H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27

By Joyce Wentworth Cunningham | May 9, 2021

Notes from Harry Eugene Wentworth’s Diaries

Harry E. Wentworth (1869-1955) was John E. Townsend’s brother-in-law. His first wife, Hattie M. Lowd (1873-1908), was a sister to John’s wife Eda (1870-1932). Harry had completed a course in business at Shaw’s Business College in Portland, Maine. He worked first for Miltonia Mills as bookkeeper. He became administrator and trustee of John’s estate upon his untimely death before John’s son, Henry A. Townsend (1898-1932), became of age.

Harry was my paternal grandfather and his diaries have languished in my storeroom for the last nine years since I retrieved them from my mother’s house upon her death. A positive benefit of COVID-19 has been much more free time to pursue “projects” I have postponed over the years. I was determined to learn more about my grandfather’s and father’s lives by reading the diaries. I soon realized what I was learning needed to be shared with succeeding generations in a more abbreviated form, so I began summarizing what I read.

The following entries and summaries of entries about Miltonia Mills are from the diaries I have completed to date. Keep in mind that I wrote these for my family’s information so they are casually and informally written and include my editorializing.

In many ways I am more frustrated by fragmented information that ever. The diaries are short on detail! If only I had read them earlier and asked Grandpa and my dad more questions!

As I worked my way through the early 1920s, I kept wondering exactly what was Grandpa’s role in the management of the Miltonia Mills. I knew that he had worked there both as bookkeeper and as manager, but which was he in the early 1920s? All his diary entries consisted of “I worked in the office all day.” “I worked in the office until noon,” “I didn’t go to the office today,” etc.

I knew that Miltonia Mills was owned by John Townsend, Grandpa’s brother-in-law. I also knew that John had died young, that he left a son too young to assume management of the mill, and that it was the wish of John to have Grandpa manage the mill until his son, Henry, was old enough to assume the role. Henry was mentioned occasionally in the early 1920s diaries, but only in terms of his comings and goings. He appears to have traveled quite a bit.

I kept moving ahead hoping for some clarification. When his position was not clearer by the end of his 1927 diary, I decided that maybe I needed to go back to earlier diaries to look for answers.

1910

The mill was owned and operated by John E. Townsend, who was married to Eda B. Lowd (Hattie M. (Lowd) Wentworth’s sister). John and Eda and family (Henry and Agnes) left for California on January 11.

Hollenbeck Hotel[PERSONAL. A party of tourist guests registered at the Hollenbeck is made up of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Townsend, Harry and Hynes [Agnes] Townsend, all of Milton Mills. N.H. (Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA), January 20, 1910)].

[Harry E. Wentworth, a woolen mill bookkeeper, aged forty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census (April 22, 1910). His household included his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged six years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Melissa Lowd, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear].

Grandpa (Hattie had died), Dad, and Mother (as Grandpa called his mother-in-law) moved into John’s house in the village (Milton Mills) while they were away. No reason for the move was given, but it may be that it was more convenient for Grandpa to get to the mill in winter weather. He appears to be in charge while John was away. John and Eda returned on April 23 and Grandpa, Dad, and Mother returned to the house on the Ridge.

John had a lengthy illness after he returned from California and was out of the office for six weeks. He went to Portland to see a doctor, but Grandpa gives no indication of a diagnosis. [John E. Townsend would eventually die of Bright’s Disease].

1911

Other than “went to the office” there is very little about the mill in this diary.

[Harry E. Wentworth married (2nd) in Acton, ME, November 29, 1911, Ella Buck, both of Acton. He was a widowed bookkeeper, aged forty-two years, and she was a music teacher, aged forty-one years. Rev. James W. Williams performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, circa 1870, daughter of John C. and Hannah (Brackett) Buck].

1912 and 1913 – no diaries

[COTTON MILL NEWS FROM THE NORTH. … A set of 60-inch cards has been added to the equipment of the Miltonia mill, Milton, N.H., operated by John E. Townsend. The plant has received increased business since Jan. 1, and is being operated on a full-time schedule (Evening Herald (Fall River, MA), May 18, 1912)].

[PRIMARY REGISTRATIONS. Large Number Have Already Filed Their Candidacy. … Those who have filed today include: … John E. Townsend, Milton, Republican, representative (Portsmouth Herald, July 27, 1912)].

1914

On February 16 Grandpa reported that John was not feeling well and was in the office for a little while in the afternoon. The next day he did not go to the office at all, and on the 18th Grandpa wrote that he was very sick with some kind of kidney trouble. Over the next two months, John’s health was constantly up and down – he would seem to be getting better and then have a relapse. He would have a good day and then a bad one. He got out of the house for a short ride for the first time in nine weeks.

On May 6 John began coming in to the office for short periods of time on days when he felt well enough. By June 6 he was back in bed and unable to get out. On August 6 he was taken to Boston. For doctor? To a hospital? Grandpa first reports he seemed better, then he was worse and the family was sent for. Finally, on August 31 he was brought back to Milton Mills where he passed away on September 8. His funeral was on September 12.

[DEATHS. TOWNSEND -In Milton Mills, N.H., Sept. 8, John E. Townsend, in his 43d year. Funeral Saturday, Sept. 12, at 2 p.m. (Boston Globe, September 10, 1914)].

Following is Grandpa’s account of the estate settlement.

September 9: According to John’s will the N.E. Trust Co. and myself are executors and trustees. He left me the sum of $2500.

[The New England Trust Co. appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1918, as having its offices at 135 Devonshire street (corner of Milk and Devonshire streets) and a telephone number of Main 4806].

[The New England Trust Company of Boston, the pioneer trust company of Massachusetts and the second oldest institution of its kind in New England, will soon celebrate the fiftieth anniversary since the Company began business. Just fifty years ago the New England Trust Company received its charter – the first trust company charter to be issued by the Massachusetts legislature – but business was commenced not until 1871. During all these years the Company has continued faithful to the best traditions of trust company business and in the administration of estates and execution of trusts it has acquired a reputation for fidelity and efficient management extending throughout the New England section (Trust Publications, 1919)]. 

September 15: N.E. Trust Co. refuses to accept trust under John’s will.

September 16: Went to Boston for business on John’s estate.

September 17: John C. [Townsend] wants to be appointed trustee. Eda doesn’t want him.

John C. Townsend (1871-1916) was a cousin of John E. Townsend, husband of John E. Townsend’s sister, Grace M. Townsend (1873-1953), and one of three witnesses to the last will.

[John C. Townsend, a general farm farmer, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Grace Townsend, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), his son, Frank Townsend, aged twelve years (b. MA), and his servant, Lucy Lilley, a private family servant, aged twenty years (b. NH). John C. Townsend owned their farm, free-and-clear].

September 18: Went to Dover in p.m. with Henry and Eda and secured Dwight Hall as Administrator and Trustee of John’s estate.

[Dwight Hall, a lawyer and county solicitor, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Frances S. Hall, aged thirty-eight years (b. New Brunswick, Canada), and his servant, Margaret Cassidy, a private family servant, aged thirty-five years (b. Canada (Irish)). Dwight Hall owned their house at 119 Silver Street, free-and-clear].

September 19 (a Saturday!): In office all day. Mr. Hall was up from Dover in P.M. on business of John’s estate.

Mr. Hall was still coming to see Grandpa at the mill three or four times a year in the 1920s!

September 21: Went to Dover and Somersworth in A.M. Wilbur Miller took us down. Everett Fox went with me. Got our appointments as Administrators and Trustees.

[Judge Christopher H. Wells (1853-1930) appointed Dwight Hall and Harry E. Townsend as joint administrators, with will annexed. Everett Fox appeared as one of the three witnesses to the will].

[Wilbur Gilman Miller, who gave them a ride, was a dairy farmer. He was born in Maine, November 25, 1872. He was married to Myrtle Winchell. He was living in North Lebanon, ME, but farming in Acton, ME, when he registered for the WWI military draft in September 1918. He was 5’8″ tall, with a medium build, blue eyes and light brown hair. At that time he was said to be confined to crutches. Perhaps recovering from injury?]

September 26 (a Saturday – this was still the era of six-day work weeks): Worked in office all day. Appraiser began taking inventory of John’s estate.

September 28: Went to Rochester in A.M. to meet Mr. Hall and get securities from vault. Came back with him and worked on inventories the rest of the day.

Mr. Hall made several more trips to Milton Mills before the end of the year. A Mr. James was with him on one of those trips. Grandpa made three more trips to Boston, two of them overnight. When he came home on December 10, he stopped in Somersworth to see Judge Wells.

[Christopher H. Wells, a probate court judge, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census, His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Oriana Wells, aged fifty years (b. NH). Christopher H. Wells owned their house at 19 Mt. Vernon Street, with a mortgage. (See also (Scales, 1914))].

1915

WOOL. TOWNSEND, JOHN E. Milton Mills, N.H., Miltonia Mill. Production and Equipment: Blankets, 4 sets cards, 29 broad looms, 960 spindles, dye, finish, 1 boiler, 2 water wheels, electric power. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co., New York and Boston, selling agents (American Wool and Cotton Reporter, July 29, 1915). 

1916

Unfortunately, his 1915 diary did not survive (or he may not have kept one), so we have a gap in the story of Miltonia Mills. We know that Grandpa and the lawyer Dwight Hall (whom Grandpa always called Mr. Hall) were co-administrators and trustees of John Townsend’s estate which included Miltonia Mills. That status continued to be borne out in 1916. Mr. Hall made short (sometimes as short as 20 minutes) visits to the mill almost every week, usually on a Wednesday afternoon. Grandpa made regular trips to Boston – once a month, at least, sometimes staying overnight, usually with Raish and Alice in Marblehead. On one trip, in addition to doing business, he attended a textile show.

[Raish and Alice would have been Horatio Brackett “Raish” Buck (1873-1941) and his wife, Alice H. Chandler (1868-1944). They then lived in Marblehead, MA. He was a grandson of Milton Mills’ Dr. Reuben Buck and had an uncle of the same name, Dr. Horation B. Buck].

Three entries cause me to wonder: “Why?”

May 12: Mr. Hall, Judge Wells, & Ex. Gov. Felker gave us a call [visit] in P.M. at the office.

[Former NH Governor Samuel D. Felker’s 1912 election was an unusual one. Neither candidate attained a majority in the election and Democrat Felker (1859-1932) was selected instead by the NH legislature. He served a single two-year term, and became thereafter a judge].

[Samuel D. Felker, a general lawyer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary D. Felker, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Samuel D. Felker rented their house at 19 Wakefield Street].

June 1: Mr. Hall was up in P.M. Mr. Southworth of Pacific Mills was with him.

[Irving Southworth was at this time an assistant agent of the Pacific Mills Co., with his house at Dover, NH. By 1920, Irving Southworth, mill agent of a cotton mill, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Columbia, SC, household. (His wife was a Southern woman, and Pacific Mills had also branches in Columbia, SC, and Dover, NH, as well as its home base in Lawrence, MA). He would return within a few years to Massachusetts].

Pacific Mills had textile mills along the Merrimack River in Lawrence, now upscale lofts which can be seen from I-495.

July 6: Mr. Peck of North Star Mills was here.

[Park W. Peck [(1869-1953)] appeared in the Minneapolis, MN, directory of 1916, as vice president of North Star Woolen Mill Co., boarding at 2613 Humboldt av., South. He was a bachelor, who seemed usually to favor boarding houses and hotels].

The North Star Mills were in Minneapolis, Minnesota. They dated back to the 1800s and by 1920 were the largest blanket manufacturers in the United States. A Mr. Park W. Peck is listed as a vice president. Those mills are now lofts, also!

Why were these people visiting Miltonia Mills? Were there talks of selling the mill? Were they planning a merger? Were other mills planning a take-over? Were the visitors interested in the superior blankets the mill was noted for? Was there any connection between the visit of Mr. Hall, Judge Wells, and Felker (a lawyer) – or were they there on other family estate business? We will probably never know!

The only other bit of mill news was that in February Eda signed off her rights to the mill. I assume she assigned them to Henry.

1917

Grandpa’s 1917 diary does not offer much more enlightenment about the mill’s operation and management. Mr. Hall continued to make frequent brief visits and Grandpa continued to make at least monthly visits to Boston.

[MILTON MILLS. Strafford Co. (SE) Pop. 1600. Stage, Union (4m.). RR47. Townsend, John E., Estate, Miltonia Mill. Harry E. Wentworth, Agt.; F.H. Simes, Supt. Blankets, 4 Sets Cards, 29 Broad Looms, 960 Sp. Dye. Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 WW. Electric. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co., New York and Boston, selling agents (Dawson’s Textile Blue Book, 1917)].

Here are the most significant entries pertaining to the mill:

February 11: Henry came home last night and telephoned up that he wanted to see me so I went down about 2 o’clock. Got back about 4.

When did Henry leave? Where had he been? Why did he request Grandpa to meet him at home and not at the office? Was it mill business or personal?

May 22: Mr. Hall was up and brought Mr. Allen of the Amoskeag Mfg. Co. to look into our power problem.

The Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. was one of the largest textile mills in the world. It was located in Manchester, New Hampshire, where it took advantage of the abundant water power provided by the Merrimack River.

[Henry W. Allen, a cotton mill civil engineer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Manchester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Georgia A. Lund, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his son-in-law, Bernard H. Lund, a cigar factory cigar maker, aged thirty-five years (b. MN). Henry W. Allen rented their house at 72 Market Street].

May 28: New looms for the mill have come. Got four of them over today.

I assume the looms had been delivered to the railroad station in Union.

May 31: They finished getting over the looms – all twelve of them are here now.

June 8: Fred & Henry started for California this morning to be gone 4 or 5 weeks.

[Frederick H. Simes, a woolen mill superintendent, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary A. [(Smith)] Simes, aged fifty years (b. NH). Frederick H. Simes rented their house on Main Street].

Remembering that Eda had relinquished her claim on the mill, was Henry now in charge of the mill?

[MILL NEWS. Cotton. MILTON MILLS, N.H. Six new automatic looms have arrived and will soon be set up in the plant of the estate of John E. Townsend, manufacturer of woolen blankets. It is possible that a small addition will have to be built to the weave room in order to accommodate the new equipment. At present 29 broad looms and 4 sets of cards are installed in the mill (Textile World Journal, June 16, 1917)].

June 27: Miss Jenness from Mr. Hall’s office was up in P.M. to figure out Agnes’ acct. I suppose this had to do with her inheritance.

[Miss Almie M. Jenness [(1886-1960)] appeared in the Dover directory of 1917 as a stenographer for Dwight Hall in his office at 349 Central av., corner of Washington street, with her home at 6 Richmond street. Emma F. Jenness, widow of George I. Jenness, had her house there also. Almie M. Jenness would marry Dwight Hall in 1950, after the death of his first wife (in 1948)].

[MILL NEWS. Cotton. MILTON MILLS, N.H. The management of the Estate of John E. Townsend gives out the following to supersede the item which was published last week regarding the installation of 6 new automatic looms. Twelve new automatic looms have arrived and will soon be set up in the plant of the Estate of John E. Townsend, manufacturers of blankets. Eight of the looms now in use will be taken out to make room for the new machines. The mill will then be equipped with 33 broad looms (24 of which are automatics) and complementary machinery (Textile World Journal, June 30, 1917)].

July 5: Went down to Dover with Mr. Northrop & Mr. Russell of the North Star Woolen Co. to have conference with Mr. Hall on the subject of this Co. handling our blankets.

“Handling” the blankets seems to imply that North Star would market them. Under their own label? Under the Miltonia Mills label?

[William G. Northrup, Jr., registered for the WW I military draft in Wayzata, MN, June 5, 1917. He was thirty years of age (b. June 13, 1886), and was employed as treasurer of the North Star Woolen Mill Co. of Minneapolis, MN. He was then single, but claimed an exemption as being engaged in government work. He was tall, with a medium build, brown eyes, and black hair].

August 28: Some of the help at the mill have demanded more pay and because we could not tell them to-day just what we will do they walked out this P.M.

August 29: Mr. Hall was up in P.M. to help straighten out the help question. Are going to give the help what they asked for. Mill did not run today.

August 30: Mill help all went to work this morning at 10% increase in pay.

September 5: Bargained for the shoe shop property for the Townsend Est. Mr. Timson is going away.

[Charles O. Timson, who was “going away” in September 1917, ran a shoe factory in the former Brierly mill at Milton Mills in 1915-18].

Modern Hospital - August 1921October 8: Went to Dover and finished Agnes’ acct. and filed it in court.

October 30: Went to Boston to see Mr. Hennesey in regard to a change in selling blankets.

[John J. Hennessey, James M. Morrison, and Frank F. Rogers, Jr., appeared in the Boston Chamber of Commerce’s annual report for 1915, as working for Thomas Kelley & Co. blanket manufacturers, of Boston. There was a lawsuit concerning this firm and these men, and Thomas A. Jenkins, in November 1918 (MA Supreme Judicial Court, 1919)].

November 20: Could not run the mill to-day. Had no water and the last can of coal is so poor it will not make steam.

November 22: Boiler at mill not working well. Couldn’t keep up steam enough to run. No water.

November 26: Couldn’t get steam enough to warm the mill with the coal we have, and no wood, so couldn’t run.

December 13: Went to Dover in morning to meet Mr. Rogers & Mr. Jenkins who came back with me at noon and were here in P.M.

[T.A. Jenkins, a blanket co. president, aged fifty years (b. NY), headed a Mount Vernon, NY, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah B. Jenkins, aged forty years (b. NY), his children, James H. Jenkins, aged fifteen years (b. NY), and Dorothy J. Whitney, aged twenty-four years (b. NY), his grandson, Harold Whitney, Jr., aged two years (b. MA), his mother-in-law, Susie L. Bennett, aged sixty-six years (b. NY), and his servants, Susie Speidell, a private family servant, aged thirty-one years (b. Ireland), and Anna M. Bennett, a private family servant, aged fifty-seven years (b. Ireland). T.A. Jenkins owned their house at 37 N. Fulton Street, with a mortgage].

December 15: Mr. James of T. Kelly & Co was at the office in P.M.

December 21: Went to Boston to meet Mr. Ransdell. [Ramsdell?]

December 26: Mr. James was here in P.M.

As usual, lots of questions, no answers! Who are all these people he mentions and why have they come to the mill or why has he gone to meet them? Where/what was the shoe shop property? Why did they want it? Did they get it? How did they resolve the boiler problem?

No diaries in 1918 or 1919 and nothing very helpful in the 1920s diaries!

[Henry A. Townsend married in Meredith, NH, March 29, 1918, Ingeborg V. “Ing” Svenson, both of Boston, MA. He was a student, aged twenty-one years, and she was at home aged twenty-three years. Edwin C. Mansfield, justice of the peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Sweden, circa 1895, daughter of Rev. Svante and Hilda C. (Lundgren) Svenson. (Her younger sister, Ruth H. Svenson, would marry (3rd), Seth F. Dawson, Jr., manager of the Milton Leatherboard Mill)].

ES191105 - Lanesburgh[Henry Albert Townsend of Milton Mills registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 18, 1918. He was twenty years of age (b. January 2, 1898) and employed as a blanket manufacturer for the John E. Townsend Estate in Milton Mills. His nearest relative was Eda B. Townsend of Milton Mills. He was of a medium height, and medium build, with brown eyes, and dark brown hair].

[MILL NEWS. Wool. MILTON MILLS, N.H. The Estate of John E. Townsend is now operating a branch mill in the same town under the name of the Antin Blanket Co. This plant has 1 set of cards, 220 spindles and 9 looms. The stock is picked and the blankets are finished at the main mills. The number of machines at the main mill has been increased to 32. Rogers, Hennessey & Jenkins, Boston, are the selling agents. H.A. Townsend is the agent in charge of this new branch (Textile World Journal, April 5, 1919)]. 

[New Hampshire. Milton Mills – The estate of John E. Townsend is now operating a branch mill company under the name of the Antin Blanket Company. This plant has 1 set of cards, 220 spindles and 9 looms. The number of machines at the main mill has been increased to 32 (American Wool and Cotton Reporter, July 31, 1919)].

[MILTON MILLS. Strafford Co. (SE) Pop. 1600. Stage, Union (4m.). RR47. Townsend, John E., Estate. Miltonia Mill. Harry E. Wentworth, Agt.; F.H. Simes , Supt . Blankets. 4 Sets Cards. 32 Broad Looms. 960 Sp. Dye. Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 W W. Electric. Employ 65. Rogers, Hennessey & Jenkins, N.Y., S. Agts. (Dawson’s Textile Blue Book, 1919)].

[Mrs. Ingeborg V. Townsend was a member (No. 8833) of the American Library Association in 1919 and 1920. The library she patronized was the Milton Mills Library (ALA, 1919)].

1920

At the time of this diary, 1920, Grandpa was working as bookkeeper and office manager for Miltonia Mills blanket factory. The mill had belonged to John Townsend, Grandpa’s brother-in-law. He began as bookkeeper and office manager. It was a small mill, but made very high quality wool blankets. Admiral Perry and Admiral Byrd carried Miltonia Mills blankets to the North and South Poles, respectively, and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge is reputed to have come to Milton Mills to purchase blankets personally.

[MILTON MILLS. Strafford Co. (SE) Pop. 1600. Stage, Union (4m.). RR47. Townsend, John E., Estate. Miltonia Mill. Henry A. Townsend, Prop.; F.H. Simes , Supt . Bed Blankets. 4 Sets Cards. 32 Broad Looms. 960 Sp. 2 Pickers. 3 Sew . Dye. Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 W W. Electric. Employ 65. Buy 14 and 18 C. Warp. Rogers, Hennessey & Jenkins, N.Y., S. Agts. (Dawson’s Textile Blue Book, 1920)].

[Harry E. Wentworth, a blanket mill manager, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella B. Wentworth, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), and his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged sixteen years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm on the Lebanon Road, free-and-clear].

John Townsend had died in 1914, a young man, leaving his widow (Eda, Grandpa’s first wife’s sister) and two teen-age children. His will named Grandpa Executor and Trustee, the court appointed him Administrator, and for the next few years, Grandpa managed the mill as well as continuing to do all the accounting.

[Agnes M. Townsend married in Milton Mills, April 24, 1920, Halton R. Hayes, she of Milton and he of Rochester, NH. He was a salesman, aged twenty-six years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. Lester E. Alexander performed the ceremony. Hayes was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1894, son of Edwin F. and Hattie (Pinkham) Hayes].

1921

Has only a few notes in the beginning of the year and nothing about the mill.

[SOUTH WOLFEBORO. Fred Sims and Henry Townsend of Milton Mills were visitors in this village Monday (Farmington News, September 2, 1921)].

[Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Spinney entertained as guests over the week-end Mr. and Mrs. H.R. Hayes and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Townsend of Milton Mills, N.H. (North Adams Transcript (North Adams, MA), October 10, 1921)].

[OXNARD AND VICINITY. Mr. and Mrs. Richard Stoehrer had as their house guests this week Mr. and Mrs. Henry Townsend of New Hampshire. Mr. Townsend, who is a blanket manufacturer in that state, has come with his wife to spend the winter in California and will reside in Los Angeles. They left here the first of the week intending to go to San Diego to witness the Centre-Arizona football game but owing to the flood conditions were unable to do so. They are expected to return to Oxnard to visit at the Stroehrer home until Saturday (Press-Courier (Oxnard, CA), December 28, 1921)].

1922

Bates Metallic Tooth Breast - TW220114The situation at the mill seems to have been the same. Although Henry Townsend is mentioned a couple of times, it is never in connection with the mill. Grandpa made business trips to both Boston and Dover on behalf of the mill. As was customary at the time, these trips were made by train. In February he mentioned that Ralph [W. Pike] was out of the office sick.

[Robert S. Pike, a retail butcher, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fannie [(Roberts)] Pike, aged sixty years (b. NH), and his children, Ralph W. Pike, a woolen mill bookkeeper, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Robert Pike, aged twenty-two years (b. NH)].

This is Grandpa’s first mention of anyone else in the office.

MILTON MILLS. Antin Blunhed [Blanket] Co. H.A. Townsend, agent. 1 set, 220 spindles, 9 looms. Townsend, John E., Est. of, Miltonia Mill. Harry E. Wentworth, agent; Fred H. Simes, superintendent. Production and Equipment: Blankets, 4 sets cards, 29 broad looms, 960 spindles, dye, finish, 1 boiler, 2 water wheels, electric power. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co., New York and Boston, selling agents (Cotton, 1922).

The Internal Revenue Service was alive and well in 1922 as witnessed by these entries.

March 1: Mr. Robbins, revenue man, came to the office to check up our Income Tax returns for the last four years.

[Carl C. Robbins, an Internal Revenue inspector, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), headed a Medford, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included Lottie L. Robbins, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and his children, Louise M. Robbins, aged two years, seven months (b. MA), and Dorothy C. Robbins, aged one year, five months (b. DC). Carl C. Robbins owned their house at 36 Tyler Street, with a mortgage].

March 4: Worked in P.M. at office with Mr. Robbins on Income returns.

No more mention is made of Mr. Robbins so the income tax returns must have been okay!

1923

Once again there are lots of empty pages in this diary and nothing about the mill.

[Milton Mills experienced an influenza epidemic in February 1923 (See Milton in the News – 1923)].

1924

There is still no mention of Henry’s role at the mill. Grandpa went regularly, but never mentions what he does, except once or twice a reference to his accounts. He seems to pretty much make his own hours, sometimes working all day, sometimes just a morning or an afternoon, sometimes not going in for several days at a time.

[The John E. Townsend Estate of Milton Mills, manufacturers of woolen blankets, had 40 male and 25 female employees, for a total of 65 employees, in 1924 (NH Bureau of Labor, 1924)].

[Milton Mills suffered a serious fire in the early hours of Thursday, November 20. The Townsend mill firemen and those of Rochester, NH, responded to the fire (See Milton in the News – 1924)].

[SANBORNVILLE. Some of the out of town visitors in the village last Thursday were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Spencer and Miss Doris Marsh of Milton Mills, Henry Townsend, Mr. and Mrs. Tom McAbby of East Wakefield, and Mrs. Jennie Spiller of Brookfield (Farmington News, November 28, 1924)].

1925

I am still unclear as to his status at the mill. There are only three mentions of Henry Townsend in this year’s diary. On Wednesday, January 26 he wrote that Henry had begun running the mill at night. On February 11 he reported, Henry took George Fox and went up to his camp at Bear Island [in Lake Winnipesaukee] to do some work on his wharf. Expects to be gone the rest of the week.

[George E. Fox, a general farm farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucia C. Fox, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and his son, Chandler P. Fox, aged twelve years (b. ME). George E. Fox owned their farm on the Fox Ridge Road].

Was Henry in charge or was Grandpa still in charge? Did Henry run the manufacturing part and Grandpa the business part? If they were both working there, one would think there would be some interaction and that there would, at least, be occasional references to Henry in Grandpa’s diary. In April, he and Henry went to Dover to meet with Mr. Hall, an annual occurrence.

I believe Mr. Hall had something to do with John Townsend’s will because in an earlier (before 1920) diary, Grandpa tells about Mr. Hall coming to Milton Mills and meeting with him after John died. Grandpa was to run the mill until Henry was of age and could take over. Henry would have been a little older than Dad and we know from a previous diary that he was married. He would, of course, have inherited enough to live on from his father’s estate plus the income from the mill. Perhaps, he preferred to travel (to California each year) and let Grandpa handle the business of the mill. Who knows?!? (I seem to be doing a lot of speculating here!!)

1926

Grandpa continued to work at the mill. Apparently, Henry was around, too, since Grandpa mentions that he was “at home” sick three days. Like Grandpa, Henry seemed to have multiple interests. He must have owned quite a bit of real estate since he hired George Marsh and George Fox to shingle the roofs of several buildings including some at the mill. George M. and Dad also did other maintenance jobs at the mill on occasion.

[George W. Marsh, a farm laborer (working out), aged forty years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eva M. Marsh, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Ithiel E. Marsh, aged ten years (b. ME), and Lester E. Marsh, aged nine years (b. ME). George W. Marsh owned their farm on the Lebanon Road, free-and-clear].

1927

My curiosity about Henry and Miltonia Mills has been piqued even further with a series of vague entries in this year’s diary.

[MILTON MILLS. Miltonia Mills. Agents: Covert & Workman, New York. Proprietor: Henry A. Townsend. Superintendent: F.H. Simes. Woollen Spinners and Manufacturers, Dyers and Finishers. Cards: 4 sets. Spindles: 1,680. Looms: 40. Fabric: Bed Blankets (Skinner, 1927)].

March 7: Henry came home this noon – has been gone 5 weeks. [California? Texas?]

May 18: Geo. [Marsh] worked for Henry 9 hours at the old counting room building. [Carpentry]

June 23: Geo. [Marsh] & Geo. Fox worked . . . and at the mill for Henry in the P.M.

October 7: Was in the office all day. Talked with Mr. D.H. Grant about our taking over the mill on a lease and running it. Went over to the office in the evening to talk with Mr. Grant again.

[D.H. Grant & Co., formerly Grant & Bullwinkel, have been appointed sole selling agents in the United States for J.H. Kippax, Manchester, England, manufacturers of fine ginghams, crepes and voiles. The concern, which is located at 225 Fourth Ave., is also engaged in the importation of high grade cotton from other countries, notably Switzerland (Textile World Journal, 1923)].

October 27: Mr. Grant from N.Y. to see about selling blankets for the mill if we take it over. Who are “we”?!

[Dana H. Grant, a manufacturer of dress goods, aged thirty years (b. U.S.), headed a Pelham, NY, household at the time of the NY State Census of 1925. His household included his wife, Dorothy R. Grant, aged thirty-one years (b. U.S.), and his mother, Mary H. Grant, a houseworker, aged sixty-nine years (b. U.S.). They resided at 128 Reed Avenue]. 

October 29: Went over to the office at 5:30 to meet with Chas. Wentworth of Rochester & a Mr. Bartlett who thought of coming into the mill business with us.

[Charles L. Wentworth appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1926, as secretary-treasurer of the Rochester Building and Loan Association and a teller at the Rochester Trust Co., with his residence at 12 Glen street].

November 2: I am in the office nearly all the time now trying to make arrangements for taking over the mill and running it.

November 7: I went to Rochester to see Mr. Bond about incorporating the business in the P.M. Went down with Henry and Ing. [Ing was Henry’s wife.]

[Bernard Q. Bond appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1926, as vice president-treasurer of the Rochester Trust Co., with his residence at 86 Wakefield street].

November 17: Grandpa explained that he had not attended prayer meeting because he had to attend the Board of Trade meeting at the hotel in the interests of mill business.

December 1: Norman [his son] took me over to Springvale in P.M. to see Judge Goodwin about incorporating the mill business.

[George Goodwin, a general practice lawyer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), headed a Sanford (“Springvale”), ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-six years), Etta Goodwin, aged sixty-three years (b. ME). George Goodwin owned their house at 24 Main Street, which was valued at $5,500. They had a radio set].

December 6: Norman and I went to Dover and Rochester on the mill business. Didn’t amount to much.

December 9: Got a letter from Mr. Grant [of] New York and it looks as if we might get the mill started.

December 15: Mill is now all shut down. No one working.

December 24: Henry & I went down to Dover to see Mr. Hall about making a lease for the mill. Henry started for Texas to-night. Will spend Christmas with Agnes and he and Joe Plummer start from there Tues. morning.

[Henry’s sister, Agnes M. (Townsend) Hayes, then lived with her husband in Bradford, MA. Halton R. (Agnes T.) Hayes appeared in the Haverhill. MA, directory of 1928, as manager of the Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co., with his house at 35 Fernwood av., Br. [Bradford]. Henry A. Townsend and Joe Plummer would have started for Texas from Bradford, after spending Christmas there (The Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co. of Kansas City, MO, made the Sunshine brand of biscuits and cookies. Hayes would have been the local sales manager)].


Ms. Bristol contributed some supplementary research support.


To be Continued in 1928 – I hope!


References:

ALA. (1919). Bulletin of the American Library Association. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rVswAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA548

Browne, George W. (1915). The Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. of Manchester, New Hampshire: A History. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Xhk9AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA237

Find a Grave. (2013, January 10). Henry William Allen. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/103373599/henry-william-allen

Find a Grave. (2013, May 23). Bernard Q. Bond. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/111342559/bernard-q-bond

Find a Grave. (2009, October 6). Samuel Demeritt Felker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42766815/samuel-demeritt-felker

Find a Grave. (2015, December 1). George Edward Fox. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/155581843/george-edward-fox

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). George A. Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612566/george-a-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2016, October 2). Dana Hamilton Grant. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170786870/dana-hamilton-grant

Find a Grave. (2013, November 15). Almie M. Jenness Hall. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/120373149/almie-m-hall

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Agnes Townsend Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893159/agnes-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, November 10). Dwight Hall. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/120133929/dwight-hall

Find a Grave. (2010, August 25). William Guile Northrup, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/57686125/william-guile-northrup

Find a Grave. (2010, May 8). Park Whitney Peck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/52144589/park-whitney-peck

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Ralph Wentworth Pike. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114912838/ralph-wentworth-pike

Find a Grave. (2016, August 13). Carl Chandler Robbins. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/168230424/carl-chandler-robbins

Find a Grave. (2013, August 13). Frederick H. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612396/frederick-h.-simes

Find a Grave. (2011, June 23). Charles Otis Timson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/71847258/charles-otis-timson

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Henry A. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893218/henry-a-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). John C. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352317/john-c-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). John E. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352496/john-e-townsend

Find a Grave. (2017, April 30). Christopher Henry Wells. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/178901058/christopher-henry-wells

Find a Grave. (2017, October 19). Charles L. Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184425974/charles-l.-wentworth

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Harry E. Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938247/harry-e-wentworth

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Norman Lowd Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938284/norman-lowd-wentworth

MA Supreme Judicial Court. (1919). Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, June 1918-January 1919. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=63gQAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA574

Memorial Hall Library. (2021). Andover Historic Preservation: 286 South Main Street. Retrieved from preservation.mhl.org/286-south-main-street

Modern Hospital. (1921, August). Miltonia Mills Advertisement. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ZV0A1TLOuZ8C&pg=RA2-PA83

NH Bureau of Labor. (1924). Fifteenth Biennial Report of the NH Bureau of Labor. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=KMJMAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA59

Old Bristol Historical Society. (1900). Photo Record: Shaw’s Business College. Retrieved from oldbristolhistoricalsociety.pastperfectonline.com/photo/6048B4BE-BDE3-4802-80C6-435168093611

Pacific Mills. (1924). Pacific Mills: Lawrence, Mass., Dover, N.H., Columbia, S.C. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=d_tvAiVRhoAC&printsec=frontcover

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA543

Trust Publications. (1919). Trust Publications. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=I7hGAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA479

Wikipedia. (2020, November 2). Bear Island (Lake Winnipesaukee). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bear_Island_(Lake_Winnipesaukee)

Wikipedia. (2021, May 1). Bright’s Disease. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bright%27s_disease

Milton Policemen – 1940-52

By Muriel Bristol | May 2, 2021

Continued from Milton Policemen – 1927-39

The Milton policemen identified in the Milton Town Reports of 1940-52 were: Oliver J. Diack, John P. Kimball, John P. Butler, Clemence C. Dixon, Roy Burroughs, John Reardon, Edwin H. Hutchins, and Howard J. Jedrey.

Oliver J. Diack – 1940

Oliver James Diack was born in Quincy, MA, September 22, 1909, son of Alfred O. and Jeannie (Wilson) Diack. (His father died in 1918).

Jeannie Diack, a widow, aged sixty-two years (b. Scotland), headed a Quincy, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Eva O. Diack, a school teacher, aged thirty years (b. MA), Mildred M. Diack, a gas co. secretary, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), Ethel B. Diack, an automobile secretary, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Oliver J. Diack, a gas co. clerk, aged twenty years (b. MA). Jeannie Diack owned their house at 47 Independence Ave., which was valued at $9,000. They had a radio set. Jeannie Diack was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1903.

BRAINTREE. The annual outing the Old Colony Gas Company of this town will be held tomorrow afternoon and evening at Pemberton. The general committee has arranged for the best time ever, end on the various committees are William Sullivan, chairman; Oliver Diack, secretary; John Swain, Joseph Shay, Miss Mildred Diack, transportation; Mrs. Margaret Jolicoeur, Miss Mary Walsh, Miss Anna Cassese, Mrs. Hazel Cassese, entertainment; David Condrick, William Webb, Joseph Shay, publicity; Oliver Diack, Joseph Shay, David Condrick, men’s sports; Miss Mildred Diack, Miss Mary Walsh, Miss Anna Cassese, Mrs. Margaret Jolicoeur, Miss Mary Tardlff, sports for the women. There will be indoor sports in case of rain. A number of local and out-of-town officials of the company have been invited to attend. (Boston Globe, August 22, 1930).

Oliver James Diack married in Braintree, MA, in 1935, Ruth Power. She was born in Milton, October 10, 1911, daughter of Lewis R. and Georgia W. (Quint) Power,

Oliver J. Diack, a farm laborer, aged thirty years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ruth Diack, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and his son, Oliver J. Diack, Jr., aged ten months (b. MA). Oliver J. Diack owned their house in the Milton Community, which was valued at $2,200. Oliver J. and Ruth Diack had resided in the same house in 1935.

Oliver James Diack of Union R.F.D., Milton, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, October 16, 1940. He was aged thirty-one years (b. Quincy, MA, September 22, 1909), and was employed by the State of New Hampshire. His telephone number was 41-12. His nearest relation was his wife, Ruth Power Diack of Union R.F.D. Milton. He was 6′ tall, weighed 200 pounds, and had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion. A later hand scratched out his Milton address and wrote in “Saint David, Arizona.”

Real Estate Transfers. Oliver and Ruth Diack of Milton sold to Robert S. and Susanne H. Bolan of Newton, Mass., land located on the north west side of “The Lane” in Milton (Farmington News, July 12, 1956).

Oliver J. Diack died in 1957.

ESTATES CONSIDERED. Oliver J. Diack, Milton. Petition to sell stocks and bonds granted (Farmington News, 1959).

Ruth (Power) Diack died in Arizona, October 11, 1970.

John P. Kimball (Chief) – 1942-43

John Pliny Kimball was born in Wolfeboro, NH, June 14, 1916, son of Fred J. and Clara M. (Dale) Kimball.

John Pliny Kimball married in Rochester, NH, June 28, 1939, Mary Elizabeth LeVangie, he of 37 White Place, Brookline, MA, and she of 87 Toxteth Street, Brookline, MA. He was a pharmacist, aged twenty-three years, and she was a stenographer and bookkeeper, aged twenty-four years. She was born in Brookline, MA, April 19, 1915, daughter of Thomas W. and Annie (Giblin) LeVangie.

Fred J. Kimball, a steam railroad laborer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Clara M. Kimball, aged fifty-two years (b. MA), his son, John P. Kimball, a drug store druggist, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Mary E. Kimball, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and his grandson, John P, Kimball, Jr., aged two months (b. NH). Fred J. Kimball owned their house on Remick Street, at its intersection with Silver Street, which was valued at $1,000.

Portsmouth Police Join in Hunt for Milton Girl. Milton police left late last night for Boston, as the search spread for Lena Anderson, 16, member of a trio of Milton girls who ran away Tuesday. The other two, Pauline Dupuis, 15, and Charlotte Weare, 16, returned to their homes yesterday but told police that they had left Lena in Boston. The girls had been sought in Portsmouth Wednesday night by Milton Chief of Police John P. Kimball and Patrolman Pierce Butler, with the assistance of City Marshal Leonard H. Hewitt, and members of the local police department. Hotels and rooming houses were investigated. It is alleged that the three girls skipped school Tuesday to go to Rochester. When they returned in the afternoon the headmaster told them to bring excuse notes from home before they would be admitted to their classes. The two girls told police that they returned to Rochester later that night and then hitch-hiked to Boston where they met three sailors. They left the Anderson girl in front of a Boston movie house in the company of one of the sailors as she refused to accompany them because she was afraid to go home, they explained. Police described Miss Anderson as being five feet six inches tall, weighing 130 pounds, having brown hair and brown eyes and wearing a red and blue flowered dress, brown and white saddle shoes, wine colored socks but no coat (Portsmouth Herald, May 8, 1942).

Rochester. Milton Girl For Whom Search Made Here, Found. (Correspondent: Basil Blake; 806-J). Lena Anderson, 16, missing since May 5, has been located Providence, R.I., where she has been working in a defense plant. Search was made for her with two other girls here and in Portsmouth at the time of their disappearance. The Milton girl, for whom a New England-wide search had been instituted, will return home Sunday, according to Patrolman John P. Kimball, of the Milton police who was in charge of the search and who has been working on the case since May. Claim Skipped Classes. On the afternoon of May 5, Lena and two companions, Charlotte Weare, 16, and Pauline Dupuis, 15, were allegedly sent home from the Nute High school and told to tell their parents that they had skipped classes in the morning. Instead they all hitch-hiked to Rochester, according to the other two girls who returned home a few days after their disappearance. Instead of going home the girls went to the Boston and Maine station in Milton and from the funds of the three which had been pooled, bought tickets for Rochester. They were seen in Rochester that night and then hitch-hiked to Boston. Patrolman John P. Kimball and Patrolman Pierce Butler of Milton went to Boston after two of the girls returned home voluntarily and said they left the Anderson girl in Boston. They told how the three girls and three sailors met outside a Boston theater and the Anderson girl, learning the others were going home, said said she was going to remain as she was afraid to return. Since then she had not been heard from until yesterday (Portsmouth Herald, August 8, 1942).

Injured Youths Leave Hospital. Treated at the Frisbie hospital late Monday for injuries sustained in an automobile accident in Milton, Stanley Parker of East Rochester and Technical Sergt. Melvin Wilkins of East Rochester, who is home on a furlough from Camp George G. Meade in Maryland, were released Tuesday. Sergeant Wilkins, said by police to have been the operator of the car, received lacerations on the face and complained of pains in his abdomen. Parker was cut on the head and was shaken up. Alfred Smith, another passenger in the car, received bruises and contusions but did not require hospital treatment. State Motor Vehicle Inspector Harold M. Foss of Dover, who was called by Patrolman John P. Kimball of the Milton police, said the car started to weave near the Boston and Maine crossing and about opposite the Wilson home, after traveling a hundred yards, left Route 16 and struck an electric light pole, snapping it (Portsmouth Herald, October 1, 1942).

John P. Kimball died in Marion, FL. June 19, 1996. Mary E. (Levangie) Kimball died in Wolfeboro, NH, April 28, 2006.

John P. Butler – 1942

John Pierce “Pierce” Butler was born in Milton, October 5, 1919, son of Edward T. and Margaret J. (Burbine) Butler.

John Pierce Butler married in Milton, November 25, 1939, Dorothy Margaret Wilson, both of Milton. He was a mill hand, aged twenty years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. Leland L. Maxfield performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, November 25, 1919, daughter of Charles W. and Florence E. (Blake) Wilson.

John P. Butler, a leatherboard mill dryer, aged twenty years (b. NH) headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Dorothy M. Butler, aged twenty years (b. NH), and his aunt, Margaret Curll, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME). John P. and Dorothy M. Butler had resided in the same place, i.e., Milton, in 1935, while Margaret Curll had resided in Newport, RI. John P. Butler rented their house on School Street, for $15 per month. Their household was enumerated between those of Fred Howard, a shoe shop shoeworker, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), and Leland Maxfield, a minister, aged thirty years.

John P. Butler enlisted in the U.S. Army in Boston, MA, October 26, 1942. He had attended four years of high school, stood 69″ tall, and weighed 155 pounds.

John P. (Dorothy M.) Butler appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1953, as a lineman for the PS [Public Service] Co. of NH, with his house at 71 Indigo Hill road.

Dorothy M. (Wilson) Butler died in Dover, NH, September 27, 2007. John P. Butler died in Dover, NH, July 13, 2018, aged ninety-eight years.

Clemence C. Dixon – 1944

Clemence Charles Dixon was born in Boston, MA, April 4, 1888, son of Joseph E. and Susanna (Mullen) Dixon.

Clemence Dixon, a U.S. government mail messenger, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. He rented his house on Charles Street, for $8 per month. He had a radio set. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Herbert F. Yeaton, a house carpenter, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and Harry L. Avery, a retail dry goods merchant, aged sixty-six years (b. NH).

Clemence Charles Dixon of Milton registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 27, 1942. He was a Milton-based U.S. government employee, aged fifty-three years (b. South Boston, MA, April 4, 1888). He stood 5′ 4″ tall, weighed 14p pounds, and had gray eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. His contact was Mr. Samuel Blaisdell of Milton.

Clemence C. Dixon died in Rochester, NH, May 10, 1951, aged sixty-three years, twenty-six days.

Roy Burroughs (Chief) – 1945-60

Leroy “Roy” Burroughs was born in Brookfield, NH, February 16, 1909, son of Howard W. and Mercy M. (Kimball) Burroughs.

Roy Burroughs married in Dover, NH, October 11, 1924, Marion G. Chamberlain, he of Brookfield, NH, and she of Milton. He was an iceman, aged twenty-one years, and she was a domestic, aged seventeen years. (She had the consent of her father). Rev. Leon Morse performed the ceremony. She was born in Chelsea, MA, July 10, 1907, daughter of Guy L. and Elizabeth (Cunningham) Chamberlain.

Roy Burroughs, an ice company laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Marian Burroughs, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and his brother-in-law, Gardner Chamberlain, a fibre mill laborer, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Roy Burroughs rented their house on North Main Street, for $10 per month. They had a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Warren Burroughs, State road trucking, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and Lyman S. Hayes, retired, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH).

Roy Burroughs, a leatherboard mill fireman, aged twenty-six [thirty-six] years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Marian G. Burroughs, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), and his brother-in-law, Howard Chamberlain, a State road laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Roy Burroughs rented their house in the Milton Community, for $12 per month. They had all resided in the same house in 1935. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Laura J. Littlefield, a widow, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and Roy M. Downs, a leatherboard mill laborer, aged forty-six years (b. NH).

MILTON. Girl Injured. The heavy rainstorm here Sunday afternoon has been reported as the reason for the one-car crash which caused the hospitalization of a Worcester, Mass., woman. Chief of Police Roy Burroughs reported the automobile left the road on Route 16, approaching Milton from the south, and hit a brick wall. Alice Dusoe of Worcester was taken to Frisbie hospital in Rochester. Her companion, said to be the driver of the car, Doris Pouliot of Boston, was released from the hospital at nightfall (Farmington News, August 11, 1955).

MILTON. Gilman, Burroughs, Mrs. Ramsey Victorious. Incumbents won reelection in the 3 contests at town meeting Tuesday. John Gilman again will serve as selectman. He defeated Leroy Forbes. Roy Burroughs defeated Robert Vachon for chief of police. Mrs. Emma Ramsey defeated Dorothy Carswell for tax collector. Town budget for Milton and the Mills will be $58,218.72, a boost of almost $3000 (Farmington News, March 12, 1959).

MILTON. SURGERY. Mrs. Roy Burroughs underwent surgery last Friday at the Frisbie Memorial Hospital and is making a good recovery (Farmington News, July 30, 1964).

Roy Burroughs died in Rochester, NH, August 8, 1975. Marian G. (Chamberlain) Burroughs died in Rochester, NH, June 28, 1978.

John Reardon – 1946-48, 1949-51

John Reardon has proven somewhat elusive. John Reardon and Anna Reardon neglected to pay their Milton poll tax for 1951, presumably because they moved from town. (Perhaps the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census may shed more light on them, when it becomes available).

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1953, as a G.E. employee, with his house at 179½ Main street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as D.S. Co. employee, with her house at 179½ Main street.

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1956, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 21 Copeland street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 21 Copeland street.

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1958, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 2 Copeland street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 2 Copeland street.

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1960, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 75 Berwick street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 2 Copeland street [75 Berwick street].

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1962, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 42 Berwick street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 42 Berwick street.

Edwin H. Hutchins – 1948, 1954-61, 1963

Edwin Henry Hutchins was born in Wolfeboro, NH, March 15, 1927, son of Bernard S. and Teresa (Hayes) Hutchins.

Bernard S. Hutchins, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Teresa H. Hutchins, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Edwin Hutchins, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Paul Hutchins, aged eleven years (b. NH), Marion Hutchins, aged nine years (b. NH), and Money Hutchins, aged seven years (b. NH). Bernard S. Hutchins owned their house on the Lovell Lake Road, which was valued at $1,000. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

Edwin Henry Hutchins married in Milton, July 27, 1947, Gloria June Clough, he of Sanbornville, Wakefield, NH, and she of Milton Mills, Milton. He was a farmer, aged twenty years, and she was a spooler, aged sixteen years (parental consent). She was born in Milton Mills, circa 1931, daughter of Dennis and Mamie V. (Marsh) Clough.

Young G.O.P. Plans Organization. Milton – A Young Republican Club is being formed to include the towns of Milton, Milton Mills, Union, Sanbornville, and Wakefield. In charge of organization is Mrs. Edwin Hutchins of Milton Mills, and anyone interested in joining the group should contact her. The first Meeting will be Monday, Feb 19 (Farmington News, February 15, 1962).

In the following article concerning the March 1963 town election is confirmed something we might have suspected before regarding Milton’s usual pair of policemen: Milton and Milton Mills had each their own elected policeman. One of them, presumably Milton’s policeman although it is not clear, would be also the chief. Edwin Hutchins received election as a Republican candidate for Milton Mills policeman.

Milton Elects Logan Selectman. Milton – Republican Charles H. Logan defeated democratic incumbent Stanley C. Tanner, 318 to 108, in Tuesday’s election in Milton. In other contested offices, George W. Meyers lost to republican Charles R. Whitehouse, by a vote of 319 to 95; Milton Mills police, Edwin Hutchins, R., 148, Frederick Meyers, 43, Frederick Morrill, 98, Norman Place, 70; 2nd engineer in the fire department, Donald Cheney, 244, Robert McIntire, 132. Pauline Clough was elected trustee of trust funds on a write-in. The other offices were uncontested. Town meeting was held and most of the articles passed without much controversy. Article 25, which had to do with a preliminary report and plan preparation for sewerage and sewage treatment facilities was passed with a provision that the job be put up for bid (Farmington News, March 14, 1963).

MILTON MILLS. Mrs. Edwin Hutchins has concluded her work at Sprague Electric in So. Sanford, Me., and has taken a position at General Electric in Somersworth (Farmington News, December 31, 1969).

Edwin H. Hutchins died in Milton Mills, July 19, 2003, aged seventy-six years.

Howard J. Jedrey – 1952

Howard J. Jedrey was born in Georgetown, MA, June 19, 1908, son of Benjamin H. and Eliza (Chaput) Jedrey.

Howard J. Jedrey married (1st) in Ipswich, MA, February 4, 1928, Bessie E. Kent, he of Broadway Avenue, Ipswich, MA, and she of Wethersfield Street, Rowley, MA. He was a laborer, aged nineteen years, and she was at home, aged sixteen years. Rev. Joseph C. Burns performed the ceremony. She was born in Rowley, MA, circa 1911, daughter of David A. and Etta E. (Wilson) Kent.

Howard J. Jedrey, a wood industry laborer, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), headed a Rowley, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Bessie K. Jedrey, aged eighteen years (b. MA), and his child, Ralph J. Jedrey, aged one year, eleven months (b. MA). Howard J. Jedrey rented their house, for $4 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Howard J. and Bessie E. (Kent) Jedrey divorced in 1933. Howard Jedrey married (2nd) in Nowata, OK, July 1, 1934, Mary E. Hoyle. She was born in Elsmore, KS, circa 1907, daughter of William G. and Myrtle M. (Ard) Hoyle.

Howard Jedrey, a cotton mill twister, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), headed a Stratham, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary Jedrey, aged thirty-two years (b. KS), and his children, Benjamin Jedrey, aged four years (b. KS), and Charles Jedrey, aged two years (b. NH). Howard Jedrey owned their house on Bunker Hill Avenue, which was valued at $50. Howard and Mary E. Jedrey had resided in Elsmore, KS, in 1935.

Howard James Jedrey of Bunker Hill Avenue, Stratham, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Stratham, NH, October 16, 1940. He was employed by the Exeter Manufacturing Co. in Exeter, NH. He was aged thirty-two years (b. Georgetown, MA, June 19, 1908). His contact was his wife, Mrs. Mary E. Jedrey, of Bunker Hill Avenue, Stratham, NH. He was 5′ 8″ tall, weighed 142 pounds, and had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. Warranty Deeds. From Howard J. and Mary E. Jedrey to Ralph D. Laskey of Milton Mills, parcel of land on southerly side of the road leading from Milton Mills to Sanbornville (Farmington News, September 1, 1955).

Howard Jedrey, aged forty-eight years, headed an Elsmore, KS, household at the time of a Kansas county census of March 1957. His household included Mary E. Jedrey, aged fifty years, Benjamin H. Jedrey, aged twenty-one years, and Charles W. Jedrey, aged nineteen years.

Howard J. Jedrey died in Moran, KS, March 4, 1977, aged sixty-eight years.

Howard James Jedrey. Howard James Jedrey, 68, Route 1, Moran, died Friday March 4 at his home. He was born June 19, 1908, in Georgetown, Massachusetts. On July 1, 1934, he was married to Mary E. Hoyle at Nowata, Oklahoma. Mr. Jedrey was a retired laborer and former member of the Eagle Lodge. Survivors include Mrs. Jedrey of the home; two sons, Benjamin Howard Jedrey of Anaheim, California, and Charles William Jedrey of West Covina, California; three brothers, Ben Jedrey of Jacksonville, Fla.; Victor Jedrey of Andover, Mass., and Harry Jedrey of Maine, two sisters, Mrs. Agnes Roberts of Providence, Rhode Island and Mrs. Grace Burns of Raymond, New Hampshire and eight grandchildren. The funeral service was held this afternoon at the Kunkel-Ralston- Hutton Chapel with the Rev. Jean Minnich officiating. Burial was in the Moran Cemetery (Iola Register (Iola, KS), March 7, 1977).

Mary E. (Hoyle) Jedrey died in Broken Arrow, OK, January 12, 1997.


See also Milton Policemen – c1891-1914 and Milton Policemen – 1927-39


References:

Find a Grave. (2009, August 27). Leroy “Roy” Burroughs. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/41231961/leroy-burroughs

Find a Grave. (2014, February 14). Oliver James Diack. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/125500635/oliver-james-diack

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Clemence C. Dixon. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214561425/clemence-c-dixon

Find a Grave. (2013, July 28). Edwin Henry Hutchins. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114529909/edwin-henry-hutchins

Celestial Seasonings – May 2021

By Heather Durham | April 30, 2021

Greetings skywatchers!

After a couple of months of minimal activity, this month brings us yet another supermoon, the only total lunar eclipse visible from our vantage point this year, along with two meteor showers!  Let’s just hope Mother Nature and her weather cooperates for optimal viewing.


May 3. The Moon and Saturn will rise closely to one another. The Moon will be in its final quarter.

May 4. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to one another.

May 5. The Aquariid meteor shower will put on a weather dependent display on tonight.  This shower comes from the Constellation Aquarius and the peak display will be at 10:00 pm.

Lyrid Meteor Shower - Alyssa NewcombMay 8. We will have the Lyrid Meteor shower tonight from the Constellation Lyra.  The best displays may be seen either before dawn or just after dusk.

May 12. Mercury will reach half phase on this date.

May 16. The Moon and Mars will rise closely to one another.

May 17. Mercury will reach it’s highest point in the sky and may be observable during twilight.

May 19. The Moon will be at its first quarter.

May 23. Saturn turns from east to west today. This event is usually known as retrograde.

May 26. The Supermoon will be full tonight and along with this, tonight we will have a total lunar eclipse.  Partial eclipse will be from 7:45 until 8:52.  The total eclipse will occur between 7:12 until 7:26.

May 30. The Moon and Saturn will rise closely to one another.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). May 2021 Astronomical Calendar. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/

Newcomb, Alyssa. (2020, April 16). Lyrid Meteor Shower. Retrieved from www.today.com/news/lyrid-meteor-shower-where-when-see-shooting-stars-t178937

Milton Policemen – 1927-39

By Muriel Bristol | April 25, 2021

In the Town Report of 1928, the Milton Town budget reported having spent $739.05 for the Protection of People and Property in 1927. That was allocated as $400 for Blister Rust, $269.85 for the Police Department, including the care of tramps, and $69.20 for the Fire Department, including Forest Fires. The allocations for 1928 were the same as for 1927 as regards the police and blister rust, but increased by $150 for the fire department.

(Blister rust (Cronartium Ribicola) is an invasive fungus introduced from China some thirty years before that attacks white pine trees).

As in earlier years, being a Milton policeman was very much as part-time job. There seem to have been no more than two part-time policemen (and rarely three) in any one year. There were also on occasion “special” policemen.

Apart from their regular duties, whatever they might have been been, Milton town budgets of this period mention paying policemen extra for traffic duty (now called detail work), rounding up tramps (including feeding them), collecting dog license fees, and even killing dogs, presumably mad or errant ones.

The Milton policemen identified in the Milton Town Reports of 1927-39 were: Fred Downs, Earle L. Walsh, William J. Madden, Fred J. Savoie, Herman J. Horne,  Verney C. Sprague. Phillip D. Pike, and George A. McKeagney.

Fred Downs – 1927-1936

Milton had two contemporary Fred Downs, the one that follows below and Fred C. Downs who, no doubt due to the duplication in names, went often by his middle name of Charles. Both were ice laborers. In the matter of determining which one was the Milton policeman, there is little on which to base a decision, at least with the currently available information. The one described below left for Rochester at the time policeman Fred Downs ceased appearing in the town records.

Fred Downs was born in Milton, December 9, 1880, son of Albert F. and Dorothy M. (Tuttle) Downs.

Fred Downs married in Milton, June 7, 1916, Ina Anna [(Bell)] Come, both of Milton. He was a shoemaker, aged thirty-six years, and she was a shoe stitcher, aged twenty-one years. Rev. John Manter performed the ceremony. She was born in Roxbury, VT, circa 1895, daughter of Joseph and Hattie M. (Gushea) Bell.

Fred Downs of Milton registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was a laborer for the Porter Milton Ice Co., aged thirty-seven years (b. December 9, 1880). His nearest relative was Ina Downs of Milton. He was of medium height, with a medium build, blue eyes, and brown hair.

Fred Downs, a [Porter-] Milton Ice Co. laborer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ina A. Downs, aged twenty-five years (b. VT). Fred Downs rented their house on the Plummer’s Ridge Road.

Fred Downs, an ice house laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Ina A. Downs, aged thirty-four years (b. VT). Fred Downs rented their house on the Plummer’s Ridge Road, for $20 per month. They had a radio set.

BURGLARS ENTER MILTON STORE. Milton, Nov. 5 – Burglars broke into a store here early yesterday and also across the river in Lebanon, Me., and then staged a party with part of the loot. At the store of Nick Sarkes, on Main street here, $90 worth of cigarettes and $10 in cash was taken after the burglars broke in a window and released the door catch. Going into Maine, they removed four cases of beer from the Tanner store, then sat on the steps and drank part of the beer and smoked some of the stolen cigarettes. The break here is being investigated by Chief Fred Downs and Deputy Sheriff Stanley Turner, and in Lebanon Deputy Sheriff H.S. Hall is being assisted by Deputy Tanner (Portsmouth Herald, November 5, 1936).

Fred (Ina) Downs appeared in the Rochester directory of 1938, as proprietor of Ike & Ine’s Tea Room, with his house on the Milton Road, R.D. #3.

Fred Downs, a restaurant proprietor, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“East Rochester”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Ina A. Downs, a restaurant proprietor, aged forty-four years (b. VT),and his helper, Rose Davis, a restaurant kitchen worker, aged fifty years (b. NH). Fred Downs rented their house on the Milton Road. Fred and Ina A. Downs had resided in Milton in 1935, and Rose Davis had resided in Acton, ME, in 1935.

Fred Downs of Milton Road, Rochester, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Rochester, NH, April 27, 1942. He was employed at Ike ‘n’ Ine’s Restaurant, aged sixty years (b. December 9, 1880). His nearest relative was his wife, Ina Downs, of R.F.D. #2, Rochester, NH. He was 5′ 9″ tall, weighed 190 pounds, with gray eyes, and white hair.

Fred (Ina) Downs appeared in the Rochester directory of 1948, as proprietor of Ike & Ine’s Tea Room, and grocery, on the Milton Road, R.D. #2, with his house at the same place.

Ike & Ine’s Tea Room appeared in the Rochester directory of 1950, on the Milton road R.D. #3, with Mrs. Fred Downs as proprietor.

Ina Downs appeared in the Rochester directory of 1953, as the widow of Fred Downs, and proprietor of The Country Store, with her house off the Milton road, R.D. #2. The Country Store, Ina A. Downs, proprietor, was on the Milton road; it sold groceries.

Earle L. Walsh – 1927-1929

Earle Leonard “Leonard” Walsh was born in Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897, son of George L. and Carrie M. (Briggs) Walsh.

Earl Leonard Walsh married in Wolfeboro, NH, April 7, 1917, Jessie Louise Tinker, both of Wolfeboro, NH. He was a machinist, aged nineteen years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-one years. Rev. Carlyle Summerbell performed the ceremony. She was born in Wolfeboro, NH, July 1, 1895, daughter of Charles A. and Elizabeth (Whitworth) Tinker.

Earl Leonard Walsh of Forge Farm, Plymouth, MA, registered for the WW I military draft in Plymouth, MA, June 5, 1918. He was employed by Sherman L. Whipple of Plymouth, MA, and was aged twenty-one years (b. Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897). His nearest relative was his wife, Jessie L. Walsh, of Forge Farm, Plymouth, MA. He was of a medium height, and slender build, with blue eyes, and brown hair.

George L. Walsh, a general farm farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie Walsh, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), his sons, Earle L. Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), Charles B. Walsh, an electric co. electrician, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Ralph W. Walsh, aged thirteen years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Jesse I. Walsh, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), his grandchild, Earling Walsh Jr., aged one year (b. MA), and his boarder, Jeremiah Hodsdon, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH). George L. Walsh owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Jessie L. (Tinker) Walsh taught at the Milton Mills school in the years 1926 to 1935 (See Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1912-52).

Earle Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Jessie Walsh, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), his children, Leonard Walsh, aged eleven years (b. MA), and Marilyn Walsh, born seven years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Charles A. Tinker, a widower, aged seventy-five years (b. ME). Earle Walsh rented their house on Church Street, for $10 per month. They had a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Lucy Marsh, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), and Annie Reynolds, a widow, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME).

MILTON MILLS. Earle Walsh, district deputy grand master, and staff installed the officers of Fidelity Lodge at Wolfeboro last Friday night, October 12 (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

LOCAL. Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., will hold its annual installation of officers this Thursday evening. The ceremonies of installation will be performed by District Deputy Grand Master Earle Walsh of Milton Mills (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

Walsh, EL - FN400419Earle L. Walsh, an undertaker, aged forty-two years (b. ME), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Jessie L Walsh, a public school teacher, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his children, Earle L. Walsh, Jr., aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Marilyn Walsh, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his father, George L. Walsh, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH). Earle L. Walsh owned [rented] their house on North Main Street, for $30 per month.

Earle Leonard Walsh of 23 Pleasant Street, Wolfeboro, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Wolfeboro, NH, February 14, 1942. He was self-employed, aged forty-four years (b. Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897). His telephone number was Wolfeboro 160. His contact was Jessie L. Walsh of Wolfeboro, NH. He was 5′ 9″ tall, weighed 165 pounds, with blue eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion.

1 Soldier Dies, 14 Hurt As Driver Hits Column. BERGENFIELD, N.J., March 27 (AP) – An automobile drove into the rear of a drilling column of 100 soldiers last night, Bergen county prosecutor John J. Breslin said, killing one and injuring 14 others. Breslin said Charles Mordaunt, 35, sales manager for an Englewood. automobile agency, had been booked as driver of the car on a charge of manslaughter by automobile and drunken driving. He said the death charge would be presented to the grand jury Tuesday while the drunken driving complaint would be taken to Bergenfield police court. The dead soldier was Murray Winawer of Brooklyn, N.Y., married. Five soldiers were treated at the scene, while nine others, were taken to Englewood and Holy Name hospitals. The injured, identified by army officers, included Earle Walsh, [Jr.,] 23, Wolfesboro, N.H., possible fractured vertebra, condition fair. He was taken to Englewood hospital (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, NH), March 14, 1942).

Fish and Game Report. Fishermen Act Quickly On Department’s Plea. Pickerel fishermen have responded quickly to the plea issued by the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department for information on large pickerel taken in the state. Recent reports include a 4¼ pound female, 25 inches long, 11 inches in girth, and a 3¼ pound female, 23 inches long, 8 inches in girth, taken Jan. 8, 1965, from Lake Wentworth in Wolfeboro by Earl L. Walsh of East Wolfeboro … (Portsmouth Herald, February 6, 1965).

Jessie L. (Tinker) Walsh died in Wolfeboro, NH, in March 1969.

William J. Madden – 1932, 1940-45

William James Madden was born in Wandsworth, Surrey, England, April 1, 1886, son of Jack and Annie (Otterway) Madden.

William James Madden of Milton Mills registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was an alien, employed as a laborer for the John E. Townsend estate, aged thirty-two years (b. England, April 1, 1886). His nearest relative was Mrs. Susie S. Otterway of Milton Mills. He was of medium height and medium weight, with blue eyes and brown hair.

William J. Madden, a general work mason, aged thirty-three years (b. England), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his maternal aunt, Susan S. Otterway, a widow, aged eighty-seven years (b. NH). William J. Madden rented their house on the Sanbornville Road. William J. Madden was an alien, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1913.

William J. Madden married in Milton Mills, October 2, 1920, Beulah Naomi Marsh, both of Milton. He was a farmer, aged thirty-four years, and she was a blanket finisher, aged twenty-nine years. Rev. Edward J. Canfield performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, March 28, 1891, daughter of Edwin E. and Lucy L. (Earl) Marsh.

William J. Madden appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as a mason, with his house at Milton Mills.

Lucy Marsh, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Leroy Marsh, an odd jobs laborer, aged fifty years (b.ME), her son-in-law, William Madden, a odd jobs mason, aged forty-four years (b. England), her daughter (Madden’s wife of ten years), Beula Madden, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), and her granddaughter, Phyllis Madden, aged six years (b. NH). Lucy Marsh owned their house on Church Street, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Frank Goodwin, a general farming laborer, aged forty-five years (b. ME), and Earle Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-four years (b. NH).

MILTON MILLS. William J. Madden celebrated his birthday Monday, April 1. Wonder if he got fooled? (Farmington News, April 5, 1935).

Willie J. Madden, a painter, aged fifty-four years (b. England), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included Beulah Madden, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), his daughter, Phyllis L. Madden, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Leroy Marsh, aged sixty-two years (b. ME). Willie J. Madden owned their house at Milton Mills Center, which was valued at $1,000. They resided in the same house in 1935.

William James Madden of P.O. Box 25, Milton Mills registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 27, 1942. He was self employed, aged fifty-six years (b. Wandsworth, England, April 1, 1886). His telephone number was Milton Mills 14, and his nearest relative was Mrs. Beulah Madden of the same address. He was 5’7″ tall, weighed 150 pounds, a sallow complexion, and had blue eyes and brown hair. He had two tattoos on his right arm and one on his left arm.

William J. Madden died in South Berwick, ME, October 30, 1963, aged seventy-seven years.

Deaths and Funerals. William J. Madden. SOUTH BERWICK – William J. Madden, 77, of Portland St., died Wednesday at his home after a long illness. He was born in Wandworth, England, April 1, 1886, the son of Jack and Ann (Otterway) Madden. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Beulah (Marsh) Madden; a daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Nelson of South Berwick; and several nieces and nephews (Portsmouth Herald, 1963).

Beulah N. (Marsh) Madden died in South Berwick, ME, in July 1978.

Fred J. Savoie – 1932

Frederick Joseph Savoie was born in Dover, NH, November 29, 1896, son of Joseph W. and Delia (Burns) Savoie.

Fred J. Savoie, a U.S. Army private, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), resided at Fort Bliss, in El Paso, TX, at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. He was in the Eighth U.S. Cavalry.

Fred J. Savoie married in Somersworth, NH, October 7, 1922, Ruby Ellis, both of Milton. He was a laborer, aged twenty-five years, and she was a mill employee, aged seventeen years. She was born in Milton, May 3, 1905, daughter of George E. and Inez G. (Duntley) Ellis.

Fred Savoie, a fibre mill overseer, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Ruby Savoie, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Jacqueline Savoie, aged five years (b. NH), Maurice Savoie, aged three years (b. NH), and Elaine Savoie, aged two years (b. NH). Fred Savoie owned their house on South Main Street, which was valued at $1,600. They did not have a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Malcolm A. Hart, a general practice physician, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and Ralph E. Meserve, a fibre mill bleacher, aged twenty-two years (b. ME).

Fred J Lavoie, a leatherboard mill finisher, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ruby Lavoie, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Jacqueline P. Lavoie, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Maurice M. Lavoie, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Elaine M. Lavoie, aged twelve years (b. NH). Fred J. Savoie owned their house on Main Street in the Milton Community, which was valued at $1,500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Malcolm A.H. Hart, a medical doctor, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), and Arthur A. Jenness, a shoemaker, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Fred Joseph Savoie of Main Street, Milton, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 26, 1942. He was employed by the Spaulding Fibre company. He was forty-five years of age (b. Dover, November 29, 1896). He stood 5′ 3″ tall, weighed 185 pounds, and had grey eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. He had no telephone number. His contact was Mrs. Ruby Savoie, P.O. Box 260, Milton.

Fredrick J. Savoie of Milton died of coronary heart thrombosis in the U.S. Naval Hospital in Kittery, ME, January 22, 1946, aged forty-nine years, one month, and twenty-four days. (He was employed as a fireman at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard).

Fireman Dies In Portsmouth Naval Hospital. Fred J. Savoie of Milton died yesterday at the U. S. naval hospital at the Portsmouth naval base where he had been a patient for eight days suffering from smoke inhalation reportedly received while fighting a blaze aboard a submarine at the base a week ago. A member of the fire department at the base, Mr. Savoie was born in Dover, the son of Joseph W. and Delia Burns Savoie. He had been resident of Milton for the past 20 years. He was 49 years old. He served in World War I and was a member of the Oscar Morehouse post, American Legion, of Milton, the Milton fire department and Rindge lodge, Knights of Pythias, East Rochester. Survivors include his wife. Mrs. Ruby Savoie: two daughters, Jacqueline and Elaine Savoie; a son, Maurice, all of Milton, and a sister, Mrs. Jennie Wentworth of Farmington (Portsmouth Herald, January 24, 1946).

Ruby (Ellis) Savoie died in Milton, September 23, 1996.

Herman J. Horne – 1933-34

Herman Julian “Rip” Horne was born in Milton Mills, October 26, 1905, son of John E. and Olive A. (Moulton) Horne.

(His father owned the Milton Mills shop occupied by blacksmith and policeman, Hiram J. Burrows, when it burned in the early hours of Thursday, November 20, 1924. (See Milton in the News – 1924)).

Herman J. Horne married in Milton Mills, June 23, 1929, Mildred E. Dow, he of Milton Mills and she of Rochester, NH. He was a clerk, aged twenty-three years, and she was a cashier, aged twenty-five years. Rev. Edwin B. Young performed the ceremony. She was born in Dover, NH, circa 1904, daughter of Joseph W. and Charlotte (Haney) Dow.

Herman J. Horne, a dry goods salesman, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mildred D. Horne, aged twenty-six years (b. NH). Herman J. Horne rented their house on School Street, for $9 per month. They did not have a radio set. They shared their two-family dwelling with the household of William Woodbury, a poultry breeder, aged thirty-two years (b. NH).

MILTON MILLS. Mr. and Mrs. Herman J. Horne entertained Mr. and Mrs. Lester Colt of Lowell, Mass., over the weekend (Farmington News, March 1, 1935).

J. Herman Horne, an electric light line foreman, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, D. Mildred Horne, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and his children, A. David Horne, aged eight years (b. NH), O. Patricia Horne, aged six years (b. NH), Pamela Horne, aged three years (b. NH), Peter Horne, aged three years (b. NH), and Robert Horne, aged seven months (b. NH). J. Herman Horne owned their house at 43 Mt. Vernon Street, which was valued at $4,500. Those old enough to have done so had all lived in Milton Mills in 1935.

Herman J. Horne died in Rochester, NH, in June 1978. Mildred E. (Dow) Horne died in Rochester, NH, in September 1980.

Verney C. Sprague – 1935-38

Verney Charles Sprague was born in Shapleigh, ME, March 10, 1893, son of Simon S. and Annie A. (James) Sprague.

Verney Sprague married (1st) in Farmington, NH, July 1, 1914, Ella May Cook, both of Farmington, ME. They were both shoe workers, he was aged twenty-two years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. John T. Clow performed the ceremony. She was born in Meredith, NH, circa 1894, daughter of Nathaniel and Helen (Browne) Cook.

PERSONAL. Mrs. Annie Rand returned Monday from a few days’ visit with her son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Verney Sprague (Farmington News, June 9, 1916).

Verney Charles Sprague of Waterboro, ME, registered for the WW I military draft in Shapleigh, ME, June 5, 1917. He was aged twenty-five years (born Shapleigh, ME, March 10, 1893). He was a fireman for Albert Sanborn of Brownfield, ME. He was tall, with a medium build, blue eyes, and light hair. He claimed an exemption (he was married).

PERSONAL. Mr. and Mrs. Verney Sprague of Brownville, Me., are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Edgerly (Farmington News, June 15, 1917).

Vernie C. Sprague, a sawmill laborer, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Waterboro, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella M. Sprague, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH). Verney Sprague rented their house. They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of [his brother] Willie E. Sprague, a sawmill laborer, aged twenty-six years (b. ME).

Verney Sprague, a medical products salesman, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Ella Sprague, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), and his boarder, George Eastman, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME). Verney Sprague owned their house. They had a radio set.

Verney C. Sprague, a retail grocery store owner, aged forty-eight years, headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella Sprague, aged forty-seven years. Verney C. Sprague owned their house on Main Street, which was valued at $2,800.

Verney Charles Sprague of No. Shapleigh, ME, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton Mills, April 27, 1942. He was aged forty-nine years (born Shapleigh, ME, March 10, 1893). He was self-employed in Milton Mills. He was 5′ 11″ tall, weighed 180 pounds, blue eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. He had scars on his left hand. His telephone number was Milton Mills 37-3. His nearest relative was his wife, Ella M. Sprague, P.O. Box 77, Milton Mills.

Ella M. (Cook) Sprague died in Sanford, ME, July 9, 1960.

Verney C. Sprague married (2nd) in ME, October 1, 1962, Ruth E. Bennett. She was born in Standish, ME, October 24, 1908, daughter of William N. and Almeda B. (Libby) Bennett.

Verney C. Sprague died in Shapleigh, ME, July 11, 1975, aged eighty-three years. Ruth E. Bennett died in Shapleigh, ME, April 24, 1976.

Herbert A. Downs – 1937-38, 1941

Herbert Arthur Downs was born in Barnstead, NH, January 15, 1915, son of Arthur L. and Maud G. (Welch) Downs.

Herbert A. Downs married in Milton, Mat 1, 1936, Wilma F. Warnecke, both of Milton. He was a mill worker, aged twenty-one years, and she was a bookkeeper, aged eighteen years. Rev. E. Lincoln Bigelow performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, circa 1918, daughter of William O.L. and Francina I. (Nutter) Warnecke.

Herbert A. Downs, an inspector, aged twenty-five years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Wilma F. Downs, aged twenty-two years, and his children, Arthur W. Downs, aged three years, and Sharon E. Downs, aged one month. Herbert A. Downs owned their house on the Farmington Road, which was valued at $1,000.

Herbert A. Downs died in Portland, ME, June 3, 1993.

Phillip D. “Damon” Pike – 1938-39

Phillip Damon Pike was born in Milton Mills, January 31, 1915, son of Phillip G. and Rosamond E. (Piper) Pike. (His mother taught at the Milton Mills school (See Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1912-52)).

Philip G. Pike, aged thirty-eight years. His household included his wife, Rosamond E. Pike, aged forty years, and his children, Louise E. Pike, aged seventeen years, and P. Damon Pike, aged fifteen years.

Phillip G. Pike, a retail meat market clerk, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Rosmon E. Pike, aged fifty years (b. NH), his son, Damon Pike, an auto factory mechanic, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Beatrice Pike, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and his grandson, Wayford Pike, aged nine months (b. NH). Phillip H. Pike owned their house on Highland Avenue, which was valued at $700. They had resided in the same house in 1935, excepting Beatrice Pike, who has lived in Rochester, NH, and Wayford Pike, who was not born in 1935.

Phillip Damon Pike of Milton Mills registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, in April 1942. He was an employee of Spaulding Fibre company of North Rochester, NH, aged twenty-five years (b. Milton Mills, January 31, 1915). His nearest relative was his wife, Mrs. Beatrice Louise Pike of the same address. He was 6′ tall, weighed 170 pounds, with a light complexion, and had blue eyes and blonde hair.

Damon Pike went on to become Milton’s fire chief:

N.H. Man, 76, Burns to Death. MILTON MILLS, N.H.. Jan. 14 – A 76-year-old laborer, burned to death when fire swept his two-room house here early this morning. Herbert Goldthwaith was found dead in his bed. Fire Chief Damon Pike said the blaze was believed started by a space heater. The victim leaves a son, Robert of Dover, N.H., and a daughter, Lillian (Boston Globe, January 15, 1961).

Phillip D. Pike died of smoke inhalation while fighting a barn fire in Milton, November 29, 1971.

Fire Chief Dies in Action. MILTON MILLS, N.H. (AP) – Veteran Fire Chief Damon Pike died Monday night after he apparently was overcome by smoke while fighting a barn fire. Death was attributed to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation (Portsmouth Herald, November 30, 1971).

Milton Mills News. And [our sincere sympathy] to the family of Mr. Damon Pike who lost his life fighting a fire here in town Monday evening (Farmington News, December 9, 1971).

George A. McKeagney – 1939

George Albert McKeagney was born in Boston, MA, July 9, 1908, son of Patrick H. and Mary L. (Gibson) McKeagney.

Laura Mckeagney, aged forty-seven years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her children, George Mckeagney, a fibre mill machinist, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Marie Mckeagney, aged eleven years (b. MA), and Robert Mckeagney, aged nine years (b. NH), and her half-brother, Edwin J. Gibson, a shoe shop shoe repairer, aged fifty-three years (b. MA). Laura M. McKeagney owned their house on the Wakefield Road, which was valued at $5,000. Their household was enumerated between those of George Kingston, a fibre mill laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and William A. Dickson, a fibre mill superintendent, aged fifty-five years (b. MA).

Laura M. McKeagney, a fibre mill office clerk, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her children, George A. McKeagney, a garage proprietor, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), and Robert B. McKeagney, an N.Y.A. Project foreman, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and her brother, Edwin J. Gibson, a shoe shop line laborer, aged sixty-one years (b.MA). Laura M. McKeagney owned their house, which was valued at $2,500. They had all lived in the same house in 1935.

George A. McKeagney married in Rochester, NH, July 8, 1941, Thelma M. Wright, he of Milton and she of 204 N. Main Street, Rochester, NH. He was a state trooper, aged thirty-two years, and she was a dietician, aged thirty-three years. She was born in Everett, MA, October 19, 1907, daughter of Frederick and Helen (Durgin) Wright.

George McKeagney appeared in the Rochester directory of 1941, as a state policeman, residing at 6 May street. Thelma M. (Mrs. George) McKeagney appeared as a clerk at F.W. Woolworth Co., with her house at 6 May street.

SOUTH MILTON, N.H., May 18 (AP) — The home of Mrs. Laure McKeagney, mother of State Trooper George A. McKeagney, was destroyed by fire yesterday with damage estimated at $5000. Sparks from the fire caused slight damage to the roof of an adjacent house and also started a brush and grass fire (Newport Express (Newport, VT), May 18, 1943).

George A. McKeagney died in Meredith, NH, February 13, 1987. Thelma M. (Wright) McKeagney died January 16, 1999.


See also Milton Policemen – c1891-1914 and Milton Policemen – 1940-52


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, August 8). Herbert Arthur Downs. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115104102/herbert-arthur-downs

Find a Grave. (2014, April 17). William James Madden. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/128115614/william-james-madden

Find a Grave. (2018, August 6). George A. McKeagney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192028770/george-a-mckeagney

Find a Grave. (2013, August 11). Phillip Damon Pike. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115287603/philip-damon-pike

Wikipedia. (2020, December 29). Cronartium Ribicola. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cronartium_ribicola

Lemonade May Flow Unvexed

By S.D. Plissken | April 12, 2021

Among other matters of perhaps greater moment, Milton-Middleton Representatives Hayward and Bailey both voted last week in the NH House in favor of HB183Prohibiting Municipalities from Requiring a License for a Soft Drink Stand Operated by a Person Under the Age of 18.

Municipalities of other states and even Federal authorities have appeared in the news from time to time – in a very bad light – when shutting down and even occasionally arresting those that set up lemonade stands. Those thus imposed upon are usually children.

New Hampshire has not been so prone to this as other more-benighted places, although it has happened here too. Much of NH might retain still some shred of allegiance to its motto: Live Free or Die.

One might assume that passage of such a measure would be a “no brainer,” but some 163 representatives actually voted against budding entrepreneurs living free in the matter of lemonade stands. (Their names may be found here. It comes as no surprise to find that the representative who left her dog in the car throughout most of that warm day’s ten-hour session was among those voting “Nay”).

A majority of 211 representatives voted in favor. (The Speaker does not vote, except in case of a tie; and some 25 representatives were absent, excused, or did not vote).

HB183 passed in the NH House and goes next to the NH Senate. Governor Sununu has said in regard to other matters that he thinks the NH House is “silly,” so there is no telling whether he will deign to sign it if it reaches his desk.


I believe that starting any business should be as easy as a 10-year-old starting a lemonade stand. – Mark Cuban


References:

CBS19 News. (2021, April 7). Little Girl Holds Lemonade Stand to Buy Stuffed Animals for Kids in Need. Retrieved from www.cbs19news.com/story/43623611/little-girl-holds-lemonade-stand-to-buy-stuffed-animals-for-kids-in-need

CBSN. (2018. May 29). Child’s Lemonade Stand Shut Down For Lack Of Permit. Retrieved from denver.cbslocal.com/2018/05/29/lemonade-stand-shut-down/

Fox 10 TV. (2021, March 25). Mesa Kids’ Lemonade Stand Raising Money for Cancer Patients. Retrieved from www.fox10phoenix.com/video/915006

KABC TV. (2021, April 1). 4th Grader on Mission to Change World with Lemonade Stand. Retrieved from abc7.com/localish/4th-grader-on-mission-to-change-world-with-lemonade-stand/10450174/

MacDonald, Steve. (2021, April 10). What Did Deb “Hot Dog” Stevens Think About Mitt Romney’s Dog on the Roof Story in 2012? Retrieved from granitegrok.com/blog/2021/04/what-did-deb-hot-dog-stevens-think-about-mitt-romneys-dog-on-the-roof-story-in-2012

NY Times. (2018, August 19). Boy’s Lemonade Stand, Shut Down for Lack of Permit, Reopens With Fanfare. Retrieved from www.nytimes.com/2018/08/19/nyregion/brendans-lemonade-stand-reopens.html

Schiewe, Jessie. (2020, June 23).  Lemonade Stands Are Illegal in Most of the United States. Retrieved from www.okwhatever.org/topics/wtf/are-lemonade-stands-illegal

Washington Post. (2018, June 12). Bullies were Shutting Down America’s Lemonade Stands. These Lawyers Work for Big Lemonade. Retrieved from www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2018/06/12/bullies-were-shutting-down-americas-lemonade-stands-these-lawyers-work-for-big-lemonade/

WFMZ-TV. (2021, March 23). Lafayette College Sorority Hosts Lemonade Stand to Raise Funds for Breast Cancer Research. Retrieved from www.wfmz.com/news/area/lehighvalley/lafayette-college-sorority-hosts-lemonade-stand-to-raise-funds-for-breast-cancer-research/article_33597f4c-8c3d-11eb-b92f-83f91e0e887d.html

WGME. (2021, April 8). Bill Could Allow Maine kids to Operate Lemonade Stands Without a License, Retrieved from wgme.com/news/local/bill-could-allow-maine-kids-to-operate-lemonade-stands-without-a-license

Milton Policemen – c1891-1914

By Muriel Bristol | April 4, 2021

The first mention of a Milton policeman that has come to hand concerns the April 1891 arrest of one Correbin E. Murphy for drunkenness.

(An examination of Strafford County Court records might shed more light on exactly when Milton policemen began sending cases that way).

Prior to having its own policemen Milton had, or perhaps had instead, many justices of the peace – as many as fifteen of them in any given year – and usually had also a resident appointed deputy sheriff who reported to the elected county sheriff.

Neighboring Farmington, NH, had town policemen as early as 1879. In 1880, five policemen, presumably including its police chief, if any there was initially, published the town’s police regulations (as countersigned by the town selectmen):

POLICE REGULATIONS FOR THE TOWN OF FARMINGTON. Article 1. No awning shade or other fixtures, in front of any store or dwelling house, shall be less than eight feet in height in the lowest part thereof. Art. 2. No boxes, barrels, or any other article, “Seats for Loafers,” will be allowed to remain on any side-walk on the Sabbath, within the limits of the village of Farmington. Art. 3. There will be no collection of persons on the side-walks, or at the corners of the streets, so as to impede or prevent any person from freely passing therein. Nor shall anyone be suffered to push, insult or abuse by words or otherwise, any person passing on the side-walk or in the streets of thus town. Art. 4. No person shall smoke any pipe or cigar, in any livery stable, or any stable used in connection with either of the hotels of this town. Art. 5. Shouting, screaming and whistling, or making any other disturbance in the streets or on the commons, particularly in the evening or night time, is strictly forbidden, under the penalty of the act hereafter mentioned. Art. 6. If two or more persons shall be on the side-walk in a situation to interfere with those that wish to pass on the side-walk, in such a manner as unnecessarily to come in contact with persons whom they may meet, they and each shall be punished as in the statute hereafter mentioned. Art. 7. Any person creating any disturbance in any public place in this town, and, being requested by a Police Officer, shall not immediately leave, or having left by such request, shall return the same evening, shall be punished as above provided. Art. 8. No person shall be allowed to play ball, pitch quoits, or make any disturbance whatever, in any of the streets, lanes or alleys of this town. Art. 9. No person or persons shall be allowed to slide or coast in any of the streets, lanes or alleys within the limits of this town. Art. 10. It shall be deemed rude or disorderly conduct, and a violation of Police Laws, for three or more persons to collect after sunset in front of the Post Office, or corners of any street in town, and there remain after a notice by the police officer to disperse, and all persons without business of necessity so found standing or sitting, shall be punished as rude and disorderly persons, according to the provisions of Chapter 296 of the General Laws of this State, Art. 11. The proprietors or employees of any and all Saloons and Restaurants, are requested to close the same at 10 P.M., and not open them on the Sabbath. Art. 12. No person shall be allowed at any meeting at the Town Hall to stamp, whistle, or make any other disturbance whatever. Art. 13. No person shall leave standing or fastened any horse or carriage in any street in such a manner as to impede the free travel thereon, in the village of this town. Art. 14. Any person offending against any of these Laws, By-Laws and Regulations, shall be punished according to the provisions of Chapter 269 and 533 of the General Laws of this State. STEPHEN NUTTER, CHAS. WHITEHOUSE, ALBERT J. WILLEY, SAML. J. LEIGHTON, JOHN G.H. SMITH, Police Officers of Farmington. Approved by the Selectmen, June, 1880. SAMUEL S. AMAZEEN, JOSEPH L. DEMERRITT, BENJAMIN ROBERTS, Selectmen of Farmington (Farmington News, June 25, 1880).

The obvious unconstitutionality of much of this might be enough almost to make one want to violate Article 12 by stamping, whistling, or making some other disturbance at the next Town Hall meeting. One might hope that Milton’s police regulations, if any there were, managed to achieve a more perfect alignment with the natural rights acknowledged by the Bill of Rights.

The offices of Milton chief of police, as well as the usually lone Milton constable or policeman, were elected positions. None of those holding those offices in this period did so on a full-time basis, they all had also their principal occupations.

The Milton policemen of this period (that have been identified to date) were: James H. “Harris” Rhines, Fred P. Howard, Charles E. Remick, Hiram J. Burrows, Hazen W. “Wesley” Downs, Hartley A. Nutter, and Mylo M. Sinclair.


James H. Rhines, Jr. – c1891-14

James Harris Rhines, Jr., was born in New Durham, NH, July 8, 1855, son of James H. and Melissa D. (Boston) Rhines.

James H. Rines married in Farmington, NH, November 12, 1877, Emma [A.] Knox, he of Farmington and she of Milton. He was a farmer, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. D.H. Adams of Farmington performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, October 19, 1855, daughter of Hosea and Belinda Q. (Leighton) Knox.

James H. Rines, works on shoes, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma Rines, keeps house, aged twenty-two years (b. NH).

The first mention of a Milton policeman that has come to hand is the April 8, 1891 arrest by Policeman J.H. Rines for public drunkenness.

MILTON. Correbin E. Murphy was arrested by Policeman J.H. Rines Wednesday night and at the court, Thursday morning, Judge Fox sentenced him to ninety days in the county jail as a common drunkard (Farmington News, April 10, 1891).

Policeman Rines appeared next in the record conducting a liquor raid on a Milton hotel. Its owner or manager, John E. Ward, was born in Calais, ME, June 27, 1843. He and his wife Eva left their home in nearby Barnstead, NH, to manage a Milton hotel in February 1892.

NORTH BARNSTEAD. We are sorry to learn of the departure of our neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. John Ward, who have gone to Milton to take charge of a hotel (Farmington News, February 12, 1892).

MILTON. Officer Rines made a raid last Saturday night on Mr. Ward’s hotel, and found evidence enough to convict him of selling liquor without a license. Mr. Ward was taken to the jail and kept there until Monday, when he had his trial. He was bound over to the superior court, which will meet at Dover in September, and held in $200 bonds (Farmington News, April 15, 1892).

MILTON. A raid was made on Ward’s hotel some time ago and he was held under bonds for the September court. Mr. Ward continued the sale of liquor without a license and last week Thursday the state took the case in hand and carried Ward to Dover, where his trial was held. He paid a large fine and returned home (Farmington News, May 6, 1892).

John E. Ward appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1895, as a teamster, with his house on Main street, at its corner with Indigo Hill road. (John E. Ward of Farmington, NH, died of apoplexy, i.e., a stroke, on the Strafford County Farm, in Dover, NH, June 13, 1926, aged eighty-three years).

MILTON. Harris Rines has strawberries in the several stages of bearing, from blossoming to ripe fruit. They are potted plants, but have been kept out of doors most of the time (Farmington News, 1898).

James Harris Rines appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a shoe edge setter, with his house at 35 South Main street.

James Rines, a day laborer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Emma Rines, aged forty-three years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Forrest E. Knox, aged twenty years (b. NH). James Rines owned their house, free-and-clear. Emma Rines was the mother of one child, of whom none was still living.

Another of the Milton Samsons is Chief of Police Harris Rines. Mr. Rines is very popular, and many of his friends assert that he is actually the strongest man in town. Chief Rines is 40, measures 5 feet 11 inches in height and tips the scales at 210 pounds. His commands are always promptly obeyed, for it is well known that the genial chief is not at all backward about enforcing them whenever occasion demands (Boston Globe, November 26, 1900 (See Milton’s Men of Muscle in 1900)).

James Harris Rines appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a shoe operative, with his house at 35 So. Main street. He appeared in the Milton directory of 1905, as a laborer, with his house at 35 So. Main street.

Milton Police Chief Rhines arrested and held in custody Genaro Calella, the suspect in the Hennessey kidnapping of 1908, until he turned him over to officer James Hoy of the Charlestown, MA, police. Before the transfer, Calella attempted to hang himself in his cell, but Chief Rhines cut him down in time.

HE TRIED HANGING, KIDNAPPER OF GIRL. Milton, N.H., May 18 – After his arrest for kidnapping seventeen-years-old Josephine Counihan of Charlestown, Mass., love-crazed Genaro Callela tried to kill himself in his cell here because he could not have her. Chief of Police Rhines, it was learned to-day, found the man hanging with a suspender around his neck from a peg in the wall where prisoners are supposed to put their clothes and cut him down just in time to save his life. Callela, who is twenty-eight years old and married, forced the girl, according to her story, to leave Charlestown with him under threat of death. He brought her here and put her in a boarding house, but while he was out getting his hair cut the girl appealed to the landlady and Callela was arrested. “I will kill myself” cried the man when he was revived after the attempt at suicide. “If I can’t have Josephine no one else shall.” He will be taken to Charlestown for trial (Meriden Journal (Meriden, CT), May 18, 1908).

James Harris Rines appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a laborer and policeman, with his house at 35 So. Main street. (He appeared also, under the alternate spelling Rhines, as a farmer and policeman, with his house at 35 So. Main street).

Hart Block - 547 White Mountatin HighwayChief of Police James Rines sought for arrest a State Highway road worker who had stabbed another road worker in their lodgings in the Hart Building in November 1909. (See Milton in the News – 1909).

MILTON. At the town meeting last Tuesday, Charles A. Jones, Haven Nutter and Samuel Drew were chosen for selectmen. Dr. M.A.H. Hart was re-elected on the school board for the next three years. Everett F. Fox town treasurer. H.L. Avery and B.B. Plummer town auditors, H.W. Downs constable, J.H. Rhines chief of police (Farmington News, March 12, 1909).

James H. Rines, Town police man, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Emma A. Rines, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), his brother-in-law, Forest Knox, a R.R. crossing flagman, aged forty years (b. NH), and his sister-in-law, Sarah Knox, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). James H. Rines owned their house, free-and-clear. Emma Rines was the mother of one child, of whom none was still living.

James Harris Rhines appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a farmer and policeman, with his house at 35 So. Main street.

J. Harris Rhines, a policeman, died of acute indigestion in Milton, September 24, 1914, aged fifty-nine years, two months, and sixteen days. (James J. Buckley, M.D., signed the death certificate).

James H. Rhines appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a farmer and policeman, who had died September 24, 1914, aged fifty-nine years. Emma A. Rhines, appeared as the widow of James H., with her house at 35 So. Main street.

Emma A. (Knox) Rhines died of fibroid phthisis in Milton, October 28, 1918, aged sixty-three years, and nine days. (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate).

Fred P. Howard – c1896-1912

Fred P. Howard was born in Rochester, NH, October 10, 1867, son of Elbridge W. and Sarah E. Howard.

Fred Howard married in Rochester, NH, May 11, 1886, Costella A. Scruton, both of Gonic, i.e., Rochester, NH. He was a shoe buffer, aged nineteen years, and she was aged nineteen years. She was born in Rochester, NH, September 24, 1869, daughter of Denman B. and Elizabeth Ann “Betsy” (Foss) Scruton.

MILTON. Chief of Police Howard captured a seven-pound lake trout at Wolfeboro Monday (Farmington News, [Friday,] May 28, 1896).

MILTON NEWS LETTER. Chief of Police Howard on Monday arrested a man, supposed to be wanted for a murder committed in Connecticut. The man proved to be a gold brick, however, as the right man was found in Massachusetts (Farmington News, August 20, 1897).

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a policeman and edge setter, with his house on School street.

Fred P. Howard, a shoe edge setter, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Costella Howard, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his child, Effie Howard, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). Fred P. Howard owned their house, free-and-clear. Costella Howard was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a shoe edge setter in Newburyport, MA, with his house at School street in Milton.

STRAFFORD CORNER. Mrs. Fred Howard and daughter, Effie, of Milton have been visiting at B.P. Berry’s the past week (Farmington News, August 8, 1902).

STRAFFORD CORNER. Mrs. Fred Howard and daughter Effie of Milton were guests of B.P. Berry’s family Wednesday of last week (Farmington News, June 19, 1903).

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directories of 1905 and 1909, as a shoe operative, with his house at 9 School street. His daughter, Effie Howard, appeared also in 1909, as a shoe operative, boarding with F.H., at 9 School street.

Fred Howard, a shoe factory finisher, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Costella Howard, aged forty years (b. NH). Fred Howard owned their house, free-and-clear. Costella Howard was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a having or working at a meat market on Main street, and as being a policeman, with his house at 9 School street.

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a shoe operative, with his house at 9 School street.

Fred Howard, a shoe shop edge setter, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Costilla Howard, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Fred Howard owned his house on the Farmington Road in Milton Village, free-and-clear.

Fred Howard, a retail meat market merchant, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-three years), Costilla Howard, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH). Fred Howard owned their house on School Street, which was valued at $1,800. They did not have a radio set. School Street lay between the Farmington Road (now Elm Street) and Church Street. It had three houses only, those of Hannah Wentworth, a widow, aged eighty-nine years (b. NH), Fred Howard, and Charles W. Wilson, a gravel company foreman, aged forty-one years (b. ME).

Costella A. (Scruton) Howard died of a pulmonary embolism at Frisbee Hospital in Rochester, NH, May 24, 1934, aged sixty-three years, and eight months. (A breast cancer operation was a contributing cause).

Fred Howard, a shoe shop shoemaker, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. He owned his house on School Street, which was valued at $1,500. He had lived in the same house in 1935.

Fred Howard died in Rochester, NH, February 1, 1950, aged eighty-two years.

Charles E. Remick – 1900-05

Charles E. Remick was born in Milton, circa 1856, son of Moses H. and Clara (Wentworth) Remick.

Charles Remick married in Wakefield, NH, August 26, 1874, Etta S. Horne, he of Milton, and she of Acton, ME. He was a farmer, aged eighteen years, and she was aged eighteen years. She was born in Sanford, ME, October 23, 1856, daughter of Edward and Louisa Horne.

Charles Remick, a day laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta S. Remick, keeping house, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and his child, Lester C. Remick, aged four years (b. NH).

Charles Remick, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta Remick, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Lester Remick, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Minnie Remick, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Forrest Remick, aged four years (b. NH). Charles Remick rented their house. Etta Remick was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living

Charles E. Remick appeared in the Milton directories of 1900, 1902, and 1905, as a policeman and shoe nailer, with his house at the rear of 70 Main street, in Milton Mills.

Remick, CE - 1909CHARLES E. REMICK appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as deputy sheriff, with his house at 42 Main street, at the corner of Charles street, in Milton Mills.

Charles Remick, a shoe factory laster, aged fifty-three years, headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Etta S. Remick, aged fifty-three years, and his child, Forest E. Remick, aged fourteen years. Charles Remick rented their house. Etta I. Remick was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Etta S. Remick died of stomach cancer in Milton Mills, April 25, 1910, aged fifty-three years, six months, and two days.

Charles E. Remick appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as having moved to Sanbornville, i.e., Wakefield, NH.

Charles E. Remick married (2nd) in Farmington, NH, September 16, 1917, Hattie M. “Maude” [(Kimball)] Hill, both of Farmington. He was a shoeworker, aged sixty years, and she was a housekeeper, aged thirty-two years. Charles Pitman, Justice-of-the-Peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Farmington, NH, circa 1884, daughter of Samuel W. and Addie R. (Young) Kimball.

Charles E. Remick of Rochester, NH, divorced Maud Remick of Farmington, NH, in Starfford County Court, October 15, 1919. He alleged extreme cruelty (one had to allege something).

Charles E. Remick, a general farm farmer, aged fifty-six [sixty-six] years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his housekeeper, Mattie L. Foss, a shoe factory lining in, aged fifty-one years (b. MA). He was divorced. They resided on Elm Street.

Harry Hamilton, a shoe factory laster, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-nine years), Minnie G. Hamilton, a shoe factory stitcher, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Rena E. Bennett, a private family housemaid, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Lena A. Hamilton, a shoe factory room girl, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Beatrice U. Hamilton, a shoe factory doubler, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Charles E. Remick, a shoe factory leveller, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Harry Hamilton rented their house at 52 Central Street, for $20 per month.

Charles E. Remick died of angina pectoris at 52 Central Street in Farmington, NH, February 11, 1936, aged seventy-six years, nine months, and seventeen days.

Hazen W. Downs – c1901-09

Hazen W. “Wesley” Downs was born in Milton, January 25, 1848, son of Joshua H. “Hanson” and Emily P. (Duntley) Downs. (Blacksmith Hazen Duntley was his maternal grandfather).

Hazen W. Downs married (1st) in Dover, NH, February 12, 1875, Fannie M. Hersom, he of Milton, and she of Dover. She was born in Waterboro, ME, circa 1849, daughter of Jesse R. and Mary E. (Smith) Hersom. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-seven years.

Hasen W. Downs, a shoemaker, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fanny Downs, keeping house, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and his daughter, Blanch Downs, aged three years (b. NH). They resided on Sixth Street.

MILTON. As the seasons change so do business men. Mr. Charles Looney has moved his goods and post-office into Wentworth’s Block on Main St., with Mr. Wesley Downs, formerly of this place, and has put in a large lot of groceries and crockery ware, and is now ready to do business o the square (Farmington News, April 29, 1881).

MILTON. Wesley Downs lost his horse Monday afternoon. While drawing a small load of brick up the hill on Silver Street, the animal fell dead in the harness (Farmington News, December 5, 1890).

Fanny M. (Hersom) Downs died of a “complication of diseases” in Milton, October 17, 1894, aged forty-six years, nine months, and two days. (W.F. Wallace, M.D., signed the death certificate).

MILTON. H.W. Downs spent last week with friends in Boston (Farmington News, April 21, 1899).

Hazen W. Downs, a teamster, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His house included his daughter, Lura Downs, a housekeeper, aged nineteen years (b. NH).

MILTON. An entertainment was given at Sid Nutter’s camp last Thursday night, by a Boston party stopping there, which was called “Dobbyn’s Rough Rider Minstrel Show, at Crape Hall.” Wesley Downs was presented by the party with a silver policeman’s badge (Farmington News, August 16, 1901).

The entertainment’s host, Sid Nutter, was father of another Milton policeman, Hartley A. Nutter (see below). John F. Dobbyn was a lieutenant in the Charlestown, MA, i.e., Boston, MA, police. He and his wife were frequent campers in Milton. (She rescued a drowning child in 1902, and it was he that escorted the alleged kidnapper of 1908 back to Boston).

Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1902 and 1905, as a truckman and policeman, with his house at 7 Silver street. Miss Lura Downs appeared in 1902 as boarding at 7 Silver street.

MILTON. At the town election Tuesday March 10, Harry Avery was chosen town clerk, Haven K. Jewett, J.H. Avery, Fred B. Roberts, selectmen, Elisha I. Libbey, treasurer, Wesley Downs, chief of police, and Dr. M.A.H. Hart on the school board. An extra appropriation of $800 was made for school. Horace Babb of Dover was present at the meeting and explained that the accumulation from the sum left by Lewis W. Nute for the care of the cemetery on Nute’s Ridge had for certain reasons not been used. It was voted that the selectmen in conjunction with a committee chosen from the heirs should be appointed to expend the accumulation in improving the grounds (Farmington News, March 13, 1903).

MILTON. Lura Downs died Dec. 31, after an illness of nine months of consumption. She was the only remaining daughter of J. [H.] Wesley Downs. The funeral was held Sunday, the D. of P. [Daughters of Pythias], of which she was a member, performing their burial service (Farmington News, January 8, 1904).

MILTON. Town meeting passed off quietly, and the following officers were elected to serve the town for the ensuing year: Selectmen, Warren Jewett, Joseph H. Avery, and Charles A. Jones; town clerk, Harry L. Avery; constables, H.W. Downs, Hartley Nutter; school board, Frank G. Howe, Forrest L. Marsh, Dr. M.A.H. Hart (Farmington News, March 12, 1904).

Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a truckman, with his house at 7 Silver street.

MILTON. At the town meeting last Tuesday, Charles A. Jones, Haven Nutter and Samuel Drew were chosen for selectmen. Dr. M.A.H. Hart was re-elected on the school board for the next three years. Everett F. Fox town treasurer. H.L. Avery and B.B. Plummer town auditors, H.W. Downs constable, J.H. Rhines chief of police (Farmington News, March 12, 1909).

Westley Downs, an odd jobs truckman, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his housekeeper, Martha G. Cushman, a private family housekeeper, aged fifty-two years (b. VT). Westley Downs owned their house, free-and-clear.

Hazen W. Downs married (2nd) in Athol, MA, August 13, 1910, Martha G. (Granger) Cushman, both of Milton, NH. He was a truckman, aged sixty-two years, and she was a housekeeper, aged fifty-three years. She was born in Fairlee, VT, August 8, 1857, daughter of Samuel L. and Hannah G. (Pierce) Granger.

Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a truckman, with his house at 7 Silver street.

Hazen W. Downs died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Milton, November 10, 1916, aged sixty-eight years, nine months, and sixteen days. (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate)

.Mrs. Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a widow, with her house at 7 Silver street.

Martha G. Downs, a widow, aged sixty-two years (b. VT), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. She owned her two-family house on Silver Street, free-and-clear. The other owner was Mary J. Twombly, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH).

Martha Downs appeared in the Brattleboro, VT, directories of 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1937, as the widow of Hazen W. Downs, with her house at 403 Western avenue.

West Brattleboro. Mrs. Effie Boynton is working as housekeeper in the home of Mrs. Martha Downs (Brattleboro Reformer, June 21, 1938).

Martha Granger Downs died on Sunset Lake Road in West Brattleboro, VT, September 28, 1938, aged eighty-one years, one month, and twenty-one days.

MRS. WESLEY DOWNS DIES. West Brattleboro Resident 9 Years, Leaves 3 Step-Sons. Mrs. Martha (Granger) Downs, 81, widow of Wesley Downs, died at 3.15 o’clock yesterday afternoon in the home of her step-grandson, Russell Cushman of the Sunset Lake road. She had been there since early in August. Last year she spent most of the time there. Her health had been gradually failing for some time. Mrs. Downs made her home for several years in the Joel Johnson house in West Brattleboro. Born in Fairlee, Aug. 8, 1857, she was a daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Pierce) Granger. She first married Peleg Cushman, of Orford, N.H., the ceremony taking place in 1892. He died about a month after their marriage. Her marriage to Wesley Downs of Milton, N.H., took place about 20 years ago. After Mr. Downs’ death Mrs. Downs moved to Rochester, N.H., coming to West Brattleboro about nine years ago. She leaves three step-sons, William, George and Henry Cushman, all of Brattleboro, and a step-daughter, Mrs. Mary Pinkham of Dover, N.H. She also leaves one brother, Charles A. Granger of West Newton, Mass. Funeral services will be held at Mitchells funeral home tomorrow at 2.30 p.m., Rev. J.H. Blackburn officiating. Burial will take place in Prospect Hill cemetery, Lebanon, Me. (Brattleboro Reformer, September 30, 1938).

Hiram J. Burrows – 1902-12

Hiram J. Burrows was born in Lebanon, ME, circa 1855, son of Edward and Mary A. (Ricker) Burrows.

Eliza Jones, Lucy Goodwin, John S. Parker, guardian of Lucy Goodwin; Ruth Lucy Goodwin, Simon Ricker, Jr., Lavinia A. Burrows, Mary Frances Burrows, Ruth Burrows, and Hiram J. Burrows, residing at North Lebanon, ME, joined with many other heirs of Benjamin Lord, deceased, in petitioning the trustees of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge for title to Brooklyn real estate held by Augustus Cruikshank, trustee (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 2, 1883).

Hiram J. Burrows married in Milton, June 29, 1884, Sarah E. Thomas, he of Milton and she of Newfield, ME. She was born in Newfield, ME, in 1862, daughter of Elbridge G. and Lydia E. (Lane) Thomas.

LEBANON, ME. Mr. L.H. Buttler has sold his farm and blacksmith shop to Hiram Burrows of Milton Mills. Mr. Butler and his son Clarence intend soon to start for the far west. We wish them success (Farmington News, September 25, 1885).

Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Sarah E. Burrows, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, John Burrows, at school, aged thirteen years (b. ME), and Eva Burrows, at school, aged nine years (b. NH). Hiram J. Burrows rented their house. Sarah E. Burrows was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directories of 1902, and 1905, as a policeman and blacksmith, on Main street, with his house on Highland street, in Milton Mills. (His house on Highland street was opposite the M.E. Church in 1905).

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a policeman and blacksmith, on Main street, with his house on the Acton side, in Milton Mills.

Geo. W. Marsh, an express teamster, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Eva M. Marsh, aged nineteen years (b. ME), and his child, Ithel E. Marsh, aged thirteen months (b. NH), his father-in-law, Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith (working out), aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law (Hiram’s wife of twenty-six years), Sarah E. Burrows, a shoe shop stitcher, aged forty-seven years (b. NH). Geo. W. Marsh rented their house. Eva M. Marsh was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Sarah E. Burrows was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a policeman and blacksmith, on Main street, with his house on the Acton side, in Milton Mills.

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a blacksmith, with his house at 20 Lebanon street, on the Acton side, in Milton Mills.

Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith (own shop), aged sixty-four years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah E. Burrows, aged fifty-six years (b. ME). Hiram J. Burrows rented their house on the Lebanon Road.

A major Milton Mills fire started in a blacksmith shop on Main st. owned by John E. Horn and occupied by Hiram Burrows in the early hours of Thursday, November 20, 1924. (See Milton in the News – 1924).

Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith (repair shop), aged seventy-five years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah E. Burrows, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME). Hiram J. Burrows owned their house, which was valued at $1,000. They did not have a radio set.

Hiram J. Burrows died in 1938. Sarah E. (Thomas) Burrows died in 1955.

Hartley A. Nutter – 1904

Hartley Addis Nutter was born in Milton, January 24, 1874, son of Luman S. “Sidney” and Arabelle “Belle” (Corson) Nutter.

Hartley A. Nutter married in Milton, July 20, 1893, Ada M. Huntress, both of Milton. He was a laborer, aged nineteen years, and she was a housekeeper, aged eighteen years. Charles H. Looney, justice-of-the-peace performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, March 17, 1875, daughter of Stillman S. and Francina (Lowe) Huntress.

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as an employee of the U.I. [Union Ice] Co., with his house near the ice house on the Leb. side.

MILTON. Town meeting passed off quietly, and the following officers were elected to serve the town for the ensuing year: Selectmen, Warren Jewett, Joseph H. Avery, and Charles A. Jones; town clerk, Harry L. Avery; constables, H.W. Downs, Hartley Nutter; school board, Frank G. Howe, Forrest L. Marsh, Dr. M.A.H. Hart (Farmington News, March 12, 1904).

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directories of 1905 and 1909, as an employee of the U.I. [Union Ice] Co., with his house at 98 Main street.

Hartley Nutter, an ice house engineer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Ada Nutter, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), and his children, Addis Nutter, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Malcom Nutter, aged ten years (b. NH), and Francine Nutter, aged eight years (b. NH). Hartley Nutter owned their house, free-and-clear. Ada Nutter was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as an employee of the U.I. [Union Ice] Co., with his house at 98 Main street.

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as an employee of the M.I. [Porter-Milton Ice] Co., with his house at 98 Main street. His daughter-in-law, Mrs. Addis S. Nutter, widow, had her house at H.A.N.’s, i.e., with he and his wife, at 98 Main street.

Hartley Addis Nutter registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He resided in Milton, and was aged forty-four years (b. January 24, 1874). He was employed by Porter-Milton Ice Co., as a laborer. His nearest relative was his wife, Addie M. Nutter, of Milton. He was of a medium height, with a medium build, gray eyes, and gray hair.

Hartley A. Nutter, a foreman at the Milton Ice Co., aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ada H. Nutter, aged forty-four years (b. ME), his daughter, Francena I. Warnecke, aged seventeen years (b. NH), his son-in-law, William H. Warnecke, a laborer at the Milton Ice Co., aged thirty-four years (b. Germany), and his grandchildren, Thelma A. Warnecke, aged three years (b. NH), and Wilma F. Warnecke, aged one year (b. NH). Hartley A. Nutter owned their house on Upper Main Street in Milton Village, free-and-clear. Son-in-law William H. Warnecke was a permantent alien, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1909.

Hartley A. Nutter, an ice company laborer, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), aged fifty-five years (b. ME), Ada H. Nutter, and his nephew, Alvin B. Roberts, a leather-board mill machinist, aged thirty-four years (b. NH). Hartley A. Nutter owned their multi-family house on No. Main Street, which was valued at $1,200. They had a radio set. They shared their building with the household of tenant [and son-in-law] William Warnecke, an ice company laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. Germany).

Hartley A. Nutter died of aortic stenosis on Main Street in Milton, December 31, 1933, aged fifty-nine years, eleven months, and seven days.

Ada H. Nutter, a boarders’ hostess, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her grandchildren, Malcom H. Nutter, a laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Donald S. Warnecke, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and her boarders, Earvin Proctor, aged seventy-seven years (b. MA), and Arnold Nash, a wood factory laborer, aged eighteen years (b. Nova Scotia). Ada H. Nutter owned their house in the Milton Community, which was valued at $1,200. They had all resided in the same house in 1935, with the exception of Arnold Nash, who had resided elsewhere in the same place, i.e., Milton.

Ada May (Huntress) Nutter died in 1966.

Mylo M. Sinclair – 1907

Mylo Martin Sinclair was born in Stow, ME, July 13, 1879, son of George H. and Susie G. (Johnson) Sinclair.

Milo M. Sinclair married in Milton, June 16, 1900, Minnie F. [(Johnson)] Ellis, he of Dover, NH, and she of Milton. Rev. E. Johnson of Lebanon, ME, performed the ceremony. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years, and she was a widowed shoe stitcher, aged thirty-two years. She was born in Milton, November 1867, daughter of James W. and Julia A. (Hatch) Johnson.

Mylo Sinclair, a shoe laster, aged twenty years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Miton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of zero years [two weeks]), Minnie Sinclair, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). Mylo Sinclair rented their house.

Miles M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as an employee of a leather-board manufacturer, with his house at 16 So. Main street. Mrs. Susie G. (George) Sinclair had also her house at 16 So. Main street.

WEST MILTON. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Johnson and their little daughter are spending his vacation from railroad work in this vicinity, visiting his aunt and sister, Mrs. George Canney and Mrs. Minnie Sinclair (Farmington News, November 22, 1901).

Milo M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1905, as an engineer for N.B.T. & Co. [N.B. Thayer & Co.], with his house at So. Main street, at the R.R. Crossing.

Mylo N. [M.] Sinclair, police officer, Milton, testified before the NH Board of Railroad Commissioners, December 13, 1907, regarding the accidental death of Lyman Welch of Wolfeboro, NH, which occurred on the railroad tracks a mile south of the Milton railroad station, September 26, 1907 (NH Board of Railroad Commissioners, 1907).

Milo M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as an engineer for N.B.T. [N.B. Thayer] Co., with his house on South Main street, at the R.R. crossing. His mother, Mrs. Susie G. Sinclair, had her house at the same address.

Mylo Sinclair, a shoe shop engineer, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie Sinclair, aged forty-two years (b. NH), his child, Arline Sinclair, aged nine years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Woodbury Johnson, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Mylo Sinclair owned their house, free-and-clear. Miriam Sinclair was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

WEST MILTON. H.D. Johnson, who was stricken with ptomaine poisoning while on his run from North Conway to Boston Friday morning, was taken from his train at Milton and conveyed to the home of his sister, Mrs. Mylo Sinclair, where he received immediate medical attention. He is so far improved that he made a trip to Boston on Tuesday, returning to the home of his aunt, Mrs. George Canney, where he will spend the remainder of the week (Farmington News, [Friday,] February 3, 1911).

Milo M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a shoe operative for M.S. [Milton Shoe] Co., with his house on South Main street, at the R.R. crossing. His mother, Mrs. Susie G. Sinclair, had her house at the same address.

Martin Sinclair registered for the WW I military draft in Rochester, NH, September 12, 1918. He resided at 6 Union Street in East Rochester, NH, and was aged thirty-nine years (b. July 13, 1879). He was employed by N.B. Thayer & Co., as a shoemaker. His nearest relative was his wife, Minnie F. Sinclair, of 6 Union Street, E. Rochester, NH. He stood 6′ 1″ tall, and had a medium build, brown eyes, and brown hair.

Mylo M Sinclair, a shoe factory rapid stitcher, aged forty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie F. Sinclair, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, James W. Thompson, aged eighty-three years (b. NH). Mylo M. Sinclair owned their house at 6 Union Street, with a mortgage.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Minnie Sinclair and her daughter, Mrs. Arline Symonds, with her little grandson, called at Teneriffe View farm a few days ago (Farmington News, September 26, 1924).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Minnie Sinclair of East Rochester called on friends here Monday (Farmington News, September 24, 1926).

Mylo M. Sinclair, a shoe factory engineer, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie J. Sinclair, aged sixty-two years (b. NH). Mylo M. Sinclair owned their house on the Salmon Falls Road. They had a radio set.

Its a Dizzy Pace! (Country correspondence in the Rochester, N.H., Courier). Mr. and Mrs. Mylo Sinclair are enjoying a new radio (Boston Globe, March 30, 1940).

Mylo Sinclair, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie Sinclair, aged seventy-two years (b. NH).

SOUTH VERNON. Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Simonds and Mr. and Mrs. Milo Sinclair were week-end guests of Rev. and Mrs. H.R. Simonds. They were returning from Florida to their home in East Rochester, N.H. (Brattleboro Reformer (Brattleboro, VT), April 21, 1950).

Mylo M. Sinclair died in March 1956. Minnie Sinclair died in March 1956.


To be continued …


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Hiram Burrows. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114726369/hiram-burrows

Find a Grave. (2002, August 22). Fred Howard. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/6722810/fred-howard

Find a Grave. (2014, January 8). James Harris Rines, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/123011041/james-harris-rines

Find a Grave. (2012, July 2). Mylo M. Sinclair. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92968497/mylo-m-sinclair

NH Board of Railroad Commissioners. (1907). Annual Report of the Railroad Commissioners of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=hmk0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA372

Celestial Seasonings – April 2021

By Heather Durham | March 31, 2021

Greetings folks! It’s long overdue for adding a photo or two. I found this one and thought I would add it along with this month’s only meteor shower. Enjoy! There will be more in future postings.


April 1. The Moon will be in its final quarter.

April 6. The Moon and Saturn will rise in close proximity with each other.

April 7. The Moon and Jupiter will rise tonight in close proximity of each other.

Lyrid Meteor Shower
April Lyrids Over Thanlyin (Yu Aung Thu/AFP/Getty)

April 17. Mars and the Moon, in close proximity to each other will rise tonight.

April 20. The Moon will be at first quarter.

April 22. The Lyrid meteor shower from the Constellation Hercules will be at its peak. Earth will pass through the Comet C/1861 Thatcher, causing this event. The Lyrids are the oldest recorded meteor shower, first observed in China in 690 BCE. Occasionally, the Lyrids can produce up to 100 meteors per hour even though they are generally weak.

April 26. The Moon will be full.


References:

Anonymous. (2021, February 2). Lyrids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyrids

Debczak, M. (2021, March 15). Dont Miss The Lyrid Meteor Shower Lightning Up The Evening Sky in April 2021. Retrieved from www.mentalfloss.com/article/643660/lyrid-meteor-shower-april-2021

Ford, D.F. (2021, March 20). Calendar of Astronomical Events. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/newscal.php?month=4&year=2021&maxdiff=1#datesel

Thu, Y.A. (2018, April 17). April Lyrids Over Thanlyin [Photograph]. Retrieved from www.space.com/40303-lyrid-meteor-shower-best-photos.html

Vaughan, K.V. (2021, March 16). Heres When You Can See The Lyrid Meteor Shower in 2021. Retrieved from www.marthastewart.com/8075855/lyrid-meteor-shower-april-2021

Milton Lumberman Frederick B. Roberts (1863-1943)

By Muriel Bristol | March 28, 2021

Frederick Belknap “Fred” Roberts was born in Milton, March 25, 1863, son of Ira and Caroline C. (Foss) Roberts. (Ira Roberts died of heart disease in Middleton, NH, June 2, 1875, aged sixty-four years. He was a carpenter).

Caroline C. Roberts, keeping house, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Fred B. Roberts, at school, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Sadie B. Roberts, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH).

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. … S.E. Twombly to F.B. Roberts, Milton. E.E. Roberts to F.B. Roberts, Milton. Joseph Plumer to F.B. Roberts, Milton (Farmington News, February 8, 1889).

MILTON. At the republican caucus Saturday afternoon the following delegates were chosen to the different conventions: State – E.W. Fox and Frank Horner. Congressional – R.M. Kimball and C.D. Fox. Senatorial – Luther Hayes and B.B. Plummer. Councillor – Chas. A. Jones and S.W. Wallingford. County – Fred B. Roberts and C.W. Gross. Town Committee – Chas. H. Looney, president; B.B. Plummer, secretary; Luther Hayes, C.A. Jones, J.H. Avery, W.H.H. Pinkham, Fred B. Roberts, S.W. Wallingford, Charles D. Fox and Charles W. Gross (Farmington News, 1892).

The partnership of Avery, Jones & Roberts appeared in the Milton business directory of 1898, as builders, and as manufacturers of  lumber, shingles, and clapboards. Fred B. Roberts evidently supplied the lumber, Harry L. Avery appears to have kept the store front. (H.L. Avery appeared also in the directory as town clerk, and as one of fifteen Milton justices-of-the-peace). Charles D. Jones‘ role is less clear, although he was also a storekeeper, being specifically a pharmacist, as well as being a medical doctor.

Fred B. Roberts, a contractor & builder, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his sister, Sadie B. Roberts, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), his brother-in-law, Freeman D. Pike, a day laborer, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), his sister (Pike’s wife of forty years), Sophia [(Roberts)] Pike, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), his niece, Addie C. Pike, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), his nephew, Lewis F. Pike, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Richard Colbath, a telegrapher, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Freeman D. Pike owned their house, free-and clear. Sophia [(Roberts)] Pike was the mother of four children, of whom two were still living.

Avery-Jones-Roberts - 1900Avery, Jones & Roberts appeared in the Milton business directory of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as builders, and as manufacturers of  lumber, shingles, and clapboards. H.L. Avery appeared also as town clerk, and as a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

The NH General Court authorized incorporation of the Milton Water Works Company, March 21, 1901, with initial board members Malcom A.H. Hart, Charles H. Looney, S. Lyman Hayes, Charles D. Jones, Fred B. Roberts, Harry Avery, George E. Wentworth, Joseph H. Avery, Ira W. Jones, Arthur W. Dudley, Everett F. Fox, Henry F. Townsend, Freeman H. Lowd, William T. Wallace, Frank G. Horne, Charles A. Jones, and Nathaniel G. Pinkham. It established itself July 19, 1899, with Harry L. Avery as its treasurer (NH Secretary of State, 1901).  

Madokawanda By-Laws - 1926PERSONAL. Fred B. Roberts is spending his vacation at the Roberts farm on the Rochester road (Farmington News, July 26, 1901).

MILTON. At the last meeting of Madokawanda Tribe, No. 21, I.O.R.M., the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Sachem, H.F. Finnegan; prophet, James Leighton; senior sagamore, Harry Perkins; junior sagamore, G. Frank Davis; C. of W., Fred B. Roberts; K. of W., Fred S. Hartford; C. of R., Edwin L. Leighton; trustee for three years, Fred B. Roberts (Farmington News, January 8, 1904).

Outgoing NH Governor Nahum J. Batchelder swore in Fred B. Roberts and 316 others as NH State Representatives, January 4, 1905. Roberts was Milton’s representative.

Partner Charles D. Jones died of typhoid fever in Milton, July 2, 1908, aged forty-four years, nine months, and ten days. The firm of Avery, Jones & Roberts continued as Avery & Roberts.

AJR Box MaterialFreman D. Pike, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-nine years), Sopha N. Pike, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and his boarders, Fred B. Roberts, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and Susan Roberts, aged forty-one years (b. NH). Sophia Pike was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Avery & Roberts appeared in the Milton business directory of 1912, and 1917, as builders, and as manufacturers of  lumber, shingles, and clapboards. H.L. Avery appeared also as town clerk, and as a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

Fred P. Jones, Union P.O. (Telephone 41-15) was State Forest Fire Warden for Milton in 1911-12, 1913-14, and 1915-16. (Jones was the father of theatrical designer Robert E. Jones). Jones’ Forest Fire Deputies were Fred B. Roberts, Milton P.O. (Telephone 23-2); H.R. Jewett, Sanbornville P.O. (Telephone 9-4); Isaac L. Lord, Union P.O. (Telephone 6-21); and F. Leroy Tripp, Farmington P.O. (Telephone 42-15) (NH Forestry Commission, 1912; NH Forestry Commission, 1914; NH Forestry Commission, 1916).

LOCAL. Two cases from Milton were brought before Judge A.H. Wiggin in the local district court on Wednesday of this week: That of State vs. Joseph D. Willey, brought by High Sheriff Edward S. Young on a charge of “keeping for sale,” in which the respondent entered a plea of guilty and the court imposed the minimum fine and jail sentence. Sentence was suspended upon payment of costs. The other case, that of State vs. Robert McIntosh, brought by Fred B. Roberts, wherein the respondent was charged with using derisive language toward the complainant, the respondent plead guilty and was fined five dollars and costs (Farmington News, December 15, 1916).

(McIntosh’s wife would divorce him in the following year. She alleged habitual drunkenness over a period of three years (One must recall always that allegations by themselves are simply that, allegations)).

Avery-Roberts - 1917Fred B. Roberts married in Milton, October 10, 1917, Mary Jane ((Raynor) Burke) Spaulding, he of Milton, and she of Worcester, MA. He was a lumber dealer, aged fifty-four years, and she was a housekeeper, aged forty-one years. Rev. A.T. Everett performed the ceremony. She was born on Prince Edward Island, Canada, circa 1875, daughter of John W. and Mary Ann Raynor. (Mary J. Raynor married (1st) in Milton, June 28, 1899, William E. Burke, both of Milton. Mary J. (Rayner) Burke married (2nd) in Worcester, MA, September 22, 1903, Algernon S. Spaulding (1847-1915), both of Worcester).

Fred B. Roberts, a lumberman (owner), aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary J. Roberts, aged forty-three years (b. Canada). Fred B. Roberts owned their farm on Upper Main Street in Milton Village (near its intersection with the Teneriffe Mountain Road). Mary J. Roberts was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1883.

REPUBLICANS FILE FOR NEW HAMPSHIRE PRIMARIES. CONCORD, N H., July 23 – All the candidates for the September primaries, who filed with the Secretary of State today, were Republicans. The list included John H. Garland of Conway, State Senator; James H. Joyce of Somersworth, Fred B. Roberts of Milton, County Commissioners; Ralph W. Davis of Derry. Henry H. Amsden of Concord, Adelbert M. Nichols of Claremont, John E. Dorr of Jefferson, William C. Goss of Henniker, Representatives (Boston Globe, July 24, 1920).

ROCHESTER MAN HIT BY TREE SUES FOR $5,000. Rochester, Aug. 31 – Claiming he received injuries when a tree on the property of Avery [&] Roberts, lumber dealers at Milton, fell on him, Feb 28, 1924, that made it necessary for him to resign as chief of police and deputy sheriff at that place. Arthur F. Remick has brought suit against the firm for $5000 (Portsmouth Herald, August 31, 1925).

Fred B. Roberts, a lumberman (own mill), aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary J. Roberts, aged fifty-two years (b. Canada). Mary J. Roberts was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1894. Fred B. Roberts owned their house on North Main Street, which was valued at $1,800. They had a radio set.

Partner Henry L. Avery died of a sudden cerebral hemorrhage in Milton, September 30, 1936, aged seventy-two years, eight months, and two days.

Here and There. The Milton town pound, one of the few remaining in New Hampshire, which was removed and rebuilt two years ago to permit a change in the location of the highway, has just been marked with a commemorative tablet by Fred B. Roberts, veteran town meeting moderator, and Ira W. Jones. In the early days pounds were common in New England for the confinement of cows and other domestic animals caught running at large. Early records of the town show that in 1803, when Gilman Jewett was town clerk, it was voted that the “town build a pound as near the center of the town as convenient.” The following year the pound was built, according to the records, “on land westerly opposite the town house, by Jonathan Pinkham.” The pound is circular and 30 feet in internal diameter. The walls are of field stone, about six feet high. A wooden gate adorns the front (Portsmouth Herald, July 3, 1939).

Milton Town Pound - 1806Fred B. Roberts, a lumberman (owner), aged seventy-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary J. Roberts, aged sixty-three years (b. Canada). Fred B. Roberts owned their house in the Milton community, which was valued at $1,800.

Fred B. Roberts died of a cerebral hemorrhage on Main Street in Milton, October 31, 1943, aged eighty years, seven months, and six days.

IN MEMORIAM. Fred B. Roberts. Fred B. Roberts, 81, well known Milton businessman and a lifelong resident of that community, died last Sunday, following a sudden illness. Mr. Roberts was a prominent figure in Milton civic affairs for many years. He was the last surviving member of the firm of Avery, Jones and Roberts. Besides operating a women’s furnishings store he was also a lumber dealer. Active in politics, he served the town in the legislature for three terms, held several town offices and was moderator of the town for over twenty years. He was a member of the Masonic lodge in Union and Order of Red Men in Milton. Funeral services were held at Milton Wednesday afternoon. Burial was in Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, November 5, 1943).

CHARTER DRAPED AT OES MEETING. At the Eastern Star meeting Tuesday night, presided over by Worthy Matron Virginia Ham, the charter was draped for Mrs. Mary Roberts of Milton and the altar was draped for Past Grand Patron Howard K. Streeter and Past Grand Matron Mrs. Florence M. Lord, both of Manchester, who passed away recently. This was the last meeting until September. Plans were made to attend the service at Milton Community Church with the Masonic Lodge on June 19 (Farmington News, June 16, 1960).


References:

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Harry L. Avery. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214557733/harry-l-avery

Kelleher Auctions. (2020). Nineteenth Century U.S. Patent Envelopes [Page 7]. Retrieved from www.kelleherauctions.com/lot_pdfs/3003/712482.pdf

NH Forestry Commission. (1912). Biennial Report of the Forestry Commission for the Two Fiscal Years Ending 1911-12. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-A48AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA130

NH Forestry Commission. (1914). Biennial Report of the Forestry Commission for the Two Fiscal Years Ending 1913-14. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=SOhDAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA107

NH Forestry Commission. (1916). Biennial Report of the Forestry Commission for the Two Fiscal Years Ending 1915-16. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=oMArAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA170

NH Secretary of State. (1901). Laws of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vJxGAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA781

Worthpoint. (2021). 1926 By-Laws for Madokawanda Tribe N0. 21 Improved Order of Red Men – Milton, NH. Retrieved from www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/1926-laws-madokawanda-tribe-21-1863377734

School District Election Results for March 9, 2021

By Muriel Bristol | March 21, 2021

Milton’s School District election of Tuesday, March 9, 2021, was quite lightly attended – only 638 participants – despite its being a clear day. (Ed.: This turnout would be only about 20% of the registered voters).

The Milton School District does not entitle its articles as does the Town. The titles employed below have been drawn from the text of the articles.

.Article 1: School Board Election. Abigail Rooney and incumbent Douglas H. Shute won the two three-year seats on the School Board with 202 votes (31.7%) and 190 votes (29.8%) respectively. The other four candidates were Travis J. Corriveau, with 185 votes (29.0%), Lynette McDougall, with 170 votes (26.6%), John Gagner, with 161 votes (25.2%), and Donald C. Diamant, Jr., with 124 votes (19.4%). There was also 1 “Scattering” write-in vote (0.2%) for Kenneth Tucker.

(Ed.: Abigail Rooney replaced outgoing board member Paul Steer, who ran instead for the Planning Board in the Town election). 

Results of the following outside warrant articles have been arranged by their vote counts.

Article 6: Building Maintenance, Repair, Renovation and Capital Project Reserve Fund. This article passed with 451 votes (70.7%) in favor, 153 votes (24.0%) opposed, and 34 abstentions (5.3%).

Article 5: Educationally Disabled Children Expendable Trust Fund. This article passed with 449 votes (70.4%) in favor, 152 votes (23.8%) opposed, and 37 abstentions (5.8%).

Article 7: School Bus Trust Fund. This article passed with 442 votes (69.3%) in favor, 158 votes (24.8%) opposed, and 38 abstentions (6.0%).

Article 8: Technology Expendable Trust Fund. This article passed with 432 votes (67.7%) in favor, 166 votes (26.0%) opposed, and 40 abstentions (6.3%).

Article 2: Operating Budget. This article passed with 397 votes (62.2%) in favor, 200 votes (31.3%) opposed, and 41 abstentions (6.4%).

(Ed.: The School Board shared generally the Board of Selectmen’s group-think approach. They managed to “achieve” a unanimous 5-0 vote recommending all of their spending articles, excepting only this operating budget article, which was recommended by only a 3-2 vote. The School Board had been advised strongly by the Budget Committee to devise a proposed budget that was lower than the default budget (as was done with the Town operating budget). It would seem that two members just could not bring themselves to recommend a budget that did not increase over the default budget).

Article 4: Library Media Fund. This article passed with 383 votes (60.0%) in favor, 219 votes (34.3%) opposed, and 36 abstentions (5.6%).

Article 3: Vehicle Capital Reserve Fund. This article passed with 364 votes (57.1%) in favor, 231 votes (36.2%) opposed, and 43 abstentions (6.7%).


See School District Election Results for March 10, 2020 and School District Election Results for March 12, 2019. (See also Town Election Results for March 9, 2021)

Town Election Results for March 9, 2021

By Muriel Bristol | March 19, 2021

Milton’s Town election of Tuesday, March 9. 2021, was quite lightly attended – only 654 participants – despite its being a clear day.

(Ed.: Only about 20% of Milton’s registered voters came out for this election. We might hope indeed that – as the mathematicians have it – the mean of this sample more or less equals a sample of the overall mean).

Article 1 encompasses the various elective offices. The results for the following contested elections in order by their highest vote count were:

Stan J. Nadeau and Larry Brown won the two three-year seats on the Zoning Board of Adjustment with 417 votes (63.8%) and 339 votes (51.8%) respectively. “Scattering” received 20 votes (3.1%). Some 237 voters (36.2%) expressed no preference.

Robert P. Carrier and James (Mike) Beaulieu won the two three-year seats on the Budget Committee with 397 votes (60.7%) and 394 votes (60.2%) respectively. “Scattering” received 11 votes (1.7%). (802 votes were cast of a potential 1,308). Some 253 voters (38.7%) expressed no preference.

Patrick Smith, with 376 votes (57.5%), won the election for Public Works Director, over Andrew Rawson, with 251 votes (38.4%), and “scattering” with 1 vote (0.2%). Some 26 voters (4.0%) did not make a choice between them.

John Katwick, with 328 votes (50.2%), won the three-year position as Cemetery Trustee over Victoria K. Finlayson and Louise LaPlante, with 115 votes (17.6%) and 114 votes (17.4%) respectively. Scattering received 3 votes (0.5%). Some 94 voters (14.4%) did not make a choice between them.

Claudine Burnham, with 323 votes (49.4%), edged out Humphrey Williams, with 290 votes (44.3%), for the three-year term on the Board of Selectmen. Some 41 voters (6.3%) expressed no preference between them.

Five candidates vied for the two three-year seats on the Planning Board. Paul Steer and Anthony Gagnon won the two seats with 305 votes (46.6%) and 227 votes (34.7%) respectively. (1,092 votes were cast of a potential 1,308). Larry Brown received 217 votes (33.2%), Kym Libby received 177 votes (27.1%), and Lynette McDougall received 162 votes (24.8%). “Scattering” received 4 votes (0.6%). Some 108 voters (16.5%) expressed no preference.

The results of the following uncontested elections have been arranged also in their vote-count order:

Nancy J. Drew won a three-year position as Library Trustee with 542 votes (82.9%). There were 2 votes (0.3%) for “Scattering” and 110 voters (16.8%) made no choice.

Marion E. Trafton won a three-year position as Trustee of the Trust Funds with 521 votes (79.7%). Some 133 voters (20.3%) made no choice.

McKenzie Campbell won a one-year term as Treasurer with 506 write-in votes (77.4%). There were 2 votes (0.3%) for “Scattering” and 146 voters (22.3%) made no choice.

Laura Turgeon won a one-year term on the Budget Committee with 40 write-in votes (6.1%).

Results of the following outside warrant articles have been arranged by their vote counts.

(Ed.: Mr. Plissken would draw our attention to the fact that – per usual – every single one of the following articles was recommended unanimously by the Board of Selectmen, and that not a single one passed at that same 100% level).

Article 12: Eradicate Invasive Plant Species. This article passed with 500 votes (76.5%) in favor, 128 votes (19.6%) opposed, and 26 abstentions (4.0%).

Article 9: Milton Free Public Library Capital Reserve Fund. This article passed with 458 votes (70.0%) in favor, 171 votes (26.1%) opposed, and 25 abstentions (3.8%).

Article 16: Posting Casey Road Conservation Land. This article passed with 445 votes (68.0%) in favor, 165 votes (25.2%) opposed, and 44 abstentions (6.7%).

Article 6: Bridge Capital Reserve Fund. This article passed with 444 votes (67.9%) in favor, 183 votes (28.0%) opposed, and 27 abstentions (4.1%).

Article 8: Boat Ramp Repair. This article passed with 443 votes (67.7%) in favor, 186 votes (28.4%) opposed, and 118 abstentions (3.8%)

.Article 10: Technology Upgrade Capital Reserve Fund. This article passed with 435 votes (66.5%) in favor, 186 votes (28.4%) opposed, and 33 abstentions (5.0%).

Article 3: Operating Budget. This article passed with 433 votes (66.2%) in favor, 192 votes (29.4%) opposed, and 29 abstentions (4.4%).

(Ed.: We may note that Mr. Williams and the Budget Committee made a concerted effort to bring the proposed budget in at a lower amount than the default budget. While not the actual cuts that are needed, this “holding of the line” did represent a step in the right direction).

Article 11: Geographic Information System. This article passed with 425 votes (65.0%) in favor, 197 votes (30.1%) opposed, and 32 abstentions (4.9%).

Article 7: Municipal Buildings Capital Reserve Fund. This article passed with 423 votes (64.7%) in favor, 200 votes (30.6%) opposed, and 31 abstentions (4.7%).

Article 4: Highway and Road Reconstruction Fund. This article passed with 413 votes (63.1%) in favor, 214 votes (32.7%) opposed, and 27 abstentions (4.1%).

Article 15: Amendment of Tax Cap – Use of July Northeast Region Consumer Price Index (CPI). This article passed with 390 votes (59.6%) in favor, 212 votes (32.4%) opposed, and 52 abstentions (8.0%).

Article 13: Establishment of Independent Capital Improvement Program Committee. This article passed with 384 votes (58.7%) in favor, 233 votes (35.6%) opposed, and 37 abstentions (5.7%). (See Article 13: Independent CIP Committee).

Article 2: Zoning – Zoning Ordinance Amendment, Solar Facilities. This article passed with 367 votes (56.1%) in favor, 169 votes (25.8%) opposed, and 118 abstentions (18.0%).

Article 17: Paving of Bolan Road. This article failed with 257 votes (39.3%) in favor, 350 votes (53.5%) opposed, and 47 abstentions (7.2%).

Article 14: Dawson Street & Silver Street Area Drainage Project – Phase 1. This article passed with 343 votes (52.5%) in favor, 286 votes (43.7%) opposed, and 25 abstentions (3.8%).

Article 5: Employee Retention Plan. This article passed with 332 votes (50.8%) in favor, 291 votes (44.5%) opposed, and 31 abstentions (4.7%). (See Article 5: Employee Retention Plan).


See Town Election Results for March 10, 2020 and Town Election Results for March 12, 2019. (See also School District Election Results for March 9, 2021)


References:

Town of Milton. (2021). Milton Election Results, March 9th, 2021. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/uploads/march_9th_2021_milton_results.pdf