Wakefield Pro-Division Renunciation – November 1820

By Muriel Bristol | May 22, 2022

Here one may find a supplementary Wakefield pro-division renunciation, dated November 1, 1820. These petitioners regretted their signing an earlier petition in favor of dividing the southern part of Wakefield and northern part of Milton and combining them as a new town.

We the subscribers, Inhabitants of Wakefield and legal voters, having unadvisedly signed a petition to disannex the southerly part of Wakefield from Said Town, and to annex the same to the northerly part of Milton to be incorporated into a Separate Town, on a reflection and decidedly of an opinion that such a division would not be of benefit of those inhabiting the new contemplated town and would materially injure the town of Wakefield and would be a damage to our property.

Therefore we beg the Honorable Legislature to consider us as opposed to said division.

Wakefield, Novr 1, 1820.

[Column 1:] Daniel Smith 3d, John Brooks, Zachariah Knox, John Knox, Benjamin Bideford, James Shepard, John Dore, Benjamin Dore, John Campnell, David Campernell, Spencer Wentworth,

[Column 2:] Jacob Welch, Simeon Philbrick, Daniel Young, John Roberts, Joseph Welch, Thomas Cook, Charles Bickford, Jeremiah Wiggin, Samuel Anies, Daniel M.D. Smith, Joseph Nason, Simeon Hanson, Israel Wiggin, Abner S. Ellice, John Thompson, James Thompson.

(See also Milton Militia Dispute – 1820 and Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrances – June 1820).

References:

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Milton Justice William Palmer, Esq. (1757-1815)

By Muriel Bristol | May 15, 2022

William Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, October 19, 1757, son of Barnabas and Elizabeth (Robinson) Palmer. (See Milton in the News – 1816).

(William Palmer’s known siblings were Mary “Molly” Palmer (1748–1810), Margaret Palmer (1749–1839), Col. Jonathan Palmer (1751–1841), Samuel Palmer (1755-), Elizabeth Palmer (1759-), Barnabas Palmer (1761-1762), John Palmer (1763), Barnabas Palmer (1765-1822), Benjamin Palmer (1766-1806), Joseph Palmer (1769-), Mercy Palmer (1770-1770), and Dudley Palmer (1775–1855)).

Sister Margaret Palmer married in Rochester, NH, July 15, 1766, David Copp. He was born in Rochester, NH, February 12, 1739, son of Jonathan and Esther (Dow) Copp. (Jonathan Copp and David Copp would sign the Association Test of 1776 in Wakefield, NH).

Sister Mary Palmer married, circa 1769, Josiah Main. He was born in Rochester, NH, December 27, 1735, son of Amos and Elizabeth (White) Main. (His father was the “Parson” Main whose statue stands on Main Street in Rochester, NH. Josiah Main was Rochester town clerk from 1771 to 1802).

Father Barnabas Palmer was among the one hundred ninety-eight men who signed the revolutionary Association Test in Rochester, NH, June 1, 1776. (Brother-in-law Josiah Main signed also).

WE, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our Lives and Fortunes, with ARMS, oppose the Hostile Proceedings of the British Fleets, and Armies, against the United American COLONIES (Batchellor, 1910). 

Twenty-two Rochester men “refused” to sign. Another twenty-two Rochester Friends, i.e., “Quakers,” did not “choose” to sign, i.e., they were conscientious objectors.

William Palmer, aged nineteen years, enlisted as a private in Capt. Frederick M. Bell’s 4th Company, 2nd NH Regiment, May 22, 1777. He received a £20 enlistment bounty up front, and £16 8s in pay over the remainder of that year.

(Due to British mercantilist policies, there were very few actual British coins circulating in the colonies. The colonies used instead a bewildering variety of coins from all over, but principally the silver Spanish milled dollar (a “piece of eight”). There were also a wide variety of provincial paper notes and bills of credit, passing usually at a depreciated value relative to “hard” coinage. But the British monetary system was used still in keeping accounts and for setting and resetting the fluctuating exchange rates of the many different monies in circulation. Under this British monetary system, 12 pence (d) made up a shilling (s), and 20 shillings made up a pound (£), so there were 240 pence in a pound).

Exchange Rate Chart of 1759 - Notre DameThe Second Regiment marched initially to take up a station at Fort Ticonderoga, NY. A British force occupied a hilltop that overlooked the fort and the Continental forces were obliged to retreat across the Hudson towards Vermont. Col. Hale’s Second Regiment brought up the rear and had with it the army’s wounded and invalids – there was then a measles epidemic among the troops – with him in the rear.

Although great loss had been suffered in this hasty retreat yet the other portion of the army retreating by land from Ticonderoga fared even worse. Col. Hale’s regiment formed a part of the rear guard. By reason of the great number of invalids and stragglers they were unable to keep up with the main body. They fell back six or seven miles and contrary to Gen. St. Clair’s express orders stopped short at Hubbardton. They were overtaken by the enemy on the morning of July sixth and sharply attacked. The regiment fled panic stricken leaving their Colonel, Adjutant, three Captains, and two other officers with from one to two hundred men prisoners to the enemy. George Heard and Ebenezer Chesley with others whose names are not known were missing from Rochester. Three also of our soldiers died this year while prisoners in the hands of the British (McDuffie, 1892).

(Col. Nathan Hale of New Hampshire should not be confused with Captain Nathan Hale of Connecticut, who had been hanged as a spy in the previous year).

Nathan Hale was from Rindge. Upon the retreat from Ticonderoga, in July of this year, Col. Hale’s regiment was ordered to cover the rear of the invalids, and fell some six or seven miles in the rear. The next morning, July 7, he was attacked by an advanced party of the enemy at Hubbardton, and suffered severely, the colonel, three captains, his adjutant, and one hundred men being taken prisoners, and his major, the gallant Benjamin Titcomb, being severely wounded (NH Adjutant General, 1866). 

2nd NH Regimental Flag
2nd NH Regimental Flag. The 2nd NH Regiment marched behind this flag to Fort Ticonderoga. It was captured by the British at Fort Anne during the retreat from Fort Ticonderoga. Their regiment’s commander, Col. Nathan Hale, who had purchased the flag, would be captured at Hubbardton, VT.

Fifer Ebenezer Fletcher (1761-1831) of the Third Company would later recall being wounded when the British overtook the rearguard …

Having just recovered from the measles, and not being able to march with the main body, I fell in the rear. The morning after our retreat, orders came very early for the troops to refresh and be ready for marching. Some were eating, some were cooking, and all in a very unfit posture for battle. Just as the sun rose, there was a cry “The enemy are upon us.” Looking around I saw the enemy in line of battle. Orders came to lay down our packs and be ready for action. The fire instantly began. We were but a few in number compared to the enemy. At the commencement of the battle, many of our party retreated back into the woods. Capt. Carr came up and says, “My lads advance, we shall beat them yet.” A few of us followed him in view of the enemy. Every man was trying to secure himself behind girdled trees, which were standing on the place of action. I made shelter for myself and discharged my piece. Having loaded again and taken aim, my piece misfired. I brought the same a second time to my face, but before I had time to discharge it, I received a musket ball in the small of my back, and fell with my gun cocked… (Fletcher, 1798).

Fletcher was captured but would later escape. The Fourth Company’s regimental commander, Col. Hale, was captured there too. He was released for a time on parole, but when that parole was revoked, he died in captivity in 1780. He would be replaced by Lt. Col. George Reid (1733–1815), who would remain their commander for the rest of the war.

The subsequent Battle(s) of Saratoga was actually two battles separated by several weeks. The first of them was the Battle of Freeman’s Farm (September 19, 1777), followed by the Battle of Bemis Heights (October 7, 1777).

The Fourth Company’s commander, Capt. Frederick M. Bell (1749-1777), was mortally wounded in the Battle of Freeman’s Farm, September 19, 1777.

Frederic M. Bell, of Dover, was wounded in the battle of Stillwater [Freeman’s Farm], was removed to the hospital, but died of his wound (NH Adjutant General, 1866). 

Capt. Bell’s widow, Elezabeth [(Gage)] Bell (1753-1846), would describe his death there in her petition to the NH Legislature of October 1784 …

… untill the 19th of Septemr when at the head of his Coy Company in an Engagement with the Enemies of his Country he received a Wound which has deprived her forever of the Best of husbands …

The Second NH Regiment fought also in Gen. Enoch Poor’s Brigade at the Battle of Bemis Heights, NY, October 7, 1777, after which British Gen. Burgoyne surrendered his army, October 17, 1777. This ended the Saratoga Campaign, which had been a British attempt to split the New England colonies from the other colonies.

William Palmer appeared in a muster roll of Capt. James Carr’s company, in Col. Nathan Hale’s 2nd NH Regiment, February 21, 1778, and in the same company, but Col. Nathan Hale’s 2nd NH Battalion, March 8, 1778. Palmer was listed among those who had enlisted originally for the term of three years. He was carried on both muster rolls as being “sick in camp,” their winter camp being situated at Valley Forge, PA, as were many others encamped with him.

Col. George Reid’s Second NH Regiment fought in Gen. Enoch Poor’s Brigade at the Battle of Monmouth, NJ, June 28, 1778.

William Palmer of the Fourth Company, Second NH Regiment, received one 8s hat, two 30s shirts, one pair of 36s leather breeches, two pairs of 6s stockings, and two pairs of 8s shoes. (Summing to £6 12s). These disbursements appeared in a commissary’s account book, whose final entry was dated July 1778.

William Palmer was promoted to Corporal, June 8, 1779. The Second NH Regiment was sent as a part of General John Sullivan’s controversial 1779 campaign against Loyalists and British-allied Iroquois in Pennsylvania and western New York.

It remains to trace the fortunes of those who were engaged in the regular army. This can be done only by noticing the services of the regiments of which they formed a part. During August and September, 1779, they were in Sullivan’s expedition against the Senecas. The object of this expedition was the capture of Niagara, and the destruction of the villages of the Indians, who had been guilty of great outrages upon the Americans. It was conducted through a region almost entirely unknown, and covered with forests, and the march was beset with unusual dangers and difficulties. Many villages were burned, orchards cut down, and crops destroyed; yet the main object was not accomplished, and the enterprise failed of beneficial results. Several engagements took place, the most severe of which was at Newtown, now Elmira, New York, in which the enemy were led by the celebrated chief, Joseph Brant. The New Hampshire troops, under Poor, sustained the brunt of the battle, and behaved with great coolness and intrepidity (McDuffie, 1892).

2nd NH Accounts - William Palmer (Dr)
The Debtor (Dr) side of the 2nd NH Regiment’s ledger account with William Palmer of its 4th Company, 1777-80. This tallies the amounts (in pounds (£)) of money and goods, including clothing, and “his part of Rum, Sugar, &c” that it paid or issued to Palmer.

Col. George Reid’s Second NH Regiment fought in Gen. Enoch Poor’s Brigade at the Battle of Newtown, NY, August 29, 1779.

2nd NH Accounts - William Palmer (Cr)
The Creditor (Cr) side of the 2nd NH Regiment’s ledger account with William Palmer of its 4th Company, 1777-80. This tallies the value (in pounds (£)) of services provided by Palmer. The two accounts, creditor and debtor, should “balance,” i.e., they should sum to the same final numbers. This credit account also notes the dates of his promotions to Corporal (June 8, 1779) and Sergeant (Jany 7, 1780), as his pay rate would have increased with each promotion.

Forty-two NH officers in Continental regiments petitioned the NH legislature in 1779 asking it to make them, their men, and their families whole again after their having been paid for over a year in depreciating Continental paper dollars. (Retaining at that point only 16.7% of their face value, and still falling). (Lt. Col. Reid and Capt. Carr were among those that signed).

… Our Pay, once liberal, has become of little Value, our Families starving, our Money refused, and publick Supplies denied our Families; when we find Gentleman of Rank in the United States publickly refusing the currency of the Continent, and all Ranks of People who would be thought virtuous, honest and religious, openly fixing a Depreciation and avowing a right of selling Six for one compared with Silver Money, and secretly promoting a further Depreciation – We are alarmed Justly and greatly alarmed …

William Palmer appeared in a pay depreciation list or report of the Fourth Company, of the Second NH Regiment, as being owed an additional $173.69 for his services over 1777-79, as a Private and then Corporal. This monetary amount appeared in a column labeled “amount of depreciation,” i.e., this calculation seems to have been intended to adjust or make up for prior amounts calculated or paid to him with depreciated Continental paper currency. (“Not worth a Continental”). Colonel George Reid commanded the regiment. 

Willm Palmer appeared in a pay roll for the Fourth Company, of the Second NH Regiment, as having been paid $40 for his services in 1780 as a Corporal and then Sergeant. (He had been promoted to Sergeant, January 7, 1780). Colonel George Reid commanded the regiment.

William Palmer received his discharge, likely in one of the middle colonies, April 30, 1780, and came home from there, probably on foot. Former Rochester, NH, selectmen Ebenezer Tebbetts and Barnabas Palmer certified retroactively, in June 1780, that they had paid an enlistment bounty to five Rochester men, including Palmer’s son, Wm Palmer, back in May 1777.

Rochester Bounty Certificate - June 1780Rochester 22nd June 1780.
This Certify all whome it may Concern that the men of the following Names Recd a Town Bounty of us the Subscribers (being Selectmen for the Town afforesaid) in May the 23rd 1777 whose Names are as followeth, D. Wengate, Enoch Wengate, Wm Palmer, D. Watson, Thos Chamberlin.
Ebenr Tebbetts, Barnabas Palmer { Selectmen at that ti time.

William Palmer married (1st), in 1783, Susanna Twombly. She was born in 1764. (Their known children were Elizabeth “Betsy” Palmer (1783-1857), Daniel Palmer (1786-1863), and Nancy Palmer (1788-1876)).

Daughter Elizabeth “Betsy” Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, September 28, 1783.

Palmer, William - 1785
William Palmer’s petition signature of August 30, 1785. The “P” of Palmer seems to be formed with two parts: an initial “L” with a swirl atop it. (This may be compared with his signature of 1813 (see below).

William Palmer was one of three hundred ten Rochester inhabitants that petitioned the NH legislature, August 30, 1785, seeking repeal of an act requiring milled boards to be square-edged and an inch thick (and other lumber in proportion). Those inhabitants described themselves then as being “largely Concerned in Lumber.” They sought also repeal of an act forbidding transport of lumber to the British West Indies, and seeking the issuance of a new paper money (Hammond, 1884).

Son Daniel Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, July 8, 1786.

During the Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress had inflated the Continental paper dollar into nothingness. (“Not worth a Continental”). (The wartime NH paper dollar was not in much better shape and was due to expire in two months).

NH Paper Dollar - 1780Under the Articles of Confederation, Congress could not tax the citizenry directly. It pressed for State-level taxes to pay off its Revolutionary War debts. This came in the midst of a serious post-war recession and a shortage of “hard” money, i.e., real money, with which to pay them.

In August [1786], a convention of committees from about thirty [NH] towns assembled, agreed upon, and preferred to the general court a long petition, setting forth their grievances on account of the scarcity of money, and praying for an emission of paper bills of credit, in which there is no single trace of an idea of redemption, or any one attempt to give the currency a foundation; but the whole seems predicated on a supposition that the general court by a mere act of legislation, by words and signs, could impress an intrinsic value on paper; which is as fully absurd as it would be to suppose, that the legislature had the power of Midas, and could, from a single touch, turn stones and sticks into gold; their great object was, however, to have this paper [be] a tender for all debts and taxes, and no plan is hinted by which the people are to get this money out of the treasury; but it rather seems that they expected the general court to apportion it among the people at large (NH Historical Society, 1832).

On September 20, 1786, over two hundred armed men – including militiamen – assembled where the legislature was meeting in Exeter, NH, and more or less besieged it. They demanded the issuance of a new NH paper money. (For which the three hundred ten Rochester petitioners of the year before had prayed also). This event would be known as the “Exeter Riot” or the “Paper Money Riot.” (It coincided in time and purposes with the lengthier and better-known “Shay’s Rebellion” in neighboring Massachusetts).

Reid, Gen. GeorgeSgt. Palmer’s former regimental commander, Col. George Reid of Londonderry, NH, was by now a Brigadier General in the NH militia. NH President John Sullivan called him out to suppress the Exeter protesters or rioters. (The “President” of NH would now be termed its Governor).

He [Gen. Reid] was brigadier general in the New Hampshire Militia in 1785, and as such, in 1786, led a portion of his command, by order of President [John] Sullivan, against the rebels in arms against the Legislature, in session at Exeter (NH Adjutant General, 1866).

Gen. Reid and his militia dispersed the protesters and the “Paper Money Riot” came to an end, if not the underlying paper money problems that had spawned it. (Several of its leaders were charged with treason but then pardoned).

Daughter Nancy Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, March 9, 1788.

Willm Palmer headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included one male aged-plus years [himself], three females [Susanna (Twombly) Palmer, Elizabeth Palmer, and Nancy Palmer], and one male aged under-16 years [Daniel Palmer]. His household was enumerated between those of Joseph Hait and John Palmer.

Susanna (Twombly) Palmer died in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, January 19, 1790.

William Palmer married (2nd), August 30, 1791, Deborah Ham. She was born in Dover, NH, February 5, 1766, daughter of Dodavah and Lydia (Plummer) Ham. (Their known children were Susanna Palmer (1792-1876), Dodavah Palmer (b. 1794), William Palmer (1796-1877), Lydia Palmer (1799–1897), Rebecca Palmer (1801–1883), Deborah Palmer (1803–1877), Nathaniel Ham Palmer (1805), Achsah Page Palmer (1807–1880), Hannah P. Palmer (1810–1889)).

William Palmer was a Rochester, NH, selectman in the years 1791 to 1795.

Lt. William Palmer was a subscriber of the Rochester Social Library in 1792, as were Levi Jones, Jotham NuteBarnabas Palmer, Beard Plumer, and Joseph Walker (McDuffee, 1892). (Palmer had risen to sergeant during the Revolutionary War. His lieutenancy in this library subscriber list of 1792 would have been his post-war militia rank).

Daughter Susanna Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, May 20, 1792. She would seem to have been a namesake for her father’s first wife, Susanna (Twombly) Palmer. Son Dodavah Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, January 29, 1794. He was a namesake for his maternal grandfather, Dodavah Ham.

Six Rochester, NH, men, including brother-in-law David Copp, petitioned to have John Plummer, Jr., and Lt. William Palmer appointed as Rochester, NH, justices-of-the-peace, February 14, 1794.

To His Excellency the Governor & Honble Council of the State of New Hampshire ~
Whereas it would be good for the State in general & more especially for the Town of Rochester to have Appointed Justices of the Peace in said Town and We beg leave to recommend John Plummer Junr and Lieut William Palmer and pray your Excellency & Honours that they may be appointed to that Office ~ And your Petitioners will Pray & c.
Exeter Feby 14th 1794 ~
James How, David Copp, Charles Hodgdon, John Waldron, Thos Tash, Jr, Isaac Waldron.

William Palmer was one of Rochester’s NH state representatives in the years 1794-1800.

US Specie Tax, 1794-95
Rochester’s account of its “Proportion of the several Towns for raising Fifty Seven Thousand Two Hundred Sixty Eight Dollars (equal to Seventeen Thousand One Hundred Eighty Pounds Eight Shillings) in Interest, Indents, for the use of the United States agreeably to an Act of the General Court passed the Seventh day of February, 1789, to be paid into the Treasury by the first day of July next.”

Wm Palmer, Esqr, received or collected some of Rochester’s share of a Federal “Specie Tax” in December 1794 and December 1795. (“Specie” was “hard” money, i.e., gold and silver coinage, as opposed to paper notes). One may note that he bore now the appellation “Esquire,” i.e., his appointment as a Rochester justice-of-the-peace had been made. As the terms ran for five years; one might expect him to be renewed in 1799, 1804, etc. The Plummer’s Ridge and Milton Three Ponds district school teacher of 1796-1805 would remember him as “Esquire” Palmer. (See Milton Teacher of 1796-1805).

Son William Palmer [Jr.] was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, July 17, 1796. Daughter Lydia Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, February 21, 1799.

Daughter Elizabeth “Betsy” Palmer married in Wakefield, NH, October 31, 1799, Caleb Wingate, both of Rochester, NH. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony. Caleb Wingate was born in Milton, June 18, 1769, son of John and Elizabeth (Cushing) Wingate.

William Palmer was an assessor for Rochester, NH, in 1800.

Wm Palmer, Esqr, headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years, two females aged 26-44 years, one male aged 10-15, one female aged 10-15, two males aged under-10 years, two females aged under-10 years. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Daughter Rebecca Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, in 1801.

William Palmer, as well as his sons-in-law, Isaac Hayes and Caleb Wingate, signed the Rochester division petition of May 28, 1802. Brothers Samuel Palmer, John Palmer, and Dudley Palmer signed also. (Father Barnabas Palmer did not so sign).

The first town meeting in Milton was called by William Palmer, Esq., and held at the dwelling-house of Lieut. Elijah Horn (now the dwelling house of Lewis B. Twombly) on the 30th day of August 1802, at which meeting Beard Plumer was chosen moderator; Gilman Jewett, town clerk; and William Palmer, John Fish, John Remick, Jr., selectmen (Hurd, 1882).

William Palmer was one of Milton’s first three selectmen, holding that office from 1802 to 1805 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). His son-in-law, Caleb Wingate, served also on the meetinghouse building committee in 1804. (See also Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

The first meetinghouse in Milton was erected on the Ridge in accordance with a vote passed at the annual meeting in 1802. John Fish, Beard Plumer and Gilman Jewett, were the executive committee. The lot on which the building was erected was purchased of Thomas and Aaron Downes for $26. The meetinghouse was completed at a cost of about $2,400, by Caleb Wingate, Capt. Daniel Hayes and Gilman Jewett. The net cost of the church, however, was not so large, as the pews were sold for nearly $2,000. The first service was held in 1804 and from that time until after 1830, the meetinghouse was constantly in use. The first preachers to occupy the pulpit were Rev. Gideon Burt and Rev. Christopher Page both of whom were here in 1804 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). 

Daughter Deborah Palmer was born in Milton in 1803.

Mother Elizabeth (Robinson) Palmer died in 1804. (Some sources have a widowed Barnabas Palmer, living thereafter with their son, William Palmer, on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton for the remainder of his life. However, his own Milton household, consisting of himself alone, was enumerated separately in the Third (1810) Federal Census).

William Palmer received his first appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, December 5, 1804. As he had been termed “Esq.” in Rochester tax accounts of 1794-95, one might infer that he had been already a Rochester justice-of-the-peace since at least that time.

Justices of the Peace and of the Quorum for the County of Strafford
William Palmer, Milton, December 5th 1804, Sepr 19, 1809.

A week after his reappointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, four Strafford County residents nominated him for appointment to the higher office of Strafford County probate judge.

To his Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council of the State of New Hampshire ~
Whereas the office of the Judge of Probate for the county of Strafford by reason of the age of the present Judge, will become vacant in the month of February next, ~ the undersigned take the liberty to name and recommend as the most suitable person in our opinion in said county to fill said vacancy, William Palmer Esqr of Milton.
Concord, Decr 12th 1804. ~
John Fish, Henry Pike, Andw Wentworth, Isaac Lord.

This probate recommendation does not seem to have been fulfilled. Palmer’s supporters’ residences spanned the county (which then included what is now Carroll County). John Fish (c1760-181?) had been elected with Palmer and John Remick, Jr., as an original Milton selectman, would succeed Gilman Jewett as Milton town clerk, and eventually become a Milton justice-of-the-peace. Henry Pike (1758-1825) of Middleton, NH, was a fellow Revolutionary veteran, Maj. Andrew Wentworth (c1765-1813) of Somersworth, NH, was a militia officer and son of a Strafford County probate judge, and Isaac Lord (1772-1838) of Effingham, NH, was a justice-of-the-peace.

Son Nathaniel Ham Palmer was born in Milton in 1805. Daughter Achsah Page Palmer was born in Milton in 1807. (She was a namesake for Beard Plummer’s second wife, Achsah Page).

William Palmer served a second stint as Milton selectman, from 1807 to 1811 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Son Daniel Palmer married in Rochester, NH, September 14, 1809, Abigail Ellis, both of Milton. She was born in Rochester, NH, February 7, 1788.

William Palmer received a renewal of his appointment as Milton justice-of-the-peace, September 19, 1809, at which point he “advanced” to justice “in quorum.”

Wm Palmer headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years, one female aged 26-44 years, one male aged 16-25 years, one female aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, one female aged 10-15 years, one male aged under-10 years, three females aged under-10 years. His household was enumerated between those of Peter Gerrish and Benair Colby.

Barnabas Palmer headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years. His household was enumerated between those of Gilbert Perkin and John Palmer.

Daughter Hannah P. Palmer was born in Milton in 1810.

Sister Mary (Palmer) Main died in Rochester, NH, January 18, 1810, aged sixty-one years.

Deborah (Ham) Palmer died in 1813.

Palmer, Wm - 1813
William Palmer’s petition signature of 1813. The “P” of Palmer seems again to be formed with two parts: an initial “L” with a swirl atop it. (This may be compared with his signature of 1785 (see above).

Milton sent William Palmer to the NH legislature as its state representative in the years 1813-15. Rep. William Palmer recommended John Remick, Jr., for appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace in 1813 (See Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1813).

On 10 Mar. 1814 David [Farnham] sold lot #8, Middleton, NH, consisting of 100 acres, to William Palmer of Milton, NH, for $5 and five annual mortgage payments of $255; in which David Farnham (likely his father) and Daniel Palmer were witnesses (Farnham, 1999).

William Palmer signed the Milton Congregational Society petition of June 1814. His father Barnibas Palmer signed also. (See Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

Son Dodavah Palmer served in Col. Sise’s 3rd NH Regiment in 1814.

William Palmer received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, September 29, 1814. He would serve only nine months of this final five-year term.

Daughter Nancy Palmer married in Wakefield, NH, March 9, 1815, Isaac Hayes, both of Milton. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony. Isaac Hayes was born in Rochester, NH, 1787, son of George S. and Ann (Hawkins) Hayes.

William Palmer made his last will, April 21, 1815. In it he devised property and/or money to the children of his first marriage, Betsy Wingate, Daniel Palmer, Nancy Hayes; and to the children of his second marriage, Susannah Palmer, Dodavah Palmer, William Palmer, Lydia Palmer, Rebecca Palmer, Deborah Palmer, Nathaniel H. Palmer, Achsah Palmer, and Hannah Palmer. He named John Ham of Gilmanton, NH, as guardian of minor children, Nathaniel H. Palmer, Achsah Palmer, and Hannah Palmer. He appointed his sons Dodavah Palmer and William Palmer as joint executors, but added [son-in-law] Caleb Wingate as an additional executor in a codicil. Benjamin Scates, Isaac Hayes, and Levi Jones signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 14:127). (See Last Will of William Palmer, Esq. (1757-1815)).

William Palmer died in Milton, April 23, 1815, aged fifty-seven years, six months, and nine days. His last will was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held at Dover, NH, April 26, 1815 (Strafford County Probate, 14:127).

Daughter Achsah Palmer and father Barnabas Palmer were two of the nine founding members when the newly incorporated Milton Congregational Society organized itself, September 8, 1815. (See Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1815-26).

Son Dodavah Palmer signed the Milton road weight petition of 1816. (See Milton Road Weight Petition – 1816).

Father Barnabas Palmer died in Milton, October 26, 1816, aged ninety-six [?] years.

DEATHS. At Milton, N.H., Mr. Barnabas Palmer, 96 – born in Cork, Ireland. He left his native country when about sixteen years old, and came to this, where he settled and became the father of a numerous family of sons and daughters – he lost an arm (right) in the battle of Louisburg, at that time a major in the British service – he was many years a member of the legislature of New Hampshire before and after the Revolution, a warm and zealous advocate for American Independence, and whilst his voice was heard in our councils with wonder, he inspired and armed his sons for the field, whom he had the satisfaction to see return victorious (Salem Gazette (Salem, MA), November 8, 1816).

On 20 Jan. 1817 David [Farnham] repurchased this [lot #8, Middleton, NH,] land for $200 from Caleb Wingate and Dodavah Palmer, of Milton, administrators [of] the estate of William Palmer, late of Milton, Esq. Witnesses were James Roberts and Levi Jones (Farnham, 1999).

Daughter Susanna Palmer married in Rochester, NH, March 4, 1817, John C. Lord, both of Milton. He was born in Lebanon, ME, in 1787, son of Elisha and Dorcas (Goodwin) Lord.

Brother-in-law Lt. Col. David Copp died in Wakefield, NH, March 13, 1817, aged seventy-eight years.

Son Daniel Palmer signed one of the Milton militia division petitions of 1820 (See Milton Militia Division Petitions – November 1820).

Son William Palmer married in Milton, November 19, 1820, Mary Nutter, both of Milton. Justice Levi Jones performed the ceremony.

Son Dodavah Palmer married in Rochester, NH, September 23, 1821, Abigail H. Hayes, he of Newington, NH, and she of Rochester, NH.

Brother-in-law Josiah Main died in Rochester, November 11, 1823, aged eighty-seven years. (He appeared in a Rochester “Table of Longevity,” a compilation of those who lived to be eighty years of age or older).

Son Dodavah Palmer died October 22, 1824.

Sister Margaret “Peggy” (Palmer) Copp died in Wakefield, NH, August 15, 1839, aged ninety years.

DEATHS. In Wakefield, Mrs. Margaret Copp, relict of the late David Copp, Esq, aged 90 (NH Gazette, August 27, 1839).

Brother Jonathan Palmer died in Wakefield, NH, January 15, 1841, aged eighty-nine years.

DEATHS. In Wakefield, Jan. 15, Col. Jonathan Palmer, in his 90th year. He was a native of Rochester, and moved up to W. [Wakefield] when two or three families constituted the entire population, and when there was scarcely a dwelling between his own and the Canadas (Portsmouth Journal, January 17, 1841).

Daughter Deborah Palmer married in 1846, Ebenezer Buzzell. Son-in-law Caleb Wingate died in Sebec, ME, June 18, 1850.

Son-in-law John C. Lord died in Dover, NH, in 1857.

Daughter Elizabeth “Betsy” (Palmer) Wingate died in Sebec, ME, August 13, 1857, aged seventy-three years, eleven months, and fifteen days.

Son Daniel Palmer died in 1863.

Son-in-law Isaac Hayes died in Milton, March 8, 1863.

Daughter-in-law Abigail (Ellis) Palmer died in Rochester, NH, December 9, 1867.

Daughter Nancy (Palmer) Hayes died in Milton, July 30, 1870.

Daughter Susanna (Palmer) Lord died of cholera morbus in Dover, NH, September 4, 1876, aged eighty-four years.

Son William Palmer, Jr. died in 1877. Daughter Deborah (Palmer) Buzzell died in 1877.

Daughter Achsah P. (Palmer) Hubbard died in 1880.

Daughter Rebecca (Palmer) Berry died of heart disease in Milton, November 22, 1883, aged eighty-two years, seven months.

HERE AND THERE. There was observed in Dover on Friday, the 21st instant, the birthday of Mrs. Lydia Davis who was born on Plumer’s Ridge, Milton, in 1799. On the day named exercises in honor of Washington took place in that one of the public schools which is taught by Mrs. Davis’ grand daughter whose birthday it also was, the combination of circumstances made the occasion thus notable in more ways than one (Farmington News, February 28, 1886).

Daughter Hannah (Palmer) Daniels died of erysipelas (and interstitial nephritis) in Barrington, NH, March 20, 1889, aged seventy-nine years, two months, and five days.

Daughter Lydia (Palmer) Davis died of old age in Dover, NH, October 18, 1897, aged ninety-eight years, seven years, and twenty-seven years.

Of the death of Mrs. Lydia Davis, grandmother of Mrs. F.H. Lathrop, of Swan Lake, and J.E. Jenkins, of this paper, the Dover Republican says: “… She was born in Milton, Feb. 21, 1799, daughter of Wm. Palmer, who served in the revolutionary war, hence was a genuine ‘Daughter of the Revolution.’ She has lived in Dover 74 years and on the same street on which she died. She joined the First Church (Congregational) in Dover 62 years ago last June and has always remained a most exemplary and worthy member of that ancient organization of which she was the senior in membership as well as in age.” The Exeter, N.H., News-Letter says: “A gloriously good Christian woman. If all should become like her in life and character we might forget evils of earth amid the bright beams of the morning sun of the millennium” (Estherville Daily News (Estherville, IA), November 11, 1897).


References:

Batchellor, Albert S. (1910). Miscellaneous Revolutionary Documents of New Hampshire: Including the Association Test, the Pension Rolls, and Other Important Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MIhQAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA127

Farnham, Russell C. (1999). New England Descendants of the Immigrant Ralph Farnum of Rochester, Kent County, England, and Ipswich, Massachusetts. Portsmouth, NH: Peter Randall Publishing

Find a Grave. (2016, July 21). Elizabeth Gage [Bell] Bennett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/167254594/elizabeth-bennett

Find a Grave. (2014, May 2). Rebecca Palmer Berry. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/129045606/rebecca-berry

Find a Grave. (2010, July 2). Deborah Palmer Buzzell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/54383783/deborah-buzzell

Find a Grave. (2011, September 26). [Maj.] James Carr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/77117657/james-carr

Find a Grave. (2012, June 14). Margaret “Peggy” Palmer Copp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/91925387/margaret-copp

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Find a Grave. (2012, October 6). Nancy Palmer Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98391660/nancy-hayes

Find a Grave. (2019, December 5). Achsah Page Palmer Hubbard. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/205247778/achsah-page-hubbard

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Find a Grave. (2015, December 20). Susan [(Palmer)] Lord. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/156216388/susan-lord

Find a Grave. (2010, February 20). Mary Palmer Main. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/48404183/mary-main

Find a Grave. (2012, June 16). Maj. Barnabas Palmer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92000601/barnabas-palmer

Find a Grave. (2011, August 24). Barnabas Palmer [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/75406384/barnabas-palmer

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Daniel Palmer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114736884/daniel-palmer

Find a Grave. (2011, June 23). Dudley Palmer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/71868759/dudley-palmer

Find a Grave. (2012, June 16). Col. Jonathan Palmer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/91997245/jonathan-palmer

Find a Grave. (2015, October 17). Sgt. William Palmer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/153850898/william-palmer

Find a Grave. (2007, March 27). Gen. George Reid. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/18649596/george-reid

Find a Grave. (2010, August 20). Maj. Andrew Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/57379165/andrew-wentworth

Find a Grave. (2011, November 9). Elizabeth “Betsy” Palmer Wingate. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/80159899/elizabeth-wingate

Fletcher, Ebenezer. (1798). Narrative of the Captivity and Sufferings of Mr. Ebenezer Fletcher, of Newipswich. Retrieved from quod.lib.umich.edu/e/evans/N25420.0001.001?rgn=main;view=fulltext

Foster’s Daily Democrat. (2016, October 19). Historic Carr Grave Site Rededicated. Retrieved from www.fosters.com/story/news/local/2016/10/19/historic-carr-grave-site-in-rollinsford-rededicated

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NH Adjutant General. (1866). Report of the Adjutant General. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=_3UUAAAAYAAJ

NH Historical Society. (1832). The 1786 Paper Money Insurrection. Collections of the New Hampshire Historical Society, Volume III. Concord, NH: Jacob & Moore.

Rothbard, Murray N. (2017, December 17). Not Worth a Continental. Retrieved from mises.org/library/not-worth-continental

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Milton Mills’ Miller Gilman Jewett (1777-1856)

By Muriel Bristol | May 8, 2022

Gilman Jewett was born in Exeter, NH, January 18, 1777, son of Paul and Elizabeth ((Gilman) Gilman) Jewett. (Paul Jewett had been among the Exeter inhabitants that petitioned the revolutionary Committee of Public Safety, July 9, 1776, complaining about merchants hoarding goods. Later that same year (per a Jewett genealogy): It appears from the records of Exeter that he [Paul Jewett] owned slaves, as “Nov. 26, 1776, two negroes of Paul Jewett married” (Jewett, 1908)).

Gilman Jewett of Exeter, NH, graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy with its Class of 1789. (In so doing, he might have stood out as an educated man, as very few people – and those mostly ministers and physicians – pursued then any studies beyond completing their local district school educations (roughly eighth grade)).

Father Paul Jewett of Exeter, NH has been said to have settled in the Northeast Parish of Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, circa 1785-86.

Paul Jewett, Amos Witham, Reuben Jones and others were the first settlers of the section near the West Branch river. They came probably about 1785 or 1786.
Among the first who settled at Three Ponds were Samuel Palmer, Levi Burgen, John Fish, Paul Jewett, Pelatiah Hanscom, Robert McGooch, and others (Hurd, 1882).

While the Jewetts may have had land or mill interests in Milton as early as the 1780s, his primary residence seems to have remained still in Exeter, NH, during the period 1790-96.

Father Paul Jewett headed an Exeter, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], two females [Elizabeth ((Gilman) Gilman) Jewett and Sally D. Jewett], and two males aged under-16 years [Gilman Jewett and Nathaniel Jewett].

Mother Elizabeth ((Gilman) Gilman) Jewett died in Exeter, NH, in 1796, aged fifty-four years. It would seem that the Jewett family moved finally to the Northeast Parish of Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, after her death. At some point, either in Exeter, NH, or later, Paul Jewett married (2nd) Mary A. Avery.

… very soon after this a saw-mill was built at Milton Mills by a Mr. Nock. This mill soon went into the hands of Paul Jewett, and was subsequently known as the Jewett mill. This place was known for a long time as Shapleigh Mills (Hurd, 1882).

Father Paul Jewett signed the Salmon Falls sawmill petition of 1797. (See Salmon Falls Sawmill Petition – 1797).

Gilman Jewett married (1st) in Exeter, NH, September 10, 1798, Sally Mead, he of Rochester, NH, and she of Newmarket, NH. She was born in Newmarket, NH, September 16, 1775, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah (Dearborn) Mead. (Their known children would be Sarah D. Jewett (1799-1869), Eliza G. Jewett (1804-1877), Paul Jewett (1814-1861), and Asa Jewett (1815-1883)).

Daughter Sarah Dearborn “Sally” Jewett was born in Rochester, NH, September 23, 1799. She was a namesake for her maternal grandmother, Sarah (Dearborn) Mead.

Sister “Mrs. Polly” Jewett married in Wakefield, NH, in 1800, Noah Robinson, he of Wakefield, NH, and she of Rochester, NH. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony.

Father Paul Jewett headed a Rochester Northeast Parish household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus [himself], one female aged 45-plus [Mary A. (Avery) Jewett], one male aged 16-25 years [Nathaniel Jewett], two females aged 16-25 years [Polly Jewett], one male aged 10-15 years, and one female aged 10-15 years. (See also Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Gilman Jewett headed a Rochester Northeast Parish household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-25 years [himself], two females aged 16-25 years [Sally (Mead) Jewett], and one female aged under-10 years [Sally D. Jewett]. (See also Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Gilman Jewett, as well as his father, Paul Jewett, signed the Rochester division petition of May 28, 1802. (Brother Nathaniel Jewett did not so sign). Paul Jewett received Milton’s first justice-of-the-peace appointment, June 9, 1802, at the time of its founding. (William Palmer, Esq., already held an appointment as a Rochester justice-of-the-peace).

The first town meeting in Milton was called by William Palmer, Esq., and held at the dwelling-house of Lieut. Elijah Horn (now the dwelling house of Lewis B. Twombly) on the 30th day of August 1802, at which meeting Beard Plumer was chosen moderator; Gilman Jewett, town clerk; and William Palmer, John Fish, John Remick, Jr., selectmen (Hurd, 1882).

Gilman Jewett was Milton’s first town clerk, holding that office from 1802 to 1806. He was succeeded by John Fish. Jewett served also on the meetinghouse building committee in 1804. (See also Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

The first meetinghouse in Milton was erected on the Ridge in accordance with a vote passed at the annual meeting in 1802. John Fish, Beard Plumer and Gilman Jewett, were the executive committee. The lot on which the building was erected was purchased of Thomas and Aaron Downes for $26. The meetinghouse was completed at a cost of about $2,400, by Caleb Wingate, Capt. Daniel Hayes and Gilman Jewett. The net cost of the church, however, was not so large, as the pews were sold for nearly $2,000. The first service was held in 1804 and from that time until after 1830, the meetinghouse was constantly in use. The first preachers to occupy the pulpit were Rev. Gideon Burt and Rev. Christopher Page both of whom were here in 1804 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). 

Daughter Eliza G. Jewett was born in Milton, December 3, 1804. (She was a namesake for her paternal grandmother, Elizabeth ((Gilman) Gilman) Jewett. She would have later a younger cousin with the same name).

Father-in-law Benjamin Mead died in Newmarket, NH, in 1805.

Merchant James Rundlett of Portsmouth, NH, sold butter on commission for Gilman Jewett’s brother-in-law, Noah Robinson of Wakefield, NH, in 1809.

His books show forty-three kegs of butter received in 1809 from Noah Robinson of Wakefield, which he sold for $380.33 on a commission of 2½% (May, 1946).

Brother Nathaniel Jewett married in Wakefield, NH, March 18, 1810, Nancy J. Rogers, both of Milton. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony. (Their known children would be Eliza G. Jewett (1811–1882), James Jewett (1813–1815), Mary Rogers Jewett (1817–1850), James J. Jewett (1822–1876), David Jewett (1825–1881), John R. Jewett (1827–1858), and Nathaniel Jewett (1827–1828)).

Father Paul Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself]. one female aged 45-plus years [Mary (Avery) Jewett], and two males aged 16-25 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Obadiah Witham and Jona Young. (And on the same page as Nathl Jewett).

Gilman Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Sally (Mead) Jewett], two females aged under-10 years [Sally D. Jewett and Eliza G. Jewett], and one male aged under-10 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Nicholas Harford and Thos Wentworth.

Brother Nathl Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Nancy (Rogers) Jewett], two males aged 16-25 years, one female aged 16-25 years, and one female aged 10-15 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Josiah Witham and Timo Wentworth. (And on the same page as Paul Jewett).

Son Paul Jewett was born in Milton, in 1814. He was a namesake for his paternal grandfather, Paul Jewett, and was sometimes called Paul Jewett, “Jr.” Son Asa Jewett was born in Milton, in 1815.

Sally (Mead) Jewett died circa 1817.

Daughter Sarah D. Jewett married in Milton, September 19, 1819, James Pinkham, both of Milton. Justice-of-the-peace Levi Jones performed the ceremony. (Their known children would be Lucy D. Pinkham (1819–1860), Nancy B. Pinkham (1821–), Mary E. Pinkham (1822–), James A. Pinkham (1824–1826), James B. Pinkham (1826–1867), Susan A. Pinkham (1828–1917), Sarah Y. Pinkham (1830–), Hannah M. Pinkham (1832–1914), Nathaniel G. Pinkham (1834–1906), John D. Pinkham (1837–1907), and Benjamin W. Pinkham (1837–1839)).

Father Paul Jewett of Milton made his last will, April 20, 1819. He devised a four-acre Milton lot and its buildings to Gilman Jewett, it being where Gilman then lived. He devised to the lawful heirs of Gilman Jewett a fifty-acre lot (purchased of N.A. and John Haven), and the Alpheus Spring lot, both in Shapleigh, ME, excepting that portion set off to Nathaniel Jewett and another portion being improved by Josiah Witham. (Acton, ME, which would border Milton Mills, was yet to be created from the western part of Shapleigh, ME). Witham would pay them for the portion he improved.

Paul Jewett’s will devised all his other Milton land and the forty-acre Wentworth lot in Shapleigh, ME, to his daughter Polly Robinson. She was to receive also his “Saw Mill & privilege & Iron Works, Saws & all the appurtenances thereto belonging, and grist mill & privilege, all I own on both side the river with all the appurtenances belonging thereto.” She was to receive also all his farming utensils.

Paul Jewett’s will reserved forty-five acres of Milton land, as fenced, for Nathaniel Jewett. This included a privilege of the Saw Mill and iron works associated with it. Nathaniel would also receive a twelve-acre portion of the aforementioned Spring Lot, and the one hundred eleven-acre Guppy Lot in Shapleigh, ME, and one-half of his money at interest, money, stock, and sheep. He named Gilman Jewett, Noah Robinson, and Nathaniel Jewett as his executors. John Remick, Junr, Wm S. Nutter, and Josiah Moulton signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 49:345). (The elder Paul Jewett would continue to live and, therefore, his will would not be proved for another sixteen years).

Jewett, Gilman - November 1820Gilman Jewett married (2nd) in Milton, circa 1820, Ann S. Nutter. She was born in Newington, NH, in December 1790, daughter of Hatevil and Susanna (Shackford) Nutter. (Note her father’s male Puritan “virtue” name: “Hate-Evil.” It is of a kind with more familiar female ones, such as Constance, Faith, Hope, Charity, Chastity, Prudence, etc.).

Gilman Jewett signed both of the Milton militia division petitions of November 1820. His father Paul Jewett, brother Nathaniel Jewett and son-in-law James Pinkham joined him in signing one of them. (See Milton Militia Division Petitions – November 1820). Milton’s selectmen sought his appointment as a Milton Three Ponds justice-of-the-peace later that same month (See Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1820).

Daughter Eliza G. Jewett married in Lebanon, ME, July 5, 1821, Thomas Corson. He was born in Lebanon, ME, September 5, 1799, son of John and Tamsen (Hodgdon) Corson. (Their known children would be Charlotte F. Corson (1825–), Caroline Corson (1828–1908), Alonzo Corson (1831–1889), Melinda K. Corson (1833–1906), Henry H. Corson (1837–1841), Tamsen A. Corson (1839-1841), Henry H. Corson (1843–1880), and Amanda E. Corson (1845–1869)).

Gilman Jewett of Milton appeared in an acknowledgement by the publisher of an 1822 NH directory as being one of the “gentlemen, who have contributed materials and afforded other facilities to the improvement of this register” (Claremont Manufacturing, 1822).

Rep. Levi Jones (1771-1847) submitted the petition of Gilman Jewett and others to the NH House of Representatives, June 7, 1822. It sought incorporation of the Milton Social Library.

Mr. Jones of Milton presented the petition of Gilman Jewett and others praying to be incorporated into a Society by the name of the Milton Social Library. Voted That the said petition be referred to the standing committee on incorporations and that they report thereon (NH General Court, 1822).

The proposed society was so incorporated, June 14, 1822. Gilman Jewett was empowered to call its first meeting and preside over it as its moderator pro tem.

Twenty-three Milton inhabitants sought appointment of Gilman Jewett as Milton coroner, June 12, 1823. This appointment does not seem to have taken place as the petition bore on its reverse side a notation that it was “To be Postponed indefinitely.” (See Milton Seeks a Coroner – 1823).

Father Paul Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 80-89 years [Paul Jewett], one male aged 50-59 years [Gilman Jewett], one female aged 50-59 years [Ann S. (Nutter) Jewett], one male aged 20-29 years, two males aged 15-19 years [Paul Jewett and Asa Jewett], and one male aged 10-14 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Steph. Shorey and Amos Witham. (And on the same page as son Nathl Jewett).

Son-in-law Jas Pinkham headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Sarah D. [(Jewett)] Pinkham], one female aged 10-14 years [Lucy D. Pinkham], two females aged 5-9 years [Nancy B. Pinkham and Mary E. Pinkham], one male aged under-5 years [James B. Pinkham], and two females aged under-5 years [Susan A. Pinkham and Sarah Y. Pinkham]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Lucy D. Hartford and Pelatiah Hanscom. (And on the same page as brother-in-law Thomas Coson [Corson]).

Son-in-law Thomas Cosan [Corson] headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Eliza G. (Jewett) Corson], one male aged 5-9 years, one female aged 5-9 years [Charlotte F. Corson], and one female aged under-5 years [Caroline Corson]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Isaac Worcester and Benj. P. Stokes. (And on the same page as brother-in-law Jas Pinkham).

Brother Nathl Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [Nathaniel Jewett], one female aged 40-49 years [Nancy J. (Rogers) Jewett], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 15-19 years [Eliza G. Jewett], one female aged 10-14 years [Mary Rogers Jewett], one male aged 10-14 years [James J. Jewett], one male aged 5-9 years [David Jewett], and one female aged 5-9 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Nutter and Obadiah Witham. (And on the same page as Paul Jewett).

Father-in-law Hatevil Nutter died in Newington, NH, December 25, 1831, aged eighty-three years.

Son Paul Jewett, Jr., married in Rochester, NH, March 9, 1834, he of Milton and she of Rochester, NH, Drusilla Pickering. Leonard Bennett performed the ceremony. She was born in Rochester, NH, March 2, 1812, daughter of William and Abigail (Calef) Pickering. (Their known children would be Sarah “Sally” Abigail Jewett (1837–), William Gilman Jewett (1842–1894), Benjamin Woodman Jewett (1844–1928), Mary Ann Jewett (1846–), Frank Henry Jewett (1849–1929), and Clara Frances Jewett (1853–)).

Father Paul Jewett died in Milton, in November 1835. His last will of April 1819 was proved before James Bartlett, Strafford County justice-of-the-peace and probate judge, December 14, 1835 (Strafford County Probate, 49:345).

The NH legislature incorporated Gilman Jewett and his associates as the Milton Mills Manufacturing Company in January 1837. They transformed an old woolen mill to a lathe and turning mill in 1837-38. (See Milton Mills Mfg. Co. & the Waumbeck Companies – 1837-98).

Paul Jewett (1744-1835) owned an early sawmill known as the Jewett Mill, which was operated by Asa, his father, Gilman Jewett, and uncle, Nathaniel Jewett. They incorporated the Milton Mills Manufacturing Company in 1837, transforming the mill into a lathe and turning mill where they produced wood products (NHHS, 2022).

The Milton Mills Manufacturing Company was organized in 1837, and in that and the following year built their mill, and after running it a few years transferred the business to Durgin & Co. (Scales, 1914).

Among the industries at Milton Mills in the early days of the town were several saw mills, a crude woolen mill, and a distillery where Stephen Watson manufactured whiskey from potatoes. Gilman Jewett, Nathaniel Jewett, Asa Jewett, and a Mr. Wedgewood transformed the old woolen mill into a lathe and turning mill about sixty-five or seventy years ago [c1837-1842], after which it was operated more or less irregularly up to the year 1847, when it was purchased by John Townsend … (Michell-Cony, 1908).

Son Asa Jewett married in Wakefield, NH, October 31, 1837, Mary Ann Richards, he of Milton and she of Wakefield, NH. Rev. Nathaniel Barker performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, April 20, 1813, daughter of Col. Ichabod and Annie (Hurd) Richards. (Ichabod Richards signed the Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrance of June 1820). (Their kn0wn children were Nancy R. Jewett (1839–1904), Lydia M. Jewett (1842–1922), and Clara Alberta Jewett (1858–1863)).

Son Asa Jewett succeeded his step-uncle, William S. Nutter, as clerk of the Acton & Milton Baptist Church, i.e., the Milton Baptist Church, in 1837. He held that position until he was in turn succeeded by David Farnham in 1850 (Scales, 1914).

Gilman Jewett headed a Milton [Milton Mills] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one male aged 40-49 years, one male aged 30-39 years [Paul Jewett], one female aged 30-39 years [Drusilla (Pickering) Jewett], and one male aged 15-19 years. Three members of his household were engaged in manufacture and the trades, while one member was engaged in agriculture. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles Swasey and John Nutter. (The household of his son Asa Jewett appeared further down the same page).

Son-in-law James Pinkham headed a Milton [Three Ponds] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Sarah D. (Jewett) Corson], two females aged 15-19 years [Lucy D. Pinkham and Nancy B. Pinkham], two females aged 10-14 years [Mary E. Pinkham and Susan A. Pinkham], one male aged 10-14 years [James B. Pinkham], two females aged 5-9 years [Sarah Y. Pinkham and Hannah M. Pinkham], and two males aged under-5 years [John D. Pinkham and Benjamin W. Pinkham]. One member of his household was engaged in manufacture and the trades. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John McMillan and John Scates. (The households of his brothers-in-law Thomas Corson and Paul Jewett appeared a little further down the same page).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson headed a Milton [Three Ponds] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Eliza G. (Jewett) Corson], one male aged 15-19 years, one female aged 15-19 years [Charlotte F. Corson], one female aged 10-14 years [Caroline Corson], one male aged 10-14 years [Alonzo Corson], one female aged 5-9 years [Melinda K. Corson], one male aged 5-9 years [Henry H. Corson], and one female aged under-5 years [Tamsen A. Corson]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Merrill Henderson and his brother-in-law, Paul Jewett. (The households of his brothers-in-law James Pinkham and Paul Jewett appeared on the same page).

Son Paul Jewett headed a Milton [Three Ponds] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Drusilla (Pickering) Jewett], and two females aged under-5 years [Sarah A. Jewett]. One member of his household was engaged in agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of brother-in-law Thomas Corson and Stephen Drew.

Jewett, Asa, House of - c1790
Jug Hill Road in Milton Mills. The Asa Jewett house depicted in the 1856 Milton Mills map as it appears today. A sign above the front door reads “c1790, Asa Jewett” (Google Maps).

Son Asa Jewett headed a Milton [Milton Mills] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years, and one female aged under-5 years [Jewett]. One member of his household was engaged in agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ezekiel Merrow and Thomas Butter. (The household of father Gilman Jewett appeared further up the same page).

Brother Nathaniel Jewett headed a Milton [Milton Mills] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Nancy J. (Rogers) Jewett], two males aged 15-19 years [James J. Jewett and David Jewett], and one male aged 5-9 years [John R. Jewett]. Three members of his household were engaged in agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Daniel Guptill and Merrill Brackett. (The households of brother Gilman Jewett and nephew Asa Jewett appeared on the previous page).

Fire at Milton Mills, N.H. About one o’clock on the morning of the 19th ult. the shingle and clapboard mill of Mr. Asa H. Jewett, was discovered to be in flames, and before aid could be had, the fire had progressed so far that all effort was useless, and the mill, with its contents, were burned to ashes. The loss is estimated at about $1200, insurance $550, in the Strafford Mutual Fire Insurance Co. Credit is due to the fire company, who with their engine succeeded in saving other buildings and property. – Dover Gazette (North Star (Danville, VT), August 4, 1845).

Not long after the fire the Jewetts sold their Milton Manufacturing Co. to Durgin & Co., who sold to John Townsend (Milton Mills Mfg. Co. & the Waumbeck Companies – 1837-98).

Jewett, Asa - Sturtevant (1848)
Asa Jewett in August 1848. To the extent that a son might resemble his father, or vice versa, Gilman Jewett might have looked like him (MutualArt, 2020).

Son Asa Jewett had his portrait painted by Sturtevant J. Hamblin (1816-1884) in August 1848. Note the “attributes” over Jewett’s left shoulder: woods verging on a body of water, not unlike Milton’s Town Seal. This sitting may have taken place at Hamblin’s studio in East Boston, MA (MutualArt, 2020; National Gallery of Art, 2022; NH Historical Society, 2022).

Mother-in-law Susan (Shackford) Nutter died in Milton, November 13, 1848, aged ninety-one years.

President Zachary Taylor appointed Gilman Jewett as Milton Mills postmaster, April 30, 1849. Such appointments were political sinecures in those days, from which one might infer that Jewett was a Whig, as was Taylor. Gilman Jewett succeeded James Berry in that position. Berry’s tenure coincided with the presidency of Democrat James K. Polk.

Gilman Jewett, a postmaster, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Ann S. [(Nutter)] Jewett, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), Joseph Sharp, a manufacturer, aged forty years (b. England), Hannah Sharp, aged twenty-five years (b. England), Benjamin Sharp, a manufacturer, aged twenty-five years (b. England), Susan A. Hubbard, aged sixteen years (b. ME), [sister-in-law] Susan S. Nutter, aged forty-six years (b. NH), John McDonald, a tailor, aged thirty-five years (b. Scotland), and Joseph Robinson, a manufacturer, aged thirty-six years (b. England). Gilman Jewett had real estate valued at $2,000. Jewett’s household appeared next to that of John Townsend, agent for the Milton Mills Manufacturing Co., aged forty-three years (b. England).

Son-in-law James Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sarah [(Jewett)] Pinkham, aged fifty years (b. NH), Lucy Pinkham, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Hannah Pinkham, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Nathaniel G. Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and John P. Pinkham, aged thirteen years (b. NH). James Pinkham had no real estate valued. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and Thomas Nutter, a shoemaker, aged thirty-five years (b. ME).

Milton - 1856 (Detail) - Corson, Jewett, Pinkham
Milton Three Ponds in 1856 (Detail). The houses of T. Corson and P. Jewett are indicated together by the larger red arrow, while that of N.G. Pinkham, i.e., James Pinkham, is indicated with the smaller red arrow. (Note also John S. Edgerley’s Milton Hotel a bit further south on the railroad side of the road near the bottom of this map detail).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson, a farmer, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eliza G. Corson, aged forty-six years (b. NH), Alonzo Corson, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Melinda Corson, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Henry Corson, aged seven years (b. NH). Thomas Corson had real estate valued at $1,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Aaron Hubbard, a carpenter, aged forty years (b. ME), and Jacob Staples, a shoemaker, aged forty-three years (b. ME).

Son Paul Jewett, a farmer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Druzilla Jewett, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Sarah A. Jewett, aged thirteen years (b. NH), William G. Jewett, aged eight years (b. NH), Mary Jewett, aged four years (b. NH), Frank S. Jewett, aged three years (b. NH), and Laura Jewett, aged four months (b. NH). Asa Jewett had no real estate valued. His household appeared between those of Joseph Nute, a laborer, aged fifty years (b. NH), and Robert Moulton, a laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH).

Son Asa Jewett, a lumber dealer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. HIs household included Mary A. [(Rogers)] Jewett, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Nancy R. Jewett, aged eleven years (b. NH), and Lydia M. Jewett, aged nine years (b. NH). He had real estate valued at $11,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Josiah N. Witham, a farmer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and Charles Swasey, a baker, aged fifty-one years (b. NH). Asa Jewett had real estate valued at $11,000. His household appeared between those of Josiah N. Witham, a farmer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and Charles Swasey, a baker, aged fifty-one years (b. NH).

Postmaster Gilman Jewett received $56.88 in compensation for his work at the Milton Mills post office in 1851, and his post office had net proceeds of $77.66. The Milton postmaster, James M. Twombly, received $112.81 and his post office had net proceeds of $148.10 (US Dept. of the Interior, 1851).

Gilman Jewett appeared in the NH directory of 1854, as postmaster at Milton Mills (Farmer, 1854).

Gilman Jewett died in Milton, May 24, 1856, aged seventy-nine years.

Milton Mills, 1856 (Detail) - Asa Jewett
Milton Mills in 1856 (Detail). The house of “A. Jewett,” i.e., Asa Jewett, is indicated with a red arrow. (See the Google Maps photo above for a picture of this house as it stands today). That of an “N. Robinson” appears across the street. (Note also near the bottom along the river that of “E Brierley,” later to be proprietor of the Brierley Mill).

Ann S. [(Nutter)] Jewett, aged sixty [seventy] years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included [her sisters,] Mary Nutter, aged seventy [seventy-two] years (b. NH), and Susan Nutter, aged fifty [fifty-eight] years (b. NH). Ann S. Jewett had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $1,000. Her household appeared between those of Joseph P. Swasey, a tailor, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Palmuth Came, a laborer, aged seventy years (b. NH).

Son-in-law James Pinkham, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah D. [(Jewett)] Pinkham, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), James B. Pinkham, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Gilman Pinkham, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Emily Pinkham, aged twenty years (b. NH), Clara Pinkham, aged two years (b. NH), and John D. Pinkham, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). James Pinkham had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $200. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Dearborn Ellis, a shoemaker, aged forty years (b. NH), and Joseph Jenness, a landlord, aged thirty-six years (b. NH).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH [ME]), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza Corson, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), Charlotte Corson, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Henry Corson, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and E.A. Corson, aged fourteen years (b. NH). Thomas Corson had real estate valued at $700 and personal estate valued at $500. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Stephen Drew, a practicing physician, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), and Simon Hart, a shoemaker, aged forty years (b. NH).

Son Paul Jewett, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Farmington P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Drusilla Jewett, aged forty-six years (b. NH), Mary A.  Jewett, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Frank H. Jewett, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Clara F. Jewett, aged seven years (b. NH). Paul Jewett had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $200.

Son Asa Jewett, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, aged forty-five years (b. NH), Nancy R. Jewett, aged twenty years (b. NH), L.M. [Lydia M.] Jewett, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and C.A. Jewett, aged one year (b. NH). Asa Jewett had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $6,000. His household appeared between those of S.S. Hart, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), and Amos Witham, a sawyer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH).

Son-in-law James Pinkham died in Milton, February 4, 1861, aged seventy years.

Son Paul Jewett of Rochester, NH, made his last will, April 9, 1861. He devised all his real and personal estate to his beloved wife, Drusilla Jewett, while she remained his widow. He devised $25 each to his beloved daughters, Mary Ann Jewett and Clara Frances Jewett. Daughter Sarah Amm Jewett and her heirs had aleady received her portion. He bequeathed all the rest and residue, including his wife’s portion after her decease (or remarriage), to his three sons, William G. Jewett, who was also appointed executor, Benjamin W. Jewett, and Frank Henry Jewett. Daniel P. Warren, L.L. Leighton, and C.E. Wiggin signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 70:426).

Son Paul Jewett died in Rochester, NH, September 4, 1861, aged forty-six years. His son and executor William G. Jewett presented his last will for proving in a Strafford County Probate court held in Dover, NH, in October 1861 (Strafford County Probate, 70:426).

Son Asa Jewett brought a lawsuit for debt against his cousin John R. Jewett, a son of Nathaniel Jewett, in the mid-1860s.

When Asa Jewett commenced his suit John R. Jewett, he held certain notes which were covered by the count for money had and received, and a claim for goods sold, covered by count for goods sold, and there was another count upon a claim growing out of the estate of their [grand?] father (NH Supreme Court, 1867).

Asa Jewett of Milton Mills paid $10 in tax for being a retail dealer. (See Milton’s US Excise Tax of May 1864).

The suit would expand to include Mary A. Page (1819-1902) of Milton, daughter of Joseph and Lydia S. (Remick) Page, whose separate suit against Asa Jewett reached the NH Supreme Court in 1866. She claimed that the sequence of events and the accounting methods employed by Asa Jewett had disadvantaged her own claims against John R. Jewett. Her case was dismissed (NH Supreme Court, 1867). (John R. Jewett was her brother-in-law, being the husband of her younger sister, Clara H. (Page) Jewett (b. 1829). In her last will, dated December 1882, Mary A. Page would devise all of her real estate to her nephew, Haven R. Jewett (1856-1924), a son of John R. and Clara H. (Page) Jewett (Strafford County Probate, 118:294).

Asa Jewett of Milton Mills paid $10 in tax for being a retail dealer, and another $10 in tax for his stallion in the US Excise Tax of May 1866.

Son Asa Fox appeared in the Milton directory of 1867, as a Milton justice-of-the-Peace. (His name appeared twice).

MILTON. … Justices – Charles Jones, Luther Hayes, State; Elbridge W. Fox, Joseph Plumer, Ebenezer Wentworth, Ezra H. Twombly, Joseph Mathes, Charles A. Cloutman, Asa Jewett, Elias S. Cook, Joseph Cook, Robert Mathes, Eli Fernald, Asa Jewett, Daniel S. Burley, Ira C. Varney, George Lyman, George W. Peavey (McFarland & Jenks, 1867).

Daughter Sally D. (Jewett) Pinkham died in Milton, July 13, 1869.

Ann S. [(Nutter)] Jewett, keeping house, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included [her sister,] Susan S. Nutter, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and Mary A. Nutter, a housekeeper, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Ann S. Jewett had real estate valued at $600. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Hiram Wentworth, a carpenter, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Frank Bush, Jr., a woolen mill finisher, aged forty-nine years (b. France).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson, a farm laborer, aged seventy years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Eliza [(Jewett)] Corson, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), Charlotte F. Corson, a housekeeper, aged forty-six years (b. ME), Caroline Parlin, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and Lydia J. Parlin, works in shoe factory, aged seventeen years (b. NH). Thomas Corson had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $2,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Robert Brown, works in shoe factory, aged forty years (b. NH), and Simon Hart, a shoemaker, aged forty years (b. NH).

Drusella Jewett, keeping house, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Lowell, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included Mary A. Jewett, works cotton mill, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Clara Jewett, works cotton mill, aged seventeen years (b. NH). (On the same page was the household of Frank E. Jewett, a tinsmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA)).

Son Asa Jewett, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, aged fifty-six years (b. NH). Asa Jewett had real estate valued at $5,000 and personal estate valued at $585. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ira Miller, a hotel keeper, aged forty-three years (b. ME), and Asenath Marsh, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME).

Ann S. (Nutter) Jewett died in Milton, November 28, 1870.

Son Asa Fox appeared in the Milton directory of 1871, as a Milton justice-of-the-Peace.

MILTON – Justices – Charles Jones, Luther Hayes, State; E.W. Fox, Joseph Plumer, Ebenezer Wentworth, E.H. Twombly, Joseph Mather, C.A. Cloutman, Asa Jewett, Joseph Cook, Robert Mathes, I.C. Varney, George Lyman, G.W. Peavey, J.S. Hersey, G.W. Tasker, E.W. Foss, M.V.B. Cook, T.H. Roberts, H.H. Wentworth, J.N. Simes, L.A. Lang (Claremont Manufacturing, 1871).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson died of cancer in Milton, March 13, 1875, aged seventy-five years, six months, and eight days.

Daughter-in-law Drusilla (Pickering) Jewett died of consumption at 113 Columbus Street in Lowell, MA, August 14, 1875, aged sixty-three years, four months, and twenty days.

Daughter Eliza G. (Jewett) Corson died in Milton, November 2, 1877.

Nancy J. (Rogers) Jewett of Milton made her last will, April 9, 1879. She devised all of her real and personal estate to her granddaughter, Mary A. Berry. (Mary A. Berry (1835-1922) was born in Milton, daughter of James and Eliza G. (Jewett) Berry). Ira Miller, Asa Jewett, Nellie C. [(Berry)] Roberts, and Irving Jewett signed as witnesses. It was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held in Somersworth, NH, in February 1881 (Strafford County Probate, 93:271).

Son Asa Jewett, a trader & farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, keeping house, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). His household was enumerated between those of Jeremiah C. Buck, a physician, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), and George Hoyt, works in felt mill, aged forty-two years (b. ME).

Son Asa Jewett appeared in the Milton directory of 1882 as a Milton Mills clothing manufacturer.

MILTON. … Milton Mills … Manufacturers – carriages and wheelwrights, John Brackett, A.O. Prescott; clothing, Asa Jewett; flannels, Waumbeck Manuf’g Co.; felt cloth, piano and table covers, D.H. Buffum & Co.; picture frames, E.A. Hargraves; plows, W.F. Cutts; saddle housings, L.B. Roberts; soap, S.G. Chamberlain; rubber linings, table and piano covers, Townsend & Co., washing powder, E.J. Brierley (Tower, 1882).

Son Asa Jewett died in Dover, NH, April 17, 1883, aged sixty-seven years.

Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, a widowed home-keeper, aged eighty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. She owned her house free-and-clear. She was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett (Asa) appeared in the Milton directories of 1902 and 1905-06, as having her house at 51 Main street in Milton Mills. She appeared also in the Milton directory of 1909, as having her house at 49 Main street in Milton Mills, and as being “96 years of age.”

Thomas Cutts, a farmer (general farm), aged seventy years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lydia [(Jewett)] Cutts, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), his mother-in-law, Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, aged ninety-seven years (b. NH), his son-in-law, William L. Hargraves, a retired barber, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), and his daughter, Alberta [(Cutts)] Hargraves, aged forty-seven years (b. NH). Thomas Cutts owned their farm free-and-clear. Lydia Cutts was the mother of one child of whom one was still living. Mary A. Jewett was the mother of two children of whom one was still living. Alberta Hargraves was the mother of one child of whom one was still living.

Daughter-in-law Mary A. (Richards) Jewett died of nephritis in Milton Mills, August 7, 1910, aged ninety-seven years, three months, and seventeen days. Frank S. Weeks, M.D., signed the death certificate.


References:

Claremont Manufacturing Co. (1822). New Hampshire Register and Farmer’s Almanac. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=KgIXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA141

Claremont Manufacturing Co. (1871). New Hampshire Register, Farmer’s Almanac and Business Directory. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=FpMBAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA79

Farmer, John. (1854). New-Hampshire Annual Register, and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=W0A4AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA136

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Mary A. Berry. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115349918/mary-a-berry

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Eliza G. Jewett Corson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214560554/eliza-g-corson

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Lydia M. Cutts. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114673349/lydia-m-cutts

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Alberta J. Hargraves. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114676772/alberta-j-hargraves

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Asa Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115418840/asa-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Clara Alberta Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115418898/clara-alberta-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). David Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115418930/david-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Gilman Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114597023/gilman-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). James J. Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115418976/james-j-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Nathaniel Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115419072/nathaniel-jewett

Find a Grave. (2011, December 31). Hatevil Nutter III. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82754846/hatevil-nutter

Find a Grave. (2012, October 16). Mary A. Nutter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/99018846/mary-a-nutter

Find a Grave. (2012, October 16). Mary Nutter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/99018792/mary-nutter

Find a Grave. (2012, October 16). Susan S. Nutter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/99018909/susan-s-nutter

Find a Grave. (2020, September 8). Sarah D. Jewett Pinkham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215360207/sarah-d-pinkham

Find a Grave. (2021, March 3). Nellie C. Berry Roberts. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/223823148/nellie-c-roberts

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Nancy R. Jewett Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612594/nancy-r-simes

Hurd, D. Hamilton. (1882). History of Rockingham and Strafford Counties, New Hampshire. Philadelphia, PA.

Jewett, Frederic C. (1908). History and Genealogy of the Jewetts of America. New York, NY: Grafton Press

McFarland & Jenks. (1867) New Hampshire Register and Political Manual. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=UMYTAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA129

May, Ralph. (1946). Among Old Portsmouth Houses. Boston, MA: Wright & Potter Printing Company.

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). The Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA100

MutualArt. (2020). Portrait of Asa Jewett. Retrieved from www.mutualart.com/Artwork/Portrait-of-Asa-Jewett/CA91E0388921E0A7

National Gallery of Art. (2022). Sturtevant J. Hamblin. Retrieved from www.nga.gov/collection/artist-info.5518.html

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

NH General Court. (1822). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=x-tFAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA16

NH Historical Society. (2022). Portrait of Asa Jewett. Retrieved from www.nhhistory.org/object/1295227/painting

NH Supreme Court. (1867). Page vs. Jewett. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=CJc0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA447

Phillips Exeter Academy. (1838). Catalogue of the Officers and Students of Phillips Exeter Academy. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=2SlDAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA10

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA516

Tower, F.L. (1882). New Hampshire Register, State Year-book and Legislative Manual. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rOsWAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA124

US Department of the Interior. (1851). Official Register of the United States: Containing a List of Officers and Employees in the Civil, Military, and Naval Service. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Vto9AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA26

Wikipedia. (2022, April 21). Whig Party (United States). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States)

Milton Militia Division Petitions – November 1820

By Muriel Bristol | May 1, 2022

A letter of this period was folded in such a way that it formed its own envelope, with the contents within and an address or label without. The label written on the outside was:

Remonstrance of Inhabitants of Milton against the petition of Luther Dearborn & others praying for a new town.

On the reverse or inside side followed a letter to Milton’s NH State Representative Daniel Hayes.

Daniel Hayes, Esquire.

Dear sir, We the subscribers, inhabitants and legal voters in the town of Milton, having lately understood that a second petition would probably be submitted at their next session; signed by a number of the inhabitants of this town, similar to that which was presented last June; praying the Legislature to divide the town; principally on account of the fatigue and hardships to which the Militia are subjected by having to travel a greater distance to travel to get to their usual places for parading than they think is necessary; and in that particular we believe that the burden on the soldiers who do duty in Milton might be made lighter by some alteration and we had not the least doubt, last June, but that the Field officers would have established the division of the company of infantry in the town of Milton, agreeably to a vote of said company which was passed in June with but very few dissenters. But as the Field officers have not established the division, we hope you will endeavor to effect such alterations as you think will best accommodate the Militia in the town of Milton without injury to the state; either by a division of the second Regt or of the 7th Company. As the petition that we suppose will be presented at this Novr session is new, and quite unexpected, it is not convenient to get the names of the people generally who would sign a Remonstrance, and believing it to be unnecessary, as we stated out objections at large last June, we therefore wish for you to make use of the objections which your constituents offered in their Remonstrance last session against the prayer of the petition that was then presented being granted.

Benja Scates, Gilman Jewitt, Wm Jones, Timo Roberts, John Scates, Samuel N. Chamberlin, Isaac Scates, Joseph Plumer, Jr, Charles Ricker, Daniel G. Dore, Aaron Downs, James Pinkham, John Palmer, Ichabod Hayes, Levi Jones, T.C. Lyman, Josiah Withem, Bidfield Hayes, Lewis Hayes.

There was also an accompanying petition to the full NH legislature, for which the above was a sort of cover letter. As in the preceding, there was an address side to the petition that was labeled:

Petitions of Levi Jones & others, James Hayes & others, for a division of the Company of Militia in the Town of Milton.

On the reverse or inside side followed the actual petition:

To the Legislature of the State of New Hampshire.

Humbly shew the undersigned inhabitants of the Town of Milton that said Town at present form but one Company of Militia which renders the meetings for company musters very fatiguing and expensive to those liable to do Military duty therein ~ That there is a sufficient number enrolled in said company to compose two companies ~ That application has been made to the Field officers of the 2nd Regt to divide said company which they have refused to do ~ That the situation of said company is the great cause why so many of the inhabitants have petitioned the Legislature for a division of the Town, believing that to be the only remedy, since the Field officers have refused to divide the company ~ But your petitioners believe that the great evil which must arise to the Town of Milton by forming a new Town may be avoided by a division of the company ~ And since the Field officers have refused to comply with our first request ~ And believing that the Legislature in such a case will not only hear out petition but will answer our prayer ~ Humbly pray that the Company of Militia in the Town of Milton may be so divided as to compose two companies ~ The division line between said Companies to commence near the center of the North West pond so called and run in such a direction [as may] leave the dwelling houses of Matthias Nutter, John Miller and James Moulton on the Easterly side of said of said line, and extending to the Middleton line ~ Milton, November 10th, 1820.

[Column 1:] David Wentworth, John Foss, John Ricker, William W. Lord, Timo Roberts, James Pinkham, Robert [Berry?], Stephen Wentworth, Richard Horn, Wm Foss, Wm Jones, James Roberts, Stephen Drew, James Nutter, Ichabod [Bodge?], David Hayes, Samuell Bragdon, Ebenr Ricker, Saml Jones, Thoms Wentworth, Isaac Worster, Isaac Worster, Jr, John Wentworth, John Wentworth, Jr, John T. Varney,

[Column 2:] Jotham Nute, Hopley Meserve, Moses Nute, Joseph Nute, Jere Cook, Wm W. Cook, William Wentworth, John C. Nute, Samuel Nute, Jr, John Nute, James Y. Pinkham, John Twombly, Dudley Burnham, Wm Downs, Isaac C. Young, Joshua Knight, Wentworth Dore, Moses Downs, Jr, Dudley Wentworth, Jonathan Place, Jacob Wentworth, Samuel Ricker, Samuel Twombley,

[Column 3:] Levi Jones, Joseph Plumer, Jr, Jeremy Nute, Danl Wentworth, Josiah Witham, Phinehas Wentworth, Levi Wentworth, Samuel Wallingford, Aaron Downs, Daniel Palmer, John Palmer, Elijah Horn, James H. Horn, Ichabod C. Horn, James Twombly, Timothy Emery, Daniel Nute, Caleb Wakeham, Isaac Varney, Charles Wakeham, Ebenr Wakeham, James Goodwin, Ambross Tuttle, Jona Hall, John H. Downs, Lemuel Ricker, Pelah Hanscom,

[Column 4:] John Scates, Alvah Scates, Gilman Jewett, William Sargent, Theodore C. Lyman, Israel Nute, Micah Lyman, Richard Walker, John Bragdon, Ezekiel Nute, James Varney, Jr, Icabod Hayes, Enoch Nute.

Another Milton petition took the same view as the first but passed around separately.

To the Honorable Legislature of the State of New Hampshire.

Humbly shew the undersigned Inhabitants of the Town of Milton that said town at present forms but one Company of Militia which renders the meetings for Company musters very fatiguing & expensive to those liable to do military duty thereon ~ that there is a sufficient number enrolled in said Company to compose two companies ~ that application has been made to the Field Officers of the 2d Regt to divide said Company which they have refused to do ~ that the situation of said Company is the great cause why so many of the Inhabitants have petitioned the Legislature for a division of the Town believing that to be the only remedy since the Field Officers have refused to divide the Company ~ but your petitioners believe that the great evil which must arise to the Town of Milton by forming a new town may be avoided by a division of the Company ~ and since the field Officers have refused to comply with our just request ~ and believing that the Legislature will in such a case will not only hear out petition but will answer our prayer ~ Humbly pray that this Company in the Town of Militia may be so divided as to compose two Companies ~ the division line between said Companies to commence near the center of Northwest pond so called and run in such a direction as to leave the dwelling houses of Matthias Nutter, John Miller & James Moulton on the Easterly side of said line & extending to Middleton line ~ Milton, November 10th 1820

[Column 1:] Simeon Applebee, Nathaniel Miller, Mark Miller, Jur, Thomas Merrow, Webster Miller, Thomas Applebee, James Applebee, Hiram Applebee, John Fifeld, Daniel Jennes,

[Column 2:] Nathl Jewett, Joseph S. Frost, Daniel Witham, Amos Witham, Paul Jewett, Samuel Rines, Alpheus S. Goodwin, Ezekiel Worster, Benaiah Dore,

[Column 3:] James Hayes, Jr, Chesley Hayes, Jona Pollard, John D. Remick, John Remick, Otis Wentworth, Josiah Witham, Reuben T. Witham

References:

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Celestial Seasonings – May 2022

By Heather Durham | April 30, 2022

Welcome to the astronomical event of the year … a full lunar eclipse!  This will create a Blood Moon. Hopefully, our weather will cooperate. Below is a snippet from Wikipedia about this event.

This occurs when the moon falls entirely within the earth’s umbra. Just prior to complete entry, the brightness of the lunar limb – the curved edge of the moon still being hit by direct sunlight – will cause the rest of the moon to appear comparatively dim. The moment the moon enters a complete eclipse, the entire surface will become more or less uniformly bright. Later, as the moon’s opposite limb is struck by sunlight, the overall disk will again become obscured. This is because as viewed from the Earth, the brightness of a lunar limb is generally greater than that of the rest of the surface due to reflections from the many surface irregularities within the limb: sunlight striking these irregularities is always reflected back in greater quantities than that striking more central parts, and is why the edges of full moons generally appear brighter than the rest of the lunar surface. This is similar to the effect of velvet fabric over a convex curved surface which to an observer will appear darkest at the center of the curve. It will be true of any planetary body with little or no atmosphere and an irregular cratered surface (e.g., Mercury) when viewed opposite the Sun. (Wikipedia, 2021, Total Lunar Eclipse).

Lunar Eclipse of May 16, 2022 - Dominic Ford


May 1. New Moon

May 3&4. Earthshine viewing a.k.a the Da Vinci Glow. Earthshine is caused by Sun reflecting off the surface of the Earth and back to the Moon.

May 6. N-Aquariid meteor shower. Our view of this shower, from the Constellation Aquarius may be best viewed just before dawn. These showers originate from Haley’s Comet.

May 8. There will be a n-Lyrid meteor shower today with best viewing, once again, is just prior to dawn. However, the Flower Moon will be at first quarter today and may interfere with shower viewing.

May 16. Today will bring a full Moon and a total lunar eclipse. It will begin at 10:28 pm through 1.55 am.  The total eclipse will be between 11:30 pm until 12.54 am. The Sun, Earth and Moon must be aligned for this to occur. As well, it can only occur with a full Moon and creates a reddish color – a Blood Moon.

May 22. The Moon and Saturn will rise to the right and closely approach one another.  The Moon will be in its final quarter.

May 24. The Moon and Jupiter will closely approach one another while rising to the right. The Moon, along with Mars will do the same on this date.

May 26. The Moon and Venus will rise to the right and orbit close to each other.

May 28. Mars and Jupiter will rise to the right together.

May 29. Mars and Jupiter will orbit close to each other.


References:

Ford, D. F. (2022). Astronomy. Retrieved from https://in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (February 2022). May 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/w1BR7UI3SAA.

Now Next. (March 2022). 15-16 May 2022 Total Lunar Eclipse. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/a93ckEDOm00

Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrances – June 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 24, 1820

A “number of respectable citizens” of Wakefield, NH, sought to split off the southerly part of Wakefield and the northerly part of Milton, and then join them together as a new town.

… in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this [Wakefield] town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this [Wakefield] town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

The pro-division petitions have not come to hand. But a few of Wakefield’s pro-division advocates can be found in other documents. Luther Dearborn has been mentioned as having been a principal actor.

J. Hall appeared in the title of the following renunciation as having been a pro-division signer, and four other formerly pro-division inhabitants would appear as signers of a November renunciation. (Their names appeared also in the June remonstrance petition).

A Certificate of Persons who signed a Petition of J. Hall and others wishing not to be considered as members

We the undersigned Inhabitants of the Town of Wakefield having signed a petition for the separation of the Towns of Wakefield & Milton to form a new Town without duly Considering the subject and after a more mature Consideration of the subject have signed a remonstrance against said separation and therefore wish the Legislature of the State to consider us as Strenuously opposed to said separation.

John Paul, Joseph Edgerly, Nathl Abbott, Jona Copp

Another twenty-seven Wakefield pro-division petitioners would sign a renunciation in November 1820. (See Wakefield Pro-Division Renunciation – November 1820).

The impetus behind the Wakefield and Milton pro-division petitions had been a desire to thereby split Milton’s militia company, which included southern Wakefield, into two parts for the benefit of those having to travel the greatest distances to militia musters and trainings. (The Wakefield anti-division remonstrance would open by describing the original pro-division signers as respectable citizens, but it would close by characterizing them as selfish and partisan disturbers of the peace).

Ten years earlier, the Third (1810) Federal Census had enumerated a rather generous number of Wakefield householders endowed with military, civil, or religious titles. They included Capt Benjan Cook, Jonan Copp, Esqr, David Copp, Esqr, William Copp, Esqr, Capt Jonathan Copp, Capt Jona Copp, Willm Sawyer, Esqr, Capt Joseph Manson, Capt Richard Dow, Elisha Sanborn, Esqr, Lt James Hutchens, Capt David Spring, Avery Hall, Esqr, Colo John Gillman, Colo John Palmer, Capt Andrew Gillman, Majr Joshua Hall, Dr Thomas Lindsay, Revd Asa Piper, and Luther Dearborn, Esqr. (Rev. Asa Piper and justice-of-the-peace Luther Dearborn, both advocates in 1820 of forming a new town, were in 1810 next-door neighbors).

Although Wakefield did have its own separate northerly militia company in 1810, it might still seem to have been a bit top-heavy in having two colonels, one major, one lieutenant, and seven captains all at the same time. It seems more likely that some at least of these military titles were courtesy ones, a residue of having held that rank at some time in the past. That is to say, some of them at least were likely former militia officers or even former Revolutionary War officers, rather than active ones.

Some rough calculations may give some idea of the relative sizes of Wakefield’s pro- and anti-division contingents. (The 1820 census was then in process only, and ultimately not preserved, except as aggregate totals. The 1810 census figures are used here as being those cited in the anti-division remonstrance). Wakefield had 1,166 inhabitants in 1810, of which 605 were male. Roughly 375 of these were below voting (and petitioning) age. That left roughly 230 potential petitioners. (N.B., 61 of those potential petitioners were above militia age). So, the 197 anti-division remonstrance petitioners represented roughly 85.7% of Wakefield’s 1810 electorate. (Leaving as many as 14.3% in the pro-division category).

(There was a companion remonstrance from the Milton voters that also opposed the division (representing roughly 65.3% of its 1810 electorate)).

As previously mentioned, Wakefield’s entries for the Fourth (1820) Federal Census are missing (as are those of Milton). The following anti-division remonstrance – signed by those 197 men opposing the proposed town division – supplies the names of at least a large portion of Wakefield’s householders (and those living with them). (There was a companion remonstrance from those Milton voters that opposed the division).

Such petitions employed a certain structure and style. Their overall tone is respectful. The authorities to whom they are directed are characterized as “honorable” and they are frequently asked – “we pray” – to consider some measure by virtue of “their wisdom.”

They begin with a salutation. The petitioners might identify themselves and their situation. There is usually then a recitation of facts, each one prefaced with “That.” Finally, the petitioners would “pray” that some proposed solution be adopted. (This term of phrase, although frequently employed in this type of writing, sounds somewhat archaic nowadays. The only higher authority to whom modern speakers might address a “prayer” is the ultimate one: God).

(Wakefield’s NH state representative for the 1820-21 biennium was William Sawyer (1774-1860)).

A Remonstrance of the Inhabitants of Wakefield praying that the southerly part of Wakefield and the northerly part of Milton May not be Incorporated into a separate Town.

To the Honorable Legislature of the State of New Hampshire convened at Concord June Session A.D. 1820.

Your memorialists, Inhabitants of Wakefield in the County of Strafford in said state; having lately learnt, that a number of respectable Citizens living at the Southerly part of Wakefield were about to present a Petition to the Honorable Legislature praying that the Southerly part of Wakefield and the Northerly part of Milton may be incorporated into a separate Town. Never having seen said Petition, nor heard of it untill since the last annual Town Meeting, we are wholly ignorant of the reasons they offer for the groundwork of their prayer. But we feel it a duty that we owe to ourselves and to Posterity to remonstrate against the prayer of said petition being granted. We do not deny, but cheerfully admit, that there may be cases, in which it is necessary, that the Legislature should incorporate new Towns, taken off from one or more old Towns. But we think and hope to be able to convince the Legislature, that this is not one of those cases.

The Town of Wakefield is small in Territory and its Inhabitants few in numbers compared with many other Towns in the State. It does not exceed six miles square, when brought into such form, and a large proportion of said surface is covered with Ponds, Heaths, and Stagnant waters, more than two thousand acres of the Northerly part of the Town is composed of poor gravelly Pitch pine plains of the worst quality on which neither Man nor Beast can make a living. The Town, according to the last enumeration, contains only Eleven hundred and sixty-six Inhabitants scarcely able to maintain their corporation. Increase of taxes is the natural consequence of the division of Towns. Public buildings are now erected fit and convenient for the Town, one of which called the old meeting-house is situated at the northerly extremity of the new contemplated Town and more than one mile South of the center of Population of the whole Town of Wakefield, in which the Town have always held their Town Meetings untill the last annual Meeting. The other, called the new Meetinghouse, is situated at the center of Population of the Town, in a handsome flourishing Village, to which all the roads in Town lead and center. If the Legislature should grant the prayer of the Petitioners, Wakefield will be deprived of nearly one-half of its cultivated soil, comprehending the ancient and best Settlements in the Town. It will subject the Inhabitants of the old Town, as well as the new, to many disadvantages and inconveniences, and to an expense more than they are able to bear. New Public Buildings must be erected or the old ones removed, new roads leading to new centers must be laid out, made and kept in repair. School Districts will be split & divided, school houses thrown off from their centers, farms divided partly into the new and partly into the old Towns.

There are other considerations which we beg leave to suggest. Property of almost every description has a local value; and in perhaps no instance more so than in those little Villages in the center of Country Towns. In the Village in the center of Wakefield, Traders, Mechanics, and others have purchased house lots and garden spots, some at the rate of more than a thousand dollars per acre, and erected Houses, Stores, and work shops thereon with the reasonable and well grounded expectation that the center of Town, public business and Buildings would there continue. But if the Town should be divided, this village will be situated at the Southern extremity of the Town and thereby its value and local situation destroyed. But what advantages and privileges do the Petitioners derive by a division; or in other words, what inconveniences and hardships do they now suffer? We apprehend none. The Public Buildings in which the Town assemble, either for Religious worship or Town Meetings are both from one to two miles nearer the Southerly part than the Northerly Yet the inhabitants of this quarter are very well [all] located and make no complaints.

We are aware that Petitioners for the new Town will point out by Carrigain’s Map, or some other Survey, what a handsomebeautiful five-mile square Town may be made out of Wakefield and Milton, and then attempt to show and make it believed, that the remaining part of those two Towns will be equally as good as the whole and in a better form.

But we apprehend that the wisdom of the Legislature will not warrant the practice or establish the principle of cutting up and destroying old corporate Towns for the sake of making handsome new-formed Towns, and thereby destroy the harmony and happiness of its inhabitants.

During nearly fifty years the inhabitants of Wakefield have lived in peace and harmony and conducted their public affairs with an unanimity not surpassed if equaled by any Town in the State. We now appeal to the Wisdom of the Legislature, as the Guardians of our rights, liberties & privileges, to keep us together in our corporate capacity and not permit the party feelings and selfish motives of the few to disturb the peace, interest and happiness of the many.

Jonathan Copp, Henry L. Wiggin, Elias Wentworth } Select Men

Reuben & Benjamin Something - 1820
Two signature surnames that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. They appeared in Column 1 of Page 3, both above and below those of Mason Dorr. Any ideas?

[Page Three]

[Column 1:]

William Sawyer, John M’Crillis, Spencer Wentworth, John Hill, John Roberts, James Young 2, James Dame, John S. Wentworth, Silvanus Wentworth, John Wentworth, Saml Sevrans, Saml Sevrans, Shadrach Folsom, Robert Quimby, Nathl M. Meserve, Reuben [Currier?], Mason Dorr, Benjamin [Dorr?], Benjamin Bickford, James Shepard, John Brooks, Ephraim G. Smith, John Nocks, Nicholas Nocks, Zachariah Nocks, Daniel M.D. Smith, Joshua Nock, Joseph Burbank, Isaiah Varney, Abner Nutter, John Dore, James Thompson, John Thompson, Daniel Smith, Eliphalet Clough, Samuel [Ames?], Israel Wiggin, Joseph Corson, Simeon Philbrick, Jeremiah Wiggin, Walter Cate,

Samuel Something - June 1820
A signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 1 of Page 3, between those of Eliphalet Clough and Israel Wiggin. Any ideas?

[Column 2:]

Moses Young, Mark Young, Mark Wentworth, Phineas Wentworth, Paul D. Young, John Campnell, Ephraim Wentworth, Thomas Cook, Daniel Young, Edmund Wentworth, Thomas Bickford, William Dame, Joseph Young, John Cook 2th [?], Stephen [Burbank?], James Young, Richard K. Young, Jesse Cook, James Cook, Peter Cook, John Blake, Thos Wiggin, Henry Wiggin, Benjamin Cook, John Blake, Jr, Joseph Bennet, Jonathan Quimby, Eliphalet Quimby, Amasa Quimby, Daniel Quimby, Jacob Clark, John Cook, Nathaniel Cook, Samuel C. Dame, Levi Dearborn, Simeon Dearborn, Thomas P. Clark,

Stephen Something - June 1820
A signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 2 of Page 3, between those of John Cook and James Young. Any ideas?

[Column 3:]

John Dame, David Allen, John Clark, Jr., Ambrose Swasey, John Wingate, Dodavah Copp, Isaac B. Chesley, Stephen Fellows, Jeremiah Dearborn, David Dearborn, Jona Dearborn, Levi Neal, Asa Dow, Jonathan Brown, Jonathan Copp, Richard Dow, Josiah Dow, Joseph [M’Coon?], John Campernell, Jr., Nathan Dearborn, Stephen Horn, Nathan Dearborn, Samuel his X mark Dearborn, James Perkins, John Sanborn, Jr., Samuel Chamberlin, Richard Cook, Ebenr Hill, Jonathan Burley, James Hill, William Burley, Benja Brown, William Brown, Noah Horne, Daniel Horne,

Joseph Something - June 1820
A signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 3 of Page 3, between those of Josiah Dow and John Campernell, Jr. Any ideas?

[Page 4]

[Column 1:]

Jacob Lock, John Lang, Richard Land, Caleb Weeks, John Weeks, Josiah Allen, Mark Allen, John Watson, Nathan Watson, Joshua Vickery, Samuel Vickery, John Clark, Phineas Weeks, Nathaniel Lock, Nicholas Tuttle, Joseph Pike, Joseph H. Pike, Moses Gage, Jonathan Gage, John Gage, Benjamin [—–], James [—–], Joseph Maleham, Nathan Mordough, Benjamin Dame, Josiah Warren, Peter K. Wiggin, Elisha Rollins, Jacob A. Chesley, Thomas Nudd, Jr, Daniel T. Carter, Alvah H. Sawyer, Ichabod Richards, Joseph Wiggin, Henry M. Lindsay, George Hill,

Benjamin & James Something - June 1820
Two signature surnames that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. They appeared in Column 1 of Page 4, between those of John Gage and Joseph Maleham. Any ideas?

[Column 2:]

Joseph Hill, Tobias Hanson, John Fellow, Nelson Nutter, Thomas Nudd, Nathaniel Evans, Stephen D. Hutchins, William Clark Frost, James Martin, Isaiah Hodgdon, Joseph Hodgdon, Otis V. Geodey, Joseph W. Sanborn, Eliphalet Philbrook, Joshua Edgerly, James Edgerly, William Parsons, James Garvin, John Paul, Miles Davis, Wentworth Davis, Wm French, Moses French, John Hanson, Wentworth Garvin, John Sanborn, Daniel H. Sanborn, Samuel R. Hutchins, Ezra M. Hutchins, Charles Carter, Nathl Cook, Jr, Timothy Watson,

[Column 3:]

William Perkins, Joseph Palmer, Shadrach Allen, John Copp, Noah Kimball, Noah Kimball, Saml Burbank, John Horne, Joseph Edgerly, George Lindsay, Nathl Abbot, Ebenr Garvin, Richard Russell, William Bennet, Daniel Hall, Elisha Sanborne, Joseph Hutchins, Nathan Weeks.


See also Milton Militia Dispute – 1820 and Milton Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820


References:

Find a Grave. (2007, October 15). Jonathan Copp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/22229979/jonathan-copp

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Luther Dearborn. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92171689/luther-dearborn

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Rev. Asa Piper. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92206616/asa-piper

Find a Grave. (2012, June 23). William Sawyer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92415030/william-sawyer

Find a Grave. (2012, June 24). Henry L. Wiggin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92466261/henry-l-wiggin

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Milton Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 17, 2022

A “number of respectable citizens” of Milton circulated a petition for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature, seeking to split off the northerly part of Milton and the southerly part of Wakefield, and then join them together as a new town. Their petition has not come to hand. (It might have been withdrawn).

... in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this [Wakefield] town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this [Wakefield] town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

Other documents, including this subsequent remonstrance petition, suggest that the impetus behind the original petition had been the simpler desire to split Milton’s militia company into two parts for the greater convenience of those having to travel the greatest distance to militia musters and trainings. (See Milton Militia Dispute – 1820).

Some rough calculations may give some idea of the relative sizes of Milton’s pro- and anti-division contingents. (The 1820 census was then in process only, and ultimately not preserved, except as aggregate totals. The 1810 census figures are used here as being those cited in the Wakefield anti-division remonstrance). Milton had 1,005 inhabitants in 1810, of which 476 were male. Roughly 276 of these 476 Milton males were below voting (and petitioning) age. That left roughly 200 potential petitioners. (N.B., 76 of those potential petitioners were above militia age). So, the 127 anti-division remonstrance petitioners represented roughly 63.5% of Milton’s 1810 electorate. (Leaving as many as 36.5% in the pro-division category).

(There was a companion remonstrance from the Wakefield voters that also opposed the division (representing roughly 85.7% of its 1810 electorate)).

As previously mentioned, Milton’s entries for the Fourth (1820) Federal Census are missing. The following remonstrance – by those 127 men opposing the proposed division – supplies the names at least of about two-thirds of Milton’s 1820 householders (and those living with them).

(Column 1 signer Daniel Hayes [Jr.] (1781-1856) was Milton’s NH state representative for the 1820-21 biennium).

Remonstrance of sundry Inhabitants of Milton agt. the prayer of certain petitions for a new town to be taken from Milton & Wakefield.

To the Honourable Legislature of the State of New Hampshire convened at Concord June session A.D. 1820 ~

Your memorialists, inhabitants and legal voters in the town of Milton in said state, having lately understood that a petition would be presented by a number of respectable citizens residing on the Northerly part of said Milton, praying that the Northerly part of Milton and the southerly part of Wakefield may be incorporated into a town, beg leave to remonstrate against the prayer of said petition being granted. A division of the town would subject the inhabitants of the old town as well as the new to many hardships and inconveniencies.

The town, though somewhat large in territory, contains but few inhabitants compared with other towns in this state ~

A large proportion of said town is composed of hills and Mountains or covered with ponds of water. Teneriff mountain and the three ponds, and almost all of the wast[e] land in said Milton lie in that part of the town not included in said petition. Should the town be divided according to the prayer of the petitioners, we are of opinion that much the best part of the town will be taken off, and Milton left without form or comeliness, within a few years the town has built a large handsome Meeting-house which is completely finished, in the center of the town, in which the inhabitants can conveniently assemble in town-meeting as well as for public Worship.

If the town should be divided this Meetinghouse will be situated on the North-Easterly section of the town, and of course must be almost (if not altogether) useless to those who have been at a large expense to complete it with the pleasing expectation that the same place would continue to be the center of said town ~

Should the prayer of the petitioners be granted it will be necessary to erect a Meetinghouse in the center of the territory that will be left, New roads leading to said center made and kept in repair; and a large increase in taxes must be the inevitable consequence ~

It is not to be expected that every individual in any town can possess and enjoy equal privileges. If towns are divided, split and subdivided there will be centers and extremities. But those living in the center purchase their privileges by giving more for their land on account of its local situation than those who live on the extremities give for land of the same quality ~

And we apprehend that it must be an extreme case in which the Legislature will take away those purchased rights by dividing the town and thereby transferring them to others ~

The public funds for the support of the Gospel and Schools, like the town are too small to be divided ~ Your memorialists, fully believing in the wisdom of that precept given us by the father of our country “United we stand; divided we fall” beg the Honourable Legislature to keep us together ~

[Column 1:]

Joseph Plumer, Levi Jones, Joseph Plumer, Jr, Benja Scates, Benjamin Scates, Jnr, Isaac Scates, Elijah Horn, James Twombly, James H. Horn, Daniel Emery, Timothy Emery, John Loud, John Palmer, Aaron Downs, John Scates, Nal Pinkham, Norton Scates, Pelah Hanscom, William Hatch, Gilman Jewett, Saml Jones, Ichabod Bodge, Isaac Worster, Wm Jones, Joshua Jones, Moses Nute, Ebenr Wakeham, James Goodwin, James Pinkham, Jedediah Ricker, Saml Ricker, Stephen Wentworth, Lemuel Ricker, Jonathan Dore, Dodovah Dore, James Hayes, Jr, Chesley Hayes, Micah Lyman, Daniel Hayes, Jr, Edward Tebbets, Stephen Drew, Wm Palmer, Theodore C. Lyman,

[Column 2:]

Richard Walker, Israel E. Nute, Jacob Nute, Benja Jenkins, Jeremy Nute, Joseph Walker, Samuel Bragdon, Isaac Wentworth, James Varney 3, John T. Varney, James C. Varney, J.C. Varney, Jr, John Jenkins, Ivory Bragdon, Lemuel Varney, Stephen Jenkins, Jr, Ezekiel Nute, Samuel Nute, Jotham Nute, Bidfield Hayes, Hayes Nute, John Twombly 3rd, James Y. Pinkham, William Wentworth, William [Hays?], Timothy Ricker, John Ricker, Richard Horn, Jonathan Ricker, Samuel Twombly, Jr, Robert Knight, Samuel Twombly, John Downs, Stephen Henderson, Daniel Wentworth, Phinehas Wentworth, Daniel Dore, Samuel Nute, Jr, Thomas Y. Wentworth, John C. Nute, William Downs, Samuel N. Chamberlin, Matthias Nutter, Hopley Varney, Joshua Knight,

William Something - 1820
The signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 2, between those of William Wentworth and Timothy Ricker. The initial letter might be a rather squiggly “H.” The next letter that looks like an “n” is also very like the rather similar open “a” of the “William.” The final two figure-eights could be the “y” and “s” of “Hays,” i.e., Hayes. Any other ideas?

[Column 3:]

James Varney, John C. Varney, Ezekiel Hayes, Stephen Hayes, Lewis Hayes, James Hayes, Ichabod Hayes, James Varney, Jr, Ephraim Plumer, John Meserve, Ephm Wentworth, Ichabod Wentworth, L.H. Wentworth, Isaac Varney, Wm Tuttle, Ambrose Tuttle, Jonathan Howe, Dudley Farnham, Jere: Cook, Isaac C. Young, William Sargent, Daniel G. Dore, James Bragdon, William Foss, John Foss, Ebenr Ricker, Charles Ricker, Wentworth Dore, Matthew Farnham, John Wentworth, John Wentworth, Jr, William W. Loud, Timo Roberts, Nathl Jewett, Merk Miller, John Blaisdell, George Dore, Nathan Jones, Joseph Corson.


See also Milton Militia Dispute – 1820 and Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820


References:

Find a Grave. (2016, September 20). Daniel Hayes, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170258230/daniel-hayes

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Thompson, Rev. Albert H. (1886). Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Organization of the First Church, and Ordination of the First Settled Town Minister of Wakefield, N.H. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EKm15quwMhsC&pg=PA42

Milton Militia Division Request – May 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 10, 2022

Jeremiah “Jeremy” Nute was born in Milton, October 25, 1788, son of Lt. Jotham Jr. and Sarah (Twombly) Nute. (Jotham Nute, Jr., had been a Revolutionary soldier, Milton militia lieutenant, and was at this time a Milton justice-of-the-peace (See Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1805)).

Jeremy W. Nute married, May 31, 1810, Martha Runnells. She was born in Farmington, NH, February 13, 1785, daughter of Joseph and Abigail (Pinkham) Runnells.

Lt. Jeremy Nute marched to Portsmouth, NH, in the Milton militia detachment commanded by Captain William Courson (1782-1863) in September 1814, during the War of 1812. (See Milton in the War of 1812).

Son Franklin W. Nute was born in Milton, in 1810. Son Henry Smith Nute was born in Milton, February 12, 1815. Son George W. Orange was born in Milton, circa 1816.

(Nephew Lewis W. Nute (1820-1888) was born in Milton, February 17, 1820, son of Ezekiel and Dorcas (Worster) Nute).

Jeremy Nute was captain of Milton’s militia company by 1820. He had been preceded in that position by Theodore C. Lyman (1770-1863) and would be succeeded by Norton Scates (1790-187[?]). Due to a vote taken by his militiamen, he and his officers sent the following letter to the regimental field officers above them seeking a division of their militia company into two parts. (See Milton Militia Dispute – 1820).

To the Field officers of the Second Regt of Militia in New Hampshire ~

Greeting

We the undersigned, belonging to the 7th Company in said Regt, have at finding about 134 enrolled in said company and having on the 30th instant taken a vote in said company upon the expediency of dividing it into two distinct companies, 69 of those present acted in favor of said division and 22 against ~ We therefore think it is expedient to divide the company agreeable to a line which was then agreed on and which you will have explained to you by the bearer and humbly request your honours, to Establish such division immediately ~

Milton, May 31st 1820

Jeremy Nute { Captain
James Hayes Jr { Lieut
Norton Scates { Ensign

Jeremy Nute and his company officers, James Hayes, Jr., and Norton Scates signed next the Milton anti-town division remonstrance petition of June 1820. He, and they, signed also the Milton company division petition of November 1820. (See Milton Militia Dispute – 1820).

While this was being settled Capt. Jeremy Nute petitioned to change his name to Capt. Jeremy W. Orange.

Petition of Jeremy Nute for the Alteration of His Name
To the Hon. the Senate and House of Representatives of New Hampshire now convened at Concord
Humbly Shew
Jeremy Nute of Milton in the County of Strafford begs leave to represent to your Hon. body that an alteration of his name and that of his family would be of benefit to him and his family in Consequence of some property which will fall into his hands provided an alteration should take place. He therefore prays that an Act may be passed authorizing him thereafter to assume and be known by the name of Jeremy W. Orange and that the rest of his family may assume the name of Orange instead of that of Nute ~ And as in duty bound will ever pray ~ Nov. 4th 1820
Jeremy Nute (NH Department of State, n.d.).

State of New Hampshire }
AN ACT EMPOWERING JEREMY NUTE TO HAVE AND ASSUME THE NAME OF JEREMY WASHINGTON ORANGE
[Approved December 21, 1820. Original Acts, vol. 26, p. 54; recorded Acts, vol. 21, p 529]
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened that the name of Jeremy Nute, of Milton in the County of Strafford be altered and changed to Jeremy Washington Orange, and that he be hereafter known and called by the name of Jeremy Washington Orange, and that the family name of the children of the said Jeremy, be in like manner changed and altered from Nute to Orange: any law usage or custom to the contrary notwithstanding (NH Secretary of State, 1920).

Jeremy W. Orange of Milton had risen to become Major of the newly-created 39th Regiment of militia by 1822, and Lt. Colonel by 1824.

39th Regiment { Colonel Joseph Ham, Farmington; Lieutenant Colonel Jeremy W. Orange, Milton; Major Joseph Cross; Adjutant Bedfield Hayes, Milton; Quartermaster William Allen, Rochester (Lyon, 1824).

J.W. Orange headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Martha (Runnells) Orange], one male aged 20-29 years, two females aged 20-29 years, three males aged 15-19 years, two females aged 15-19 years, and one female aged 10-14 years.

Father Jotham Nute, Jr., died in Milton, February 3, 1836.

Son George W. Orange married in Somersworth, NH, October 24, 1837, Emily H. Badger, both of Somersworth. Rev. Alfred Goldsmith performed the ceremony. She was born in Kittery, ME, March 5, 1820, daughter of William Jr. and Abigail J. “Nabby” (Plaisted) Badger.

Jeremy Orange headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years, one female aged 50-59 years, one female aged 30-39 years, one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 20-29 years, and one male aged 10-14 years. One member was employed in Manufacture and Trade and two members of his household were employed in Agriculture.

Son Henry S. Orange married (1st) in Lowell, MA, June 10, 1841, Sarah A. Bradley, both of Lowell. She was born in Dracut, MA, circa 1810, daughter of Joshua and Mary (Poor) Bradley.

Father-in-law Joseph Runnells died in Dover, NH, March 20, 1846.

Jeremy W. Orange was in 1848 chaplain of the Libanus Lodge, of Great Falls, Somersworth, NH (Moore, 1848).

Jeremy W. Orange and his son, George W. Orange, were among the political Whigs of Somersworth that subscribed to the following notice in September 1848,  seeking to select Whig convention delegates.

Pursuant to the above call, the Whigs of Somersworth, and all other persons, without any discrimination, who prefer Gen. Zachary Taylor for President, and Millard Filmore for vice President, will assemble at the Town Hall, this (Monday) Evening the 11th inst. at 7½ o’clock, for the purpose of choosing Delegates to attend said Convention. Great Falls, Sept. 4, 1848 (Knapp, 1894).

The Whig party (c1833-1856) was an amalgamation of several prior parties, such as the National Republicans (c1824-34), the Anti-Masons (c1828-40), Democrats who opposed Andrew Jackson, some remaining Federalists, and others. It would be succeeded eventually by the Republican party. Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore were elected as U.S. President and Vice President, respectively. Taylor died in the first year of his term and was succeeded by Fillmore.

Mother Sarah (Twombly) Nute died of dropsy in Milton, November 21, 1849, aged eighty-six years.

Jeremy W. Orange, a machinist, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Martha Orange, aged sixty years (b. NH), and Julia Welch, aged twenty years (b. ME). Jeremy W. Orange had real estate valued at $5,000.

Daughter-in-law Sarah Ann (Bradley) Orange died of dropsy on John Street in Lowell, MA, January 21, 1853, aged forty-three years.

Son Henry S. Orange married (2nd) in Gilmanton, NH, August 2, 1859, Elizabeth A. Kendall, he of Lowell, MA, and she of Gilmanton. He was a merchant, aged forty-one years, and she was aged twenty-four years. Rev. R.M. Sargent performed the ceremony. She was born in Pembroke, NH, December 3, 1832, daughter of Prescott V. and Mary (Dow) Kendall.

Martha (Runnells) Orange died February 3, 1860.

Jery W. Orange, a machinist, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth (“Great Falls P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Martha Orange, aged seventy-five years (b. NH). Jery W. Orange had real estate valued at $3,000 and personal estate valued at $1,500. (The late Martha (Runnells) Orange’s posthumous appearance was an intentional feature of the census enumeration, she having died within the census year).

Jeremy W. Orange married (2nd) in Somersworth, NH, April 27, 1865, Mrs. Lydia R. [(Roberts)] Mendum, both of Somersworth, NH. Rev. E.N. Hidden performed the ceremony. She was born in Great Falls, Somersworth, NH, circa 1805, daughter of George and Polly Roberts.

Daughter-in-Law Mary ([Dorr?]) Orange died in March 25, 1866.

Jeremy Orange, a wood machinist, aged eighty-one years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth (“Great Falls P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lydia Orange, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). Jeremy Orange had real estate valued at $10,000 and personal estate valued at $2,000.

Son Franklin Orange, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), resided in the Milton household of his paternal uncle, Jacob Nute, a farmer, aged eighty years (b. NH), at the time of the Tenth (1870) Federal Census. He was characterized as being at that time “insane.”

Franklin W. Orange died of paralysis, August 31, 1872, aged sixty-one years, nine months.

Strafford County. The Nute family in Milton is wonderful for longevity. Jotham, the father, was seven years in the Revolutionary war, beginning with the battle of Bunker Hill. There are six children living, whose united ages aggregate over 473 years. Jeremy Orange is in his 89th year, Jacob in his 86th, Sarah in her 82d, David in his 78th, Ivory in his 74th, and Andrew in his 72d (Vermont Journal, October 23, 1875).

Jeremiah W. Orange appeared in the Great Falls, i.e., Somersworth, NH, directories of 1876 and 1878, as having his house on Orange street.

Jeremy W. Orange of Somersworth, NH, made his last will February 23, 1877. He devised $1,500 to his wife, Lydia Orange, “in lieu and full satisfaction of all rights of dower and homestead.” Should she die within his lifetime, that money would revert instead to the estate, rather than pass to any heir or assign of hers. He devised $1,000 each to Emily Orange, wife of his son, George Orange, and to [his daughter-in-law,] Elizabeth A. Orange. His five shares of Somersworth National Bank stock were not to be liquidated for ten years, and the dividends paid over to the town for maintenance of his burial plot in Forest Glade Cemetery and, should the bank fail, his executor should pay $30 per year for that same ten-year period. After the ten years had elapsed, the executor was to pay to Somersworth $200 in trust. It was to have the annual interest on that trust sum for cemetery plot maintenance. The remainder of the estate was to be divided between his two sons. He named his son, Henry S. Orange of Gilmanton, NH, as his executor. Samuel James, Clarence L. Chapman, and George William Burleigh signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 89:491).

Jeremy W. Orange died of heart disease in Great Falls, Somersworth, NH, June 1, 1879, aged ninety years. He was a mechanic. His last will was proved in Rochester, NH, July 1, 1879 (Strafford County Probate, 89:491).

His widow, Lydia Orange filed for and received a War of 1812 veteran’s widow’s pension (#26430) after his death. It was based upon his service in Captain William Courson’s militia company.

Lydia R. ((Roberts) Mendum) Orange died of dropsy in Great Falls, Somersworth, NH, February 12, 1880, aged seventy-five years.

MARRIAGES. GLIDDEN-ORANGE. At Gilmanton, N.H., in the Congregational Church, 20th inst., by Rev. S.N. Greeley, Mr. Charles H. Glidden of Boston and Miss May G. Orange, daughter of Henry S. Orange of Gilmanton (Boston Evening Transcript, November 23, 1889).

Son Henry S. Orange died in Gilmanton, NH, October 26, 1894.

Death of a Former Lowell Citizen. Henry S. Orange, for many years a dry goods merchant in Lowell, died Friday at his home in Gilmanton, N.H., after a long illness, aged 80 years. He was born In Great Falls, N.H., and when a young man went to Lowell, where he soon after went into business, retiring some 20 years ago. He had served in the Lowell city government, but never took a very active part in politics aside from this. He was an Odd Fellow and belonged to the Lowell lodge. He was a republican from the formation of the party. He is survived by a widow and three children (Boston Globe, October 27, 1894).

Daughter-in-law Elizabeth A. (Kendall) Orange died in Gilmanton, NH, March 10, 1927.


References:

Find a Grave. (2011, December 21). Jotham Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82753837/jotham-nute

Find a Grave. 2013, October 3). Franklin Orange. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/118126603/franklin-orange

Find a Grave. (2019, November 4). Henry Smith Orange. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/202730856/henry-smith-orange

Find a Grave. (2013, October 3). Col. Jeremy W. Orange. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/118125086/jeremy-w-orange

Knapp, William D. (1894). Somersworth: An Historical Sketch. Somersworth, NH

Moore, Charles. (1848). Freemasons’ Monthly Magazine, Volumes 7-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mCAsAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA255

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820. Concord, NH

Wikipedia. (2022, March 24). Whig Party (United States). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States)

Milton Militia Dispute – 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 3, 2022

[Editor: Here follows Ms. Bristol’s description of the Milton militia dispute of 1820. It contains references to several petition documents which will be published separately over the coming months. It will serve then also as a sort of index to those documents].

New Hampshire relied upon a militia system for its defense from colonial times through 1847.

Each and every free, able-bodied white male citizen, between the ages of 18 and 45 years, is liable to do military duty (Lyon, 1824).

Militiamen were required to present themselves – to “muster” – with their weapons once or twice a year for company-level drills, as well as a final time in the Fall for a larger regimental-level drill.

The [Rochester regimental] muster field at its best presented a gay appearance. The various companies drawn up in line, with muskets and accouterments bright and clean, the officers scattered between the lines with fine uniforms and stately plumes, the Light Infantry much like the officers but with shorter plumes, and the Artillery Company with their formidable cannon, together with the motley crowd on every side must have been an attractive and interesting scene. Gingerbread carts, candy stands, and all sorts of variety shows, with an occasional fight between heated partisans from different towns afforded abundant merriment and diversion. Liquor and gambling booths grew more and more frequent so that one year Captain Samuel Jones and his company from Farmington made a charge upon them and pitched them and their belongings over the fence. The brisk step, the martial dignity and the clear distinçt orders of the morning had in those days generally become somewhat limp, languid and indistinct toward the close of the day. Many still living can remember the great contrast between the inspiriting, clear cut, exactly timed strains of fife and drum as the companies came marching to the field in the morning and the slip shod timeless whistle and fumbling taps as they started on their homeward way (McDuffee, 1882).

NH Militia Order Blank
NH Militia Muster Order Form. This example is blank, with its spaces to be completed by the company sergeant at the request of the captain.

Old Fashioned Muster Gingerbread. One cup of molasses, 2 large spoons of butter, 1 teaspoon of soda dissolved in 3 tablespoons of boiling water, 1 teaspoon of ginger and flour enough to knead well but not hard. Roll into 3 sheets, mark with a fork, and bake quickly; after baking, while hot, mix 1 teaspoon each of milk and molasses and wet the top. I have sent this recipe by request of Mrs. G.L.D. of Chelsea. Portland, Me. E.E.E. (Boston Globe, November 24, 1894).

[A woodburning “quick oven” would have a modern oven temperature of between 425 to 450 F. It would take about 20 minutes to bake. A toothpick inserted in the center should come out clean when done].

Muster ginger bread. Boil 1 pt. molasses and 1 tablespoon ginger; let cool, add ½ pt. shortening, mostly butter, 2 teaspoons soda dissolved in ¼ cup hot water, ½ teaspoon alum dissolved in ¾ cup cold water, flour to make a dough that can be handled. Roll about two inches thick. Mark the top with back of fork. Bake quickly, take out as soon as done, as too long baking spoils it. Put away in jar and keep a week or so. The longer it is kept the moister becomes. Somebody try in and report. Von Edirb (Boston Globe, August 24, 1906).

Milton’s militiamen and those from southern Wakefield made up the Seventh Company of New Hampshire’s Second Regiment of militia at this time. It was led then by Captain Jeremy Nute (1788-1879), with James Hayes, Jr. (1790-1845), as its Lieutenant, and Norton Scates (1790-187[?]) as its Ensign.

The Seventh Company’s area encompassed all of Milton and that part of neighboring Wakefield that lay south of Lovell Lake. Depending upon where one lived in this company area, travel to militia musters might be rather burdensome. (Milton Mills was at least a 15-mile hike, if not more, to the regimental muster location in Rochester, where one would then spend the day drilling and marching around, before making a weary 15-mile return hike. Union village in Wakefield was at least 13 miles distant (for a round-trip of at least 26 miles)). The militiamen traveling furthest to drills and musters grew restive.

Some 134 Seventh Company militiamen took a vote on May 30, 1820. They were likely assembled together for a company-level militia drill. By their vote, 69 [51.5%] militiamen chose to seek a division of their company into two parts, while 22 [16.4%] of them preferred to leave the situation as it was. The remaining 43 [32.1%] did not express a preference either way.

The company officers petitioned the regimental field officers above them, on May 31, 1820, seeking to divide the Seventh Company into two companies. There would be a northern company, encompassing Union Village, Milton Mills, and Milton south to a certain east-west division line – the Milton town meeting house would have been north of the proposed line – and a southern company from that division line to the Rochester line, encompassing Milton Three Ponds, as well as South and West Milton. (See Milton Militia Division Request – May 1820).

The field officers rejected this proposition, although their reply has not come to hand. (They likely rode horseback to the muster). But they seem to have been unaware that “there is more than one way to skin a cat.” If the field officers refused to divide the town militia company into two parts, there was another, more drastic solution available to the petitioners. The town itself might be divided into two parts, which might achieve the same thing.

... in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this [Wakefield] town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this [Wakefield] town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

Dearborne-Piper Signatures - Wakefield - 1813
Signatures of Luther Dearborne and Rev. Asa Piper on an earlier June 1813 petition by the citizens of the “pleasant village at Wakefield Corner” recommending William Sawyer (1774-1860) as a Wakefield justice-of-the-peace.

Wakefield’s three selectmen became aware that there was trouble in paradise, so to speak, at some time after their annual March town meeting and before June 1820.

We are aware that Petitioners for the new Town will point out by Carrigain’s Map, or some other Survey, what a handsome, beautiful five-mile square Town may be made out of Wakefield and Milton, and then attempt to show and make it believed, that the remaining part of those two Towns will be equally as good as the whole and in a better form.

Carrigain Survey Map - 1816 (Detail)
Carrigain Map of New Hampshire in 1816 (Detail). Division advocates pored over this map with prospective signers. The “Lisbon” or “Milfield” they envisaged would have run from Lovell Lake in Wakefield south to Meetinghouse Pond in Milton. It would have included what is now Union village in Wakefield, as well as Milton Mills and Plummer’s Ridge in Milton. Milton Three Ponds, South Milton, and West Milton would have been the remaining “rump” of Milton after such a division.

The “Carrigain map,” the most famous of New Hampshire maps, is named for Philip Carrigain (177[6]-1842), secretary of state of New Hampshire, who was granted much of the responsibility of compiling it. The map was authorized by the New Hampshire legislature in 1803. Carrigain may have engraved the cartographic portions, and he held the copyright. The map is based upon many individual surveys, and in its early stages, Carrigain, a lawyer, depended heavily upon the technical skills of Phinehas Merrill (1767-1815), a professional surveyor (WhiteMountainHistory, 2021).

Neither the Milton nor Wakefield pro-division petitions, although mentioned in other documents, have come to hand. If ever they were actually filed, they might have been withdrawn. Luther Dearborn (1771-1844) of Wakefield, NH, and John Remick, Jr. (1777-1840) of Milton, were said to have headed their respective lists of petitioners. (Remick was a Milton selectman and both men were justices-of-the-peace in their respective towns). Wakefield’s lifelong Congregational minister, Rev. Asa Piper (1757-1835), is said to have been also a proponent of division.

Some 127 Milton men filed an anti-division remonstrance petition intended for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature. Company officers Jeremy Nute, James Hayes, Jr., and Norton Scates all signed this remonstrance, as did former company officers Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, and future officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes (1789-1842). One may note that none of Milton’s selectmen signed. (See Milton Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820).

Wakefield selectmen Jonathan Copp (1792-1869), Henry L. Wiggin (1791-1844), and Elias Wentworth (1774-1852) filed their own anti-division remonstrance petition intended for that same June 1820 session. It was signed also by 199 Wakefield inhabitants (See Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820).

Some 88 Milton men filed a company division petition intended for the November 1820 session of the NH legislature. Company Captain Jeremy Nute signed this proposal, as did former company officers Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, future company officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes, and Milton selectman Hopley Meserve (1789-1875). (See Milton Militia Division Petitions – November 1820).

Some 27 Wakefield division petitioners later thought better of their having signed the division petition. They signed a retraction and anti-division petition, November 1, 1820. (See Wakefield Pro-Division Renunciation – November 1820).

One should note that Fourth (1820) Federal Census enumerations for Strafford County have not been preserved (although the aggregate totals have). They would have had the names of the household heads and age-based tick marks for the members of their households. The various petitions related to dividing or not dividing either the militia company or the towns are valuable in that they provide us with the names of a plurality at least of Milton’s adult male inhabitants of 1820, including many of its household heads.

Obviously, the proposed splitting of the towns never took place. Milton’s militia company was divided instead into two companies. The Milton company was reassigned to a newly-created Thirty-Ninth Regiment of militia in 1822. The new regiment included also companies from Rochester and Farmington, NH. Wakefield’s south company, which appears to have included also Milton Mills, was assigned to the Thirty-Third Regiment of militia, along with those from Alton, Brookfield, Middleton, and New Durham, NH. Its north company was assigned to the Twenty-Seventh Regiment of militia, along with those from Effingham, Ossipee, Tuftonboro, and Wolfeboro, NH.

The general muster of the militia at the same [Fall] time of year was a holiday of no less interest and importance to the people of two preceding generations. By a state law of 1792, able-bodied citizens between the ages of eighteen and forty-five were required to meet twice a year for military drill. To these spring and fall trainings for each company in its own town was afterwards added the annual muster of the Thirty-ninth Regiment. This regiment consisted of five companies of regular infantry, one from each of the villages of Farmington, West Farmington, Milton Three Ponds, Gonic, and Rochester, together with one Light Infantry Company collected from all parts of the district and the Rochester Artillery Company (McDuffee, 1892).

Luther Dearborn received a reappointment as a Wakefield justice-of-the-peace, June 14, 1828. His wife, Sarah “Sally” (Pike) Dearborn, died in 1831. His term as justice would have expired in June 1833. Instead of a reappointment, the court roster bears a marginal notation that he had “moved to Somersworth,” N.H. He was living there at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census.


See also Milton Militiaman’s Petition – 1807 and Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1820


References:

Colonial Quills. (2012, October 7). Muster Day Gingerbread Recipe. Retrieved from colonialquills.blogspot.com/2012/10/muster-day-gingerbread.html

Cow Hampshire. (2006, May 29). New Hampshire’s Militia: Gathering for Annual Muster Day. Retrieved from www.cowhampshireblog.com/2006/05/29/new-hampshires-militia-gathering-for-annual-muster-day/

Find a Grave. (2013, January 16). Phillip Carrigain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/103677228/philip-carrigain

Find a Grave. (2007, October 15). Jonathan Copp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/22229979/jonathan-copp

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Luther Dearborn. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92171689/luther-dearborn

Find a Grave. (2016, September 13). Col. Bidfield Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169872910/bidfield-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 22). Capt. James Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336842/james-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 2). Hopley Meserve. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114785277/hopley-meserve

Find a Grave. (2013, October 3). Col. Jeremy W. [Nute] Orange. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/118125086/jeremy-w-orange

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Rev. Asa Piper. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92206616/asa-piper

Find a Grave. (2012, June 24). Henry L. Wiggin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92466261/henry-l-wiggin

McDuffie, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RY0-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA551

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Lyon, G. Parker. (1824). New-Hampshire Annual Register, and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=O0g9AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA72

Secretary of State. (1920). Laws of New Hampshire: Second constitutional period, 1811-1820. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Cb9GAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA941

Thompson, Rev. Albert H. (1886). Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Organization of the First Church, and Ordination of the First Settled Town Minister of Wakefield, N.H. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EKm15quwMhsC&pg=PA42

WhiteMountainHistory. (2021). 1816 Phillip Carrigain Map. Retrieved from whitemountainhistory.org/1816_Philip_Carrigain_Map.html

Celestial Seasonings – April 2022

By Heather Durham | March 31, 2022

Hi everyone! Welcome to our April 2022 edition including the first meteor shower of the year, two occurrences of the black Moon, a partial eclipse that will not be visible to us along with Aprils Pink Moon which is said to have been named after the colors of flowers that bloom this time of year.

There are also two videos that enhance the events of this month including those that cannot be seen with the naked eye. The videos do contain interesting graphic depictions of a variety of events for your viewing pleasure.

Now let us look down this page to read about this month’s astronomical events!


April 1. New or black Moon.

April 4. Mars and Saturn will rise and come close to one another.

April 9. The new Moon will be at first quarter.

April 16. The full Pink Moon will be on display tonight.

April 22. Today, we will have the Lyrid Meteor Shower from the Constellation Hercules. This will be visible beginning just past 10:00 pm until a few minutes after 5:00 am during which time you may see around 17 meteors per hour. However, the last quarter of the Moon may interfere with early morning viewing.

April 23. The Moon will be in its final quarter.

April 24. The Moon and Saturn will rise closely together and towards the right.

April 26. The Moon and Venus will travel in close proximity to each other.

April 27. The Moon and Venus will rise to the right together. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to the right.

April 28. Mercury will travel to its highest point in the evening sky.

April 29. Mercury will be located at its furthest point from the Sun.

April 30. Venus and Jupiter will rise to the right together. There will also be a partial eclipse of the Sun but it will only be visible from South America or Antarctica. There will also be another black moon tonight.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (2022, January 17). April 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/RMl8bNI86q0

Secrets of Space. (2022, March). Astronomy Events April 2022. Retrieved from youtu.be/_HmU3jFcQYA

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