton Woolen Company of Littleton, NH, between 1865 and 1869. Henry H. Townsend worked there first as a clerk and later as the superintendent.

John Townsend was treasurer, and Leland, Allen & Bates selling agents, while Henry H. Townsend, a son of the treasurer, became superintendent. In 1869 Jordan, Marsh & Co. purchased controlling interest and Capt. William H. Stevens became and agent (Jackson, 1905).

Henry H. Townsend married in Milton, June 7, 1870, Agnes J. Brierley, he of Boston and she of Milton, NH. She was born in Lowell, MA, May 17, 1844, daughter of Edward and Margaret M. (Thompson) Brierley. (See also Milton Mills’ Brierley Mill – c1864-18). He was a merchant, aged twenty-seven years; she was aged twenty-six years. Rev. N.D. Adams of Union, NH, performed the ceremony. (This record appeared also in Boston vital records).

Victorian Table Cloth-Piano Cover
Victorian Table Cloth / Piano Cover

H.H. Townsend appeared in the Milton directories of 1873, 1874, and 1875, as a manufacturer of table covers, or table and piano covers.

Henry H. Townsend, of Milton Mills, NH, filed for a U.S. Patent (#137,638), January 17, 1873, for his invention of “Presses for Printing Fabrics.” R.H. Eddy and S.N. Piper signed as his witnesses (U.S. Patent Office, January 1873). Robert H. Eddy was a Boston patent solicitor, the first in fact, and civil engineer. S.N. Piper, was a mechanical expert, who worked with him (American Publishing, 1889).

A soap salesman interviewed Henry Townsend in Milton Mills, in or around 1877, and “sold him,” i.e., convinced him to place an industrial soap order. Soap is used in the fulling process.

Townsend & Co. appeared in the Milton directories of 1876, 1877, 1880, 1881, and 1882, as manufacturers of table and piano covers. The “company” of Townsend & Co included now his brother-in-law, Sullivan H. Atkins, as his partner.

Sullivan Holman Atkins was born in Canaan, ME, February 14, 1837, son of Thomas and Lucinda (Fairbanks) Atkins. He married (1st) in Somersworth, NH, April 30, 1857, Frances Wilkins. She was born in Waterford, ME, June 18, 1838, daughter of William K. and Lorena (Lovejoy) Wilkins. She died in Berwick, ME, January 26, 1865, aged twenty-six years.

Atkins appeared in the Boston directory of 1867, as a partner in the woolen firm of Atkins, Remick & Brackett, with its offices at 47 Summer street, and his home at Somerville, MA.

Sullivan H. Atkins married (2nd) in Brookline, MA, December 25, 1865, Jane R. “Jennie” Townsend, he of Great Falls, i.e., Somersworth, NH, and she of Brookline, MA. He was a merchant, aged thirty years and she was aged twenty-nine years. She was born in Dorchester, MA, in 1836, daughter of John and Jane M. (Townsend) Townsend (and elder sister of Henry H. Townsend). She died of consumption, i.e., tuberculosis, in Holyoke, MA, June 23, 1869, aged thirty-two years.

Sullivan H. Atkins married (3rd) in Boston, MA, May 14, 1870, Sarah A. “Abby” Ricker, he of Boston and she of Great Falls, i.e., Somersworth, NH. He was a salesman, aged thirty-four years, and she was aged twenty-five years. She was born in Great Falls. NH, circa 1845, daughter of Stephen and Sarah Ricker.

Sullivan Atkins, a dry goods clerk, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included his [third] wife, Abbie Atkins, keeps house, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and his daughter, Winnie Atkins, at school, aged eight years (b. NH). Sullivan Atkins had personal estate valued at $2,000.

Sullivan H. Atkins, of Melrose, MA, filed for a U.S. Patent (#136,636), in April 1873, for his invention of “Water-Proof Furze Fabrics.” His invention was intended to line overshoes, boots, horse blankets, carriage robes, and various other purposes. The same Robert H. Eddy that served as patent solicitor for Henry H. Townsend signed as his witnesses, along with J.R. Snow (U.S. Patent Office, March 1873).

Sullivan H. Atkins and Luther Harris were elected as Milton’s state representatives in March 1876 (Boston Post, March 15, 1876).

Townsend & Company’s woolen felt factory suspended production for a time in early 1878.

TELEGRAPHIC NOTES. Townsend & Co., at Milton Mills, N.H., have suspended, throwing 30 hands out of employment (St. Albans Daily Messenger,  January 3, 1878).

Sullivan H. Atkins, a felt manufacturer, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his [third] wife, Sarah A. Atkins, keeping house, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), his children, Winnifred Atkins, at house, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Mary E. Atkins, at house, aged six years (b. NH), and George K. Atkins, at house, aged four years (b. NH), and his sister, Emma J. Atkins, at house, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME).

Henry H. Townsend bought out Sullivan H. Atkins’ share in Townsend & Company in 1880. (The partnership name continued to appear in Milton business directories for several years). Sullivan H. Atkins remained in the area for a time. He went on to become a Baptist minister (Pastor, Emmanuel Baptist Church in West Roxbury, MA, in 1905). He died in Melrose, MA, May 5, 1918, aged eighty-one years.

Alton. Mr. Sullivan Atkins, of Milton Mills, preached at the Baptist church Sunday forenoon and lectured on temperance in the evening. Mr. Atkins is a very forcible speaker and handled the great question without gloves. He believes in being radically right and has little confidence in lukewarm work. He dealt out some heavy blows to the tobacco users that made the chewing deacons and the smoking church members, as well as the sinner who indulges in the pernicious habit, squirm in their seats. Ich Dien (Farmington News, February 5, 1886).

(“Ich Dien” is German for “I Serve,” which has been the motto of the English royal heir since the Battle of Crecy (1346). Whether it relates somehow to the article or is a pseudonym for its author is not entirely clear).

Henry H. Townsend, a woolen manufacturer (felt), aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Agnes J. Townsend, keeps house, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), and his children, John E. Townsend, at school, aged eight years (b. NH), and Grace M. Townsend, at house, aged six years (b. NH).

Davis & Furber Wool Carding Machine - 1880
Davis & Furber Wool Carding Machine – 1880

It would later be said that Henry H. Townsend “met with reverses” in this period, but overcame them honestly, paying in full his obligations. It was about this time also that he began to manufacture blankets, as well as his previous line of table and piano covers.

TRADE EMBARASSMENTS. NEW HAMPSHIRE. MILTON MILLS. Henry H. Townsend, flannel manufacturer, assigned. He claimed about $20,000 in mills, machinery, etc. (Bradstreet, 1884). 

H.H. Townsend appeared in the Milton directories of 1884, 1887, 1889, 1892 [John Townsend], 1894, 1898, 1901, and 1904, as a manufacturer of woolen goods.

Henry H. Townsend, who had 2 sets of cards in his Milton Mills factory, endorsed a circular letter or petition opposing removal or reduction of wool tariffs, in July 1885 (National Association of Wool Manufacturers, 1885). (The nearby Waumbeck Co., who had 10 sets of cards in its Milton Mills factory, also endorsed).

Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Townsend of Milton Mills, NH, were guests at the Bay View hotel in Wells, ME, in late July 1888 (Boston Globe, July 29, 1888).

Hy. H. Townsend was agent in 1888 for the East Lake Mills, a Milton Mills woolen blanket manufacturer, with 3 sets of cards and 16 looms. (“East Lake Mills” might be thought to have been the name of Townsend’s mill prior to its being named “Miltonia Mills”).

Miltonina Mills Adv Card-Walbridge
Card Insert from a Miltonia Mills Blanket

Milton Mills experienced a contentious shoe factory strike in 1889. (The strike took place against the Varney & Lane company, who had taken over the former Brierley Mill). Townsend’s brother-in-law, Edward J Brierley, who was then a dry goods merchant, spoke in favor of the strikers.

Henry H. Townsend represented Milton Mills on a citizens’ committee formed in 1890 to promote construction of a railroad branch line between Wakefield, NH’s Union station and Portland, ME. It would have been tremendously beneficial for his mill to have a railroad connection.

MILTON MILLS. There is a scheme now in progress to run a connecting branch line of railroad, tapping the Boston & Maine near Union, passing through Milton Mills, Horne’s Mills, this state, Acton, North Shapleigh, Newfield, Limerick and Cornish, Me., to the Portland and Ogdensburg. This will be about thirty-five miles long, through some of the best country in Maine and Eastern New Hampshire. Opening up thirteen fine water privileges and several large ponds with excellent facilities for ice cutting. A committee of five has been chosen, one from each town, to solicit subscriptions for the survey, $1,000 being required or $200 from each town benefited. The following well-known citizens comprise this committee: Milton Mills, H.H. Townsend; Acton, E.J. Brierly; Shapleigh, Edward Hargraves; Limerick, Luther Moore, and Newfield, George Hannaford. The spirit prompting this enterprise is of the right kind; New England men applying their energy and push to “booming” New England towns, instead of going “West,” as advised by the late Horace Greeley, cannot fail to reap a bright reward in the near future (Farmington News, March 21, 1890).

Despite the enterprising spirit, energy and push mentioned, construction of this proposed branch line never took place.

H.H. Townsend of Milton Mills, NH, was a guest at the American House hotel in Boston, MA, in early October 1891 (Boston Globe, October 9, 1891).

Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend died December 26, 1891, aged forty-seven years.

MACHINERY WANTS. The East Lake mills, Milton Mills, N.H., are expected to put in new cards and machinery (Fibre & Fabric, January 16, 1892).

Henry H. Townsend, of Milton Mills, was a guest at the Kearsarge House hotel in North Conway, NH, in August 1894 (Boston Globe, August 5, 1894). Henry H. Townsend (and the estate of his late father, John Townsend,) appeared in the Boston directories of 1894 through 1906, as having an office at Room 223 in the John Hancock Mutual Insurance Company building, at 178 Devonshire street in Boston, MA, with his house at Milton, NH.

Henry H. Townsend, a woolen manufacturer, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. He was a widower, residing alone.

NEWS OF THE STATE. Charles Johnson of Hollis and Fred Googins of Sanford, Me., are in Milton Mills where they are building a brick wheel house and mixing room for H.H. Townsend. They will also build foundations for an engine and dynamo for the same party. In all they will lay about two hundred thousand bricks (Farmington News, July 19, 1901).

Wool Manfrs. NEW HAMPSHIRE. MILTON MILLS, Stafford, Co. (S.E.) Pop. 680. Stage. Union (4m), RR107. Townsend, H.H. Miltonia Mill, Blankets, 3 Sets Cards, 21 Broad Looms, 720 Sp., Dye and Finish. 1 Boiler, 2 W.W. Thos. Kelly & Co., N.Y., Boston and Chicago, S. Agts. (Davison, 1901).

Henry H. Townsend died in Milton Mills, June 25, 1904, aged sixty-one years, ten months, and thirteen days.

DEATHS. TOWNSEND – In Milton Mills, N.H., June 25. Henry H. Townsend, 62 yrs. Funeral at Milton Mills, N.H., Wednesday, June 29, at 2 p.m.. Relatives and friends invited to attend without further notice (Boston Globe, June 27, 1904).

Knowles Fancy LoomHENRY H. TOWNSEND. Mr. Henry H. Townsend of Milton Mills, N.H., who died there recently was born at Dorchester, Mass., on August 12, 1842. He commenced his career in the business world as book-keeper for the Littleton, N.H., woolen mills and in 1871 he began manufacturing felt at Milton Mills, N.H. In 1882 he started to manufacture blankets in a small way, gradually increasing the capacity of the concern until it is now one of the best-equipped mills in New England, although not very large. It consists of three sets of cards, 24 Knowles fancy looms and an output or 225 to 250 pairs per day. Mr. Townsend met with reverses in his business earlier in life, but overcame them honestly, paying in full his obligations, and has been very successful in later years. He commenced to learn the woolen business in his father’s mill when not attending school, and, in fact, he was always around the mill from boyhood. Mr. Townsend was a very charitable man in his way, never seeking notoriety as to his bequests and never turning away those who were needy or worthy. He continued in active business until a few weeks prior to his decease (American Textile Reporter, 1904).

Deaths. Henry H. Townsend of Milton Mills, N.H., died recently. In the early seventies he formed á copartnership and commenced the manufacture felt goods for the rubber trade, etc. Later he built a new mill and began weaving blankets. This mill has since been enlarged and refitted with the most modern and up-to-date machinery and considered one of the best equipped mills in state. Mr. Townsend will be very much missed, not only by his only family, but by a very wide circle of friends and by his employees (Lord & Nagle, 1904).

Henry H. Townsend of Milton had signed his last will in Milton, September 26, 1895. Elbridge W. Fox, Everett F. Fox, and George S. Lovering signed as witnesses. The will was proved in Dover, NH, in late July 1904 (Strafford County Probate, 124:76). E.W. Fox appeared in the Milton Mills directory of 1894 as a conveyancer, i.e., someone who wrote up deeds, bills of sale, and, apparently, wills. His son, E.F. Fox kept a Milton Mills furniture store. George S. Lovering was a peddler and traveling salesman, who lived on Church street in Milton Mills.

John Edward Townsend – 1904-1914

Townsend Mill
Townsend’s Mill, Milton Mills, N.H.

John E. Townsend was born in Milton Mills, September 9, 1872, son of Henry H. and Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend.

John E. Townsend was educated at Milton Mills and Lindsey University, Me. He afterward entered his father’s office and continued therein until the latter’s death. He then took charge and operated the mill until 1906, when he bought the plant of the estate and conducts the mill along the line of fine blanket manufacturing, affording constant employment to sixty-five men. As superintendents he has men well-known for their efficiency, including F.H. Simms, A.T. Loud, J.F. Archbold and E.A. Wentworth. This mill is classed as a 4-set mill and is equipped with electricity, the plant site covering two acres (Scales, 1914).

F.H. Simes of Milton Mills, NH, received a U.S. patent for a loom invention in late 1901 (Boston Globe, January 4, 1902). F.H. Simes, a woolen mill weaver, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Mary A. [(Smith)] Simes, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and his boarder, Ethel Birch, a woolen mill weaver, aged twenty years (b. ME). F.H. Simes owned their house, free-and-clear. Mary A. Simes was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Frederick H. Simes (1868-1953) was mill superintendent in 1920 and 1930.

Archie T. Lowd, a woolen mill finisher, aged forty years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Clara M. [(Page)] Lowd, aged forty years (b. NH), his children, Albert P. Lowd, aged eight years (b. ME), and Marion P. Lowd, aged two years (b. ME), and his mother, Sarah E. [(Tasker)] Lowd, a widow, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH). Archie T. Lowd owned their farm, free-and-clear. Clara M. Lowd was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Archie Tasker Lowd (1870-1930) was boss finisher in 1920.

John Frank Archibald (1852-1924) appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as boss carder at the woolen mill, with his house at 92 Main street, Milton Mills. John F. Archibald, a wool carder, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Hannah [(Greenleaf)] Archibald, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and his daughter, Emma Archibald, a shoe closer-on, aged nineteen years (b. NH). John F. Archibald rented their house. Hannah Archibald was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. He was a packer in 1910 and foreman in 1920.

Edgar A. Wentworth (1856-1932). Edgar A. Wentworth, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife (of nineteen years), Cora [(Lord)] Wentworth, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), and his daughter, Dora Wentworth, aged seventeen years (b. NH). Edgar A. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear. Cora Lowd was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Mr. Townsend married Miss Eda B. Loud, a daughter of Elbridge and Melissa Loud of Acton, Me., and they have two children: Henry A., attends the Brunswick School at Greenwich, Conn., and Agnes M., who is a student at Brookline, Mass. In politics a Republican Mr. Townsend was elected in 1903 a member of the New Hampshire legislature. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and belongs also to the Odd Fellows at Milton Mills. The handsome family residence is on the corner of Western avenue and Church street, Milton Mills (Scales, 1914).

John E. Townsend married in Milton, January 28, 1896, Eda B. Lowd, he of Milton, and she of Acton, ME. He was a clerk, aged twenty-four years, and she was a milliner, aged twenty-four years. Rev. R.L. Sheaff, of Wakefield, NH, performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, 1870, daughter of Elbridge and Melissa M. (Buck) Lowd.

In an 1897 Boston Globe article extolling the wonders of Great East Lake as a fishing destination, John Townsend’s steam-powered launch was mentioned.

There are two steam launches on the pond. One of these belongs to the Goodall camp. and the other is owned by John Townsend of Milton Mills (Boston Globe, August 29 1897).

John E. Townsend, a woolen mill superintendent, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of four years), Eda B. Townsend, aged thirty years (b. ME), and his children, Henry A. Townsend, aged two years (b. NH), and Agnes M. Townsend, aged zero years (b. NH, May). John E. Townsend owned their house, free-and-clear. Eda B. Townsend was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

John E. Townsend and Dr. Jeremiah S. Elkins advertised for someone knowledgeable in photography in 1902. They appear to have been amateur photographers seeking some professional advice. (Other interpretations are possible).

The Henry H. Townsend Estate appeared in the Milton directory of 1905-06 as a Milton Mills manufacturer of woolen goods. John E. Townsend appeared in the Milton directories of 1909 and 1912, as a Milton Mills manufacturer of woolen goods.

White Auto - 1905
White Steam Car Advertisement, 1905

John E. Townsend was among the first to have an automobile in Milton Mills, and in the state. He had initially a 10-horsepower White Sewing Machine Company steam automobile, registered with license plate #204 (Blanchard, 1905). In the following year his registration / license plate was #1055, likely reflecting a change in vehicle. By 1909 he had a 45-horsepower Nordyke & Marmon company gasoline automobile, registered as #3100, as well as a 40-horsepower Overland gasoline automobile, registered as #4600. His cousin (and brother-in-law), John C. Townsend, was also a motorist. (See also Milton Automobiles in 1906-07 and Milton Automobiles in 1909-10).

MACHINERY WANTED AND FOR SALE. FOR SALE. 2 Davis & Furber Mules, 240 Spindles, 1¾-inch gauge. In good condition, may be seen at work. 3-11 Roll Cleveland Condensers, one nearly new. JOHN E. TOWNSEND, Milton Mills, N.H. (American Textile Reporter, 1908).

Milton Mills, N.H. The blanket mill closed recently for a few days for repairs to the boiler and to give the employes a day off to attend the Rochester fair (Fibre & Fabric, October 2, 1909).

Some later Miltonia Mills advertisements promoted Admiral Peary’s use of their blankets on his polar expeditions. (Peary claimed to have reached the North Pole in 1909).

MILTON MILLS, Stafford Co. (S.E.) Pop. 1,600. Stage, Union (4m), RR47. Townsend, John E. Miltonia Mill. Blankets. 3 Sets Cards. 28 broad Looms. 720 Sp. Dye and Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 W.W. Electric Power. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co. N.Y. and Boston, S. Agts. (Davison, 1910).

John E. Townsend’s fur-lined coat was stolen from his stable office in Milton Mills in February 1910. He traveled to Fresno, CA, in March 1910. (It would have taken the better part of a week to get there by train).

PERSONAL MENTION. J.E. Townsend of Milton Mills, New Hampshire, is at the Sequoia [Hotel] (Fresno Morning Republican (Fresno, CA), April 8, 1910).

John E. Townsend, a woolen blankets manufacturer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Eda B. Townsend, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), and his children, Henry A. Townsend, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Agnes M. Townsend, aged ten years (b. NH). John E. Townsend owned their house, free-and-clear.

Richard Edward Brierley married in the First Methodist Church in Rochester, NH, October 26, 1910, Gertrude Alberta Ricker, he of Fitchburg, MA, and she of Rochester. John E. Townsend of Milton Mills, who was Brierley’s cousin, was an usher at the ceremony (Boston Globe, October 27, 1910).

HELP WANTED. WANTED. One or two families of weavers. One loom work. White warp and filling. Low rents. MILTONIA BLANKET MILLS, Milton Mills, N.H. (Fibre & Fabric, April 15, 1911).

Enlargements and Improvements. New Hampshire, Milton Mills. A new engine for the blanket mill of John E. Townsend has been received. As noted several weeks ago the mill has been running only part of the time on account of low water in the mill pond (McGraw-Hill, 1911).

TOWNSEND, JOHN E. (MILTONIA MILL.) Milton Mills, N.H. Production and Equipment: Blankets; 3 sets of cards; 28 wide looms; 720 mule spindles; 1 boiler, 2 water wheels; electric power. Dye and finish. Employ 65 (Bennett, 1912).

John E. Townsend died in Milton Mills, September 8, 1914, aged forty-two years, eleven months, and thirty days.

John E. Townsend Dead. MILTON MILL, N.H, Sept 9 – John E. Townsend, a prominent blanket manufacturer died yesterday after a long illness. He leaves a wife, son and daughter (Boston Globe, September 9, 1914).

DEATHS. TOWNSEND – In Milton Mills, N.H., Sept. 8, John E. Townsend, in his 43d year. Funeral Saturday, Sept. 12, at 2 P.M. (Boston Globe, September 10, 1914).

Eda B. (Lowd) Townsend died in Haverhill, MA, February 2, 1932.

To be continued.


See also Milton Mills Mfg. Co. & the Waumbeck Companies – 1837-98 and Milton Mills’ Brierley Mill – c1864-18.


References:

American Publishing & Engraving Co. (1889). Illustrated Boston: The Metropolis of New England. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Vu4JAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA175

American Textile Reporter. (1904, July 21). American Textile Reporter. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=H2ZYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA763

American Textile Reporter. (1908, February 13). American Textile Reporter. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=8nJYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA335

Atlas Publishing Co. (1917). Waste Trade Journal. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=5adAAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA274

Bennett, Frank P. & Co. (1922). American Wool and Cotton Reporter. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=D_ZYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA585

Blanchard, F.S. & Co. (1905). Red Book: Interstate Automobile Guide. New England. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=JjpKAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA352

Bradstreet Company. (1884). Bradstreet’s Weekly: A Business Digest. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=a_lDAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA141

Davison Publishing Co. (1901). The “Blue Book” Textile Directory of the United States and Canada. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nyMqAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA247

Davison Publishing Co. (1910). The “Blue Book” Textile Directory of the United States and Canada. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=R-EBfPEK7fIC&pg=PA255

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). J. Frank Archibald. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114596901/j-frank-archibald

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Fred H. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612396

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Henry H. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352239

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). John E. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352496

Find a Grave. (2013, August 16). Edgar A. Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115565651/edgar-a-wentworth

Lord & Nagle. (1904, August). Textile World Record. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=zw_OAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA5-PA171

McGraw-Hill. (1911). Textile World. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=_5JAAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA150

National Association of Wool Manufacturers. (1885). Bulletin of the National Association of Wool Manufacturers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=zoBAAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA325

Palmer, J.E.. (1888). The “Blue Book” Pocket Directory of the Textile Manufacturers of the United States and Canada. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=szUqAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA93

U.S. Patent Office. (1873, January). Specifications and Drawings of Patents Issued from the U.S. Patent Office. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=jMk6AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA328

U.S. Patent Office. (1873, March). Specifications and Drawings of Patents Issued from the U.S. Patent Office. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ksg6AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA267

Wikipedia. (2020, June 14). White Automobile Company. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Motor_Company

Youtube. (2015, July 12). Bemidji Woolen Mills Carding Machine. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hVwpGxM5Aw

Youtube. (2016, June 7). Crompton & Knowles Power Loom Running. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IicxSu9rHro

Youtube. (2011, October 20). Spinning Mule. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=RczuXg5nhMI

Non-Public BOS Session Scheduled (July 20, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | July 3, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a BOS meeting to be held Monday, July 20.

The BOS meeting is scheduled to begin with a Public session beginning at 5:30 PM. There will be a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance before the BOS disappears into a Non-Public session. That session’s agenda has one item classed as 91-A3 II (c).

(c) Matters which, if discussed in public, would likely affect adversely the reputation of any person, other than a member of the public body itself, unless such person requests an open meeting. This exemption shall extend to any application for assistance or tax abatement or waiver of a fee, fine, or other levy, if based on inability to pay or poverty of the applicant.

This will be another secret confab likely affecting adversely someone’s reputation, someone who did not request an open meeting, assuming that the someone in question even knew they were to be discussed or that they had the option to request an open meeting.


Due to their concerns regarding Covid-19, seating will be limited to allow spacing. (This limitation would be unnecessary if the meeting were held at the Nute High School gym). Should a larger number of attendees appear, the meeting will be adjourned. The session may be watched remotely through the usual YouTube means or by teleconference. The links for both are in their original agenda, for which there is a link in the References below.

From several agenda items we learn what we did not hear before: The BOS at some point elected Andrew Rawson as its chairman, and Matt Morrill as its vice-chairman.

The quasi-Public portion of the agenda has Old Business, New Business, Other Business, and some housekeeping items.


Under Old Business are scheduled six items: 1) Jones Brook Update: Chairman Rawson; 2) Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Operational Activities / Plans; 3) 2021 Budget Development: a) Police Chief Richard Krauss: Budget Questions / Clarifications, b) Town Administrator Ernest M. Cartier Creveling: Scheduling and Preliminary Default Budget Development; 4) Ordinance Updates Status (Currently Under Final Review); 5) Status of Following Tax Deeded Structures: 20 Dawson, 79 Charles and 565 White Mountain Highway (No Change from Previous Meeting); and 6) Status of GOFERR Grant Reimbursement Application for May 1 – June 30.

Jones Brook Update: Chairman Rawson. Last week this turned out to be improvements to the Jones Brook conservation area, about which we will apparently hear an update..

Exhaling with a Mask
Exhaling with a Mask

Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Operational Activities / Plans. Plan to open up. Everyone has seen the photos of people lined up in the hot sun at six-foot intervals in front of the Emma Ramsey Center.

If the Town cannot manage even that it will soon be time to start pro-rating its tax amounts and waiving its requirements. Past time really. Amazing.

The original lockdown orders – whose constitutionality remains very much in question – never proposed to reduce the number of cases. That would be both impossible and completely counterproductive to the stated objective of achieving “herd immunity.” They were intended merely to space out transmission rates – to “flatten the curve” – so as to not overwhelm hospitals. That has been accomplished. Congratulations.

The actual number of deaths has been of the same order of magnitude as those occurring in less novel virus years. Have some sense of proportion. Milton lost ten residents in the much more serious Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918, eleven if you count Oscar Morehouse’s death in France. It does not seem as if anything in town was ever “locked down.” One supposes that some may have elected to stay home on their own. Milton, having now three times the population, would need to have had thirty deaths this year – not just thirty cases – to even approach the conditions of 1918.

It seems as if the “heroes” of the last few months have been those staffing grocery stores and gas stations, as well as those transporting their goods to them. Remember to thank them. The next agenda item for the BOS meeting is to be budget planning. How many departments wish to identify themselves as inessential for purposes of constructing the 2021 budget? Speak up.

2021 Budget Development: a) Police Chief Richard Krauss: Budget Questions / Clarifications, b) Town Administrator Ernest M. Cartier Creveling: Scheduling and Preliminary Default Budget Development. Under the terms of the newly-approved Tax Cap, the Town budget cannot be increased by more than the lesser amount of 2% or the inflation rate.

For some budget items to increase more than others would necessarily mean that other budget items must increase less, remain the same, or even decrease. Increasing a larger budget item, or several larger items, might supplant or limit any number of smaller ones. The shape – although not the size – of the new budget would seem to rely, as Mr. Brown told us once, upon the “prudential management” of Town officials.

WWII Memorial Closed
WW II Memorial Closed During 2013 “Shutdown.” Bureaucrats Were Paid Nevertheless.

In other jurisdictions – less enlightened ones –  government officials have been known to employ the so-called Washington Monument Syndrome or Firemen First Gambit: underfunding essentials, as opposed to inessentials, in order to cause maximum taxpayer pain and, hopefully, induce a reversal by them of any restrictions on spending. But surely that could never happen here.

Ordinance Updates Status (Currently Under Final Review). Chief Krauss sought a review and revision of the Town’s ordinances. Because we don’t write the laws, we just enforce them?

Status of Following Tax Deeded Structures: 20 Dawson, 79 Charles and 565 White Mountain Highway (No Change from Previous Meeting). These are troubled properties, due to make an appearance at an upcoming auction.

Status of GOFERR Grant Reimbursement Application for May 1 – June 30. Returning from prior meetings.


Under New Business are scheduled three agenda items: 1) Warrant for Unlicensed Dogs; 2) Authorize Vice Chair Matt Morrill to Provide Countersignatures to the Treasurer’s Signature on Accounts Payable and Payroll Checks (where applicable) in the absence of Chairman Rawson; and 3) Board / Committee / Commission Appointment Considerations: a) Cemetery Commission: i) Katherine Ayers; b) Heritage Commission: i) John Katwick, ii) Ryan Thibeault, iii) Eric Salmonsen, iv) Amy Weiss, and v) Katherine Ayers.

Warrant for Unlicensed Dogs. Per usual.

Vice Chair - Olive
Vice Chair – Olive. Dining chair with steel frame and velvet upholstery, designed in the Netherlands – 160€

Authorize Vice-Chair Matt Morrill to Provide Counter-signatures to the Treasurer’s Signature on Accounts Payable and Payroll Checks (where applicable) in the absence of Chairman Rawson. Surely Mr. Morrill is a vice-chairman, rather than an inanimate chair. Or is it wrongspeak to say so?

Board / Committee / Commission Appointment Considerations: a) Cemetery Commission: i) Katherine Ayers; and b) Heritage Commission: i) John Katwick, ii) Ryan Thibeault, iii) Eric Salmonsen, iv) Amy Weiss, and v) Katherine Ayers. Is the Heritage Commission so vital that its seating cannot await the next election? And this list leaves unaddressed concerns about those sitting on multiple boards.


There will be the approval of prior minutes (from the quasi-Public session of June 24, 2020, the non-Public session of June 24, 2020, the quasi-Public session of July 6, 2020, the non-Public session of July 6, 2020, the quasi-Public session of July 8, 2020, the non-Public session of July 8, 2020, and the Workshop meeting of July 13, 2020; an expenditure report, as of a month ago (June 17), administrator comments, BOS comments, and Other Business.

The administrator comments will address a correspondence concerning SAU #64, specifically a Thank You Regarding the 2020 Graduation.


Under Other Business there are no scheduled agenda items.


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

GOFERR. (2020). Main Street Relief Fund. Retrieved from www.goferr.nh.gov/

State of New Hampshire. (2016, June 21). RSA Chapter 91-A. Access to Governmental Records and Meetings. Retrieved from www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/VI/91-A/91-A-3.htm

Town of Milton. (2020, July 17). BOS Meeting Agenda, July 20, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/events/a_07-20-2020_bosagenda_0.pdf

Wikipedia. (2020, April 21). Washington Monument Syndrome. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Monument_Syndrome

Youtube. (1965). Cone of Silence. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1eUIK9CihA&feature=youtu.be&t=19

Milton Mills Mfg. Co. & the Waumbeck Companies – 1837-98

By Muriel Bristol | July 19, 2020

The Milton Mills Manufacturing Company (1837-1864) was incorporated in 1837, and established itself as a lathe and wood-turning mill (that replaced an original woolen mill).

Gilman Jewett, Nathaniel Jewett, Asa Jewett and a Mr. Wedgewood transformed the old woolen mill into a lathe and turning mill about sixty-five or seventy years [1838-43] ago, after which it was operated more or less irregularly up to the year 1847 [1845] (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

English immigrant John Townsend took over their mill in or around 1845 and used it to manufacture woolen flannel. It continued in this line of business, through several owners, until it burned down in 1898. Its site is now the Waumbeck Park in Milton Mills.

Milton Mills Manufacturing Company – Gilman Jewett (1777-1856) – 1837-4?

Gilman Jewett was born in Milton, January 18, 1777, son of Paul and Elizabeth (Gilman) Jewett.

He married (1st) in Exeter, NH, September 10, 1798, Sally Mead, he of Rochester, NH, and she of Newmarket, NH. She was born in Newmarket, NH, September 16, 1775, daughter of Stephen and Lucy (Wright) Mead. She died circa 1817. Her children were Sarah D., Eliza, Paul, and Asa Jewett.

He married (2nd) in Milton, circa 1820, Ann S. Nutter. She was born in Newington, NH, in December 1790, daughter of Hatevil and Susanna (Shackford) Nutter. (Note her father’s male Puritan “virtue” name: “Hate-Evil.” It is of a kind with more familiar female ones, such as Constance, Faith, Hope, Charity, Chastity, Prudence, etc.). Her children were James J. and David Jewett.

Gilman Jewett was one of nine named incorporators of the Milton Social Library in June 1822.

The NH legislature granted Gilman Jewett and his associates incorporation as the Milton Mills Manufacturing Company in January 1837. They transformed an old woolen mill to a lathe and turning mill in 1837-38.

The Milton Mills Manufacturing Company was organized in 1837, and in that and the following year built their mill, and after running it a few years transferred the business to Durgin & Co. (Scales, 1914).

President Zachary Taylor’s administration appointed Gilman Jewett as Milton Mills postmaster, April 30, 1849. Such appointments were political sinecures in those days, from which one might infer that Jewett was a Whig, as was Taylor. Gilman Jewett succeeded James Berry in that position. Berry’s tenure coincided with the presidency of Democrat James K. Polk.

Gilman Jewett, a postmaster, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Ann S. Jewett, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), Joseph Sharp, a manufacturer, aged forty years (b. England), Hannah Sharp, aged twenty-five years (b. England), Benjamin Sharp, a manufacturer, aged twenty-five years (b. England), Susan A. Hubbard, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Susan S. Nutter, aged forty-six years (b. NH), John McDonald, a tailor, aged thirty-five years (b. Scotland), and Joseph Robinson, a manufacturer, aged thirty-six years (b. England). Gilman Jewett had real estate valued at $2,000. Jewett’s household appeared next to that of John Townsend, agent for the Milton Mills Manufacturing Co., aged forty-three years (b. England).

Gilman Jewett died in Milton, May 24, 1856. Ann S. (Nutter) Jewett died in Milton, November 28, 1870.

Milton Mills Manufacturing Company – Durgin & Co. – 184?-45

Gilman Jewett and his associates sold Milton Mills Manufacturing Company to Durgin & Co., who remain as yet a bit elusive. They seem to have been in the wood business, rather than the wool business. Durgin & Co. sold to John Townsend.

Milton Mills Manufacturing Company – John Townsend (1807-1891) – 1845-64

In 1845-46 the whole property was bought by John Townsend and was run successfully by him for several [nineteen] years (Scales, 1914).

John Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, October 22, 1807, son of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend, and was baptized there January 8, 1808.

He married (1st) in Dorchester, MA, January 14, 1834, Jane Matilda “Matilda” Townsend, both of Dorchester. Rev. David Sandford performed the ceremony. She was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, September 18, 1815, daughter of Thomas B. and Jane (Randall) Townsend, She died in Dorchester, MA, December 24, 1843.

John Townsend “hired” a colored flannel factory in Gilsum, NH, in 1838, and produced flannel there until 1845. George Learoyd and Thomas Townsend bought it then and produced flannel there until 1847 (Hayward, 1881). George Learoyd (1805-1887) was the brother-in-law, and Charles T. “Thomas” Townsend (1810-1881) was the brother, of John Townsend.

John Townsend married (2nd) in Boston, MA, April 22, 1844, Eliza A. Townsend (sister of the first wife). She was born in Milton, MA, April 8, 1823, daughter of Thomas B. and Jane (Randall) Townsend. She died in Needham, MA, September 19, 1896.

John Townsend, the grandfather, was born in England and came to the United States in 1819, and to Milton Mills, N.H., about 1845. He purchased the plant of the Milton Manufacturing Company and continued it, carrying on woolen manufacturing under the name of John Townsend (Scales, 1914).

The Milton Mills company of Milton, NH, having John Townsend as its president, appeared in the New England Mercantile Union trade directory of 1849. It produced 235,000 yards of flannel annually, from 42 tons of material. It had 1,000 spindles, 18 looms, and employed fifteen male and sixteen female workers (Pratt, 1849).

Several of John Townsend’s brothers worked with him. An elder brother, William B. Townsend, died in Milton Mills village, November 23, 1847, aged forty-four years. A younger brother, Joseph Townsend, married in Milton, January 6, 1850, Ruth Paul Wentworth, he of Milton and she of Acton, ME.

John Townsend, agent for Milton Mills Manufacturing Co., aged forty-three years (b. England), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eliza A. Townsend, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), Jane R. Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. MA), Henry Townsend, aged eight years (b. MA), Emma Townsend, aged four years (b. NH), and William B. Townsend, aged one month (b. NH). They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of Michael Folley, a manufacturer, aged thirty years (b. Ireland). Folley’s household included Margaret Folley, aged twenty-eight years (b. Ireland), and Betsy Dore, aged fifty years (b. NH). Neither household had any real estate. Their neighbor was Gilman Jewett, postmaster, aged seventy-three years (b. NH); he had real estate valued at $2,000.

English immigrant Joseph Robinson (1812-1895) was Townsend’s mill superintendent and dyer in the early 1850s. (See Milton in the News – 1895). He resided with Gilman Jewett in 1850 (see Jewett above).

Milton Mills – John Townsend proprietor; capital, $50,000; manufacture flannels; have 18 looms and 1200 spindles. Amount manufactured per annum, $90,000; Do. stock used per annum, 120,000 pounds wool; Number of operatives, 35 (Charlton, 1857).

John Townsend, a woolen manufacturer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza A. Townsend, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Jane R. Townsend, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Caroline F. Townsend, aged twenty years (b. NH), Henry H. Townsend, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Ermina M. Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Willie B. Townsend, aged ten years (b. NH), and Frank A. Townsend, aged five years (b. NH). John Townsend had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $8,000. His neighbor was [his younger brother,] Joseph Townsend, a woolen manufacturer, aged thirty-seven years (b. England).

Mr. Townsend was a wonderfully astute buyer, and manufacturer, and one who understood the art of selling the manufactured goods. As a result he was very successful (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

John Townsend succeeded John L. Swinerton as Milton Mills postmaster, June 22, 1860. He received his appointment during the administration of Democrat President James Buchanan, which might suggest that he was a Democrat too. He was, in turn, replaced by Henry S. Swasey, April 12, 1861, during the administration of Republican President Abraham Lincoln.

Destruction of a Flannel Factory. Great Falls, N.H., Oct. 19. The flannel factory of John Townsend, at Milton Mills, N.H., was burnt this morning. The loss is estimated at $30,000, on which there is a partial insurance. The factory was running on a government contract for army flannels (Baltimore Sun, October 22, 1861).

Miscellaneous Items. The flannel factory belonging to John Townsend. at Milton Mills, N.H., was burnt Saturday morning, at about 2 o’clock. Loss about $30,000; partially insured. The mill was running on a government contract (New England Farmer, October 26, 1861).

John Townsend rebuilt in the same location a larger plant to replace that which had burned.

In June 1863, he opened a much larger factory which replaced the mill that had been burned, and after continuing the manufacture of flannels for some time, sold the mill to Mudge, Sawyer & Co., of Boston, Mass. (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

John Townsend appeared in the Vulpes Letter of 1864, as having the best woolen mill in New England, which was then running “full blast.”

The Milton Mills Co., manufacturers, paid $10 for their Class B license in the US Excise Tax of May 1864. (A $10 gold eagle would have today the gold value (as opposed to numismatic value) of about $900 in Federal Reserve notes).

John Townsend sold the newly rebuilt mill to E.R. Mudge, Sawyer & Co., of Boston and New York, in or before May 1864.

ORIGINAL AND SELECTED. The new woolen mill at Milton Mills, belonging to John Townsend, Esq., has been sold to a Boston company (Portland Daily Press, May 12, 1864).

John Townsend, a merchant, aged fifty-five years (b. England), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) Massachusetts State Census. His household included his wife, Eliza Townsend, aged forty-two years (b. Milton, ME), Jane R. Townsend, aged twenty-nine years (b. Dorchester), Caroline L. Townsend, aged twenty-five years (b. Dorchester), Henry H. Townsend, a clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. Dorchester), Emma M. Townsend, aged nineteen years (b. Milton, N.H.), William B. Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. Milton, N.H.), Frank A. Townsend, aged ten years (b. Milton, N.H.), and Flora G. Townsend, aged two years (b. Milton, N.H.), and [his servant,] Mary Welsh, aged twenty years (b. Ireland).

John Townsend was a principal owner and treasurer of the Littleton Woolen Company of Littleton, NH, between 1867 and 1869.

This year also marks the beginning of a change in the life of the town [of Littleton, NH]. The woollen mill and the scythe factory were for many years the only industries that did not have their origin in the soil. In 1867 E.J.M. Hale sold the woollen mill to a corporation that had been organized under the title of The Littleton Woollen Company with a capital of $200,000. In this company Mr. Hale, John Townsend, Jordan, Marsh & Co, and the firm of Leland, Allen & Bates, were the principals. All but the first named were of Boston, and Joseph L. Whittaker was the only resident of the town who held any of the stock. John Townsend was treasurer, and Leland, Allen & Bates selling agents, while Henry H. Townsend, a son of the treasurer, became superintendent. In 1869 Jordan, Marsh & Co. purchased controlling interest and Capt. William H. Stevens became and agent (Jackson, 1905).

A post-war recession in the woolen blanket market – the Federal army no longer buying blankets in tens of thousands at inflated wartime prices – occasioned a necessary and obvious return to Littleton’s peacetime wage structure, the only alternative being a suspension of production.

LITTLETON. The workmen and women in the Littleton woolen mills have refused to work for 15 per cent reduction of their wages, and the mills are stopped until spring (St. Johnsbury Caledonian, December 13, 1867).

The Littleton Woolen Company mill was damaged by a “freshet,” i.e., rapid flooding through sudden melting of snowpack, in Spring 1869. (This sometimes take the form of a sudden and destructive rush of water released through collapse of a natural ice dam). The mill was still coping with the damage in the Fall.

HANOVER. The damages by the freshet to the Littleton Woolen Mill are nearly repaired (Vermont Journal, November 20, 1869).

John Townsend, a wool merchant, aged sixty-two years (b. England), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Eliza A. Townsend, keeps house, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), Emma Townsend, at home, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), William B. Townsend, a dry goods store boy, aged twenty years (b. NH), Frank A. Townsend, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Flora A. Townsend, at school, aged six years (b. NH). John Townsend had real estate valued at $15,000 and personal estate valued at $100,000.

(John Townsend’s son, Henry H. Townsend, established his own woolen mill at Milton Mills, entirely separate from the prior one, in 1872).

John Townsend of Brookline, MA, donated the bell for the Milton Mills school-house (now the Milton Mills Free Public Library).

MILTON – M.V.B. Cook. During the past year an excellent wooden school-house has been erected in district No. 7 situated in the thriving village of Milton Mills. The main building is 40×40 ft., one and a half stories high, with French roof, and basement; also, tower in front, 10×12 ft. It contains two school-rooms, four ante-rooms, and a library, and is finished with western pine and black walnut. The furniture is of the latest improvements. The entire cost exceeds $6,000, besides some valuable presents, – among which was a bell, presented by Hon. John Townsend, of Brookline, Mass. The dedication consisted of music and an address by Rev. Geo. Michael (NH Board of Education, 1876).

John Townsend, a wool merchant, aged seventy-two years (b. England), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eliza A. Townsend, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), his children, Frank A. Townsend, at home, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Flora F. Townsend, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his servant, Jennie Farquhar, a servant, aged twenty-five years (b. Nova Scotia). Daughter Flora G. Townsend was sick with “consumption,” i.e., tuberculosis.

John Townsend and his wife, Eliza A. Townsend, of Brookline, MA, and their son, Frank A. Townsend, also of Brookline, MA, were among the guests at the Kearsarge House hotel in North Conway, NH, in July 1884.

NEAR THE ZENITH. The Summer Season at Hillside and Seashore. … There is much that is fascinating to the lover of nature along the banks of the Saco, and year in and year out the pleasure-seeker comes here to spend the summer months. The drives about North Conway, as well as its scenery, are attractive, and of them none is more delightful than the one to Conway, going and returning by different routes. In point of numbers, North Conway is not ahead in guests of previous years, but it is having at least an average season, so far as the present month is concerned. August is always the big month of the year, when Boston comes up to have a holiday season among the White hills. The new proprietors of the Kearsarge House are building for themselves a reputation. The house is much better kept than formerly, and in time the reward for well-doing will come. Among the present guests are the following: Mrs. C.B. Sawyer. Boston; P.G. Peabody and family, New York; John Townsend and wife, Brookline; F.A. Townsend, Brookline; Mrs. S.M. Eldridge, Boston; Mrs. S.A. Caldwell. Philadelphia; Mr. and Mrs. Albert Currier, Miss S.N. Hills, Newburyport; J.F. Harvey and wife, Chelsea; J.M. Kupler, Boston; Mrs. D.N. Stanton and family, New York; C.W. Abbott, Wolfboro; Horace Hunt and family, Boston; Miss Florence Wyman, Mrs. John C. Lee, Miss Harriet Lee, Miss H. Silsbee, Miss J.P. Phillips, Miss G. Phillips, Salem; J.J. Fitzgerald, Mrs. Ally Freeman, Boston; William R. Wood and family, Portland; Rev. Melville Boyd and family, Mrs. Thomas Waller, W.R. Deming, Miss Miller, Brooklyn; Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Coe. Mrs. J.B. Barr, New York; George T. Coolidge. Boston; Mrs. R.E. Radway and two Misses Radway, New York; Mr. and Mrs. H.L. Fearing, Newton; Charles B. Train and family, Esther R. Stratton, Boston: Dr. J.F. Frisbie and family, Newton; Judge Nathan Webb and family, Portland; Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Dodge, Boston; George E. Hughes and wife, Bath, Me. (Boston Globe, July 27, 1884).

John Townsend of Brookline, MA, woolen manufacturer, made out his last will and testament on November 1, 1890.

John Townsend died in Brookline, MA, May 21, 1891 aged eighty-three years, seven months. Eliza A. (Townsend) Townsend died in Needham, MA, September 19, 1896.

Six Bequests to Charity. DEDHAM, Jan. 27 – The will of Mrs. Eliza A. Townsend, late of Brookline, filed in the Norfolk registry this afternoon, contains the following public bequests: Free Will Baptist church of Acton, Me., $2000; the Consumptives home, Boston highlands, $1000: the home for Little Wanderers, Boston, $1000; the Old Ladies’ home in Boston, $1000, and the blind asylum in South Boston, $1000. The will was executed Aug 25, 1886, and the testatrix’s son, Frank A. Townsend, is named as its executor (Boston Globe, January 28, 1897).

Milton Mills Manufacturing Company – Mudge, Sawyer & Company – 1864-1870

It was soon after sold to Mudge, Sawyer & Co., and [later] to the Waumbeck Company, and has continued to do a very successful business (Scales, 1914).

MP660406 - Mudge Sawyer
Mudge, Sawyer & Co. Advertisement, 1866 (Memphis Daily Post, April 6, 1866).

E.R. Mudge and Joseph Sawyer formed their partnership in 1862. They were commission agents for a number of textile and yarn mills, including the Washington Mills, the Burlington Woolen Company, the Chicopee Manufacturing Company, the Ellerton New Mills, Milton Mills, and Victory Manufacturing Company. They first advertised their association with Milton Mills in April 1866.

Enoch Redington Mudge was born in Orrington, ME, March 22, 1812, son of Rev. Enoch R. and Jerusha H. (Hinckley) Mudge.

He married in Portland, ME, April 20, 1832, Caroline A. Patten. She was born in Kennebunkport, ME, August 6, 1811, daughter of John and Olive (Lassell) Patten.

Erastus [Enoch] R. Mudge, agent manager – company, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Swampscott, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Caroline A. [(Patten)] Mudge, aged fifty-eight years (NH), Caroline E. Mudge, aged nineteen years (MA), Henry S. Mudge, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Sarah Townsend, a seamstress, aged thirty-nine years (b. New Brunswick), Agnes Goodwin, domestic service, aged thirty-seven years (b. CA), Tessie James, domestic service, aged thirty-two years (b. LA), and Daniel Buns, a coachman, aged thirty-one years (b. Ireland). Erastus R. Mudge had real estate valued at $250,000 and personal estate valued at $400,000. Caroline A. Mudge had real estate valued at $80,000.

E. Redington Mudge died in Lynn, MA, October 1, 1881. Caroline A. (Patten) Mudge died in Swampscott, MA, January 9, 1882.

Mudge, ER
E. Redington Mudge

Death of Hon. E.R. Mudge. Special Despatch to The Boston Globe. Swampscott, October 1. Hon. E. Redington Mudge of Swampscott died at his home, at 11.20 a.m., from congestion of the brain. He was about 70 years of age and leaves two adult children. The deceased was born in Lynn in 1812. His father was a prominent Methodist minister of that place. During the war be was proprietor of the St. Charles Hotel in New Orleans. Subsequently he came to Boston and engaged in the dry goods trade at 15 Chauncy street, under the firm name of Mudge, Sawver & Co. He served two years in the State Senate, but aside from this was not much interested in politics. Some time ago he gave $200,000 to an Episcopal parish of Lynn for the erection of a memorial church in memory of his two deceased children, Mrs. Van Brunt and Lieutenant-Colonel C.R. Mudge, who was killed [at Gettysburg] in the war. He leaves a wife, an invalid, who some time ago had an apoplectic shock, from which she is still suffering. Mr. Mudge was a man of great wealth (Boston Globe, October 1, 1881).

Mudge’s partner was Joseph Sawyer. He was born in Boston, MA, September 22, 1823, son of William and Ellen (White) Sawyer.

He married in Boston, MA, June 10, 1847, Anne M. Dillaway, he of Chelsea, MA, and she of Boston. She was born in Boston, MA, April 3, 1823, daughter of William and Susan (Bassett) Dillaway.

In 1888, Joseph Sawyer paid $1,399 in property taxes in Boston, MA, at a rate of $13.40 per $1,000, i.e., he had property valued at $104,403. He was one of only 20,000 New Englanders that paid $100 or more (Luce, 1888).

Joseph Sawyer died in Boston, MA, May 27, 1901, aged seventy-seven years. Anne M. (Dillaway) Sawyer died in Brookline, MA, December 25, 1905.

DEATH OF JOSEPH SAWYER. One of Most Prominent Merchants of the Old School and Well-Known Philanthropist. In the death of Joseph Sawyer, Boston loses one of her most prominent merchants of the old school. philanthropy one of its most generous and deserving benefactors, and religion a most conscientious and ardent supporter. Mr. Sawyers giving was never of the obstrusive kind, and yet no worthy cause was presented to him in vain. The amount of his contributions was never heralded by himself, but those who knew him best estimate them at more than $500,000. His assistance to objects which commended themselves to his judgment was never niggardly, and he was accustomed to carefully weigh every claim presented. Particularly did he enter into the spirit of the Salvation Army work, and his voice, his presence and his purse were ever ready when needed, while the workers found a hearty welcome at his home from both Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer. In fact, no suppliant was too obscure, and no cause too humble to claim his attention and sympathy. Mr. Sawyer was a member of the Warren-av. Baptist church, a prominent supporter, and active participator in all its interests. He was also closely affiliated with various charitable organizations, and his advice was frequently sought and always welcome. In private, too, his counsel was often solicited and given, whether in business troubles, social relations or personal grievances, and in all these it was considered invaluable. Mr. Sawyer was the oldest of 11 children, and was born 77 years ago. His father was a mariner, plying his vocation between America and Liverpool, where he met and married his wife. He came of English stock, his ancestor, James Sawyer, having settled in Ipswich about 1630. Joseph received his education in the Eliot school, which he left at the age of 14 to enter the employ of Josiah Stetson on Hanover st., then the headquarters of the retail dry goods business. In 1849, Mr. Sawyer was admitted to partnership in the woolen and jobbing business of Wilkinson, Stetson & Co., from which he retired in 1862, when he became a member of the firm of E.R. Mudge, Sawyer Co., to carry on the sale of textile fabrics. This concern, with that of Wilkinson, Stetson & Co., purchased the Burlington woolen mills of Winooski. Vt., the largest in the state, and in 1869, Mr. Sawyer became treasurer, and in 1882 its president. The firm was dissolved on the death of Mr. Mudge, and Mr. Sawyer retired from active business, although he afterward assisted in the formation of the firm of Sawyer & Manning, for the purpose of placing his son, Joseph D. Sawyer, in the business in which his father had succeeded. Mr. Sawyer was married in this city in 1847 to Miss Anna Maria, daughter of William Dillaway, who survives him with three sons and two daughters. The family home was at 31 Commonwealth av. Mr. Sawyer’s health began to cause anxiety about three weeks ago, but last Friday he was able to take a walk to the Public Garden. He was confined to his room on Sunday and his health failed rapidly from that time, until death came yesterday afternoon. The funeral will be held on Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock, at the Warren-av. Baptist church (Boston Globe, May 28, 1901).

Milton Manufacturing Company appeared in the Milton directories of 1867-68 and 1869-70. E.R. Mudge & Co. was its owner, and George H. Jones was its agent.

Mudge, Sawyer & Co.’s Boston facility was seriously damaged by an attic fire in April 1869. This circumstance might be compared with that suffered by Lewis W. Nute, and a large part of downtown Boston, in the Great Boston Fire of 1872. There too goods stored in the attics fed the fire.

DESTRUCTIVE FIRES. In this city, store No. 57 Summer Street, occupied by Mudge, Sawyer & Co., was damaged by fire in the attic some $4000 or $5000, and the goods to a larger amount (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), April 24, 1869).

George H. Jones, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lucy J. Jones, keeping house, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Addie V. Jones, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Charles A. Jones, a farm laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Ira W. Jones, a farm laborer, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Nettie J. Jones, at school, aged seven years (b. NH). George H. Jones had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $455. (His son, Ira W. Jones, would become Milton’s famous hydraulic engineer).

Waumbeck Company – 1870-1898

Waumbeck is said to be an Abenaki word meaning “White Rock.” It is commonly used in New England where such geographic features appear.

[Mudge, Sawyer & Co.], after occupying it for about six years, disposed of it to the Waumbeck Company, a stock corporation, of which John D. Sturtevant of Boston was the managing agent. Geo. W. Olney was the first superintendent under the Waumbeck Company, and was succeeded by Benj. J. Adams. During the management of John A. Buguey, a different concern assumed control of the mill, the Waumbeck Woolen Co. The mill was burned in 1898 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Waumbeck Company manager John D. Sturtevant was born in Center Harbor, NH, July 14, 1816, son of Perez and Dorothy (Kimball) Sturtevant. He married Dorcas A. “Adaline” Bradley. They had children Franny, who married Amasa Clarke, and Ellen, who married Edward Steese.

John D. Sturtevant, a woolen manufacturer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Adeline Sturtevant, keeps house, aged fifty-one years (b. MA), Franny Sturtevant, at home, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), Edward Steese, a wool merchant, aged twenty-six years (b. OH), Ellen Steese, at home, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Edwin S. Steese, at home, aged one year (b. OH), Mary Moran, a domestic servant, aged thirty-five years (b. Ireland), Michael Moran, a laborer, aged thirty-two years (b. Ireland), Patrick Welch, a coachman, aged twenty-four years (b. Ireland), Mary McSweeney, a domestic servant, aged twenty years (b. Ireland), and Lydia Archer, a nurse, aged thirty-three years (b. OH). John D. Sturtevant had real estate valued at $20,000 and personal estate valued at $200,000.

In 1888, J.D. Sturtevant paid $2,955 in property taxes in Brookline, MA, at a rate of $10.50 per $1,000, i.e., he had property valued at $281,429. He was one of only 20,000 New Englanders that paid $100 or more (Luce, 1888).

John D. Sturtevant died in Brookline, MA, July 5, 1889. Dorcas A. “Adeline” (Bradley) Sturtevant died December 20, 1892.

OBITUARY. JOHN D. STURTEVANT. Boston, July 5 (Special). – John D. Sturtevant, a well known woollen manufacturer, died at his home in Brookline to-day. He was born at Centre Harbor, N.H., on July 4, 1814 [SIC]. For forty years he was engaged in the manufacture of woollens. He owned mills at Rochester and Milton, N.H., and Winthrop, Me., and was interested in a mill at Norwich, Conn. (New York Tribune, July 6, 1889).

Superintendent George Wilson Olney was born in Louisville, KY, August 27, 1840, son of Wilson and Eliza (Butler) Olney.

He married in Oxford, MA, November 17, 1862, Waity M. Harwood. She was born in Oxford, MA, April 24, 1839, daughter of Elihu and Hannah (Beals) Harwood.

George W. Olney, agent for woolen mill, aged twenty-nine years (b. KY), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Waity M. Olney, keeping house, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), Thomas W. Olney, at school, aged six years (b. MA), Robert S. Olney, aged one year (b. NH), Frederick A. Olney, clerk in woolen mill, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Ellen Conley, a domestic servant, aged fifteen years (b. NH). George W. Olney had personal estate valued at $700. The census enumerator recorded his household between those of Patrick English, weaving room superintendent, aged forty-nine years (b. Ireland), and John U. Simes, a retail grocer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH).

Waumbeck Company - BP750622
Sole Agents for Waumbeck Company Mill (Boston Post, June 22, 1875)

The Waumbeck Manufacturing Company appeared in the Milton directories of 1871, and 1873, as Milton Mills manufacturers of flannel. It cut wages in response to reduced sales during the financial and economic Panic of 1873.

INDUSTRIAL NOTES. The operatives employed by the Waumbeck Manufacturing Company at Milton Mills, N.H., have been notified that on and after Nov. 15th their wages will be reduced 15 per cent (Portland Daily Press, November 11, 1873).

Labor Notes. The Waumbeck Manufacturing Company, at Milton Mills, N.H., has reduced the wages of its operatives 15 per cent (New York Herald, November 28, 1873).

The newspapers were full of accounts of firms that laid off most of their staff or simply shut down altogether. The Waumbeck Company survived and had recovered to the extent that it was able to pay its shareholders their dividend in December 1874 (Boston Globe, December 29, 1874).

George W. Olney died in Leicester, MA, February 28, 1894. Waity M. (Harwood) Olney died in Providence, RI, July 1, 1916.

Death of George Olney. WORCESTER, Mass., March 1. George W. Olney, a brother of Attorney General Olney, a well-known woolen manufacturer, died at Cherry Valley last night of rheumatic fever. He was born at Louisville 53 years ago, but his parents moved to this state when he was two years old. He spent his business career in the woolen industry (Berkshire Eagle, March 1, 1894).

Olney’s successor, Benjamin G. Adams, was said to have been Waumbeck Manufacturing Co. superintendent for seventeen years. His tenure likely ran from about 1874 through 1890.

Benjamin G. Adams was born in Barnstead, NH, May 27, 1823, son of James and Elizabeth (Bellamy) Adams.

He married in Farmington, NH, April 4, 1846, Sophia Nutter. She was born in Farmington, NH, in May 1827, daughter of John H. and Hannah (Hall) Nutter.

The Waumbec Company bought a whole carload, i.e., a train carload, of industrial soap from a soap salesman in or around 1877.

The Waumbeck Manuf’g Company appeared in the Milton directories of 1874, 1875, 1876, and 1877, as Milton Mills manufacturers of flannel.

Another Trade Sale of Blankets and Robes. Special Despatch to The Boston Globe. New York, July 23. A great sale of 6000 cases blankets. carriage robes, lap robes and horse blankets took place today. The entire production belonged to the Clinton Mills Company, the Norwich Woollen Company, the Waumbeck Company, Winthrop Mills Company and Norway Plains Company, and included all sizes and qualities. At least 600 persons were present, representing some of the largest dry-goods houses throughout the country. The sale was peremptory, on a credit of four months (Boston Globe, July 23, 1878).

FIRE RECORD. Dover, N.H., Aug. 8. – The Waumbeck Company’s mills at Milton Mills, N.H., caught fire yesterday in the picker room, but through the prompt use of the hose connected with the mills the fire was confined to the picker house. The damage was slight by the fire, but considerable by the water (Boston Post, August 9, 1878).

Sheperd Norwell - Detail - BG870130
Waumbeck Shaker Flannels On Sale (Boston Globe, January 30, 1887)

The Waumbeck Manuf’g Company appeared in the Milton directories of 1880, 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, [and 1889], as Milton Mills manufacturers of flannel.

Benjamin G. Adams, superintendent of the woolen mill, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sophia Adams, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and his son, Frank H. Adams, works in woolen mill, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH).

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. 10-4 white Waumbeck blankets, $2.75; 10-4 gray blankets, $2, at Wilcox Bros’ (The Pantagraph (Bloomington, IL), November 10, 1883).

The Waumbeck Company appeared several times in the U.S. Census’ water power report of 1885.

Benjamin G. Adams died in Amesbury, MA, January 31, 1905. Sophia (Nutter) Adams died in Lawrence, MA, September 25, 1908.

Obituary. Amesbury, Mass. Benj. G. Adams, a retired woolen manufacturer, died Tuesday, Jan. 31, aged 82 years. Deceased was boss weaver in the Pemberton Mills, Lawrence, 45 years ago, when many employes were buried in the ruins. Mr. Adams was an expert designer. The last 20 years of his active life he was agent of the Waumbeck Woolen Co., Milton, N.H. (Fibre & Fabric, 1905).

Waumbeck Company manager John D. Sturtevant died in 1889 and was succeeded by his son-in-law, Amasa Clarke (1844-1907). The Waumbeck Company appeared in the Milton business directory of 1892, as a manufacturer of woolen goods. Amasa Clarke, was its agent.

John Andrew Buguey was mill superintendent after Benjamin G. Adams. He was born in Leicester, MA, August 29, 1844, son of James and Winifred Buguey.

Mr. George Kavanagh was in [Concord] town Sunday as the guest of John A. Buguey (Concord Enterprise (Concord, MA), March 22, 1889).

The Waumbeck Company joined 916 other corporate woolen concerns in petitioning the US Senate in April 1892. Their petition sought continuance of McKinley’s woolen duties, i.e., tariffs, on foreign wool imports. (They had been in place since 1878). The Waumbeck company (J.A. Bugney, Supt.) appeared in the list of petitioners as having 10 sets of cards, i.e., 10 carding machines.

The following advertisements for cloth workers appeared in the Boston Globe near the end of 1892 (and beginning of 1893).

MALE HELP WANTED. A RELIABLE MAN who thoroughly understands the business of piece dyeing to dye dress goods, flannels, etc. A man of this stamp may address JOHN A. BUGUEY, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, November 27, 1892).

MALE HELP WANTED. WANTED. A good experienced man to run a Parks & Woolson six-quarter shear. Write at once or come to JOHN A. BUGUEY, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, November 29, 1892). 

MALE HELP WANTED. WANTED. Boss weaver on Davis & Furber looms, must be a good manager of help, competent, steady and reliable. Man with family preferred. Address JOHN A. BUGNEY, supt., Milton Mills, N.H. (January 26, 1893).

The Waumbeck Company mill suspended production for six months during the Panic of 1893. (See also Milton in the News – 1893).

A Three Months’ Vacation. MILTON MILLS, N.H., July 21. – The agent of the Waumbeck company has issued orders for closing the mills here for three months as soon as the goods now in process of manufacture are finished. The reason assigned for this action is a lack of orders except at ruinous prices. This is the first time in the history of this company that work has been ordered to cease on account of the conditions of the market (Fall River Daily Evening News, July 21, 1893).

The Waumbeck Manuf’g Company appeared in the Milton directories of 1894, and 1898, as manufacturers of flannels.

Senator William E. Chandler (R-NH) presented to the US Senate a remonstrance from the Waumbeck Company employees in 1894. They opposed the Wilson-Gorman Tariff Act. It “reformed” the tariff system by reducing tariffs, but also added the first peacetime national income tax. It passed, but the income tax was struck down as unconstitutional in 1895.

Mr. CHANDLER presented the memorial of John A. Buguey and 42 other employes of the Waumbek Co[mpan]y, [M]ilton Mills, New Hampshire, remonstrating against the passage of the so-called Wilson tariff bill; which was referred to the Committee on Finance (US Senate, 1894).

It took passage of the Sixteenth Amendment in 1911 to saddle us with a national income tax. New Hampshire opposed passage of that amendment. (See Milton and the Income Tax – 1911).

Mary E. (Keating) Buguey died in Milton Mills, NH, April 22, 1896. John A. Buguey appeared in the Concord directory of that year, as foreman of Damon’s mill, with his house on Main street, in Westvale. He and his children resided in Concord, MA, in 1900, where he was a weaving instructor at the Massachusetts State Prison there. He married (2nd) in Concord, MA, September 8, 1913, Elinor Cummiskey. John A. Buguey died in Acton, MA, June 11, 1921.

DEATHS. BUTNEY – In Acton, Mass., June 11, John A. Butney. Funeral from his late residence, Fletchers Corners, South Acton, Monday, June 13, at 7:45. Solemn high mass at St. Bridget’s Church. Maynard, Mass., at 8 p. m. (Boston Post, June 12, 1921).

Waumbeck Woolen Company – 1898-04

A newly-formed Waumbeck Woolen Company sought to revive the Waumbeck Manufacturing Company’s moribund mill operation in July 1898. Its agent was M.F.S. Whipple, who was also its treasurer. (He was a partner in Whipple & Pratt).

Merritt F.S. Whipple was born in Burrillville, RI, April 2, 1845, son of Sterry and Maria H. (Warner) Whipple.

He married in Pawtucket, RI, in 1867, Evaline J. Larkin. She was born in Cranston, RI, in December 1847, daughter of Samuel A. and Sarah W. (Collins) Larkin.

NEWS IN BRIEF. Owing to the depression in the woollen business the woollen mill operated at Greenville, R.I., by Merritt F. Whipple, will run out [of] stock and stop until business revives (Boston Post, March 15, 1876).

WOOLEN MILL BURNED. Loss $75,000. Providence, April 14 – The mill of the Greenville Woolen Co. in Smithfield was burned last night, with the boiler house and a five tenement block. A large boarding house was on fire and partially destroyed. Loss $75,000. The buildings and machinery were owned by the wife of M.F. Whipple. Insured for $46,250. The stock and supplies were owned by the Greenville Woolen Co. and were insured for $16,085 (Fall River Daily Evening News, April 14, 1882).

TESTIMONIALS. From a Well-known Woollen Manufacturer. Greenville, R.I., Aug. 10, 1883. Dear Sirs, I wish to inform my friends and the public that for many years I have been a great sufferer from sick headache, and have tried almost every remedy, but could find no relief until your “BlLIOUSINE” was recommended to me. After taking a few doses of your powder I was greatly relieved. I have now taken the medicine about a month, and pronounce myself cured. I cheerfully recommend every one who is troubled with sick headache to give it a fair trial. Yours respectfully, M.F. WHIPPLE (Boston Globe, March 1, 1884).

Biliousine was manufactured in Providence, RI. Similar “specific” medicines for these symptoms contained super-carbonate of soda [baking soda], charcoal, paregoric and water.

During the management of John A. Buguey, a different concern assumed control of the mill, the Waumbeck Woolen Co. The mill was burned in 1898 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908)

MARKET AND FINANCIAL NOTES. Milton Mills, N.H. The Waumbeck Woolen Co has been incorporated with capital of $60,000 (Fibre & Fabric, 1898).

JULY 1898. Waumbeck Mills, Milton Mills, N.H. Woolens; new company organized; capital, $60,000; M.F. Whipple treasurer and manager (National Association, 1898).

The Waumbeck Woolen Co. mill burned to the ground on Sunday morning September 11, 1898, before it could be reopened. (See also Milton in the News – 1898).

BAD FIRE AT MILTON MILLS. Waumbeck Woolen Mills Burned to the Ground Sunday Morning. The entire plant of the Waumbeck woolen mills at Milton Mills was completely destroyed by fire early Sunday morning with a loss of nearly $100,000. The mills have been idle since 1890, but arrangements were recently completed for resuming work, and they were to start up again Monday of this week, giving employment to 390 hands. While the origin of the fire is unknown, it is supposed to have been caused by spontaneous combustion in the picker room. Agent M.F.S. Whipple of the mills stated that the company had $70,000 insurance on the property. The fire could be seen from Farmington and caused a bright reflection on the sky for miles around. It is not thought that the mill will be rebuilt. The fire was discovered by the night watchman, Charles Williams, about 2:15 a.m. and he at once gave an alarm. He then attempted to return to the engine room and start the fire pump, but the heat had become so intense that he was unable to do so. The village fire department responded promptly and did everything in their power to save the structure, and by energetic effort did succeed In keeping the flames away from the office. The factory was a three-story structure with basement, 150 feet long and 50 feet wide. This was the chief industry of the town, and the loss is a disastrous blow (Farmington News, September 16, 1898).

Merritt F. Whipple, a woolen manufacturer, aged fifty-five years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-three years), Evaline [J. (Larkin)] Whipple, aged fifty-two years (b. RI), and his children, Harry C. Whipple, aged twenty-six years (b. RI), and Bessie M. Whipple, at school, aged sixteen years (b. RI). Merritt F. Whipple rented their portion of a two-family household at 28 Oak Street. Evaline Whipple was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

Henry H. Townsend bought the Waumbeck mill land in 1900. The Waumbeck Company appeared in the U.S. Geological Survey’s water power report of 1901. The Waumbeck Company was dissolved officially on January 27, 1904.

Merritt F. Whipple died in Providence, RI, November 8, 1912, aged sixty-seven years. Evaline J. (Larkin) Whipple died July 1, 1924.


As a sort of epilogue, three former Milton residents, two of them sons of Waumbeck mill superintendents, ran for high office in Massachusetts in 1903. Two of them ran as the Socialist candidates for governor and lieutenant governor, and one as the Democrat candidate for lieutenant governor.

LOCAL. The Milton Mills correspondent for the Rochester Courier says: Among the candidates for the gubernatorial honors in Massachusetts this fall are several who in times past have been well known in our village. On the Socialist ticket, John Chase, candidate for governor, was well known as a barefoot little urchin when his mother resided here. John Q. Adams, candidate for lieutenant governor on the same ticket, is a son of Benj. F. Adams, for seventeen years agent of the Waumbeck Co. here, and Richard Olney, 2d, Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor, is a son of George Olney, who was agent of the Waumbeck mills before Mr. Adams. Though neither of these may reach the prize they are striving for, we are glad to know that out boys are ambitious (Farmington News, October 16, 1903).

At this point, the two young Socialists might be excused to some extent. The Bolshevik revolution lay still fourteen years in the future. Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises had not yet proved Socialism to be both logically and economically impossible, as he would in 1919. And, of course, Socialism’s hundreds of millions of deaths lay also in the future. For those that cling still to its blood-stained notions in the present day, ignorance may be an explanation but is not an excuse.


See also Milton Mills’ Brierley Mill – c1864-18 and Milton Mills’ Miltonia Mill – 1872-14


References:

Fibre & Fabric. (1898, June 18). Fibre & Fabric. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=6QwAAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA210

Fibre & Fabric. (1905, February 11). Fibre & Fabric. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RBYAAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA14

Find a Grave. (2013, February 25). Benjamin Gilman Adams. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/105828849

Find a Grave. (2016, February 21). John Andrew Buguey. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/158425960/john-andrew-buguey

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Gilman Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114597023

Find a Grave. (2007, November 24). Enoch Redington Mudge. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/23074952/enoch-redington-mudge

Find a Grave. (2014, September 8). George Wilson Olney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/135623720

Find a Grave. (2012, August 15). Joseph Sawyer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/95382257/joseph-sawyer

Find a Grave. (2011, October 5). John D. Sturtevant. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/77706467/john-d-sturtevant

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Henry H. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352239

Find a Grave. (2016, February 21). Merritt F. Whipple. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/32868252

Hayward, Silvanus. (1881). History of the Town of Gilsum, New Hampshire: From 1752 to 1879. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=VWgjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA139

Jackson, James R. (1905). History of Littleton: Topical History. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=XlygsD5BizYC&pg=PR13

MA Supreme Judicial Court. (1893). Massachusetts Reports: Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=tRAQAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA454

National Association of Wool Manufacturers. (1898). Bulletin of the National Association of Wool Manufacturers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=uIZAAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA419

NH State Board of Education. (1876). Biennial Report of the New Hampshire State Board of Education. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=4fxIAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA338

Wikipedia. (2018, August 17). Kearsarge House. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kearsarge_House

Wikipedia. (2020, May 3). Pemberton Mill. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemberton_Mill

Wikipedia. (2020, February 11). William E. Chandler. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_E._Chandler

Wikipedia. (2020, April 25). Wilson-Gorman Tariff Act. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilson%E2%80%93Gorman_Tariff_Act

 

Right to Know NH Leaflet

By S.D. Plissken | July 13, 2020

I obtained at a recent gathering a leaflet from the Right to Know NH organization, which I reproduce below for the benefit of our readers.


Obverse side:

Right to Know NH

Right to Know NH is a nonpartisan organization dedicated to improving adherence to and strengthening the Right to Know Law (RSA 91-A).

What We Do

  • Assist citizens in exercising their right to obtain information from their government.
  • Provide resources on Right to Know with the goal of making government more open and accountable.
  • Help public officials on how they can provide their constituents with access to government meetings and records so they may be in compliance with both the letter and the spirit of the law.
  • Propose legislation to strengthen the Right to Know Law (RSA 91-A).
  • Advocate for or against proposed legislative changes by writing to legislators and testifying at legislative committee hearings.
  • Maintain an extensive website with up-to-date case law, how-to information, and Right-to-Know Law training links.
  • Educate citizens on their right to know their government.
  • Build cooperative associations with organizations which share an active and ongoing interest in government transparency.

Membership

Membership is free, knowledge is invaluable. We meet regularly in Concord and invite new members. For more details check our website. We also welcome organizations to ally with us so together we have a stronger voice promoting open government.

Contact Us

righttoknownh@gmail.com
righttoknownh.wordpress.com


Reverse side:

Part I, Article 8 of the New Hampshire Constitution

All power residing originally in, and being derived from, the people, all the magistrates and officers of government are their substitutes and agents, and at all times accountable to them. Government, therefore, should be open, accessible, accountable, and responsive. To that end, the public’s right of access to governmental proceedings and records shall not be unreasonably restricted.

RSA 91-A:1 Preamble

Openness in the conduct of public business is essential to a democratic society. The purpose of this chapter is to ensure both the greatest possible public access to the actions, discussions and records of all public bodies, and their accountability to the people.

www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/VI/91/91-A-mrg.htm


Accompanying business card:

Right to Know NH
promoting open government

www.righttoknownh.org
righttoknownh@gmail.com
#opengov

Public BOS Session Scheduled (July 13, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | July 12, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a BOS meeting to be held Monday, July 13.

The BOS meeting is scheduled to begin with a quasi-Public session beginning at 6:00 PM.


Covid-19 restrictions have been lifted to the limited extent that an audience limited to nine persons – apart from the BOS itself – will be permitted to attend.

The quasi-Public portion of the agenda has New Business, Old Business, Other Business, and some housekeeping items.


Under New Business are scheduled two agenda items: 1) Swearing-In of Select-Board appointee – Claudine Burnham, and 2) Workshop to Discuss Budget Scheduling & Guidance Development for Departments.

Swearing-In of Select-Board appointee – Claudine Burnham. The two Selectmen remaining appointed Ms. Claudine Burnham at their last meeting to replace outgoing Chairwoman Erin Hutchings.

Workshop to Discuss Budget Scheduling & Guidance Development for Departments. Last year’s BOS “guidance” was both a surprise and a disappointment for taxpayers, who expressed their displeasure through voting instead a second default budget. Let us hope they need not do so a third time running.


The GOFERR reimbursement and “Other” appear at the bottom of the agenda, but would seem to be there in error, as merely continued from the prior agenda.


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

Town of Milton. (2020, July 10). BOS Meeting Agenda, July 13, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/agendas/07-13-2020_workshopagenda.pdf

The Envelope, Please

By S.D. Plissken | July 9, 2020

Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) chairwoman Erin Hutchings announced her resignation, effective July 7, during the Selectman Comments portion of the BOS meeting of Monday, June 15, 2020. She had sold her house and would be moving out of town.

On June 22, 2020, the Town posted a notice seeking applicants from which they might select a replacement.

At their quasi-Public meeting of July 6, 2020, the BOS opened a sealed envelope with the names and particulars of three applicants vying to be her replacement. They were Laurence D. “Larry” Brown, Claudine Burnham, and Humphrey S. Williams. (Mr. Brown and Mr. Williams were candidates for this office at the March election).

At their quasi-Public meeting of last night, Wednesday, July 8, 2020, the BOS went immediately into a 91-A:3 II (c) session.

(c) Matters which, if discussed in public, would likely affect adversely the reputation of any person, other than a member of the public body itself, unless such person requests an open meeting. This exemption shall extend to any application for assistance or tax abatement or waiver of a fee, fine, or other levy, if based on inability to pay or poverty of the applicant.

When they emerged from their secret session, they announced that they had selected Claudine Burnham to serve out the remainder of Erin Hutchings’ third year.

Ms. Burnham was for two years (2015-17) assistant recreation director for the Town of Milton, and has been for two years (2018-Present) a resident mentor at Shortridge Academy, on Governor’s Road in West Milton. Northeastern University conferred upon her in 1993 a B.S. degree, with a major in business administration.

References:

LinkedIn. (2020). Claudine Burnham. Retrieved from www.linkedin.com/in/claudine-burnham-61a55214a

Shortridge Academy. (2020). Claudine Burnham. Retrieved from www.shortridgeacademy.com/staff_member/claudine-burnham/

State of New Hampshire. (2016, June 21). RSA Chapter 91-A. Access to Governmental Records and Meetings. Retrieved from www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/VI/91-A/91-A-3.htm

Town of Milton. (2020, July). BOS Meeting Minutes, June 15, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/minutes/06-15-2020_meetingminutes.pdf

Town of Milton. (2020, July 3). BOS Meeting Agenda, July 6, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/agendas/07-06-2020_bosagenda_final_0.pdf

Town of Milton. (2020, July 6). BOS Meeting Agenda, July 8, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/agendas/a_07-08-2020_bosagenda_final.pdf

Town of Milton. (2020, June 22). Milton Select-Board Vacancy Needs to Be Filled. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/news/milton_select_board_vacancy_needs_to_be_filled_003.pdf

Youtube. (1965). Cone of Silence. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1eUIK9CihA&feature=youtu.be&t=19

Last Will of John Townsend (1807-1891)

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | July 9, 2020

Here follows a transcription (with annotations) of the last will and testament of Milton Mills woolen manufacturer John Townsend.

John Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, October 22, 1807, son of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend, and was baptized there January 8, 1808. He died in Brookline, MA, May 21, 1891, and this last will, which was dated November 1, 1890, was proved in Norfolk County Probate Court, in Dedham, MA, May 27, 1891 (Norfolk County Probate, 167:54).

Townsend was twice married. He married (1st) in Dorchester (Boston), MA, January 14, 1834, Jane Matilda Townsend, both of Dorchester, MA. She was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, September 18, 1815, daughter of Thomas B. and Jane (Randall) Townsend. Their children were Jane Randall “Jennie” Townsend (1835-1869), Caroline Frances Townsend (1840-1897), and Henry Herbert Townsend (1842-1904). Jane M. (Townsend) Townsend died in Dorchester, MA, December 24, 1843.

He married (2nd) in Boston, MA, April 22, 1844, Eliza Ann Townsend. She was born in Milton, MA, April 8, 1823, daughter of Thomas B. and Jane (Randall) Townsend, i.e., she was a younger sister of his deceased first wife. Their children were Emma M. Townsend (1848-1875), William B. Townsend [II] (1850-1878), Frank Albert Townsend (1855-1913), and Flora G. Townsend (b. 1863). Eliza A. (Townsend) Townsend survived him and died in Needham, MA, September 19, 1896.

Townsend started his Milton Mills woolen mill in or around 1846. He and his second wife, Eliza, and the children of both marriages resided in Milton Mills from then until the early to mid 1860s. (His eldest son, Henry H. Townsend, would run the rebuilt mill there in later years).

GREAT FALLS, N.H., Saturday, Oct. 19. The flannel factory of JOHN TOWNSEND, at Milton Mills, N.H., was burnt this evening. Loss about $30,000, which is partially insured. The factory was running on a Government contract (NY Times, October 20, 1861).

John Townsend, a merchant, aged fifty-five years (birthplace omitted), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA Census. His household included his wife, Eliza Townsend, aged forty-two years (b. Milton, ME [SIC], Jane R. Townsend, aged twenty-nine years (b. Dorchester), Caroline F. Townsend, aged twenty-five years (b. Dorchester), Henry H. Townsend, a clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. Dorchester), Emma M. Townsend, aged nineteen years (b. Milton, NH), William B. Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. Milton, NH), Frank A. Townsend, aged ten years (b. Milton, NH), Flora G. Townsend, aged two years (b. Milton, NH), and Mary Welsh, aged twenty years (b. Ireland). John Townsend and Henry H. Townsend were ratable polls and legal voters.

Will of the Late John Townsend Filed. DEDHAM, May 27. This afternoon the will of John Townsend, late of Brookline, the deceased woollen manufacturer, was filed for probate in the Norfolk registry at Dedham. He left about $400,000, of which amount all but $700 is bequeathed to his family and other relatives. The instrument was drawn November 1, 1890, and his sons, Henry H. and Frank A. Townsend, are named as his executors and trustees (Boston Globe, May 27, 1891).

Note that $400,000 in 1891 would be worth about $36,000,000 today. (Each $20 might be taken as a one-ounce gold “double eagle” coin, and that one ounce of gold is worth about $1,800 in Federal Reserve notes at their present value).


John Townsend – Will – Proved May 27, 1891

I, John Townsend of the Town of Brookline, County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Woolen Manufacturer, make this my last will and testament hereby revoking all other wills.

Item 1st. I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Eliza Ann Townsend sixty thousand dollars to be held in trust and five thousand dollars in cash and all the furniture and horse or horses, harnesses, carriages, and sleighs at her disposal to sell or otherwise as she may think best, and for her benefit the income or interest on her bequest of sixty thousand dollars may be paid at any time she may desire provided the trustee or trustees have cash on hand received by them for or on account of income or interest on their investments.

Eliza A. (Townsend) Townsend died in Needham, MA, September 19, 1896. (Her son, Frank A. Townsend, lived then in Needham).

Item 2nd. I give and bequeath to my son Frank Albert Townsend one hundred thousand dollars in cash, and all my office furniture excepting the small desk, and I trust he will make good use of the above as his father has done before him. I also give him five thousand dollars in cash extra to be paid him for his services rendered me.

Frank Albert Townsend was born in Milton Mills, NH, July 5, 1855, son of John and Eliza A. (Townsend) Townsend. He died at his home at 371 Walnut Street, Brookline, MA, July 29, 1913, aged fifty-eight years, twenty-four days. (He was buried in Forest Hills Cemetery, in Jamaica Plain, Boston, MA).

Frank A. Townsend, own income, aged fifty-eight [fifty-five] years (b. MA), headed a Needham, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Anna L. Townsend, aged sixty years (b. NH), and his servants, Rose G. Lufkin, a private family waitress, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), and Bessie G. McGlone, a private family cook, aged thirty-five years (b. Ireland (English)).

Item 3rd. I give and bequeath to my son Henry Herbert Townsend one hundred thousand dollars in cash, also my small desk in the counting room, if the said Henry Herbert Townsend owes my Estate either by note or on account it is to be deducted from his cash amount.

Henry Herbert Townsend was born in Dorchester, MA, August 12, 1842, son of John and Jane M. “Matilda” (Townsend) Townsend. He died in Milton Mills, June 25, 1904, aged sixty-one years, ten months, and thirteen days.

Henry H. Townsend married in Milton, June 7, 1870, Agnes J. Brierley, he of Boston and she of Milton, NH. She was born in Lowell, MA, May 17, 1844, daughter of Edward and Margaret M. (Thompson) Brierley. (See also Milton Mills’ Brierley Mill – c1864-18). He was a merchant, aged twenty-seven years; she was aged twenty-six years. Rev. N.D. Adams of Union, NH, performed the ceremony. (This record appeared also in Boston vital records).

Item 4th. I give and bequeath to my beloved daughter Caroline Frances Townsend forty five thousand dollars to be held in trust, the interest or income to be paid to her semiannually. I also give and bequeath to the aforementioned Caroline Frances Townsend in cash one thousand dollars, and at her decease the amount held by the trustee or trustees shall be paid one half to Henry Herbert Townsend and the other half to Frank Albert Townsend of their heirs.

Caroline Frances Townsend was born in Dorchester, MA, May 2, 1840, daughter of John Townsend and his first wife, Jane Matilda (Townsend) Townsend.

Caroline F. Townsend of Milton Mills appeared in a list of first and second year women taking the English course of studies at the New Hampton Literary & Biblical Institution, in New Hampton, NH, during the 1856-57, when she was called “Carrie F.,” 1857-58, 1858-59 academic years. She majored in Modern Languages. Her elder sister, Jennie R. Townsend, was a student there also during the 1856-57 academic year.

Caroline F. Townsend boarded for many years with another legatee, Mary W. Robinson of Dorchester.

Caroline F. Townsend married in the Bromfield Street Methodist Church in Boston, MA, June 27, 1894, John W. Wellman, she of Dorchester, MA, and he of Wakefield, MA. He was a cotton broker, aged seventy-four years (b. Farmington, ME), and she was at home, aged fifty-four years (b. Boston); it was his third marriage and her first.

Caroline F. (Townsend) Wellman died in Wakefield, MA, December 26, 1897, aged fifty-seven years, seven months, and twenty-four days. Her husband died in Wakefield, MA, January 30, 1900, aged eighty-one years.

Item 5th. I give and bequeath to my grandchild John Townsend son of Henry Herbert and Agnes Townsend five thousand dollars to be held in trust and Gracy Townsend daughter of Henry Herbert and Agnes Townsend two thousand dollars to be held in trust until they arrive at the age of twenty-one years when there shall be paid to them the forenamed legacies and accrued income thereon.

John E. Townsend was born in Milton Mills, September 9, 1872, son of Henry H. and Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend. He died in Milton Mills, September 8, 1914, aged forty-two years, eleven months, and thirty days. He married in Milton, January 28, 1896, Eda B. Lowd.

His sister, Grace Maud “Gracie” Townsend, was born in Milton Mills, November 14, 1873. She died September 7, 1953. She married in Milton Mills, June 19, 1896, John C. Townsend, she of Milton, and he of Saugus, MA. He was a clerk, aged twenty-four years, and she was aged twenty-two years. He was born in East Wilton, ME, September 17, 1871, son of Joseph and Ruth P. (Wentworth) Townsend. He died in Milton Mills, February 14, 1916.

Item 6th. I give and bequeath to my brother James Townsend two thousand dollars to be held in trust, also to my sister Eliza, also Charles Townsend son of my brother Thomas, one thousand dollars each, also to Ruth widow of Joseph Townsend two thousand dollars, all of the above mentioned to be held in trust.

James Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, June 2, 1802, son of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend. He married in Dorchester, MA, June 12, 1826, Sarah Kilham. He died in Marlborough, NH, August 6, 1892, aged ninety years, one month, and twenty-eight days.

Townsend, Charles Thomas
Charles T. Townsend (1810-1881)

Eliza J. Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, February 2, 1814, daughter of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend. She died in Saugus, MA, January 22, 1894, aged seventy-nine years, eleven months, and twenty days.

Charles Thomas “Thomas” Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, January 17, 1810, son of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend. Charles Thomas Townsend was “now residing at Milton Mills,” NH, when he made his will on May 20, 1879. Charles T. Townsend of Peterborough, NH, died on Walnut Street in Brookline, MA, January 27, 1881, aged seventy-two years, one month. (John Townsend had his home at 371 Walnut Street in Brookline).

He married in Gilsum, NH, in 1837, Elsea M. Bingham. They had children Ellen A. Townsend (1838-1908), Elsea R. Townsend (1839-1932), the legatee Charles Horace Townsend (1842-1899), Edward P. Townsend (1846-1879), Adelaide M. Townsend (1848-1935), and Alfred B. Townsend (1853-1879).

Joseph Townsend was born in England, in 1823. He died in 1887. He married in Milton, January 6, 1850, Ruth Paul Wentworth, he of Milton and she of Acton, ME. She was born in 1826. She died in 1901.

Item 7th. I give and bequeath to Martha Townsend widow of William B. Townsend two thousand dollars to be held in trust and in case of the decease of the parties named in Items 6 + 7 or either of them then their proportions shall be equally distributed between the families of John and Matilda and John and Eliza Ann Townsend.

William B. Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, October 21, 1803, son of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend. He died in Milton Mills village, November 23, 1847, aged forty-four years.

William B. Townsend married in Canton, MA, December 13, 1832, Martha W. (Holden) Townsend, both of Canton. She was born in Boston, MA, circa 1808, daughter of Stephen and Martha (Niles) Holden. They had children Mary E. Townsend (1833-1906), Anna A. Townsend (1836-1861), Harriet Townsend (1840-), and William E. Townsend (1844-). Martha W. (Holden) Townsend died in Worcester, MA, February 5, 1896, aged eighty-eight years, five months, and nineteen days.

Item 8th. I give and bequeath to Agnes wife of Henry H. Townsend three thousand dollars to be held in trust the income or interest to be paid to her semiannually and at her decease the amount held by the trustee shall be paid to her husband Henry H, the trust ceasing at her death.

Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend did not long survive the testator. She died December 26, 1891, aged forty-seven years.

Item 9th. I give and bequeath to my brother-in-law Joseph Whitehead one thousand dollars in cash.

Joseph Whitehead was born in Yorkshire, England, May 20, 1823. He died in the Masonic Home in Charlton, MA, November 17, 1912, aged eighty-nine years, five months, and twenty-seven years.

Joseph Whitehead married in Saugus, MA, November 18, 1849, Sarah M. Townsend, both of Saugus. (He was of Milton, NH, in the marriage intentions). He was a spinner, aged twenty-four years (b. England), and she was aged twenty-five years. She was born in England, circa 1821, daughter of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Whitehead. She died of consumption in Saugus, MA, February 28, 1869, aged forty-eight years, six months.

Joseph Whitehead, a trader, aged thirty-seven years (b. England), headed a Saugus, MA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah Whitehead, aged thirty-nine years (b. England), Ralph S. Whitehead, aged three years (b. MA), Ann Townsend, aged forty-eight years (b. England), Eliza Townsend, aged forty-six years (b. England), and Elizabeth Townsend, aged forty-four years (b. England). Joseph Whitehead had real estate valued at $2,200 and personal estate valued at $1,800.

Item 10th. I give and bequeath to my friend Aaron S. McIntosh five hundred dollars in cash.

Aaron S. McIntosh was born in Needham, MA, August 22, 1819, son of Samuel and Priscilla (Smith) McIntosh. He died in Boston, MA, November 4, 1895, aged seventy-six years.

Aaron S. McIntosh appeared in the Boston directory of 1885, as a bookkeeper at 25 Tremont Temple, with his house at 2859 Washington street.

Item 11th. I give and bequeath to my faithful employee John Young two hundred dollars in cash provided he is in my employ at my decease.

John W. Young was born in Barrington, NH, April 8, 1851, son of John B. and Mary J. (Buzzell) Young. He died in Brookline, MA, January 21, 1901, aged fifty-one years.

John W. Young appeared in the Brookline directory of 1891, as a coachman for John Townsend, at Walnut street, with his house on Sewall street, corner of Chestnut street.

Item 12th. I give + bequeath to my kind friend Miss Mary W. Robinson of Dorchester in consideration of her great kindness to my daughter Caroline Frances the sum of five hundred dollars in cash.

Mary Withington Robinson was born in Dorchester, MA, April 30, 1819, daughter of Stephen and Hannah (Withington) Robinson. She died in her home at 33 Brent Street, Boston, MA, September 16, 1905, aged eighty-six years, four months, and sixteen days.

Mary W. Robinson, keeping house, aged sixty-one years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her boarder, Caroline F. Townsend, aged forty years (b. MA). They resided on Washington Street.

Miss Mary W. Robinson of Dorchester, MA, was a vice-president of the New England Wheaton Seminary Club in May 1891 (Boston Globe, May 10, 1891).

Mary W. Robinson appeared in the Boston directory of 1893 as having her house at 33 Brent street. Caroline F. Townsend appeared as boarding with her. The property was described when sold by Robinson’s estate as being a frame house, with 5,186 square feet of land, situated between Talbot avenue and Washington street in Dorchester (Boston Globe, April 17, 1908).

I also direct that after all my just debts and expenses and all the hereinbefore mentioned legacies have been fully paid the remainder of my estate if any shall be equally divided between the families of John and Matilda and John and Eliza Ann Townsend.

I appoint as my Executors and Trustees of this my last will and testament my sons Henry Herbert and Frank Albert Townsend without giving surety or sureties on their official bonds as Executors or Trustees.

In witness whereof I have signed + sealed this instrument and published and declared the same as + for my last will and testament at Boston in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts this first day of November in the year A.D. one thousand eight hundred and ninety.

John Townsend (Seal)

The said John Townsend at Boston, on the first day of November signed and sealed this instrument and published and declared the same as and for his last will and testament and we at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other have written our names as subscribing witnesses. John G. Wetherell. Chas L. Lane. W.W. Martin.

Atlas Bank Five Dollar Note of 1862
A $5 Note of the Atlas Bank of Boston (Redeemable in Gold Coin)

Witness John G. Wetherell (1822-1897) was president and a director of the Atlas National Bank of Boston. Charles L. Lane (1828-1891) was an Atlas National Bank cashier. (He did not long survive the testator). William W. Martin (1854-1908) was an Atlas National Bank clerk and messenger.

References:

Find a Grave. (2015, December 23). Aaron S. McIntosh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/156311366/aaron-s_-mcintosh

Find a Grave. (2010, June 5). Mary W. Robinson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/53292471/mary-w-robinson

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Agnes J. Brierley Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352199/agnes-j-townsend

Find a Grave. (2014, July 25). Charles Thomas Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/133322411

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Henry H. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352239/henry-h-townsend

Find a Grave. (2007, October 23). James Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/22412532

Find a Grave. (2018, February 16). Jane Matilda Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/187367942/jane-matilda-townsend

Find a Grave. (2018, February 16). Jane Randall Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/187367952/jane-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Joseph Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115343080/joseph-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Ruth W. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115343108/ruth-w-townsend

Find a Grave. (2018, February 16). Thomas B. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/187367919/thomas-b-townsend

Find a Grave. (2015, January 28). William B. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/141904441

Find a Grave. (2016, April 10). John W. Young. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/160833788/john-w-young

Wikipedia. (2020, March 28). Wilton, Wiltshire. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilton,_Wiltshire

An Inconvenient Freedom

By Ian Aikens | July 4, 2020

As the annual holiday most associated with the idea of liberty, it would not be an understatement to say that limited government took a massive hit this year. The virus was one thing, but the disastrous effects of the lockdowns will be felt for years to come. Worse still is what appears to be approval from most folks that the lockdowns were the correct course of action for state and local governments to take. While one can’t trust the mainstream media to put anything in perspective, I do believe a poll I read a few months back that 81% of the respondents did NOT want the lockdowns to end and were concerned about opening up too soon.

Incredibly, even here in the Live Free or Die state, it appears that most people have succumbed to the idea that “this time it’s different.” Really? If you check even the CDC records, in the 2017-2018 flu season, there were anywhere from 46,000 to 95,000 deaths in the US. For those with longer memories, you might recall the 1968-1969 Hong Kong flu season when an estimated 100,000 people perished in the US. Benjamin Franklin’s eternal words, “Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety” come to mind. Should our state motto be changed to read “Live Free AND Die”?

I moved to this state specifically because it had a reputation for being liberty-oriented. What a major disappointment when our governor issued Emergency Order #17 and required all “non-essential” Granite Staters to stay at home. Of course, many people were already cutting back on their social contacts as news of the virus was everywhere, but not everyone was, so the heavy hand of government stepped in to “protect” us. The initial emergency order was only 4 pages long, but Exhibit A describing “essential” jobs was 11 pages long. My own industry was not originally listed as “essential,” but my professional trade association raised Cain, and voilà suddenly we were added to the list and became “essential.” So much for there being any doubt about the arbitrariness of it all.

On the other hand, I have great respect for how the pandemic was handled in South Dakota. The governor’s executive order was only 2 pages long, and there was no lockdown. As the governor stated, it’s the residents of South Dakota who are primarily responsible for their own safety. These days, what a radical thought to proclaim publicly—and as a government official too—that people have to take care of themselves and not expect the government to take care of them. They have the freedom to be treated like adults but also the responsibility to face the consequences of their choices. The governor noted that she was trusting them to act like responsible adults during the pandemic, so there was no need for authoritarian behavior like in other states.

Of course, the government control freaks weren’t keen on letting some folks keep their liberties intact, so when there was an outbreak of the virus at a meat plant in South Dakota, the governor took a lot of heat for not locking down the state. Unlike other governors who caved in to mounting pressure, she once again reiterated her non-authoritarian stance and also pointed out that meat plants were deemed essential by the president, so they would have been open anyway during a lockdown.

So, does liberty really work or are we destined for gloom and doom if our leaders don’t treat us like children? Obviously the original “models” were pathetic in how far they were off base, but let’s look at some actual data a few months into the pandemic. New Hampshire is not very different from South Dakota as it’s mostly rural. With a population of 1.36 million, it’s the 10th least populated state, while South Dakota is the 5th least populated state with a population of around 882,000. As of this week, New Hampshire had 373 corona-related deaths, while South Dakota had 93. Dividing the number of deaths by the total population, the virus death rate is .027% per capita for New Hampshire and .013% for South Dakota. If lockdowns save lives, then why is the rate lower for South Dakota, which had no lockdown? As for unemployment as of 06/19/20, the rate for New Hampshire was 14.5% and 9.4% for South Dakota. So apparently authoritarianism isn’t good for your livelihood—or even your health.

To be completely fair to our governor, one of our state reps told me that when some of them complained to the governor that state troopers were pulling drivers over during the initial phase of the lockdown to check why they were out driving, he vowed to put a stop to that nonsense. From what I’ve read, he kept his word, and there were none of the really outrageous civil liberty violations here like arresting surfers, citing people sitting in their cars watching the sunset, taking down the license numbers of cars in church parking lots during Easter Sunday, and the disgusting “Karens” who turned in their neighbors to local police departments and “good citizen” government hotlines.

As today’s holiday approached, there’s been a mainstream media feeding frenzy about the president visiting South Dakota and Mount Rushmore for a celebration and fireworks. The governor said, “We’ve told people to focus on personal responsibility. Every one of them has the opportunity to make a decision that they’re comfortable with. So, we will be having celebrations of American independence. We told those folks that have concerns that they can stay home. But those who want to come and join us, we’ll be giving out free face masks, if they choose to wear one. But we won’t be social distancing.” Needless to say, those who celebrate the god of government control are fit to be tied. Ignoring CDC guidelines is akin to or perhaps worse than heresy.

If I were a bit more cynical, I would say the governor’s critics are hoping for lots of new infections and, better still, deaths resulting from today’s celebration in South Dakota. But I prefer to focus on being happy that there’s actually an elected official who is actively promoting self-ownership, personal responsibility, and self-reliance. Perhaps the meaning behind today’s holiday hasn’t been lost after all.

References:

Baumann, Beth. (2020, April 18). SD Gov. Noem Drops a Truth Bomb on Critics Demanding She Issue a Stay-at-Home Order. Retrieved from https://townhall.com/tipsheet/bethbaumann/2020/04/18/sd-gov-kristi-noem-claps-back-at-critics-who-wanted-her-to-implement-a-statewide-stayathome-order-n2567167

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1968 Pandemic (H3N2 virus). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/1968-pandemic.html

Cummings, William. (2020, July 1). ‘We won’t be social distancing’ at Mount Rushmore celebration with Trump, says SD Gov. Noem. Retrieved from https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2020/07/01/kristi-noem-social-distancing-mount-rushmore-trump/5354257002/

Fund, John. (2020, June 7). Kristi Noem: The Governor Who Stayed the Course. Retrieved from https://www.nationalreview.com/2020/06/coronavirus-pandemic-south-dakota-governor-kristi-noem-stayed-the-course/

State of New Hampshire – Governor Chris Sununu. EXHIBIT A to Emergency Order #17. Retrieved from https://htv-prod-media.s3.amazonaws.com/files/emergency-order-17-1585267833.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2020, June 19). Local Area Unemployment Statistics. Retrieved from https://www.bls.gov/web/laus/laumstrk.htm

Wikipedia. 2017-2018 United States Flu Season. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017%E2%80%932018_United_States_flu_season

Non-Public BOS Session Scheduled (July 6, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | July 3, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a BOS meeting to be held Monday, July 6.

The BOS meeting is scheduled to begin with a Non-Public session beginning at 6:00 PM. That agenda has one Non-Public item classed as 91-A3 II (a).

(a) The dismissal, promotion, or compensation of any public employee or the disciplining of such employee, or the investigation of any charges against him or her, unless the employee affected (1) has a right to a meeting and (2) requests that the meeting be open, in which case the request shall be granted.

This likely has to do with compensation, rather than the other possibilities. (The Town government has posted four positions).


Due to their concerns regarding Covid-19, there will be no public in attendance and, therefore, no public comment. The session may be watched remotely through the usual YouTube means or by teleconference. The links for both are in their original agenda, for which there is a link in the References below.

The quasi-Public portion of the agenda has New Business, Old Business, Other Business, and some housekeeping items.


Under New Business are scheduled four agenda items: 1) Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Operational Activities / Plans, 2) Ira Miller’s General Store – Tax Abatement Agreement in lieu of RSA 79-E application, 3) Jones Brook Discussion, 4) Vote to Authorize Tax Exempt Drawdown Basis Tax Anticipation Note for Fiscal Year 2020.

Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Operational Activities/Plans. One supposes, by the very terms of the meeting announcement, that the Covid-19 is still among us. We will evidently hear an update on those things with which the BOS has been active.

There will be a fifth ReopenNH rally at the State House in Concord, NH, July 4, from noon until 2 PM. This one will include a prayer, a reading of the Declaration of Independence, children’s activities, and a parade.

Ira Miller’s General Store – Tax Abatement Agreement in lieu of RSA 79-E application. Under the Community Revitalization Tax Relief Incentive (RSA 79-E), a redevelopment project resulting in a substantial rehabilitation (at least $75,000 or 15% of the total existing assessed value), any new taxable value directly generated by the renovation can be freed from the levying of property taxes for five years (for a substantial renovation), with an additional four years possible for a property listed or eligible to list on the National Register of Historic places.

Jones Brook Discussion. A bit cryptic. Either the watershed, conservation area, or partnership of that name is to be discussed.

Vote to Authorize Tax Exempt Drawdown Basis Tax Anticipation Note for Fiscal Year 2020. In which Milton’s Town government plumbs the depths: borrowing in order to spend. Taxpayers will henceforth pay not only their taxes, but interest on those taxes. Do you want to pay more in taxes than need be in order to pay interest on borrowed money? I know I don’t.

Aah, but is bond interest in the default budget? Probably not.

Tax Anticipation Note (TAN): “A municipal bond, usually with a maturity of less than one year, issued on the assumption that the debt will be paid back on future tax revenue. Municipalities issue tax anticipation notes to provide cash for immediate or time sensitive needs.”

Tax Exempt: “Federal tax laws require an analysis of a governmental unit’s cash flow needs if the borrowing is to be done on a tax-exempt basis. The need is demonstrated by preparing month-by-month cash flow estimates for the funds for which the borrowing will be made. … The statutes under which notes and warrants are authorized are likely to include a formula or dollar amount limiting the amount of notes or warrants that may be lawfully issued. They are typically payable solely from the taxes or revenues being anticipated.”

Major Hogan: What do you do when you’re short of cash? Lt. Sharpe: Do without, sir. Hogan: You borrow, Richard, from a bank.


Under Old Business are scheduled three items: 5) Request for a One-year Extension for Completion of Project on Tax Deed Auction Property Located at 1121 White Mountain Highway (Issuance of Certificate of Occupancy), 6) Status of following tax deeded structures: 20 Dawson, 79 Charles and 565 White Mountain Highway, and 7) Possible Conservation Commission Appointment.

Request for a One-year Extension for Completion of Project on Tax Deed Auction Property Located at 1121 White Mountain Highway (Issuance of Certificate of Occupancy). The owner of the so-called Blue House, which sold at auction last year, with covenants for repair within the year, has requested an extension.

Status of following tax deeded structures: 20 Dawson, 79 Charles and 565 White Mountain Highway. Properties not disposed of when the prior one sold at auction.

Possible Conservation Commission Appointment. Another “selection” (see next agenda item).


Under Other Business That May Come Before the Board is scheduled one item: 8) Open submissions for Select Board Vacancies and Announcement of Applicant Names.

Open submissions for Select Board Vacancies and Announcement of Applicant Names. Herein lies a tale, no doubt, likely one we will not hear. It would seem that one or more of the selectmen (“vacancies” being the plural form) is to be replaced, per statute, by a special “selection” rather than a special election. Those doing the selecting were themselves elected by a plurality of a minority of the electorate, but they did at least face an election.

The only statute alternative is to have a judge make the “selection” rather than the remaining selectmen. Hmm.


There will be the approval of prior minutes (from the quasi-Public session of June 15, 2020, the quasi-Public session of June 30, 2020, the non-Public session of June 30, 2020, an expenditure report, administrator comments, and BOS comments.

The administrator comments will address the first meeting report of the Local Government Efficiency Task Force™; the receipt of the GOFERR grant reimbursement; and “other.”

The Milton recipients of $288,319.13 in grants from the Governor’s Office for Emergency Relief and Recovery (GOFERR) were Eastern Boats, Inc. ($190,067.26), Shortridge Academy, LLC ($78,393.22), Aerial NDT Inspection Inc. ($11,150.72), Milton Associates, LLC ($4,534.26), and Mary V`S Unique Creations ($4,173.67).


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

GOFERR. (2020). Main Street Relief Fund. Retrieved from www.goferr.nh.gov/

State of New Hampshire. (2016, June 21). RSA Chapter 91-A. Access to Governmental Records and Meetings. Retrieved from www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/VI/91-A/91-A-3.htm

Town of Milton. (2020, July 3). BOS Meeting Agenda, July 6, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/agendas/07-06-2020_bosagenda_final_0.pdf

Town of Milton. (2020, June 22). Milton Select-Board Vacancy Needs to Be Filled. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/news/milton_select_board_vacancy_needs_to_be_filled_003.pdf

Youtube. (1965). Cone of Silence. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1eUIK9CihA&feature=youtu.be&t=19