Celestial Seasonings – February 2023

By Heather Durham | January 31, 2023

Hi everyone! How are you doing these odd Wintry days. Here I am, writing for February when there’s been no chance for me to snowshoe! … not yet anyway. I’ve been studying phone photography. In the process, I found this amateur photography guide I thought I would share with you along with the date of each New or Black Moon. This means that the skies would be really dark, and dark it needs to be for Astrophotography.

I hope you enjoy the new moon and photography additions. Happy reading and sky watching. Until we meet again next month. …

February 5. Today will have the full Snow Moon.

February 13. The Moon will be at final quarter today.

February 22. Tonight’s sky should be delightful for the Moon along with Venus and Jupiter will all ascend close together towards the right.

February 27. The Moon and Mars will travel together and ascend towards the right.


“At the end of February the zodiacal light (reflection produced by the scattering of sunlight due to particles moving along the entire solar system) also begins to be visible. In the Northern Hemisphere at this time of year, it’s visible to the west, at the end of the astronomical twilight, after Sunset, in the direction of the Sunset. On the contrary, in the Southern Hemisphere it’s visible to the east, before the astronomical twilight begins, before dawn, in the direction of the Sunrise.” PhotoPills.com

(https://www.photopills.com/articles/astronomical-events-photography-guide#step3)

“February 20: New Moon.

The Moon is between the Earth and the Sun, so the bright side of the Moon is facing away from the Earth. The Moon phase is 0% at 07:07 UTC.

The days around the New Moon are great for photographing the night sky.

If you’re in the Southern Hemisphere, you can start hunting the Galactic Center of the Milky Way with your camera! And don’t forget the Magellanic Clouds heading south.

Depending on your latitude, you can see the Galactic Center closest to the horizon (perfect for panoramas). And as you go to latitudes further south, you can photograph it more and more vertical. For example, in New Zealand you can almost capture it completely vertical.

In February, you can also capture the Galactic Center in the Northern Hemisphere: you see it low, near the horizon… although the conditions are not as good as in the Southern Hemisphere. And if you don’t get it, you can always wait until March to start enjoying it.

In the Northern Hemisphere you can also photograph the Orion constellation and the Winter Triangle.

And also during the New Moon, you can capture Star Trails, whose pattern depends on your latitude and the direction to which you point your camera at.” PhotoPills.com

(https://www.photopills.com/articles/astronomical-events-photography-guide#step3).


References:

Unknown (n.d.) Astronomical Events 2023: The Definitive Photography Guide. Retrieved from https://www.photopills.com/articles/astronomical-events-photography-guide

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). December 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Milton Farmer David Wallingford, “Jr.” (1819-1903)

By Muriel Bristol | January 29, 2023

David Wallingford was born in Milton, April 4, 1819, son of Samuel and Sarah “Sally” (Worcester) Wallingford. (Father Samuel Wallingford (c1790-1826) was a brother of David Wallingford (1801-1878)).

(The known children of Samuel and Sally (Worster) Wallingford were Zimri Scates Wallingford (1816–1886), David Wallingford [“Jr.”] (1819–1903), Mary E. Wallingford (1821-1899), and Ira Wallingford (1823–1853)).

Father Samuel Wallingford died in Milton, August 11, 1826, leaving a widow, Sally (Worster) Wallingford, and four small children.

Mrs. Sally [(Worster)] Wallingford married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, November 24, 1831, Col. Levi Jones, both of Milton. Rev. Isaac Willey performed the ceremony (NEHGS, 1908).

(The known children of Col. Levi and Sally ((Worster) Wallingford) Jones were James Jones (1832-183?), and Charles P. Jones (1833-1873)).

Half-brother Charles P. Jones was born in Milton, July 21, 1833.

Levi Jones headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years, one female aged 40-49 years [Sally ((Worster) Wallingford) Jones], one male aged 30-39 years [Joseph P. Plummer], one male aged 20-29 years [David Wallingford?], one female aged 15-19 years [Mary E. Wallingford], and one male aged 5-9 years [Charles P. Jones]. Three members of his household were employed in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Sarah Plumer and James A. Ricker. Elder brother William Jones had also a Milton household.

Brother Zimri S. Wallingford married in Berwick, ME, August 26, 1840, Alta Lucy Gray Hilliard. Rev. Joseph Hilliard performed the ceremony. She was born in Berwick, ME, February 17, 1810, daughter of Rev. Joseph and Sarah (Laughton) Hilliard. (See Zimri S. Wallingford in Our Business Pioneers – 1916).

Brother Z.S. Wallingford and his wife, A.L.G. [(Hilliard)] Wallingford, were among twenty Maine inhabitants and thirteen New Hampshire inhabitants that signed an Anti-Slavery Declaration of Independence, January 20, 1844. Among the reasons given was “… The government, too, has proved itself to be the enemy of human freedom and the guardian of American chattel slavery.” Their declaration was published in both the Herald of Freedom and Liberator newspapers (The Liberator (Boston, MA), June 7, 1844).

David Wallingford married, circa 1844, Susan A. Jones. She was born in Milton, February 23, 1820, daughter of Joshua and Sally (Cowell) Jones.

(The known children of David and Susan A. (Jones) Wallingford were: Sarah E. Wallingford (1847-1902), Clara J. Wallingford (1849-1903), Clarence M. Wallingford (1852-1920), and Alta L.G. Wallingford (c1861-193?)).

Sister Mary E. Wallingford married (1st) in Canterbury, NH, September 18, 1844, Capt. Thomas C. Neal, she of Milford [SIC], NH, and he of Loudon, NH. Elder Jeremiah Clough performed the ceremony. He was born in 1817, son of Samuel and Mehitable “Hitty” (Perkins) Neal.

Daughter Sarah E. “Sally” Wallingford was born in Milton in 1847. Brother-in-law Thomas C. Neal died in Loudon, NH, in 1847.

Step-father Levi Jones died in Milton, August 18, 1847, aged seventy-five years.

Brother Ira Wallingford married in Dover, NH, May 13, 1848, Delania D. Thompson. Rev. J.G. Forman performed the ceremony. She was born in Sandwich, NH, in 1826, daughter of Samuel and Betsy (Seavey) Thompson.

Daughter Clara J. Wallingford was born in Milton, in 1849.

Sally [(Worster) Wallingford)] Jones, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Charles P. Jones, a farmer, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Mary [(Wallingford)] Neal, aged twenty-eight years, (b. NH) Kirk B. Neal, aged five years (b. NH), Jonathan Abbott, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. ME), and Charles W. Conway, a farmer, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Sally Jones had real estate valued at $10,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Nahum Tasker, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), and William Sanborn, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. ME).

Ira Wallingford, a farmer, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Delana [(Thompson)] Wallingford, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Thomas C. Wallingford, aged two years (b. NH); Daniel Wallingford, a farmer, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Susan A. [(Jones)] Wallingford, aged thirty years (b. NH), Sarah E. Wallingford, aged five years (b. NH), and Clara J. Wallingford, aged eight months (b. NH). Ira Wallingford had real estate valued at $1,000 and David Wallingford has real estate valued at $1,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of William Sanborn, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. ME), and James Bragdon, a farmer, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH).

Sister Mary W.W. (Wallingford) Neal married (2nd) in Milton, November 3, 1852, Daniel Wentworth, she of Milton and he of Ossipee, NH. He was born in New Hampshire, circa 1803.

Son Clarence M. Wallingford was born in Milton, November 20, 1852.

Brother Ira Wallingford died in Milton, November 13, 1853, aged twenty-nine years.

Brother Z.S. Wallingford, of Dover, NH, donated $5 to the American Anti-Slavery Society, in March 1856 (Liberator (Boston, MA), April 4, 1856).

The Milton selectmen of 1856 were Jos. Sayward, J.C. Wentworth, and D. Wallingford, Jr. The Milton selectmen of 1857 were D. Wallingford, Jr., C.C. Hayes, and S.S. Wakeham.

Sister-in-law Delania D. (Thompson) Wallingford died in Milton, January 28, 1860.

Brother Z.S. Wallingford was appointed agent of the Cocheco Manufacturing Company in July 1860.

NEW HAMPSHIRE ITEMS. Z.S. Wallingford, Esq., has been appointed Agent of the Cocheco Manufacturing Company. Mr. Wallingford has been in the employ of the Company for many years (Boston Evening Transcript, July 27, 1860).

David Wallingford, Jr., aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Susan A. [(Jones)] Wallingford, aged forty years (b. NH), Sarah E. Wallingford, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Clara J. Wallingford, aged ten years (b. NH), and C.M. [Clarence M.] Wallingford, aged seven years (b. NH). David Wallingford, Jr., had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Benja Scates, a farmer, aged seventy years (b. NH), and John C. Dore, a farmer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH).

Daniel Wentworth, a merchant, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed an Ossipee, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary [((Wallingford) Neal)] Wentworth, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), Achsa Wentworth, aged twenty years (b. NH), and Kirk B. Neal, aged fourteen years (b. NH). Daniel Wentworth had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $5,572.

Daughter Alta L.G. Wallingford was born in Milton, circa 1862. She was a namesake for her aunt, Alta L.G. (Hilliard) Wallingford (1810-1891), wife of her paternal uncle, Zimri S. Wallingford (1816-1886).

Mother Sally ((Worster) Wallingford) Jones died in Milton, January 12, 1863, aged sixty-nine years, five months, and twenty-one days.

Daughter Sarah E. Wallingford married, circa 1868, Charles L. Lord. He was born in Lebanon, ME, May 8, 1843, son of Ezekiel R. and Draxa (Dixon) Lord.

The Milton selectmen of 1870 were Chas. Hayes, D. Wallingford, Jr., and T.H. Roberts.

David Wallingford, Jr., a farmer, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan A. [(Jones)] Wallingford, aged fifty years (b. NH), Clarance M. Wallingford, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Alta L.G. Wallingford, aged eight years (b. NH). David Wallingford, Jr., had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $743. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Sarah A. Horne, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and John C. Dorr, works in shoe factory, aged thirty-five years (b. NH).

Charles L. Lord, a shoe cutter, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah E. [(Wallingford)] Lord, keeping house, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Charles Downs, works for shoe factory, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). Charles L. Lord had real estate valued at $600 and personal estate valued at $100. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ezra H. Twombly, a postmaster, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and John L. Wing, works in shoe factory, aged forty-six years (b. ME).

John Reed, a storekeeper, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary E. [(Roberts)] Reed, keeping house, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Bell Roberts, aged eleven years (b. ME), Helena Roberts, aged nine years (b. NH), and Clara Wallingford, works in shoe factory, aged twenty years (b. NH). John Reed had real estate valued at $500.

Daniel Wentworth, a farmer, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed an Ossipee, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary W. [(Wallingford) Neal)] Wentworth, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Daniel Wentworth had real estate valued at $1,400 and personal estate valued at $460.

Half-brother Charles P. Jones died in Milton, May 8, 1873, aged thirty-nine years, nine months.

Daughter Clara J. Wallingford married, circa 1875, Frederick V. “Fred” Stanley. He was born in York, ME, in 1846, son of William and Lydia M. (Chadbourne) Stanley.

Brother-in-law Daniel Wentworth died in Ossipee, NH, October 27, 1876.

Sister-in-law Betsy (Varney) Jones died in Milton, February 28, 1878, aged forty-one years.

Son Clarence M. Wallingford married in Milton, February 15, 1879, Ida E. Downs, both of Milton. He was a shoemaker and she was a shoe stitcher. Rev. John N. Lowell performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, June 12, 1856, daughter of Joshua H. and Emily P. (Duntley) Downs.

The Milton selectmen of 1880 were A.A. Fox, H.B. Scates, and D. Wallingford. The Milton selectmen of 1881 were H.B. Scates, D. Wallingford, and E.W. Fox.

David Wallingford, a farmer, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Susan A. [(Jones)] Wallingford, keeping house, aged sixty years (b. NH), his daughter, Alta L.G. Wallingford, aged eighteen years (b. NH). They shared a two-family residence with the household of his son, Clarence Wallingford, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-seven years and his wife, Ida E. [(Downs)] Wallingford, keeping house, aged twenty-three years (b. NH).

Charles L. Lord, works in shoe factory, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah E. [(Wallingford)] Lord, keeping house, aged thirty-six years (b. NH). They shared a two-family residence with the household of Fred V. Stanley, a carpenter, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), and his wife, Clara J. [(Wallingford)] Stanley, keeping house, aged thirty years (b. NH).

Mary W. [((Wallingford) Neal)] Wentworth, keeping house, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed an Ossipee, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Kirk B. Neal, makes sails [&] clothing, aged thirty-four years, and her boarder, Wm. S. Greenough, a stationer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH).

Daughter Altie L.G. Wallingford married (1st) in Dover, NH, May 30, 1881, Charles A. [Albert] Osborne, she of Berwick, ME, and he of Dover, NH. He was a shoemaker, aged nineteen years, and she was aged nineteen years. Rev. Ephraim W. Ricker performed the ceremony. Osborne was born in Dover, NH, in 1862, son of Charles B. and Lucy A. (Quimby) Osborne.

Brother Zimri Scates Wallingford died of dropsy in Dover, NH, May 28, 1886, aged sixty-nine years, seven months, and twenty-one days. He was an agent for the C.M. [Cocheco Manufacturing] Co. Carl H. Harsch signed the death certificate.

Hon. Zimri Wallingford Dead. DOVER. N.H., May 28. – Hon. Zimri S. Wallingford died today aged 69. He was a master machinist and builder, and was an alderman in ’57, ’58, ’61 and ’62. He was a member of the constitutional convention and presidential elector in ’76, being always a strong Republican. He was president of the following: Savings bank for Strafford county, Dover Library Association, proposed Dover & Barrington railroad, Dover horse railroad, and director in Stratford National Bank, Dover & Winnepiseogee railroad, Elliot Bridge Company, Dover Navigation Company. He was an honored member of St. Paul’s Commandery Knights Templar. He leaves a widow and two daughters. The funeral will occur Tuesday afternoon, when the Cocheco works will shut down in respect to the deceased (Boston Globe, May 28, 1886).

Son-in-law Charles A. Osborne died of consumption in Dover, NH, April 6, 1887, aged twenty-five years, six months, and twenty-six days. He had been a teamster. H.R. Parker signed the death certificate.

Sister-in-law Alta L.G. (Hilliard) Wallingford died of general debility in Dover, NH, March 5, 1891, aged eighty-one years, and sixteen days.

DEATHS. WALLINGFORD. – In Dover, N.H., March 5, Mrs. A.L.G. Wallingford, widow of the late Z.S. Wallingford of Dover (Boston Post, March 10, 1891).

Daughter Altie L.G. [(Wallingford)] Osborne married (2nd) in Boston, MA, December 23, 1891, James G. Shattuck, she of Milton, NH, and he of Boston, MA. He was a horse dealer, aged forty-two years, and she was at home, aged thirty years. (It was a second marriage for each of them). George A. Crawford performed the ceremony. Shattuck was born in Pepperell, MA, circa 1844, son of Jeremiah G. “Jerry” and Nancy C. (Parker) Shattuck.

Son-in-law James G. Shattuck died of peritonitis-rupture of intestine (homicide) in Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA, August 5, 1892, aged forty-eight years, seven months, and thirteen days.

Shattuck, James G - BP920802KICKED TO DEATH. That the Fate of Shattuck, the Horseman. ERNEST FLAGG ACCUSED. He Became Angry at Shattuck – Alleged Murderer in Cambridge Jail – A Sad Home Scene. James G. Shattuck, a well-known horse dealer, lies dead at the Massachusetts General Hospital, the victim of an assault committed upon him by a man alleged to have been under the influence of liquor. As a result of his death Ernest Flagg, a well-known Somerville man, occupies a cell in the East Cambridge jail charged with murder. The assault, which ended so seriously, occurred on a public street of Somerville last Friday. The victim was 52 years of age. He was returning to his home on Carleton street, and was passing the Independent Club on Somerville avenue, when he was accosted by a crowd of young men who were standing on the sidewalk. Among the crowd were Ernest Flagg, 21 years of age; “Toby” Lyons, the well-known ball player and variety actor, and “Shorty” Shaw, a well-known member of the club. The boys began to jeer at Shattuck as he approached – so it is claimed by the police and asked him several questions, to which he paid little attention. Finally, as he was in their midst, Flagg cried out: “Take your team and take us to the beach.” Shattuck replied in the negative, and the refusal, it is said, made Flagg angry, He jumped at the old man and kicked him twice in the abdomen. The victim was nearly knocked over by these blows, but managed to reach his home unassisted. Then the consequences of the blows inflicted by Flagg began to show. He was in terrible agony and took to his bed, writhing in pain and groaning as he tossed from one side of the bed to the other. Serious Indeed. Dr. Dearborn was called, and after making a thorough examination prescribed for the sufferer. The patient passed a bad night and throughout Saturday and Sunday continued to grow worse. On Sunday afternoon Dr. Richardson of the Massachusetts General Hospital decided that an operation was absolutely necessary, and that the man should be removed to the hospital. At about 8 o’clock Sunday evening he was taken in an ambulance to Boston. The operation was performed, but the sick man became worse, and his condition was so serious that his wife was sent for. In her presence he died yesterday morning about 4 o’clock. Flagg Is Arrested. When it became evident that Shattuck could not live, Chief Parkhurst of the Somerville police was notified, and a warrant was sworn out for Flagg’s arrest. The paper was put in the hands of Captain Perry, and he, accompanied by Officer Smith, arrested Flagg at the home of his parents, 325 Somerville avenue, early yesterday morning. The prisoner was arraigned before the Police Court yesterday, and pleading “Not guilty” to the charge of murder he was held till Aug. 11 without bail. Flagg is a fresco painter by trade, and was employed in Boston. The victim was one of the best-known horsemen in New England. For years he ran the sale stables on Chardon and Portland streets. He was married last December, and in a neat cottage on Carleton street a Post man found the young widow last evening. The pale face and wet eyes plainly told their pathetic story. She told the facts from first to last, but the terrible recital was too much for her nerves. And now it’s for the jury (Boston Post, August 2, 1892).

Sister Mary E. ((Wallingford) Neal) Wentworth died of apoplexy in Ossipee, NH, June 24, 1899, aged seventy-eight years, one month, and eighteen days. She was a widowed housekeeper. E.B. Andrews, M.D., signed the death certificate.

David Wallingford, a farmer, aged eighty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-six years), Susan A. [(Jones)] Wallingford, aged eighty years (b. NH), his son, Clarence M. Wallingford, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law (of twenty-one years), Ida E [(Downs)] Wallingford, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), and his grandchildren, Amos D. Wallingford, aged eleven years (b. NH), and Alice Wallingford, aged eight years (b. NH). Susan A. Wallingford was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Ida E. Wallingford was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Charles L. Lord, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. ME), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Sally E. [(Wallingford)] Lord, aged fifty-four years (b. NH). Charles L. Lord owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Fred Stanley, a farmer, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Clara [(Wallingford)] Stanley, aged fifty years (b. NH). Fred Stanley owned their farm, with a mortgage. Clara Stanley was the mother of two children, of whom none were still living.

Seward Durgin, a shoe factory edger, aged forty years (b. ME), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Cora B. [(Pitts)] Durgin, aged thirty-three years (b. ME), his children, Rena L. Durgin, a shoe factory operative, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Ethel S. Durgin, a shoe factory stitcher, aged fifteen years (b. ME), Nelson N. Durgin, at school, aged twelve years (b. ME), and Clarence E. Durgin, at school, aged ten years (b. ME), and his lodgers, Thomas Hannan, a shoe factory laster, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and Alta [((Wallingford) Osborne)] Shattuck, a shoe factory stitcher, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH). Seward Durgin rented their house at 12 Park Street. Cora B. Durgin was the mother of five children, of whom four were still living.

PERSONALS. Mrs. Clarence Wallingford of Milton, accompanied by her father [in-law], Mr. David Wallingford, and her daughter, Miss Alice Wallingford, visited Mrs. John Corson last Monday (Farmington News, August 3, 1900).

LOCAL. Mr. and Mrs. Clarance Wallingford of Milton, with the latter’s sister, Mrs. Elzina Downs, were in town the first of the week. Mrs. Downs, long well known in Farmington, expects to spend the winter at Southern Pines, N.C., with the family of her sister, Mrs. George A. Kimball, formerly of Milton and Newburyport (Farmington News, October 18, 1901).

Daughter Sarah E. (Wallingford) Lord died in Berwick, ME, January 4, 1902, aged fifty-six years, seven months, and fifteen days. She died of “exhaustion, following a fall, and acute bronchitis.” K.V. Noyes, M.D. signed the death certificate.

Susan A. (Jones) Wallingford died of old age in Milton, February 11, 1902, aged eighty-one years, eleven months, and nineteen days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the certificate.

MILTON. David Wallingford of Plummer’s ridge is slowly failing (Farmington News, January 9, 1903).

David Wallingford died of old age in Milton, February 22, 1903, aged eighty-three years, ten months, and eighteen days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the certificate.

Daughter Clara J. (Wallingford) Stanley died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Berwick, ME, May 5, 1903, aged fifty-three, seven months, and eleven days. She was the daughter of David and Susan (Jones) Wallingford and wife of Fred V. Stanley.

Daughter Alta L. [((Wallingford) Osborne)] Shattuck married (3rd) in North Berwick, ME, November 28, 1904, Fred V. Stanley, both of Berwick, ME. He was a farmer, aged fifty-nine years, and she was shoe stitcher, aged forty-three years. Rev. J.L. Smith performed the ceremony. Stanley was born in York, ME, in 1846, son of William and Lydia M. (Chadbourne) Stanley. (He was the widower of her late sister, Clara J. (Wallingford) Stanley).

Married. WALLINGFORD-MEDCALF – At Trinity church, Boston, July 26, 1909, by the assistant rector, the Rev. Ernest Collard Tuthill, Edith Annie, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Medcalf, of Newburyport, Mass., to Mr. Amos D. Wallingford, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence M. Wallingford, of Milton, N.H. (The Churchman (New York, NY), August 14, 1909). 

Chris L. Lord, own income, aged sixty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his brother, Charles L. Lord, own income, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and his sisters, Tryphena Lord, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), and Josephine Lord, aged sixty-one years (b. ME). Chris L. Lord owned their house, free-and-clear.

Clarence M. Wallingford, a general farm farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-one years), Ida [(Downs)] Wallingford, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), his son, Amos Wallingford, a home farm helper, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Edith [(Medcalf)] Wallingford, aged [twenty-one] years (b. NY), and his daughter, Alice Wallingford, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Clarence M. Wallingford owned their farm, free-and-clear. Ida Wallingford was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Fred V. Stanley, a farmer, aged sixty-four years (b. ME), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Alta [(((Wallingford) Osborne) Shattuck)] Stanley, aged forty-eight years (b. NH). Fred V. Stanley owned their farm on the Berwick Road, with a mortgage. Alta Stanley was the mother of no children. It was his second marriage and her third marriage.

Son-in-law Frederick V. Stanley died in Berwick, ME, March 11, 1911.

Son-in-law Charles L. Lord died of lobar pneumonia in Milton, May 30, 1917, aged seventy-four years, and twenty-two days. He had resided in Milton for fifteen years, i.e., since circa 1902, with his previous residence having been in Somersworth, NH. He was a widowed shoemaker. James J. Buckley, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Son Clarence M. Wallingford died of mitral insufficiency at Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, January 6, 1920, aged sixty-seven years, one month, and seventeen days. He had been a farmer. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the certificate.

Amos D. Wallingford, a teamster (owner) aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his mother, Ida E. [(Downs)] Wallingford, aged sixty-three years (b. NH). Amos D. Wallingford owned their farm on Plummer’s Ridge, free-and-clear. (He was divorced).

Seth P. Dillingham, a bleachery spare man, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice L. [(Lord)] Dillingham, aged forty years (b. NH), his children, Marjorie Dillingham, aged twelve years (b. ME), and Alice M. Dillingham, aged five years (b. NH), his mother-in-law, Alice M. [(David)] Lord, a widow, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and his lodger, Alta L. [(((Wallingford) Osborne) Shattuck)] Stanley, a widow, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH). Seth P. Dillingham owned their house at 120 High Street, with a mortgage. (There was a separate rear dwelling).

Ida M. (Downs) Wallingford died of natural causes in her home on the State Road through Plummer’s Ridge (“probably heart disease”) in Milton, October 22, 1925, aged sixty-nine years, four months, and ten days. She had been a lifelong resident. Forrest L. Keay, M.D., and Strafford County medical examiner, signed the death certificate.

Belle C. [(Banfill)] Brown, boarding home, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Fifteen (193o) Federal Census. Her household included her mother, Olive J. [(Jackson)] Banfill, a widow, aged eighty-three years (b. NH), her boarder, Alta L. [(((Wallingford) Osborne) Shattuck)] Stanley, a widow, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and her roomers, Robert Meiklejohn, a restaurant waiter, aged forty-two years (b. NH), John Mayo, a portable sawmill teamster, aged sixty-nine years (b. Canada), and [his wife,] Elizabeth E. [(Banfill)] Mayo, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Belle C. Brown rented their house on Sullivan Street, for $11 per month. They did not have a radio set.


References:

Find a Grave. (2011, November 1). Charles Dana [P.] Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/233615967/charles-dana-jones

Find a Grave. (2017, October 16). Sally Worcester Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184333250/sally-jones

Find a Grave. (2022, May 16). Sarah E. “Sally” Wallingford Lord. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/239779343/sarah-e-lord

Find a Grave. (2020, August 11). Thomas C. Neal. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214301760/thomas-c-neal

Find a Grave. (2016, May 28). C. Albert Osborne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/163394092/c-albert-osborne

Find a Grave. (2011, August 17). James G. Shattuck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/75087644/james-g-shattuck

Find a Grave. (2016, June 16). Clara J. Stanley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/165177907/clara-j-stanley

Find a Grave. (2016, June 16). Frederick V. Stanley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/165177903/frederick-v-stanley

Find a Grave. (2009, November 26). Clarence M. Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/44820417/clarence-m-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2017, October 26). David Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184628124/david-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2017, October 29). Ira Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184732220/ira-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2017, October 16). Samuel Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184333199/samuel-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2015, July 19). Zimri Scates Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/149504393/zimri-scates-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2016, October 23). Mary W. Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/171752079/mary-w.-wentworth

Milton Occupations – 1840

By Muriel Bristol | January 22, 2023

The Sixth (1840) Federal Census tabulated occupations as well as populations. The available categories were Mining; Agriculture; Commerce; Manufactures and Trades; Navigation of the Oceans; Navigation of Canals, Lakes, and Rivers; Learned Professions and Engineers.

Milton had 1,322 people overall in 1840. Those 1,322 people resided in 250 households, i.e., there was an average of 5.3 people per household. A large portion (41.1% of the total population) were children. Some 156 infants and toddlers (11.8% of the total population) would have been below school age. Another 388 children (29.3% of the total population) were attending school, which ran through the seventh or eighth grade (thirteen or fourteen years of age).

Of those past school age, 435 adults and teenagers (32.9% of the total population) were employed in some capacity or another. Likely, many of the remaining 343 people (25.9% of the total population) were engaged in what would later be called “keeping house” (250 houses suggests at least 250 housekeepers) or were engaged in some activity or occupation not tabulated, such as innkeepers, or were simply retired or semi-retired (53 people (4.0% of the total population) were aged seventy years or above)).

The vast majority of the 435 Milton persons that were tabulated as engaged in economic activities were working in Agriculture (84.6% of those engaged), followed by Manufacture & Trades (12.2%), followed by Commerce (1.6%) and the Learned Professions (1.4%), and lastly by a single person engaged in Navigation of the Ocean (0.2%).

Some 53 persons (12.2% of those engaged) were engaged in Manufacture & the Trades. This category would have included shoemakers, millers, millwrights, blacksmiths, etc. They resided in the households headed by Joseph C. Wentworth (2 persons), William Wentworth (1 person), Parker Knowles (1 person); Stephen Main (2 persons), Ebenezer Wentworth (1 person); Nathaniel Durrell (1 person), Dearborn Wedgewood (1 person), Alexander Goodwin (1 person), Francis Looney (2 persons), James Worcester (1 person), George Worster (1 person), John H. Varney (3 persons); Elizabeth [(Spencer)] Gerrish (1 person), Hazen Duntley (1 person), John McMillen (1 person), James Pinkham (1 person), John Scates (1 person), Daniel Quimby (1 person), John Drew (2 persons); Thomas Edgerly (2 persons); Benjamin Furnald (1 person); Alpheus Goodwin (3 persons), Ebenezer Osgood (1 person), Stephen Stores (5 persons), Charles Swasey (5 persons), Gilman Jewett (three persons), Samuel Hart (1 person), Thomas Butter (1 person), John Marsh (1 person); Samuel W. Applebee (two persons), Mary Pager (1 person), and Joseph Rines (two persons).

Some 7 persons (1.6% of those engaged) were engaged in Commerce. This category would have included shopkeepers, merchants, traders, etc. They resided in the households headed by Robert Mathes (2 persons), James M. Twombly (2 persons), Bray Sims (1 person), Asa Fox (1 person), and James Berry (1 person).

Some 6 persons (1.4% of those engaged) were engaged in the Learned Professions. This category would have included ministers, lawyers, physicians, etc. They resided in the households headed by Joseph Pearle (1 person (Dr. Rufus K. Pearl)), Wesley Burnham (1 person), Benjamin G. Willey (1 person), Stephen Drew (1 person), John L. Swinerton (1 person), and Theodore Stevens (1 person).

Only 1 person (0.2% of those engaged) was engaged in Navigation of the Ocean. He resided in the household headed by James Quimby. (One wonders if he had with him Odysseus’ “winnowing oar”).

No one in Milton was engaged in Mining or Navigation of Canals, Lakes, and Rivers. (The Salmon Falls River was not navigable).

Extra: Revolutionary Pensioners and Number of Schools (and Students)

Some continuation pages gave the names and ages of “Pensioners for Revolutionary or Military Services.” Sarah [(Twombly)] Nute, aged seventy-seven years, resided in the household of David Nute; Amos Bragdon, aged seventy-eight years, resided in his own household; Elizabeth [(Hayes)] Roberts, aged eighty years, resided in the household of James C. Roberts; Jonathan Dore, aged eighty-three years, resided in the household of Jonathan Dore; David Corson, aged seventy-nine years, resided in the household of David M. Corson; Thomas Applebee, aged eighty-four years, resided in his own household; and Benniah Dore, aged seventy-five years, resided in his own household.

Some continuation pages enumerated the numbers of schools and the number of scholars attending them. It is difficult to determine what, if any, relationship there might be between a householder’s line and the school information that appeared on that same line of an associated continuation page. (This data always appeared at the top of the continuation page, two of three together if there were more than one).

Edward Tibbetts appeared with 1 primary or common school, with 20 scholars, on his line of a continuation page. James Y. Pinkham appeared with 1 school, with 35 scholars, and Sarah Pinkham appeared with 1 school, with 25 scholars, on their lines. David Nute appeared with 1 school, with 24 scholars, and Ezekiel Nute appeared with 1 school, with 80 scholars, on their lines. William Ricker appeared with 1 school, with 27 scholars, Joshua H. Ricker appeared with 1 school, with 70 scholars, and John Foss appeared with 1 school, with 50 scholars, on their lines. Jonathan Dore appeared with 1 school, with 27 scholars, and Samuel Clement appeared with 1 school, with 30 scholars, on their lines.

Summed up, this would amount to a total of ten primary or common schools, with a total of 388 scholars. (There was a mean (average) of 38.8 students per school, due to a few larger outliers, and a median of only 28.5 students per school).

References:

Wikipedia. (2022, May 26). Winnowing Oar. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winnowing_Oar

Milton Farmer David Wallingford (1801-1878)

By Muriel Bristol | January 15, 2023

David Wallingford, Jr., was born in Milton, in 1801, son of David [Sr.] and Sarah (Corson) Wallingford.

(N.B.: There were several Milton men in this time named “David Wallingford,” and it is difficult to distinguish between them. This David Wallingford (1801-1878) was called “Jr.” from his birth through the death of his father, who was also named David Wallingford, in 1826. The “Jr.” appellation passed then to his seven-year-old nephew of the same name, David Wallingford (1819-1903), son of Samuel Wallingford (1790-1815). He was “Jr.” only in that sense that he was younger, rather than as being the son of the elder. The elder David Wallingford had also a son named David W. Wallingford (1848-1926), who was distinguished through his having had a middle name, whereas the others lacked them. For these reasons, it is here assumed the elder David Wallingford (1801-1878) – without appellation – to have been the Milton Selectman of 1845-1846 and the NH State Representative of 1855-56, while his younger nephew, David Wallingford (1819-1903) – with the “Jr.” appellation – is assumed to have been the Milton Selectman of 1855-56, 1870, and, after the 1878 death of the elder David Wallingford, as having been – now without appellation – the Milton Selectman of 1880-81).

Mr. David Wallingford married in Strafford, NH, September 21, 1828, Miss Mary Ann Tasker, he of Dover, NH, and she of Strafford, NH. Rev. Enoch Place of Strafford, NH, performed the ceremony. She was born in Strafford, in 1805, daughter of Daniel and Sarah “Sally” (Randall) Tasker.

(The known children of David and Mary A. (Tasker) Wallingford were: Samuel Wallingford (1830–1830), Eliza Jane Wallingford (1832–1867), George S. Wallingford (1834–1857), Samuel Willard Wallingford (1837–1899), Mary E. Wallingford (1841-1882), David Woodbury Wallingford [I] (1844–1844), Sarah Ann Wallingford (1845–1893), David Woodbury Wallingford [II] (1848–1926), Emma F. Wallingford (1850–1920), and Susan E. Wallingford (1852–1856)).

David Warringford [SIC] headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Mary A. (Tasker) Wallingford], one male aged 10-14 years, one male aged 5-9 years, one male aged under-5 years [Samuel Wallingford], one female aged 30-39 years, and one female aged 50-59 years [Sarah (Corson) Wallingford]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Lord and Amos Gerrish.

Son Samuel Wallingford was born in Milton in 1830. He died in Milton in 1830.

Daughter Eliza J. Wallingford was born in Milton in 1832. Son George S. Wallingford was born in Milton in 1834. Son Samuel Willard “Willard” Wallingford was born in Milton, November 27, 1837.

David Wallingford headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. Hos household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Mary A. (Tasker) Wallingford], one male aged 15-19 years, one female aged 15-19 years, one female aged 5-9 years [Eliza J. Wallingford], one male aged 5-9 years [George S. Wallingford], one male aged under-5 years [Samuel W. Wallingford], and one female aged 60-69 years [Sarah (Corson) Wallingford]. Two members of his household were engaged in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Amos Gerrish and Nahum Tasker.

Daughter Mary E. Wallingford was born in Milton in 1841.

Son David Woodbury Wallingford [I] was born in Milton in 1844. He died in Milton in 1844. Daughter Sarah Ann Wallingford was born in Milton in 1845.

The Milton selectmen of 1845 were Asa Fox, I.H. Wentworth, and David Wallingford.

In the NH Gubernatorial election of March 1845, Milton gave 52 [31.7%] votes to Abolitionist Daniel Hoit, of Sandwich, NH, 69 votes [42.1%] to Whig Gen. Anthony Colby, of New London, NH, and 43 votes [26.2%] to Democrat John H. Steele, of Peterborough, NH. (See Milton and Abolitionism). (On a statewide basis, Abolitionist Hoit received 5,786 votes [12.9%], Whig Colby received 15,579 votes [34.8%], and Democrat Steele received 23,406 votes [52.3%]). Democrat Steele won the election. Most editors identified Steele as a “Loco Foco” Democrat, while others said he was favored by the “Polkites.”

NEW HAMPSHIRE ELECTION. The Loco-Focos elect 4 of the 5 Councillors and 10 of the 12 Senators, and will of course elect the others in Joint Meeting of the Legislature. Hon Salma Hale, the Whig candidate for Senate in the 9th (Cheshire) District, is said by the Patriot to lack six votes of a majority over all others. The House, so far, stands 156 Loco, 74 Whig, 7 Abolition, 2 politics unknown, 19 towns no choice, 9 to be heard from – probably all Loco (Greenfield Recorder, March 25, 1845).

Essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson said of the “Loco Foco” Democrats: “The new race is stiff, heady, and rebellious; they are fanatics in freedom; they hate tolls, taxes, turnpikes, banks, hierarchies, governors, yea, almost all laws.” They had favored formerly Presidential candidates Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren.

The Milton selectmen of 1846 were Asa Fox, D. Wallingford, and J.C. Varney.

Son David Woodbury “Woodbury” Wallingford [II] was born in Milton, November 22, 1848.

David Wallingford received an initial five-year appointment as a Milton justice-of-the peace, December 27, 1848.

David Wallingford, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary [(Tasker)] Wallingford, aged forty-five years (b. NH), Eliza J. Wallingford, aged seventeen years (b. NH), George S. Wallingford, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Samuel W. Wallingford, aged twelve years (b. NH), Mary E. Wallingford, aged nine years (b. NH), Sarah Wallingford, aged five years (b. NH), David W. Wallingford, aged two years (b. NH), and Sarah [(Corson)] Wallingford, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH). David Wallingford had real estate valued at $1,500. Sarah Wallingford had real estate valued at $600. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Francis D. Horn, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Enoch Plummer, a farmer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH).

Emma F. Wallingford was born in Milton in 1850. Susan E. Wallingford was born in Milton in 1852. She died in Milton in 1856.

Milton - 1856 (Detail) - Wallingford, D
Milton, 1856 (Detail) – The home of D. Wallingford (indicated with red arrow) on the right-hand side of what is now Bolan Road (that road being a right just above the Plummer’s Ridge S.H., or schoolhouse). The homestead of his nephew, D. Wallingford, “Jr.,” may be seen on the left-hand side of the Plummer’s Ridge Road, just past what is now Bolan Road.

David Wallingford received a five-year renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the peace, December 9, 1853.

Milton sent David Wallingford to Concord, NH, as one of its two NH State Representatives for the 1855-56 biennium. (The other was Eli Wentworth (1821-1863)). His mileage was rated as 100 miles.

New Hampshire passed a prohibitory law on a third attempt in July 1855, only a month after the Portland Rum Riot. (See Milton Under “Semi-Prohibition” – 1855-02).

Son George S. Wallingford died in Milton in 1857.

Daughter Eliza J. Wallingford married in Strafford, NH, circa 1858, Edmund O. Caswell. He was born in Strafford, NH, September 12, 1833, son of Thomas and Sally (Evans) Caswell.

David Wallingford received a five-year renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the peace, September 30, 1858.

MILTON. Justice, State, John E. Goodwin. Justice, Quorum. Eli Wentworth. Justices, John L. Swinerton, Daniel P. Warren, Joseph Pearl, Robert Mathes, Elias S. Cook, David Wallingford, Charles C. Hayes, Thomas Y. Wentworth, Asa Fox, Daniel E. Palmer, Joseph Plumer, Luther Hayes, Ezra H. Twombly, Joseph Mathes, Elbridge W. Fox, Charles Jones (Farmer, 1860).

David Wallingford, a farmer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Tasker)] Wallingford, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), Saml. W. Wallingford, a farmer, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Mary E. Wallingford, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Sarah A. Wallingford, aged fourteen years (b. NH), David W. Wallingford, aged twelve years (b. NH), Emma F. Wallingford, aged ten years (b. NH), and Sarah [(Corson)] Wallingford, aged eighty-eight years (b. NH). David Wallingford had real estate valued at $3,000 and personal estate valued at $900. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Nahum Tasker, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and Benja Scates, a farmer, aged seventy years (b. NH). (The household of David Wallingford, Jr., a farmer, aged forty-one years (b. NH), appeared below that of Benja Scates).

Edmond O. Caswell, a farmer, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza J. [(Wallingford)] Caswell, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). Edmond O. Caswell had real estate valued at $1,050 and personal estate valued at $250. They shared a two-family residence with the household of Charles C. Caswell, a farmer, aged twenty-three years. (His real estate was also valued at $1,050, i.e., they likely had equal shares of the same farmstead).

David Wallingford received a five-year renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the peace, September 29, 1863. (This was his final appointment).

Son Saml W. Wallingford paid a $1 US Excise Tax on his carriage, which was valued at $75, September 16, 1864.

Mother Sarah (Corson) Wallingford died in Milton, November 22, 1864.

Daughter Mary E. Wallingford married in Farmington, NH, January 5, 1865, John Wingate, she of Milton and he of Strafford, NH. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-nine years, and she was a lady, aged twenty-three years. Rev. Roger M. Sargent performed the ceremony. Wingate was born in Strafford, NH, in 1835, son of Joshua and Mary (McNeal) Wingate.

Daughter Eliza J. (Wallingford) Caswell died in Strafford, NH, in 1867.

Daughter Sarah A. Wallingford married in Strafford, NH, March 13, 1867, Thomas Sawyer Pease, she of Milton and he of Strafford, NH. He was aged twenty-seven years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. B.B. Smith performed the ceremony. Pease was born in New Bedford, MA, September 5, 1839, son of Daniel Jr. and Jerusha (Hall) Pease.

Son Daniel W. Wallingford married (1st) in Barnstead, NH, February 13, 1870, Mary J. Tuttle, he of Milton and she of Barnstead, NH. He was a farmer, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged nineteen years. Rev. Hector Canfield performed the ceremony. She was born in Chichester, NH, September 28, 1850, daughter of Thomas and Lois (Wingate) Tuttle.

Daughter Emma F. Wallingford married in Andover, MA, February 23, 1870, George E. Drew, she of Milton and he of Strafford, NH. He was a machinist, aged twenty-four years, and she was aged nineteen years. Rev. James P. Law performed the ceremony. Baker was born in Strafford, NH, circa 1846, son of Tobias and Eliza Drew.

David Wallingford, a farmer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Tasker)] Wallingford, keeping house, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), David W. Wallingford, a farm laborer, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Mary J. [(Tuttle)] Wallingford, a housekeeper, aged nineteen years (b. NH). David Wallingford had real estate valued at $4,000 and personal estate valued at $982. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles Bragdon, a farmer, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and Peleg B. Trask, works in shoe factory, aged thirty-two years (b. ME).

John Wingate, a worker (“work for …”), aged thirty-five years, headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary E. [(Wallingford)] Wingate, keeping house, aged twenty-nine years, Hattie G. Wingate, aged four years, and Mary [(McNeal)] Wingate, aged seventy-six years.

Thomas Peas, works for shoe manufactory, aged twenty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Farmington (“Gonic P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah P. [(Wallingford)] Peas, keeping house, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Herbert Peas, at home, aged three years (b. NH). Thomas Peas had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $450.

Son Samuel W. Wallingford married, November 10, 1870, Mary B. Plummer. She was born in Milton, September 8, 1844, daughter of Col. Enoch and Orinda (Ayers) Plummer.

Milton, 1871 (Detail) – The homes of D. Wallingford and his son, S.W. Wallingford, (indicated with red oval) on the right-hand side of what is now Bolan Road (that road being a right just above the Plummer’s Ridge S.H. No. 1, or schoolhouse). The homestead of his nephew, D. Wallingford, Jr., may be seen (inside the left-hand red oval) on the left-hand side of the Plummer’s Ridge Road, just past what is now Bolan Road. (The house (of L.B. Twombly) near the bottom of the map detail was formerly the tavern of Elijah Horne).

George Drew appeared in the Fall River, MA, directory of 1873, as a machinist, boarding at 7 North Main street. George E. Drew appeared in the directory of 1874, as a machinist, with his house at 214 South Main street. He appeared in the directory of 1876, as a machinist, boarding at 7 North Main street. (Marianne Grinnell kept a boarding house at 7 North Main street).

Samuel W. Wallingford, a penitentiary instructor, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Brooklyn, NY, household at the time of the NY State Census of 1875. His household included his wife, Mary B. [(Plummer)] Wallingford, aged thirty years (b. NH). They shared their two-family frame house with the upstairs household of John M. Pinkham, a penitentiary foreman, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH).

Daughter-in-law Mary J. (Tuttle) Wallingford died in Milton, October 18, 1877, aged twenty-seven years, and twenty days.

David Wallingford of Milton made his last will August 23, 1878. He devised all his provisions, household furniture, stock, hay, and farming tools to his beloved wife Mary Ann Wallingford. She was also to receive a life estate in his 140-acre Milton homestead farm. He devised $600 to his son, David W. Wallingford; $100 each to his three daughters, Mary E. Wingate, Sarah A. Pease, and Emma F. Drew; and $1 each to the three children of Edmund O. Caswell, they having already received $100 each. He devised the aforementioned Milton homestead farm to his son, Samuel W. Wallingford, after the decease of his wife. Son Samuel W. Wallingford was named also as executor. Enoch T. Mason, Calvin M. Hubbard, and T.W. Tuttle signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 89:493; Strafford County Probate Docket 4941).

David Wallingford died in Milton, July 20, 1879, aged seventy-six years. He had been a farmer. He was said also to have been a widower. His will was proved in Strafford County Probate court held in Dover, NH, August 5, 1879 (Strafford County Probate, 89:493; Strafford County Probate Docket 4941).

Son Daniel W. Wallingford married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, December 15, 1879, M. [Mary] Ellen Wingate, he of Milton and she of Rochester, NH. He was a shoemaker, aged thirty-seven years, and she was aged thirty years. Rev. Ezekiel True performed the ceremony. She was born in Strafford, NH, July 23, 1849, daughter of Lyman and Abigail T. “Abbie” (Gray) Wingate.

Samuel W. Wallingford, a farmer, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary B. [(Plummer)] Wallingford, keeping house, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), his mother, Mary A. [(Tasker)] Wallingford, at home, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), his nephew, George W. Wallingford, aged eight years (b. NH), and his niece, Millie M. Wallingford, aged five years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Frank G. Horn, works on shoes, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and James A. Wentworth, a farmer, aged forty-two years (b. NH).

John Wingate, works in shoe factory, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. [(Wallingford)] Wingate, keeping house, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and his daughter, Hattie G. Wingate, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH).

Thomas S. Pease, a farmer, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah A. [(Wallingford)] Pease, keeping house, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Herbert H. Pease, at home, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Edgar S. Pease, aged four years (b. NH).

David W. Wallingford, works in shoe factory, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nellie M. [(Wingate)] Wallingford, keeping house, aged thirty years (b. NH). They shared a two-family residence on Charles Street with the household of Sarah E. Severance, keeping house, aged thirty years (b. NH).

Emma [(Wallingford)] Drew, a servant, aged twenty-five [twenty-nine] years (b. NH), was a servant in the Fall River, MA, boarding house of Marianne Grinnell, aged seventy-nine years (b. RI), at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. It was situated at North Main Street.

Daughter Mary E. (Wallingford) Wingate died in Rochester, NH, February 14, 1882.

Mary Ann (Tasker) Wallingford died in Milton in 1887.

Emma F. Drew appeared in the Fall River, MA, directories of 1889, as a widow, with her house at Section B, of the Granite Block. Emma F. Drew appeared in the Fall River, MA, directories of 1890, 1894, and 1895, as a widow, with her house at Section D, of the Granite Block.

Daughter Sarah A. (Wallingford) Pease died of apoplexy in Rochester, NH, June 22, 1893, aged forty-seven years. E.T. Hubbard, M.D., signed the death certificate.

The Milton selectmen of 1896-97 were S.W. Wallingford, J.H. Avery, and F.H. Lowd. The Milton selectmen of 1898 were S.W. Wallingford, G.E. Nute, and F.H. Lowd.

Emma F. Drew appeared in the Fall River, MA, directories of 1896, 1897, and 1899, as widow, with her house at 23 South Main street.

Son Samuel W. Wallingford died of pyemia (following a pulmonary abscess) in Milton, May 25, 1899, aged sixty-one years, five months, and twenty-eight years. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

LOCALS. The many friends of the Plumers of the ridge in Milton bearing their name, feel sympathy for one of their number in the death of her husband, S. Willard Wallingford, on Thursday of last week. He had been ill only a week (Farmington News, June 2, 1899).

Mary B. [(Plummer)] Wallingford, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her brother-in-law, John H. Twombly, a physician (retired), aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and her sister (and his wife of twenty years), Frances W. [(Plummer)] Twombly, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Mary B. Wallingford owned their farm, free-and-clear. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Susan F. Horn, a widow, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and George F. Henderson, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. ME).

John Wingate was a farm laborer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), boarding in the Strafford, NH, household of Charles A. Tibbetts, a farmer, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census.

Thomas S. Pease, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a North Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife (of five years), Helen A. [(Loud)] Pease, aged forty-three years (b. NH), and his daughter, Lucy M. Pease, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). Thomas S. Pease owned their farm, with a mortgage. Helen A. Pease was the mother of no children.

David W. Wallingford, a shoe laster, aged fifty-two years, headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty years), Mary E. [(Wingate)] Wallingford, aged fifty years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Lyman Wingate, retired, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH). David W. Wallingford rented their house on Mont Street.

Emma F. Drew appeared in the Fall River, MA, directories of 1900, 1901, and 1903, as widow, with her house at 23 South Main street.

Son-in-law John Wingate died of stomach cancer in North Barrington, NH, July 30, 1903, aged sixty-eight years, five months, and twenty-one days.

MILTON. Mrs. Mary B. Wallingford went to Boston last week (Farmington News, February 5, 1904).

MILTON. Mrs. Mary B. Wallingford returned home last week from a visit to Boston and vicinity (Farmington News, May 6, 1904).

MILTON. Mr. and Mrs. D.W. Wallingford of Rochester were in town last week (Farmington News, June 3, 1904).

Daughter-in-law MARY B. WALLINGFORD, widow of Samuel W., appeared in the Milton directory of 1905, as proprietor of a summer boarding-house at Plummer’s Ridge, near the schoolhouse.

Mrs. Emma Drew appeared in the Fall River, MA, directories of 1906, and 1908, as a loom harnessmaker, with her house at 271 Franklin street.

PERSONAL. Miss Florence Hayes made a short visit home to Milton last week, to bid bon voyage to her brother Charles and others who have gone to Washington for the class tour, M.H.S., ’08. Principal C.E. Kelly is with his students, and Mrs. Mary B. Wallingford is acting as chaperon (Farmington News, April 24, 1908).

MILTON. About 11.30 o’clock Monday night of last week a fire was discovered in the barn connected with the house on Main street owned by Woodbury Wallingford, of Rochester, and occupied by Charles Bodwell. An alarm was given but before the hose could be connected with the S.F. Dawson mill the fire had gained an uncontrollable headway. Everything was removed from the house except the furniture of two chambers. All possible work was done to save the buildings around, but the house occupied by George Gowan was lost, together with an empty store beside it. The fire was probably set by fireworks, since the barn was not occupied (Sanford Journal Tribune (Biddeford, ME), July 16, 1909).

Mary B. [(Plummer)] Wallingford, a general farm farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her brother-in-law, John H. Twombly, a home farm keeper, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), her sister (and his wife of thirty-one years), Fannie W. [(Plummer)] Twombly, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), and her sister-in-law, Susan [(Pecker)] Plummer, aged seventy years (b. NH). Mary B. Wallingford owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Thomas S. Pease, a general farm farmer, aged seventy years (b. MA), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his [third] wife (of six years), Mary E. [(Berry)] Pease, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Hannah A. [(Foss)] Berry, aged eighty-five years.

D. Woodbury Wallingford, a shoe factory laster, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Mary E. [(Wingate)] Wallingford, aged sixty years (b. NH). D. Woodbury Wallingford owned their house at 20 Jackson Street, free-and-clear.

OUR FOLKS AND OTHER FOLKS. Mrs. Emma Drew, who has been summering in Rochester N.H., has returned to this city (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), October 21, 1912).

LOCAL. The Milton Woman’s club at its annual election last week elected the following officers for the ensuing year: President, Mrs. Carrie E. Kimball; vice presidents, Mrs. Ira W. Drew, Mrs. Ruth F. Plummer; recording secretary, Mrs. Gertrude Getchell; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Edith A. Dawson; treasurer, Miss Sadie Avery; auditor, Mrs. Mary B. Wallingford; exceutive committee for three years, Mrs. Annie Hayes; delegate to State Federation, Miss Gertrude Getchell (Farmington News, May 4, 1917).

Daughter Emma Drew appeared in the Fall River, MA, directory of 1919, as having removed to Rochester, N.H.

Mary B. [(Plummer)] Wallingford, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her brother-in-law, John H. Twombly, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), her sister, Frances W. [(Plummer)] Twombly, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and her sister-in-law, Susan E. [(Pecker)] Plummer, aged eighty years (b. NH). Mary B. Wallingford owned their farm on Plummer’s Ridge Road, free-and-clear.

Thomas S. Pease, a general farm farmer, aged eighty years (b. MA), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E [(Berry)] Pease, aged sixty-one years (b. NH). Thomas S. Pease owned their farm, free-and-clear.

David W. Wallingford, a general farm farmer, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ellen M. [(Wingate)] Wallingford, aged seventy years (b. NH). David W. Wallingford owned their farm on the Strafford Road.

Daughter Emma F. (Wallingford) Drew died in Fall River, MA, in 1920.

CARD OF THANKS. We desire to return our thanks to the kind associates who arranged for the care of our late sister, Mrs. Emma F. Drew, of Fall River, Massachusetts; to her esteemed nephew in the furtherance of those plans for the opening of her native home to perform the burial service; also for the choice floral offerings. MR. AND MRS. WOODBURY WALLINGFORD – Rochester N.H., December 24, 1920. Rochester New Hampshire papers please copy (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), December 27, 1920).

Son-in-law Edmund O. Caswell died of angina pectoris at Bow Lake in Strafford, NH, October 20, 1920, aged eighty-seven years, one month, and eight days. He had been a farmer and a lifelong resident of Strafford, NH.

Son-in-law Thomas S. Pease died of apoplexy in Strafford, NH, December 21, 1922, aged eighty-three years, three months, and sixteen days. He had been a farmer, who had resided in Strafford, NH, for twenty-two years, i.e., since circa 1900. His previous residence had been in North Hampton.

Son David W. “Woodbury” Wallingford died of arteriosclerosis on Strafford Road in Rochester, NH, October 18, 1926, aged seventy-seven years, ten months, and twenty-six days. He had been a farmer, who had resided in Rochester, NH, for forty years, i.e., since circa 1886. His previous residence had been in Milton.

Mary B. [(Plummer)] Wallingford, a widow, aged eighty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Mary B. Wallingford owned her house on Plummer’s Ridge, which was valued at $4,000.

Mary [(Wingate)] Wallingford, aged eighty-two years (b. NH), was one of fourteen inmates in the Gafney Home on Wakefield Street in Rochester, NH, at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census.

Daughter-in-law Mary Ellen (Wingate) Wallingford died of natural causes (arteriosclerosis senility) in the Gafney Home on Wakefield Street in Rochester, NH, November 17, 1933, aged eighty-four years, three months, and twenty-four days. She had resided in the Gafney Home for four years, i.e., since circa 1930, with her previous residence in Rochester, NH. C.E. Dunbar, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Daughter-in-law Mary B. (Plummer) Wallingford died of hypertensive heart disease in the Masonic Home in Manchester, NH, September 22, 1939, aged ninety-five years, and fifteen days. She had resided in the Masonic Home for seven years and eight months, i.e., since circa January 1932, with her previous residence in Milton. C.E. Dunbar, M.D., signed the death certificate.


References:

Essex Institute. (1916). Historical Collections of the Essex Institute, Volume 52. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=pmhNXD0THysC&pg=PA325

Farmer, John. (1860). NH Annual Register, and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mkA4AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA56

Find a Grave. (2011, October 10). Eliza Jane Wallingford Caswell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/78177836/eliza-jane-caswell

Find a Grave. (2022, February 24). Emma F. Wallingford Drew. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236480466/emma-f-drew

Find a Grave. (2016, May 26). David Wallingford, Sr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/163318058/david-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2017, October 16). David Wallingford, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184326191/david-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2022, February 4). David W. Wallingford [I]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236480371/david-w-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2017, January 11). David Woodbury Wallingford [II]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/175233731/david-woodbury-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2017, October 17). Samuel Willard Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184358734/samuel-willard-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2022, February 4). Susan E. Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236480403/susan-e-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2017, January 8). Mary Ellen [Wallingford] Wingate. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/175073088/mary-ellen-wingate

Wikipedia. (2022, November 25). James G. Birney. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_G._Birney

Wikipedia. (2022, April 18). Locofocos. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locofocos

Milton Shoemaker George W. Tasker (1829-1911)

By Muriel Bristol | January 8, 2023

George W. Tasker was born on Milton, October 28, 1829, son of Nahum and Mary (Wallingford) Tasker. (She was a sister of David Wallingford (1801-1878)).

Nahum Tasker, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary [(Wallingford)] Tasker, aged fifty years (b. NH), George Tasker, a shoemaker, aged twenty years (b. NH), Abby A. Tasker, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Clary Tasker, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Hiram Tasker, aged nine years (b. NH). Nahum Tasker had real estate valued at $500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joseph Plummer, a farmer, aged thirty years (b. NH), and Sally [(Worster) Wallingford)] Jones, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH).

George W. Tasker married (1st) in Lebanon, ME, September 20, 1855, Lydia S. Jones, both of Milton. She was born in Milton, in 1831, daughter of Joshua and Sarah K. “Sally” (Cowell) Jones. (She was a sister of Susan A. (Jones) Wallingford).

(The known children of George W. and Lydia S. (Jones) Tasker were Charles W. Tasker (1856–1939), Mabel Tasker (1858-1858), Addie F. Tasker (1862-1863), Nellie B. Tasker (1867–1955), Amy E. Tasker (1870-1871), and Dana J. Tasker (1874-1975)).

Son Charles W. Tasker was born in Lebanon, ME, in 1856.

Sister Abby A. Tasker died of consumption in Milton, April 1, 1858, aged twenty-three years, one month, and nineteen days. She was a teacher.

Daughter Mabel Tasker was born in Milton, in July 1858. She died in Milton, September 25, 1858, aged ten weeks. (A bud on earth, A rose in Heaven).

George W. Tasker, a shoemaker, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Lydia S. [(Jones)] Tasker, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and Charles W. Tasker, aged four years (b. NH). George W. Tasker had real estate valued at $900 and personal estate valued at $700. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ephraim Plummer, a shoemaker, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and John H. Varney, a shoemaker, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH).

Daughter Addie F. Tasker was born in Milton, March 11, 1863. She died in Milton, April 14, 1863, aged five months, and three days. (Our little girl too fair for earth, But not too fair for heaven).

Daughter Nellie B. Tasker was born in Milton, September 15, 1866.

George W. Tasker was one of the ten prominent Milton citizens who incorporated a private secondary school – the Milton Classical Institute – at Three Ponds Village in Milton, NH, in July 1867. The incorporators included also NH Governor’s Councilor (and ex-officio NH State Board of Education member) Charles Jones, Strafford Sheriff Luther Hayes, manufacturer Hiram V. Wentworth, miller William P. Tuttle, Dr. George W. Peavey, and others.

Mother Mary (Wallingford) Tasker died of consumption in Milton, January 5, 1868, aged sixty-nine years, two months, and seventeen days.

Father-in-law Joshua Jones died of palsy in Milton, June 17, 1868, aged seventy-nine years, three months, and eight days.

George W. Tasker was the Milton Town Clerk in 1869. He filled a one-year gap between a first term of Joseph Mathes, 1856-68, and a second term of Joseph Mathes, 1870-74.

George W. Tasker received an initial appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, May 13, 1869. (John S. Hersey received one that same day).

MILTON. Justices – Charles Jones, Luther Hayes, State; Elbridge W. Fox, Joseph Plumer, Ebenezer Wentworth, Charles A. Cloutman, Asa Jewett, Joseph Cook, Robert Mathes, Ira C. Varney, George Lyman, George W. Peavey, Martin V.B. Cook, John T. Hersey, George W. Tasker, Edward W. Fox, Ezra H. Twombly, Thomas H. Roberts, John U. Şimes, Larkin A. Craig (McFarland & Jenks, 1869).

George W. Tasker, a shoe cutter, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lydia S. [(Jones)] Tasker, keeping house, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), Charles W. Tasker, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Nellie B. Tasker, aged three years (b. NH), and Ellen F. Wentworth, a domestic servant, aged sixteen years (b. NH). George W. Tasker had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $300. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Lucas, a carpenter, aged forty-six years (b. ME), and Eliza A. Fernald, keeping house, aged forty-eight years (b. NH).

Daughter Amy Edly Tasker was born in Milton, June 26, 1870. She died of liver congestion in Milton, March 15, 1871, aged eight months, seventeen days. (In life [beloved], In death not forgotten).

Milton - 1871 (Detail) - GW TaskerIn the NH gubernatorial election of 1871, Milton gave 187 votes [57.5%] to Republican candidate James Pike, 116 votes [35.7%] to Democrat candidate James A. Weston, and 22 votes [6.8%] to Labor Reform candidate L.P. Cooper, Temperance candidate Rev. M.S. Comings, and “Scattering.” Statewide, the gubernatorial race was effectively a draw, and the legislature chose Democrat James A. Weston to be governor.

Milton sent George W. Tasker to Concord, NH, in that same election, as one of its two NH State Representatives for the 1871-72 biennium. (The other representative was initially Samuel G. Chamberlain (1827-1911), for the first year of the biennium (1871); and then Bray U. Simes (1801-1885), for the second year of the biennium (1872)).

Rep. George W. Tasker of Milton served on the Committee on the Division of Towns. (Another Rep. Tasker – Rep. Charles E. Tasker of Newmarket, NH – served on the Committee on the Insane Asylum). His mileage was rated as 174 miles.

The House of Representatives. … STRAFFORD COUNTY – Dover, republican, Jonas D. Townsend, James E. Lothrop, Russell B. Wiggin, John B. Hull, George T. Day, Moses D. Page, Calvin Hall, Jasper H. Randlett, John C. Varney; dem., John Roberts; Madbury, dem., V.B. Felker; Milton, rep., George W. Tasker, Bray N. Lines [Bray U. Simes]; Barrington, rep., W.E. Waterhouse, William Jewett; Somersworth, rep., James M. Tebbets, Joseph Sibley, Hiram Wentworth, Geo. S. Bates, Hartley S. Chapman; Farmington, rep., James E. Haves, J.L. Haskins; Durham rep., Thomas H Wiswall; Rollinsford, rep., Temple Lord (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT). March 16, 1872).

George W. Tasker received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, May 19, 1874.

Son Dana Jones Tasker was born in Milton, June 1, 1874.

Father Nahum Tasker married (2nd) in Strafford, NH, October 26, 1879, Mary ((Clark) Peavey) Hanson, he of Milton and she of Barrington, NH. He was a farmer, aged seventy-five years, and she was a widow, aged sixty-eight years. Rev. B. McDaniel performed the ceremony. She was born in Barrington, NH, December 23, 1808, daughter of Martha Clark. (She was the widow of Caleb Hanson, who had died in Barrington, NH, in March 1871/72).

George W. Tasker, works in shoe manufacturing, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lydia S. [(Jones)] Tasker, keeps house, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), his children, Charles W. Tasker, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Nellie B. Tasker, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Dana J. Tasker, aged five years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Pound, tends grist mill, aged thirty-four years (b. England), and Eliza A. Fernald, keeps house, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH).

George Tasker appeared in the Milton directories of 1880, 1881, and 1882, as a Milton mechanic, specifically a shoemaker.

Mother-in-law Sarah K. “Sally” (Cowell) Jones died of old age in Milton, May 8, 1884, aged ninety-one years, and one day. (She was a daughter of Samuel and Amy (Kilgore) Cowell).

Step-mother Mary (((Clark) Peavey) Hanson) Tasker died October 12, 1883, aged seventy-four years, nine months, and nineteen days.

Son Charles W. Tasker married in Haverhill, MA, June 2, 1885, Ida B. Shattuck, both of Milton. He was a shoe-cutter, aged twenty-nine years, and she was a lady, aged twenty-eight years. Rev. J.N. Lowell performed the ceremony. She was born in Rochester, NH, in 1857, daughter of Charles O. and Lydia (Cobb) Shattuck.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. D.S. Burley to G.W. Tasker, land in Milton, $400 (Farmington News, January 6, 1888).

Father Nahum Tasker died of kidney disease in Milton, July 12, 1888, aged eighty-four years, six months, and twelve days. He was a farmer.

Lydia S. (Jones) Tasker died of Bright’s disease in Milton, April 3, 1890, aged fifty-eight years, eight months, and four days. Charles D. Jones signed the death certificate, in his capacity as Milton Town Clerk, rather than as a physician.

MILTON. Mrs. George W. Tasker of this village died at her home last Tuesday morning, after an illness of several months’ duration, from a complication of diseases. She suffered very much, especially the last days of her life, and was ready for the messenger of death when he came. Mrs. Tasker was a christian, highly esteemed in this community, having resided here many years. A husband and three children are in sorrow by her departure, besides a large circle of relatives and friends. Funeral services occurred at the house Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. F. Haley, with appropriate selections by the choir of the Congregational church of which she was an honored member (Farmington News, April 11, 1890).

Daughter Nellie B. Tasker married in Farmington, NH, September 24, 1890, Royal K. Webber, both of Milton. He was a carpenter, aged thirty years, and she was a shoe stitcher, aged twenty-four years. Rev. W.J. Sweet performed the ceremony. Webber was born in Shapleigh, ME, October 15, 1859, son of Greenleaf and Sarah (Grant) Webber.

George W. Tasker appeared in the Portsmouth, NH, directories of 1895, and 1897, as a shoe cutter, rooming at 8 Langdon Street.

George W. Tasker married (2nd) in Kittery, ME, January 22, 1898, Elizabeth A. “Lizzie” (Caverly) Hanson, he of Portsmouth, NH, and she of Barrington, NH. He was a shoemaker, aged sixty-eight years, and she was a shoe stitcher, aged fifty-four years. Rev. Henry Emerson performed the ceremony. She was born in Barrington, NH, April 29, 1843, daughter of Azariah and Elizabeth (Tasker) Caverly. (Her first husband, Stephen W. Hanson, had died in Barrington, September 4, 1894).

PERSONALS. Mr. John C. Plummer and Mr. and Mrs. George W. Tasker have been visiting in Milton (Portsmouth Herald, September 15, 1899).

PERSONALS. George W. Tasker is to remove to Milton, N.H. (Portsmouth Herald, April 30, 1900).

George W. Tasker, a retired shoemaker, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Elizabeth A. [((Caverly) Hanson)] Tasker, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). George W. Tasker owned their house, free-and-clear. Elizabeth A. Tasker was the mother of zero children. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Hiram S. Cate, a leatherboard hand (retired), aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), and Royal K. Webber, a carpenter (house), aged thirty-seven years (b. ME).

Charles Tasker, a shoe cutter (uppers), aged forty years (b. NH [SIC]), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Ida [(Shattuck)] Tasker, aged forty-three years (b. VT [SIC]), his children, Edgar Tasker, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Grace Tasker, aged eleven years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Charles Shattuck, a retired woolen mill superintendent, aged seventy-five years (b. MA). Charles Tasker owned their house, free-and-clear. Ida Tasker was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles Cole, a shoe finisher, aged forty-six years (b. ME), and Elvira V. [(Leighton)] Pierce, a home keeper, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH).

Royal Webber, a carpenter (house), aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Nellie B. [(Tasker)] Webber, aged thirty-three years (b. NH). Royal Webber opened their house, free-and-clear. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of George W. Tasker, a retired shoemaker, aged seventy years (b. NH), and John A. Barrett, a mill engineer, aged forty-six years (b. ME).

Webber, Royal K. - 1905Sarah J. [(Waite)] Libby, a widow, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed a Fort Fairfield, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Jerre H. Libby, a lawyer, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), and Amy L. Libby, at school, aged seventeen years (b. ME), and his boarders, Mary E. Fish, a milliner, aged twenty-eight years (b. MA), Laura E. Harvey, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), Bessie E. Burpee, a school teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. Canada), Dana J. Tasker, a drug salesman, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and George S. Osborne, a house painter, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME). Sarah J. Libby owned their house on Main Street, free-and-clear. She was the mother of six children, of whom three were still living.

Son Dana J. Tasker married in Center Ossipee, NH, June 12, 1901, Lena M. Spear, he of Milton and she of Ossipee, NH. He was a pharmacist, aged twenty-seven years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-five years. Rev. S.W. Richardson performed the ceremony. She was born in Ossipee, NH, November 2, 1879, daughter of Alphonso and Sarah E. Spear.

SANFORD LOCALS. Dana Tasker is working at Meserve’s drug store in Kennebunk (Sanford Journal-Tribune (Sanford, ME), April 17, 1903).

George W. Tasker appeared in the Milton directories of 1902, and 1905, as retired, with his house on South Main Street, opposite Charles Street. His son, Charles W. Tasker, appeared in 1902 as a shoe cutter, resident in Roxbury, MA.

Son Charles W. Tasker appeared in the Boston directories of 1902, 1903, and 1904, as a [shoe] cutter, boarding at 6 Galena Street, Roxbury.

SANFORD LOCALS. Dana J. Tasker and Mrs. Tasker are on a vacation trip in New Hampshire (Sanford Journal-Tribune (Sanford, ME), July 18, 1902).

Son Charles W. Tasker appeared in the Boston directories of 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, as a [shoe] cutter, with his house at 82 Bower Street, Roxbury.

Our Grange Homes. NEW HAMPSHIRE. The following officers of Lewis W. Nute grange were installed Jan. 10th by John A. Edgerly of Tuftonboro: B.B. Plummer, Jr., M.; James F. Doe, O.; Ruth L. Fall, L.; Hervey W. Dorr, S.; Carl H. Keene, A.S.; Mrs. Mary C. Hall, Chap.; Mrs. Nellie B. Webber, Sec.; Charles A. Jones, T.; J.W. Johnson, G.K.; Mrs. Ina Webber, C; Mrs. Lucia Jones, P.; Mrs. C.M. Dorr, L.A.S. (New England Farmer (Brattleboro, VT), February 3, 1906).

MILTON, N.H. Dana Tasker of Center Ossipee visited his father, George W. Tasker, who has been quite ill, last Wednesday (Sanford Journal-Tribune (Sanford, ME), February 1, 1907).

MILTON, N.H. Dana Tasker of Centre Ossipee visited his father, George W. Tasker, Monday (Sanford Journal-Tribune (Sanford, ME), March 22, 1907).

MILTON, N.H. Mrs. Eleanor Metcalfe Hunt, of Boston, is visiting at Mrs. Royal K. Webber’s (Sanford Journal-Tribune (Sanford, ME), June 26, 1908).

Son Charles W. Tasker appeared in the Boston directory of 1910, as a sexton, with his house at 82 Bower Street, Roxbury.

George M. Tasker, a laborer, aged eighty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Elisabeth [((Caverly) Hanson)] Tasker, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH). George M. Tasker owned their house, free-and-clear. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Melvina [(Staples)] Dorr, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), and John R. Kennett, a paper mill lapper, aged thirty-eight years (b. NY).

Charles W. Tasker, a church sexton, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Ida B. [(Shattuck)] Tasker, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and his children, Edgar S. Tasker, an electric light distributor, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and Grace M. Tasker, a law office stenographer, aged twenty years (b. NH). Charles W. Tasker rented their house at 82 Bower Street. Ida B. Tasker was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Roy Webber, a leatherboard mill carpenter, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty years), Nellie [(Tasker)] Webber, aged forty-three years (b. NH). Roy Webber owned their house, free-and-clear. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of John R. Kennett, a paper mill lapper, aged thirty-eight years (b. NY), and Charles Stackpole, a shoe shop foreman, aged thirty-five years (b. NH).

Alphonso A. Spear, a general farm farmer, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Ossipee, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Fedeal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-three years), Sarah E. [(Hodsdon)] Spear, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), his daughter, Lena M. [(Spear)] Tasker, a housekeeper, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), his son-in-law (of nine years), Dana J. Tasker, a periodicals agent, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, John W. Hodsdon, a farmer (works at home), aged seventy-four years (b. NH). Alphonso A. Spear owned their farm in Center Ossipee, and/or the Road to Ossipee, free-and-clear. Sarah E. Spear was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

George W. Tasker died of chronic valvular heart disease in Milton, March 13, 1911, aged eighty-one years, four months, and fifteen days. He was a shoe cutter (his father, Nahum Tasker, had been a stone mason). James J. Buckley, M.D., signed the death certificate.

MILTON, N.H. The annual meeting and roll call of the Congregational church was held last Saturday afternoon and a large number was present. A most enjoyable dinner was prepared by the ladies of the church which was fully enjoyed by all. After an hour was spent in the discussing of the good things spread on the table the members met in the church for the election of the officers for the ensuing year and to listen to the reports from church officers. The report of the clerk showed a loss of two members by death the past year, George W. Tasker and Samuel Chamberlain, who had been Deacon of the church for over 58 years. Six members had been dismissed by letter to other churches. Three persons were elected to church membership to receive the hand of fellowship on Sunday. James M. Gage was elected as Deacon and Mrs. Emma Looney, as clerk in place of Mrs. A.M. Roberts, who is in California. J.M. Gage was chosen as treasurer. The committees are Standing Committee, Rev. Clarence Pike, R.M. Kimball, Frank Dawson, Jr., Mrs. Chipman and Mrs. J.B. Hart; Music, Mrs. Ella Hart, Mrs. Bertha Chipman and Mrs. Frank Dawson; Reception, Mrs. R.A. McIntosh, Mrs. Sarah Miller, Mrs. Fred P. Jones and Mrs. Ella Hart; Visiting Committee, Mrs. Ella Hart, Mrs. Lizzie Plummer, Mrs. C.L. Clements, and Mrs. Clara Corson. Letters were read from many who were unable to be present (Sanford Journal-Tribune (Sanford, ME), November 10, 1911).

Son Charles W. Tasker appeared in the Boston directories of 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, as a sexton at Immanuel-Walnut Ave. Church, with his house at 75 Humboldt Avenue, Roxbury. His son, Edgar S. Tasker, appeared in 1912, 1913, 1915, 1916, as a clerk at 39 Boylston Street, boarding at 75 Humboldt Avenue, Roxbury. His daughter, Grace May Tasker, appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1916, as an interior decorator at 6 Beacon Street, Room 627, boarding at 75 Humboldt Avenue, Roxbury.

Brother Hiram H. Tasker died of heart disease on School Street in Berwick, ME, December 25, 1912, aged seventy-one years, eleven months. He was a shoemaker. W.T. Elliot, M.D., signed the death certificate.

BP160819 - Miss Grace M. TaskerSon Charles W. Tasker appeared in the Boston directories of 1916, 1917, 1918, and 1920, as a sexton at Immanuel-Walnut Ave. Church, with his house at 6 Harold Park, Roxbury. His son, Edgar S. Tasker, appeared in 1917, as a salesman, boarding at 6 Harold Park; in 1918, as a clerk at 219 South Station, with his house at 6 Harold Park, Roxbury; and in 1920, as a clerk at 420 South Station, with his house at Atlantic. His daughter, Grace May Tasker, appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1915, 1916, as an interior decorator at 6 Beacon Street, Room 627, boarding at 6 Harold Park, Roxbury.

ROXBURY GIRL TO MARRY ARCHIRECT. Miss Grace May Tasker, an interior decorator, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Tasker of 6 Harold Park, Roxbury, and G. Bertram Washburn of Arlington, a Boston architect, announced tbsir engagement Thursday (Boston Post, August 19, 1916).

Florence E. [(Griffin)] Tuck, a leatherboard mill molder, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Marjorie E. Tuck, aged eight years (b. MA), Donald L. Tuck, aged six years (b. MA), Gordon C. Tuck, aged four years, seven months (b. MA), Helen M. Tuck, aged three years, three months (b. MA), and James H. Tuck, aged two years, three months (b. MA), her mother-in-law, Clara [((Todd) Tuck)] Martell, a leatherboard mill molder, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), and her grandmother, Elizabeth [((Caverly) Hanson)] Tasker, a widow, aged seventy-six years (b. NH). Florence E. Tuck rented their house at 14 Front Street.

Son Charles W. Tasker, a church sexton, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Ida B. [(Shattuck)] Tasker, aged sixty-two years (b. NH). Charles W. Tasker rented their apartment at 6 Harold Park Street.

Royal K. Webber, a house carpenter, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nellie B. [(Tasker)] Webber, aged fifty-three years (b. NH). Royal K. Webber owned their house on Lower Main Street, Milton Village, free-and-clear. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of George H. Paul, a laborer, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), and Joel Barron, an owner teamster, aged thirty-five years (b. ME).

Dana J. Tasker, a civil engineer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed an Ossipee, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lena S. [(Spear)] Tasker, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Sarah E. Spear, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH). Dana J. Tasker owned their house on the State Road, free-and-clear.

Son Charles W. Tasker appeared in the Boston directories of 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, as a sexton at Immanuel-Walnut Ave. Church, with his house at 6 Harold Park, Roxbury. His son, Edgar S. Tasker, appeared in 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, as a clerk at 420 South Station, with his house at Atlantic.

Daughter-in-law Ida B. (Shattuck) Tasker died in 1924.

Son-in-law Royal K. Webber died of lung oedema on Main Street in Milton, July 16, 1928, aged sixty-eight years, nine months, and one day. He was a carpenter, who had resided in Milton for forty-four years, i.e., since circa 1884. Robert V. Sweet, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Elizabeth A. ((Caverly) Hanson) Tasker died of valvular heart disease at Bow Lake in Barrington, NH, May 8, 1929, aged eighty-six years, and nine days. J. Messill, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Charles W. Tasker, a Congregational church sexton, aged seventy-three years (b. ME), headed an Orange Park, FL, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. He resided at 262 New England Avenue.

Dana J. Tasker, a road surveyor, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed an Ossipee, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Lena S. [(Spear)] Tasker, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and his boarder, Maynard W. Helton, a farm laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Dana J. Tasker owned their house. They had a radio set.

CENTER OSSIPEE LANDMARK BURNS. Center Ossipee, March 20 – “Bonnie Brow,” the home of Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Eldridge, was completely destroyed by fire about 4.30 o’clock this morning with damage estimated at $10,000. The two and one-half story, wooden building, ell and shed was well known as the old Miller place. It was built in 1760 and was one of the finest houses in this vicinity. The fire was discovered by Mrs. Eldridge. Mrs. Eldridge had been sick during the night and was sleeping on a couch in the dining room when she was awakened by the smell of smoke. She saw flames eating their way through the wall of the dining room above a fireplace. Mrs. Eldridge rushed upstairs and woke her husband, who drove a mile and a half to the home of Dana J. Tasker to call the Fire Department. A mixup in the telephone message the firemen nearly five miles out of the way. When the mistake was discovered and the apparatus got to the fire, it was too late. The fire spread so rapidly that Mrs. Eldridge saved but little furniture. The cause of the fire is unknown. The place was partially covered by insurance (Portsmouth Herald, March 30, 1935).

Daughter Nellie B. (wid. Royal K.) Webber, appeared in the Orlando, FL, directory of 1936, as residing at 107 E. Robinson Street.

Son Charles W. Tasker died of a cerebral hemorrhage in the Memorial Hospital in North Conway, NH, July 14, 1939, aged eighty-three years, two months, and twenty-eight days. He was a widowed shoe operator. Daughter Mrs. Grace [(Tasker)] Washburn of Arlington, MA, supplied the personal details. C.M. Wiggin, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Nellie B. [(Tasker)] Webber, a widow, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed an Orlando, FL, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. She rented her apartment at 107 East Robinson Street, for $30 per month. She had resided in Milton, NH, in 1935.

Dana J. Tasker, a state highway engineer, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed an Ossipee, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lena S. [(Spear)] Tasker, aged sixty-three years (b. NH). Dana J. Tasker owned their farm, which was valued at $2,000.

Nellie B. [(Tasker)] Webber, a widow, aged eighty-three years (b. NH), headed an Orlando, FL, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. She resided at 303 Livingston Street (Apt. 1).

Dana J. Tasker, a retiree, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), headed an Ossipee, NH, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lena S. [(Spear)] Tasker, aged seventy-three years (b. NH). Dana J. Tasker owned their house.

Daughter Nellie B. (Tasker) Webber died in Orland0, FL, May 7, 1955.

Obituaries. MRS. NELLIE B. WEBBER. Mrs. Nellie B. Webber, a native of Milton, N.H., died Saturday in a local hospital. She is survived by a brother, Dana Tasker, Ossipee, N.H. The body will be shipped to Union, N.H., for services and burial by Fairchild Funeral Home (Orlando Sentinel (Orlando, FL), May 9, 1955).

Son Dana Jones Tasker died in 1960. Daughter-in-Law Lena May (Spear) Tasker died in Laconia, NH, in May 1971.


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, May 3). Elizabeth A. “Lizzie” Caverly Hanson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/109938032/elizabeth-a-hanson

Find a Grave. (2020, October 21). Addie F. Tasker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217549626/addie-f-tasker

Find a Grave. (2020, October 21). Amy Edly Tasker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217549779/amy-edly-tasker

Find a Grave. (2021, December 16). Charles W. Tasker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/234933392/charles-w-tasker

Find a Grave. (2017, June 16). Dana Jones Tasker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/180423007/dana-jones-tasker

Find a Grave. (2020, October 21). George W. Tasker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217549444/george-w-tasker

Find a Grave. (2020, October 20). Mabel Tasker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217549718/mabel-tasker

Find a Grave. (2020, July 27). Mary Hanson Tasker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/213829765/mary-tasker

Find a Grave. (2017, October 20). Nahum Tasker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184457302/nahum-tasker

Find a Grave. (2020, October 25). Nellie B. Tasker Webber. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217677162/nellie-b-webber

McFarland & Jenks. (1869). Political Manual and Annual Register for the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=K0A4AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA100

NH General Court. (1871). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=UtFHAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA5

NH General Court. (1872). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=JT9NAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA5

NH Secretary of State. (1866). Laws of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=o5ZGAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA3374

NH Bureau of Labor Report on Milton’s Shoe Industry – 1896

By Muriel Bristol | January 1, 2022

The NH Bureau of Labor reported in 1896 on their sense of the history of shoe manufacturing in Milton.

The Bureau’s report covered first an initial phase of Milton shoe manufacturing, in which the shoe manufacturers caused shoe pieces to be cut from tanned leather to be assembled later into finished shoes by others – shoemakers – on a piecework basis. The assembling shoemakers worked either separately in their own homes or else in small groups in local shoe shops. (Period maps show buildings labeled “S.S.” for “Shoe Shop,” as distinct from those labeled “S.H.” for “School House”). This phase peaked with military production for the American Civil War.

Pearl Davis - NGA - Shoemaker's BenchMost of their assembly work would have been done by hand at a shoemaker’s bench, perhaps assisted in some tasks by simple treadle-driven machinery. Shoemakers of this period were often quite well informed, because groups of them might pay to have a “lector” read aloud to them from newspapers, magazines or books while they worked.

MILTON. Among the early manufacturers of shoes in this town were John E. Goodwin & Co., at West Milton, who gave employment to 25 or 30 hands in cutting and putting up stock, to be fitted and bottomed by the people of the town; H.V. & Eli Wentworth, who carried on a large business at South Milton for several years, until burned out; and D. & S. Washburn, L. Berry and J. Layward [Sayward], who carried on a successful business at various times at Three Ponds, the latter continuing until burned out in 1864 (NH Bureau of Labor, 1896).

John E. and Charles H. Goodwin ran their shoe manufactory in the Goodwinville section of West Milton from the mid to late 1840s until John E. Goodwin moved the business to Dover, NH, in or after 1863. (His Dover, NH, factory would burn in a fire in 1870).

Milton - 1856 (Detail) - Goodwin, JE-CHJohn Colbath (1828-1915) moved to Goodwinville in West Milton in 1847 to work with the Goodwins, which he did until 1853. He resided with Charles H. Goodwin in 1850. Harrison Kimball (1817-1855) was associated with the Goodwins in shoe manufacturing. He resided next door with Elder J.T.G. Colby. Alvah Wentworth (1831-1874) and Ira W. Nute (1831-1896) were associated with the Goodwins in shoe manufacturing too. They resided next door with Goodwin brother Daniel B. Goodwin.

Milton - 1871 (Detail) - WentworthBrothers Hiram V. and Eli Wentworth started a shoe manufactory at South Milton in the mid to late 1840s. John C. Plumer (1829-1902) was a resident associate of Eli Wentworth in 1850. Sen. Eli Wentworth received an army commission in 1861 and would die in Mississippi in 1863. Hiram V. Wentworth continued to run the shoe manufactory until it burned down in 1875.

Brothers Daniel and Samuel Washburn came to Milton Three Ponds from Natick, MA, circa 1849, and there ran a shoe manufactory until the mid 1850s, when they returned to their native Natick, MA.

In addition to those mentioned in the retrospective portion of the 1896 report, Francis D. Horn (1815-1863) and James R. Horn (b. c1826), both of Plummer’s Ridge, Ira S. Davis (1812-1889), and Daniel P. Warren (1815-1881), were all identified also in the Seventh (1850) Federal Census as being Milton shoe manufacturers, rather than shoemakers.

Lewis N. Berry was already a shoemaker when he came to Milton Three Ponds in the mid to late 1850s. He became a shoe manufacturer there from at least 1860 until his death in June 1863.

Joseph Sayward ran his shoe manufactory at Milton Three Ponds from the mid to late 1850s until it burned down in 1864. (At which point he became instead a merchant).

The Bureau’s report covered next a more machine-driven phase or style of production, which arrived here in the mid 188os. These new shoe manufactories used Milton’s rivers to power their machinery, backed up by supplementary steam power when river levels were low. (See also Milton Water Power in 1885). Most of these firms had their principal shoe manufactories elsewhere, often in Massachusetts cities, and their Milton operations were merely for overflow or supplementary operations.

In 1884 an organization composed of citizens of the town erected a shoe factory 160 x 40 and four stories high, with other accessories, at Milton, at a cost of $12,000, which was leased to Burley & Usher in 1885, who were afterwards succeeded by N.B. Thayer & Co., the present occupants. Misses’ and children’s kid and Dongola spring heel slippers are manufactured, and employment is given to 100 or more hands. Steam and water are used for power, and the firm is not exempt from taxation (NH Bureau of Labor, 1896).

The firm of Burley & Usher occupied the subsidized shoe manufactory building at Milton Three Ponds from 1885 to 1893.

Milton - 1892 (Detail) - Burley-UsherN.B. Thayer & Co. took over the shoe factory building which had formerly been occupied by Burley & Usher. They would be active there between 1894 and 1909.

BG941024 - NB ThayerMeanwhile, Varney & Lane ran briefly a subsidized shoe manufactory in the old Brierley felt mill at Milton Mills from 1888 to 1890.

In 1888 Varney & Lane began the manufacture of shoes in the factory originally built and occupied as a felt mill by E. Brierly & Son, at Milton Mills (110 x 50 and four stories high, and erected in 1873 at a cost of $13,000), and did a successful business for some time. They were succeeded by the Sale [Gale] Shoe Manufacturing company of Haverhill in 1895, who are in the manufacture of women’s kid and Dongola button boots, Oxford ties and misses’ spring heel slippers, and give employment to 75 or more hands. Water and steam are for power, and the firm is not exempt from taxation (NH Bureau of Labor, 1896).

Milton - 1892 (Detail) - Varney-LaneVarney & Lane’s Milton Mills operation ended in a contentious shoe strike. (See Milton Mills Shoe Strike of 1889).

SJ891122 - CW VarneyVarney & Lane were replaced in the Brierley mill building by the Gale Shoe Manufacturing Co. from 1890-1904.

BG970531 - Gale ShoeSome $60,000 capital is invested in the shoe business in Milton. Two hundred people, more or less, are employed, to whom are paid nearly $50,000 annually in wages, and the yearly output is valued at $150,000 (NH Bureau of Labor, 1896).

BG091028 - Andrews WasgattAnd, after the publication of the NH Bureau of Labor’s 1896 report, the Andrews Wasgatt Co. took over from the Gale Shoe Manufacturing Co., at the old Brierley Mill in Milton Mills, from 1904 to 1914, and the Timson Shoe Co., from 1915 to 1918.


References:

Find a Grave. (2017, June 19). John Colbath. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/180530106/john-colbath

Find a Grave. (2022, November 30). Ira S. Davis. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/246074249/ira-s-davis

Find a Grave. (2016, March 14). Harrison Kimball. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/159450571/harrison-kimball

Find a Grave. (2015, November 8). Ira Wallace Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154759010/ira-wallace-nute

Find a Grave. (2022, April 6). Daniel P. Warren. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/238563886/daniel-p-warren

Find a Grave. (2022, April 28). Alvah Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/239295490/alvah-wentworth

National Gallery of Art. (2022). Shoemaker’s Bench. Retrieved from www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.20290.html

NH Bureau of Labor. (1896). Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=dEQbAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA23

Celestial Seasonings – January 2023

By Heather Durham | December 30, 2023

Happy New Year one and all! Before we begin discussing the new year, let’s travel back to last month for an Artemis update.

The space.com website gives us a brief but informative overview as follows:

NASA’s Artemis 1 moon mission, the agency’s first big step toward returning astronauts to the lunar surface, launched to the moon on Nov. 16 on a critical test flight to return astronauts to the moon. It splashed down on Dec. 11.

Artemis 1 is the first test flight of the agency’s new Space Launch System megarocket and the Orion spacecraft. The SLS rocket launched the uncrewed Orion spacecraft on a 26-day mission, during which it will orbit the moon before returning to Earth (Howell, Malik, 2022).

In addition, universe.com gives us a glimpse of what can be expected during this year.

Astronomy 2023 highlights include two fine solar eclipses, the Sun heading towards solar maximum, a series of spectacular lunar occultations and much more.

Been out enjoying the sky in 2022? The past year saw two fine total lunar eclipses, a surprise meteor outburst from the Tau Heraclids, a fine occultation of Mars by the Moon and more. Astronomy 2023 promises more of the same, plus much more” (Flannery, 2022).

Now, let us review January’s events.


January 3. Our Moon and Mars will travel close to each other and rise to the right.

January 4. The Quadrantid meteor shower will be its most prolific today. As well, our Earth will be at its closest point towards the Sun.

January 6. Today brings the full Wolf Moon.

January 12. Mars appears to reverse its direction.

January 14. The Moon will be in its final quarter.

January 19. The γ-Ursae Minorid meteor shower should peak today.

January 23. Mercury will reach its highest place in the sky.

January 24. Mercury will be at half phase and will shine brightly.

January 25. The Moon and Jupiter will rise to the right and orbit close to each other.

January 30. Mercury will be shining brightly as it reaches its greatest separation from the Sun. The Moon and Mars will travel close to each other and rise to the right.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). December 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Milton Merchant Joseph Sayward (1817-1889)

By Muriel Bristol | December 25, 2022

Joseph Sayward, Jr., was born in Thomaston, ME, August 27, 1817, son of Joseph and Martha (Wheeler) Sayward. (His father was a sergeant in Capt. G. Coombs’ militia company, in Lt. Col. E. Foot’s regiment, when it was raised in Thomaston, ME, in September 1814, for coastal defense at Camden and Thomaston, ME).

In 1820 he [Joseph Sayward, Sr.] moved to Twenty-five Mile Pond Plantation, now Burnham, and in 1824 took an active part in the incorporation of that town. In 1828 he moved to Thorndyke, nine years after its incorporation, and from the virgin forest commenced to clear the farm on which the last fifty-three years of his life were spent (Sayward, 1890).

Joseph Sayward married (1st) in Vassalboro, ME, May 17, 1840, Mary A. Getchell. She was born circa 1818.

Joseph Sayward headed a Thorndyke, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], and one female aged 20-29 years [Mary A. (Getchell) Sayward]. One person in his household was engaged in Agriculture. (His father headed another Thorndike household).

Mary A. (Getchell) Sayward died in Unity, Waldo County, ME, April 27, 1849, aged thirty-one years. Son Charles Francis Sayward was born in Milton [?], circa 1849.

Joseph Sayward married (2nd), circa 1849, Ann E. Wiggin. She was born in Vassalboro, ME, circa 1829.

Joseph Sawords, a joiner, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Ann [(Wiggins)] Sawords, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), and Charles H. Sawords, aged one year (b. ME). Their house appeared in the enumeration between those of John W. Ricker, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and Daniel W. Horne, a blacksmith, aged forty-one years (b. ME).

Son Charles Francis Sayward died of dysentery in Milton, September 29, 1852, aged three years.

The Milton selectmen of 1855 were Jos. Sayward, Lewis Plummer, and J.C. Wentworth.

Daughter Martha A. “Mattie” Sayward was born in Milton, June 27, 1855.

The Milton selectmen of 1856 were Jos. Sayward, J.C. Wentworth, and D. Wallingford, Jr.

Son Frank Sayward was born in Milton, October 24, 1857. D.E. Palmer, M.D., reported the birth. Frank Sayward died in December 1859.

Milton - 1856 (Detail) - Sayward
Milton in 1856 (Detail). The “J. Sayward” residence on Main Street (NH Route 125), south of its intersection with Charles Street. This might have been the site of his shoe manufactory too, but there is also on the opposite side of the street, below its intersection with Silver Street, an “S.S.,” i.e., a shoe shop. Neither location would have had access to water power.

Son Fred B. Sayward was born in Milton, December 25, 1858. (Recorded as Frank B. Sayward). He was the fourth child; his father was a shoe manufacturer.

Joseph Sayward, aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Ann E. [(Wiggin)] Sayward, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), M.A. [Martha A.] Sayward, aged eight years (b. NH), and F.B. [Fred B.] Sayward, aged one year (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joseph Nute, a laborer, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), and B.E. Witham, a laborer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH).

Joseph Sayward of Milton paid $7.21 as a 3% tax on 480 pairs of shoes (valued at $240.30) for the month of December in the US Excise Tax of 1862.

Joseph Sayward of Milton paid $10.62 as a 3% tax on 539 pairs of shoes (valued at $354.26) for the month of January in the US Excise Tax of 1863. Joseph Sayward of Milton paid $5.59 as a 3% tax on 300 pairs of shoes (valued at $186.52) for the month of January in the US Excise Tax of 1863.

The Milton selectmen of 1864 were T.H. Roberts, Jos. Sayward, and D.B. Goodwin.

The NH Bureau of Labor report of 1896 mentioned the destruction by fire of J. Sayward’s shoe manufactory in 1864.

… and J. [S]ayward, who carried on a successful [shoe manufactory] business at various times at Three Ponds, the latter continuing until burned out in 1864 (NH Bureau of Labor, 1896).

Joseph Sayward of Milton paid $5.83 on an auctioneer’s license in the month of October 1864.

The Milton selectmen of 1865 were Jos. Hayward [Sayward], J.U. Simes, and Ebenezer Wentworth.

Joseph Sayward of Milton paid $10 for a retail dealer’s license in the US Excise Tax of 1865. Joseph Sayward of Milton paid $10 for a retail dealer’s license in the US Excise Tax of 1866.

Joseph Sayward and sixty-eight other Milton residents petitioned the NH House seeking establishment of a NH state constabulary, i.e., a NH state police force, in 1867.

PETITIONS, ETC., PRESENTED AND REFERRED. To the Special Committee on the State Constabulary. By Mr. Gault, of Hooksett, petition of A. Burnham and forty seven others, of Hooksett; by Mr. Smith of Raymond, petition of Joseph Fullerton and fifty-six others of Raymond; by Mr. Miller, of New Durham, petition of Cyrus B. Bean and eighteen others of New Durham; by Mr. Lang, of Lee, petition of Mason Morse and one hundred and eighty-nine others of Lee; by Mr. George, of Lempster, petition of Collins Hurd and thirty-three others of Lempster; by Mr. Andrews, of Orange, petition of John W. Hodges and one hundred and sixty others of Canaan; petition of Moses R. Marshall and seventeen others of Pelham; petition of Joseph Sayward and sixty-eight others of Milton; by Mr. Horne, of Farmington, petition of R.M. Sargent and forty-two others of Farmington; – severally for a State Constabụlary (NH General Court, 1867). 

Joseph Sayward was one of the ten prominent Milton citizens who incorporated a private secondary school – the Milton Classical Institute – at Three Ponds Village in Milton, NH, in July 1867. The incorporators included also NH Governor’s Councilor (and ex-officio NH State Board of Education member) Charles Jones, Strafford Sheriff Luther Hayes, manufacturer Hiram V. Wentworth, Dr. George W. Peavey, William P. Tuttle, and others.

Joseph Sayward appeared in the Milton directories of 1868, and 1869-70, as a Milton merchant.

Mother Martha (Wheeler) Sayward died in Thorndike, ME, January 20, 1869, aged seventy-nine years.

We cherish all thy tender love, That once thy lips did speak, Though thou art sleeping in the grave, Thy spirit’s with the meek.

Joseph Sayward, a retail grocer, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Ann E. [(Wiggin)] Sayward, keeping house, aged forty years (b. ME), Martha A. Sayward, a teacher, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Fred B. Sayward, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), George W. Sayward, a retail grocer, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Gracia H. Sayward, at school, aged twelve years (b. ME), Nellie F. French, aged four years (b. MA). Joseph Hayward had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $1,620. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Nathaniel G. Pinkham, works for shoe factory, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and Joseph Mathes, a carpenter, aged fifty-four years (b. NH).

Thorndike, ME, sent father Joseph Sayward to the Maine House of Representatives in 1870.

REPRESENTATIVES ELECTED. Waldo – Entitled to 9. Republicans. Belfast, Willard P. Harriman; Unity, William Taber; Searsmont, James Severance; Monroe, Ashur H. Mayo; Thorndike, Joseph Sayward; Lincolnville, Henry Crehore; Searsport, Isaac Carver – 7. Democrats. Winterport, George White; Morrill, Thomas Storer – 3 (Kennebec Journal (Augusta, ME), September 21, 1870).

Brother George W. Sayward appeared in the Milton directory of 1871, as a Milton merchant.

Daughter Martha A. “Mattie” Sayward married in Rochester, NH, November 14, 1874, George E. Horne, she of Rochester, NH, and he of Lebanon, ME. He was a farmer, aged twenty-six years, and she was aged twenty-two years. Rev. Anthony C. Hardy performed the ceremony. Horne was born in Milton, circa 1848, son of Charles F. and Betsy Horne.

Joseph Sayward, a retail grocer, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ann E. [(Wiggin)] Sayward, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), his son, Fred Sayward, clerk in store, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), his brother, George W. Sayward, a laborer, aged fifty years (b. ME), his niece, Nellie French, at home, aged fifteen years (b. MA), and his boarders, Lewis S. Clark, works in shoe shop, aged thirty-two years (b. VT), Elma J. Clark, works in shoe shop, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), Henry L. Cutter, works for express co., aged twenty-two years (b. MA), Bridget McQuade, works in woolen mill, aged thirty years (b. (Ireland), and William R. Pettee, a clerk in store, aged twenty years (b. MA). They resided on Charles Street.

George E. Horne, works in woolen mill, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mattie A. [(Sayward)] Horne, keeping house, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), his son, Roy C. Horne, aged five years (b. NH), his servant, Anne Furbish, a domestic servant, aged twenty years (b. ME), and his boarders, John Moulton, works in woolen mill, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), Walter Cullen, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-one years (b. Ireland), Noah Eaton, a carpenter, aged fifty years (b. ME), John Mason, works in shoe factory, aged twenty years (b. NH), Thomas Keefe, a painter, aged thirty years (b. Ireland), Nellie Chamberlain, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and C.H. Chamberlain, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH).

Father Joseph Sayward [Sr.] was quite sick in Thorndike, ME, in February 1881.

Thorndike. It is quite sickly at the present time. Joseph Sayward, one of our oldest towns men is quite sick. R.S. Rich, Esq., is very ill with rheumatic fever, and Isaac Collin has been afflicted some time with rheumatism. Daniel Cordon is teaching high school in Johnson’s Hall, and having quite a good attendance, he is one of our best teachers. Business continues good — Hay and potatoes are coming in every day in large quantities.  O.J. Farwell has a car load of wool ready for shipment (Republican Journal (Belfast, ME, February 24, 1881).

Father Joseph Sayward died in Thorndike, ME, April 21, 1881, aged eighty-eight years, eleven months, and twelve days.

Rest weary heart Like a tired child Upon its mother’s breast. Rest, sweetly rest.

Son Fred B. Sayward married in Rochester, NH, August 10, 1881, Helen Augusta Roberts, both of Rochester, NH. He was a merchant, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged twenty-two years. Rev. A.J. Quick performed the ceremony. She was born in Rochester, NH, April 17, 1857, daughter of John R. and Ellen Roberts.

LOCALS. Fred Sayward of Rochester handled the piano keys in a satisfactory manner last Friday and Monday evenings (Farmington News, April 12, 1889).

Joseph Sayward died in Rochester, NH, July 24, 1889, aged seventy-one years.

CLIPPINGS ABOUT ROCHESTER. The late Joseph Sayward had a policy for $5000 in the Granite State Mutual Aid Association. Soon after Mr. Sayward’s death the association went out of business. It had quite a sum of money on deposit in one of the banks of this village upon which Mrs. Sayward placed an attachment. On Wednesday she received $2500 in settlement of the claim, previous offer of 40 per cent having been declined (Farmington News, November 8, 1889).

Brother George W. Sayward died in Rochester, NH. March 3, 1898.

PERSONALS. Mr. Fred B. Sayward of Rochester was here on Wednesday (Portsmouth Herald, August 25, 1898).

George E. Horne, a shoe cutter, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Martha A. [(Sayward)] Horne, a boarding house keeper, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his son, Roy C. Horne, a printer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and his boarder, Arthur Sewall, a shoe packer, aged seventeen years (b. ME). George E. Horne owned their house at 11 Glen Street., with a mortgage. Martha Horne was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living.

Fred P. Sayward, a music teacher, aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Augusta [(Roberts)] Sayward, aged forty-one years (b. NH), his son, Carl B. Sayward, at school, aged ten years (b. NH), and his boarder, James A. Roberts, a hotel clerk, aged forty-three years (b. NH). Fred P. Sayward rented their house at 94 Charles Street. Augusta Sayward was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

George E. Horne, a shoe cutter, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-six years), Martha [(Sayward)] Horne, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), his son, Roy C. Horne, a job work printer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law (of seven years), Lucy M. Horne, a compositor, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his lodgers, George W. St. John, a printer, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), Patrick S. Driscoll, a box mill bookkeeper, aged twenty-nine years (b. RI), and Royal Lord, a drug salesman, aged twenty years (b. NH). George E. Horne owned their house at 11 Glen Street., with a mortgage. Martha Horne was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living.

Fred B. Sayward, a moving picture piano player, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Helen A. [(Roberts)] Sayward, aged fifty years (b. NH), and his boarder, Carrie Tabert, aged forty-three years (b. MA). Fred P. Sayward rented their portion of a two-family residence at 147 Charles Street. Helen A. Sayward was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

MR. COCHRANE DEAD. George Edward Cochrane, one of the best known attorneys in Strafford County, died last week Thursday night at the residence of Fred Sayward of Rochester, where he had been living since the death of his wife last spring. … (Farmington News, December 20, 1912).

LOCAL. Willey & Sayward, proprietors of the new moving picture house known as the Colonial Theatre, in Rochester, opened Saturday night (Farmington News, July 28, 1916).

George E. Horne, a school house janitor, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Martha A. [(Sayward)] Horne, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), his son, Roy C. Horne, a print office proprietor, aged forty-four years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Lucy M. Horne, a print office printer, aged forty years (b. NH), and his boarder, Mary A. Atterton, a toilet article canvasser, aged forty-nine years (b. ME). George E. Horne owned their house at 11 Glen Street.

Fred B. Sayward, a theater pianist, aged sixty-one years (b. Milton, NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Helen A. [(Roberts)] Sayward, aged sixty years (b. Rochester, NH). Fred P. Sayward owned their house at 155 Charles Street. This particular census taker, McDowell Healey, collected more information than required in that he recorded birth town names, rather than just states. His supervisor crossed out the town names. His parents were said to have been born in Thorndyke, ME, and hers were born in Rochester, NH, and Dover, NH.

Son Fred B. Sayward died of natural causes at 155 Charles Street in Rochester, NH, May 7, 1920, aged sixty-one years, four months, and twelve days. He was a musician, who had resided in Rochester, NH, for fifty-two years, i.e., since circa 1867. His previous residence had been Milton. Forrest L. Keay, M.D. signed the death certificate.

George Horne, a school janitor, aged eighty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Martha [(Sayward)] Horne, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH), his son, Roy Horne, a print office printer, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and his servant, Elma J. Aula, a private family servant, aged seventy-one years (b. NH). George Horne owned their house at 11 Glen Street, which was valued at $3,200. They had a radio set.

Carl B. Sayward, a plumber, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Cambridge, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna [(Whitten)] Sayward, a printing co. bookkeeper, aged thirty-nine years (b. MA), his daughter, Priscilla Sayward, a retail store clerk, aged nine years (b. MA), and his mother, Helen A. [(Roberts)] Sayward, aged sixty [seventy] years (b. NH). Carl B. Sayward owned their house at 185 Lakeview Avenue, which was valued at $6,200. They had a radio set.

Son-in-law George E. Horne died in Rochester, NH, November 24, 1930, aged eighty-two years.

Daughter Martha A. (Sayward) Horne died of angina pectoris at 7 Central Avenue in Rochester, NH, January 7, 1933, aged eighty years, six months, and twenty-nine days. She had resided in Rochester, NH, for sixty years, i.e., since circa 1873. She had formerly lived in Milton.

Carl B. Sayward, a plumber, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Cambridge, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna [(Whitten)] Sayward, a printing co. secretary, aged forty-nine years (b. MA), his daughter, Pricella Sayward, a retail store clerk, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and his mother, Helen A. [(Roberts)] Sayward, aged eighty-one years (b. NH). Carl B. Sayward owned their house at 185 Lakeview Avenue, which was valued at $6,500. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

Daughter-in-law Helen A. (Roberts) Sayward died in Cambridge, MA, October 14, 1946, aged eighty-nine years.

DEATH NOTICES. SAYWARD – Helen Augusta, at her home, 183 Lakeview av., Cambridge, Mass., widow of the late Fred B. Funeral services will be held at the Edgerly Funeral Home, Rochester, N.H., Thursday afternoon at 1:30. (Boston Globe, October 15, 1946).

References:

Find a Grave. (2012, September 21). Martha A. Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/97553396/martha-a-horne

Find a Grave. (2016, July 15). Fred B. Sayward. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/167015693/fred-b-sayward

Find a Grave. (2009, April 16). Joseph Sayward [Sr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/35933597/sa

Find a Grave. (2008, November 20). Mary Sayward. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/31568225/mary-sayward

NH Bureau of Labor. (1896). Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=dEQbAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA23

NH General Court. (1867). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Z0AtAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA263

Sayward, Charles A. (1890). The Sayward Family: Being the History and Genealogy of Henry Sayward of York, and His Descendants. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=hnktAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA93

Milton Manufacturer Lewis N. Berry (1824-1863)

By Muriel Bristol | December 18, 2022

Lewis N. Berry was born in Strafford, NH, March 7, 1824, son of Mesach and Eliza (Kimball) Berry.

(The known children of Mesach and Eliza J. (Kimball) Berry were: Lewis N. Berry (1824–1863), Sarah E. Berry (1834–1874), Martha J. Berry (1836–1919), and Alice F. Berry (1844–1884)).

Meshach Berry headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Eliza J. (Kimball) Berry], one male aged 15-19 years [Lewis N. Berry], two females aged 5-9 years [Sarah E. Berry and Martha J. Berry], and one female aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Berry and Hiram Berry.

Lewis N. Berry married in Farmington, NH, June 17, 1848, Emily Maria Leighton, both of Farmington, NH. Rev. J.H. Nutter performed the ceremony. She was born in Somersworth, NH, March 11, 1827, daughter of Tristram and Betsy (Peavey) Leighton.

Lewis Berry appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1848, as a cordwainer, boarding at B. Davis’s house.

Meshach Berry, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eliza [(Kimball)] Berry, aged forty-five years (b. NH), Martha J. Berry, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Ellis F. [Alice F.] Berry, aged six years (b. NH). Meshach Berry had real estate valued at $1,000.

Lewis N. Berry, a shoemaker, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Emily [(Leighton)] Berry, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Sarah Berry, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Laura A. Sleeper, aged eighteen years (b. NH). They resided in a two-family residence with the household of Nathaniel Montgomery, a laborer, aged forty-three years (b. NH).

Sister Sarah E. Berry married (1st) in Farmington, NH, April 29, 1852, Asa B. Hayes, Jr. He was born in Farmington, NH, in January 1830, son of Asa B. and Mehitable (Hayes) Hayes.

Mother Eliza (Kimball) Berry died in Strafford, NH, October 16, 1853.

Daughter Jeannette E. Berry was born in Milton, June 24, 1858.

Mesach Berry, a workman, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included M.J. [Martha J.] Berry, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and A.F. [Alice F.] Berry, aged fifteen years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of [his son,] Lewis N. Berry, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and E.R. Lord, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH).

Lewis N. Berry, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Emily [(Leighton)] Berry, aged thirty-three years, and Janette E. Berry, aged three years (b. NH). Lewis N. Berry had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $2,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of James M. Twombly, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), and Mesach Berry, a workman, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH).

Wentworth Hayes, a farmer, aged eighty-one years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Asa B. Hayes, a farmer, aged thirty years (b. NH), Sarah E. [(Berry)] Hayes, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Clara J. Hayes, aged five years (b. NH), Jesse B. Hayes, aged three years (b. NH), Cora Bell Hayes, aged two months (b. NH), and Lucy A. Pease, aged twelve years (b. MA). Asa B. Hayes had real estate valued at $1,800 and personal estate valued at $1,500.

Lewis N. Berry of Milton paid $10 for his manufacturer’s license for September in the US Excise Tax of 1862.

Lewis Berry received an initial appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, September 13, 1862.

L.N. Berry of Milton paid $22.39 as a 3% tax on 1,260 pairs of split brogan shoes (valued at $746.55) for the month of October 1862 in the US Excise Tax of 1862. He paid $35.80 as a 3% tax on 1,560 pairs of brogan shoes (valued at $1,193.43) for the month of November 1862. He paid $23.59 as a 3% tax on 840 pairs of brogan shoes (valued at $786.51) for the month of December 1862.

Mother-in-law Elizabeth “Betsy” (Peavey) Leighton died of a bilious colic in Farmington, NH, December 25, 1862, aged seventy-two years. (There is a question mark next to the “62” of 1862 on the death certificate). She had been a farmer.

L.N. Berry of Milton paid $109.47 as a 3% tax on 3,960 pairs of shoes (valued at $3,649.05) for the month of February 1863 in the US Excise Tax of 1863. He paid $88.45 as a 3% tax on 3,000 pairs of shoes (valued at $2,948.40) for the month of March 1863. He paid $107.81 as a 3% tax on 3,660 pairs of shoes (valued at $3,593.70) for the month of April 1863. He paid $175.86 as a 3% tax on 6,360 pairs of shoes (valued at $5,856.30) for the month of May 1863. He paid also $6.67 for a renewed manufacturer’s license in May 1863.

Lewis N. Berry died of softening of the brain in Milton, June 5, 1863, aged thirty-nine years, three months. He had been a shoe manufacturer.

Brother-in-law Asa B. Hayes, Jr., died of consumption in Farmington, NH, September 16, 1863, aged thirty-three years. He had been a farmer.

Father Mesach Berry died in Farmington, NH, May 6, 1864, aged sixty-one years.

Lewis Berry appeared posthumously in NH Political Manual of 1866, as a Milton justice-of-the-peace. The court roster column reserved for his 1867 reappointment bore instead a notation that he was “dead.”

MILTON. Justices – Charles Jones, State; Elbridge W. Fox, Joseph Plummer, Luther Hayes, Ebenezer Wentworth, Ezra H. Twombly, Joseph Mathes, Charles A. Cloutman, Asa Jewett, Elias S. Cook, Lewis Berry, Joseph Cook, Robert Mathes (McFarland & Jenks, 1866).

Sister Sarah E. (Berry) Hayes married (2nd) in Farmington, NH, August 27, 1867, John F. Scruton, she of Farmington, NH, and he of Strafford, NH. She was a lady, aged thirty-three years, and he was a farmer, aged twenty-six years. Rev. N.S. Tufts performed the ceremony. Scruton was born in Strafford, NH, November 8, 1841, daughter of Joseph and Louisa (Brock) Scruton.

Emily [(Leighton)] Berry, keeping house, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Jennette E. Berry, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH). They resided in a two-family residence with the household of John L. Wing, a works in shoe factory, aged forty-six years (b. ME).

John F. Scruton, works in shoe manufactory, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah E. [((Berry) Hayes)] Scruton, keeping house, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Clara J. Hayes, at home, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Jessie B. Hayes, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Fannie S. Hayes, aged ten years (b. NH), Louis Scruton, aged two years (b. NH), and [Female] Scruton, aged two months (b. NH). John F. Scruton had personal estate valued at $1,000 and Sarah E. Scruton had real estate valued at $2,500.

Sister Martha Berry, without occupation, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), was one of about one hundred residents in the Rockingham County Farm in Brentwood, NH, at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. She could neither read nor write and was identified as being “idiotic.”

Geo. W. Webster, a shoe cutter, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Webster, keeps house, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), Cora Webster, at home, aged four years (b. MA), Alice Berry, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Hattie Jones, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Lucas Poor, works in shoe factory, aged thirty years (b. NH), Greeley Cumming, a shoe contractor, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Geo. S. Horn, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Edward Hoyt, works in shoe factory, aged eighteen years (b. NH), John Gale, works in shoe factory, aged twenty years (b. NH), Elena Heart, no employment, aged sixty-two years (b. NH). Geo, Webster had real estate valued at $5,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000. Greeley Cumming has personal estate valued at $600; and Geo. S. Horn had person estate valued at $400.

Sister Alice F. Berry married in Barnstead, NH, April 2, 1871, Calvin C. Chesley, she of Haverhill, MA, and he of Barnstead, NH. He was a dentist, aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-five years. Rev. Hector Canfield performed the ceremony. Chesley was born in Barnstead, NH, circa 1842, son of Benjamin and Sally (Bodge) Chesley.

Father-in-law Tristram Leighton died in Rochester, NH, April 26, 1873.

Sister Sarah E. ((Berry) Hayes) Scruton died in Farmington, NH, January 14, 1874, aged thirty-nine years.

Son-in-law John F. Scruton married (2nd) in Barnstead, NH, November 23, 1876, Lydia A. Varney, he of Farmington, NH, and she of Madbury, NH. He was a farmer, aged thirty-five years, and she was a school teacher, aged thirty-six years. Rev. William Rogers performed the ceremony. She was born in Farmington, NH, circa 1840, daughter of Amos and Anna (Locke) Varney.

Emily [(Leighton)] Berry, works in shoe factory, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Jennette Berry, keeping house, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). They resided in a three-family residence at 30 Franklin Street with the households of John Wiggin, retired, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), and Lucy Nute, keeping house, aged sixty-one years (b. NH).

Oliver Waldren, a farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Madbury, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. Waldren, keeping house, aged fifty years (b. NH). and his servant, Martha J. Berry, a servant, aged forty-four years (b. NH).

Calvin C. Chesley, a dentist, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice F. [(Berry)] Chesley, keeping aged thirty-five years (b. NH). They resided on Arch Street.

Brother-in-law Calvin C. Chesley appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1884, as a dentist in Bracewell’s building, with his house on Washington street, at its corner with Arch street.

Sister Alice F. (Berry) Chesley died of cancer in Dover, NH, June 4, 1884, aged thirty-nine years. E.S. Berry, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Brother-in-law Calvin C. Chesley died of paralysis in Barnstead, NH, September 29, 1889, aged forty-seven years, three months, and twenty-eight days. He had been a dentist. G.H. Hawley signed the death certificate.

Alice L. [(Berry)] Chesley, widow of Calvin C. Chesley, appeared posthumously in the surviving Veterans Schedule of the Eleventh (1890) Federal Census. Both were deceased. He had been a private in Company B of the Twelfth NH Volunteer Infantry.

Mrs. Emily Berry appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1892, as a tailoress at 438 Central avenue, boarding at 43 Grove street. Miss Jennette E. Berry appeared as a clerk at 380 Central av., boarding at 43 Grove street. Miss Fannie E. Morrison appeared as a cashier at 380 Central av., boarding at 43 Grove street.

Mrs. Emily Berry appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1895, as a tailoress, with her house on Milk street, near Central av. Jennette E. Berry appeared as a clerk at 380 Central av., boarding at Mrs. Emily Berry’s house.

Daughter Jennette E. Berry died in Dover, NH, March 20, 1897, aged thirty-eight years.

Abednigo Drew, a wheelwright, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Ella J. Drew, a boarding-house keeper, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), his brother-in-law, Tristram A. Smith, aged forty-two years (b. NH), his aunt, Emily [(Leighton)] Berry, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), and his boarders, Augustus Oniel, a heel trimmer, aged forty-one years (b. NH), Joseph Schlenken, a dry goods salesman, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Annie Schlenken, aged twenty-one years (b. NH).

Martha Berry, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), was one of eleven boarders in the Old Ladies Home on Deer Street in Portsmouth, NH, at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census.

Emily M. (Leighton) Berry died of stomach cancer on Charles Street in Rochester, NH, February 7, 1904, aged seventy-six years, ten months, and eighteen days. She had resided in Rochester for five years, i.e., since circa 1897. Her previous residence had been in Dover, NH. Robert V. Sweet, M.D., signed the death certificate.

PERSONAL. Mr. and Mrs. G.I. White and Mrs. A.R. Leighton were in Rochester Wednesday, attending the funeral of Mrs. Emily Berry. H.W. Andrews of Dover took charge of the express office during Mr. White’s absence (Farmington News, February 12, 1904).

Martha H. Berry, aged eighty [seventy-four] years (b. NH), was an inmate at the Rockingham County Farm at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census.

Sister Martha Berry died of senility at the Rockingham County Farm in Brentwood, NH, March 21, 1919, aged eighty-six years. She was said to have been born in Rochester, NY [NH], but had entered into care from Rye, NH, about fifty years, previously, i.e., circa 1869. A.W. Mitchell, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Brother-in-law John F. Scruton died of broncho-pneumonia in Farmington, NH, May 11, 1927, aged eighty-five years, six months, and three days. He had resided in Farmington, NH, for sixty-two years, i.e., since circa 1864-65, with his previous residence having been in Strafford, NH. He had been a farmer. D.L. Stokes, M.D., signed the death certificate.

LOCAL. John Frank Scruton, aged 85, one of the oldest and most highly respected residents of this town, died at his home in West Farmington on Wednesday night. The funeral services will be held from the home Saturday afternoon at two o’clock. Owing to the lateness of the hour at which the report was received, it is impossible to publish a full account this week. Particulars will appear next week (Farmington News, May 13, 1927).


References:

Find a Grave. (2015, June 15). Martha Berry. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147882459/martha-berry

Find a Grave. (2016, October 23). Alice F. Berry Chesley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/171714470/alice-f-chesley

Find a Grave. (2020, May 31). Asa B. Hayes, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/210624862/asa-brewster-hayes

Find a Grave. (2016, April 7). John F. Scruton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/160696850/john-f-scruton

Find a Grave. (2020. May 31). Sarah Elizabeth Berry [Hayes] Scruton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/210624881/sarah-elizabeth-scruton

McFarland & Jenks. (1866). Political Manual for the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=g4ABAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA3-PA127

Milton’s Washburn Bros. Shoe Manufacturers – c1849-1856

By Muriel Bristol | December 11, 2022

David Washburn was born in Natick, MA, March 7, 1815, and Samuel Washburn was born in Natick, MA, April 10, 1823, both sons of Jedediah and Mehitable “Mitta” (Frost) Washburn.

David Washburn married in Natick, MA, December 16, 1834, Eliza Jane Parker, both of Natick, MA. She was born in Framingham, MA, June 6, 1817, daughter of Artemas and Almy (Clark) Parker.

Almy Clark Washburn was born in Natick, MA, September 27, 1835, daughter of David and Eliza J. (Parker) Washburn. She was a namesake for her maternal grandmother, Almy (Clark) Parker. Romanzo Neridin Washburn was born in Natick, MA, July 4, 1839, son of David and Eliza J. (Parker) Washburn.

David Washburn headed a Natick, MA, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Eliza J. (Parker) Washburn], two males aged 15-19 years [Samuel Washburn [?] and another], one female aged 10-14 years, one female aged under-5 years [Alma C. Washburn], and one male aged under-5 years [Romanzo N. Washburn]. Three members of his household were engaged in Manufacture and the Trades.

Mary Eliza Washburn was born in Natick, MA, April 4, 1845, son of David and Eliza J. (Parker) Washburn.

Samuel Washburn married in Natick, MA, April 28, 1848, Abigail W. Haynes, both of Natick, MA. He was a cordwainer, aged twenty-three years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. Samuel Hunt performed the ceremony. She was born in Natick, MA, March 8, 1830, daughter of Martin and Hannah (Carter) Haynes.

The Washburn brothers moved from Natick, MA, to Milton and there carried on a shoe manufacturing business at Milton Three Ponds from about 1849 to sometime around 1856.

… and D. & S. Washburn, L. Berry and J. Layward [Sayward], who carried on a successful [shoe manufacturing] business at various times at Three Ponds, the latter continuing until burned out in 1864 (NH Bureau of Labor, 1896).

Edgar Warren Washburn was born in Milton, July 12, 1849, son of Samuel and Abby W. (Haynes) Washburn.

Oscar Jedediah Washburn was born in Milton, January 28, 1850, son of David and Eliza J. (Parker) Washburn.

David Washburn, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eliza J. [(Parker)] Washburn, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), Alma E. Washburn, aged fourteen years (b. MA), Romanzo N. Washburn, aged ten years (b. MA), Mary E. Washburn, aged five years (b. MA), and Oscar J. Washburn, aged four months (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Scates, a tailor, aged forty-five years (b. ME), and [his brother,] Samuel Washburn, a shoe manufacturer, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA).

Samuel Washburn, a shoe manufacturer, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Abby W. [(Haynes)] Washburn, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Edgar W. Washburn, aged eleven months (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of [his brother,] David Washburn, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), and Robert Mathes, a trader, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH).

D. Washburn appeared in a MA register of 1852, as a shoe manufacturer, resident in Natick, MA (Lord & Holbrook, 1852). It would seem that he had resettled his family back in Natick, MA, while he continued as a Milton shoe manufacturer. (His family would appear without him in Natick, MA, in the MA State Census of 1855).

Milton sent Rev. James Doldt and John D. Lyman to Concord, NH, as its NH State Representatives for the 1853-54 biennium. For some reason, Rev. James Doldt dropped out after the first year and was replaced by Samuel Washburn for the second (1854) year. Washburn served on the NH House Education Committee.

The NH House voted on a series of four NH House Resolutions intended to advise or direct its Federal delegation (NH General Court, 1854).

The issues involved in these resolutions concerned the Missouri Compromise of 1820, which had admitted Missouri as a slave state and Maine as a free state, while limiting the territory available for the expansion of slavery. But the Missouri Compromise had been recently repealed by the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, which would allow for local option regarding slavery in the territories. Its repeal would set the scene for partisan violence in “Bleeding Kansas” and would be the subject of the Lincoln-Douglas debates: US Senator Stephen A. Douglas having been the author of the Kansas-Nebraska Act. (See also Milton and Abolitionism).

Resolved, That the State of New Hampshire reaffirms the principles promulgated by her House of Representatives in 1850, “that the people are bound by no compact, express or implied, to suffer the introduction of slavery into territory now free, and that they are unalterably opposed to the erection of any territory without its prohibition by positive law;”

This first resolution passed by a vote of 159-118, with Milton Rep. John D. Lyman voting “aye,” and Milton Rep. Samuel Washburn voting “nay.”

Resolved, That the repeal of the Missouri Compromise by the passage of the Nebraska and Kansas bill, so called, was in violation of those principles, was unnecessary, impolitic, a breach of faith with the North, dangerous and wrong;

This second resolution passed by a vote of 154-120, with Rep. Lyman voting “aye,” and Rep. Washburn voting “nay.”

Resolved, That the course of George W. Morrison and George W. Kittredge, a portion of our delegation in Congress, in resisting such repeal, receives the hearty and united approval of the people of New Hampshire; 

US Reps. George W. Morrison (1809-1888) of Manchester, NH, and George W. Kittredge (1805-1881) of Newmarket, NH, have been characterized as anti-Kansas-Nebraska Act Democrats. This third resolution passed by a vote of 155-110, with Rep. Lyman voting “aye,” and Rep. Washburn voting “nay.”

Resolved, that the course of Harry Hibbard, Moses Norris and Jared W. Williams, the other members of our delegation, in voting for such repeal, was in opposition to the wishes of the people of the State, treacherous to freedom and the great cause of equality and human rights, and meets our decided reprobation;

US Rep. Harry Hibbard (1816-1872) of Bath, NH, and US Senators Moses Norris (1799-1855) of Pittsfield, NH, and Jared W. Williams (1796-1864) of Lancaster, NH, were Democrats who were in favor of the Kansas-Nebraska Act. This fourth resolution passed by a vote of 151-118, with Rep. Lyman voting “aye,” and Rep. Washburn voting “nay.”

Frank Samuel Washburn was born in Milton (“Milton Falls”), August 16, 1854, son of Samuel and Abby W. (Haynes) Washburn.

Eliza J. [(Parker)] Washburn, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Natick, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. Her household included Almy C. Washburn, aged twenty years (b. MA), Romanso N. Washburn, aged sixteen years (b. MA), Mary E Washburn, aged ten years (b. MA [SIC]), and Oscar J. Washburn, aged five years (b. MA [SIC]). They shared a two-family residence with the household of Mary A. Bigelow, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA).

The Washburn brothers, including Samuel Washburn’s family, left Milton and returned to their native Natick, MA, at some time between July 1855 and June 1860.

Daughter Almy C. Washburn married (1st) in Natick, MA, January 1, 1856, Charles M. Felch, both of Natick, MA. He was a shoe manufacturer, aged twenty-one years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. Elias Atick performed the ceremony. Felch was born in Natick, MA, in 1834, son of Asa and Ellen (Haven) Felch.

David Washburn, a mechanic, aged forty-five years (b. MA), headed a Natick, MA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza J. [(Parker)] Washburn, aged forty-two years (b. MA), Romanzo Washburn, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Mary E. Washburn, aged fifteen years (b. MA), Oscar J. Washburn, aged ten years (b. MA [SIC]), and Ann Coultra, a milliner, aged thirty-two years (b. VT). David Washburn had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $500.

Samuel Washburn, a shoe maker, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), headed a Natick, MA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Abby W. [(Haynes)] Washburn, aged twenty-eight years (b. MA), Edgar W. Washburn, aged ten years (b. MA), and Frank S. Washburn, aged five years (b. MA).

Son R.N. Washburn of Natick, MA, a clerk, aged twenty-five years, enlisted in the U.S. Army in Washington, DC, June 23, 1864. He had blue eyes, dark hair, and a dark complexion. He served as a hospital steward with the 39th MA infantry until discharged July 11, 1865.

Son-in-law Charles M. Felch died of typhoid fever in Medford, MA, April 23, 1864, aged twenty-five years, six months.

Son Romanzo N. Washburn married in Augusta, ME, August 22, 1865, Annie Church, he of Natick, MA, and she of Augusta, ME. Rev. John Young performed the ceremony. She was born in Augusta, ME, June 14, 1843, daughter of Amos and Catherine (Stackpole) Church.

Daughter Mary E. Washburn married in Natick, MA, September 8, 1865, Sylvanus Stewart, she of Natick, MA, and he of Haverhill, MA. She was aged twenty years, and he was a hatter, aged twenty-five years. Rev. E.E. Strong performed the ceremony. Stewart was born in Haverhill, MA, April 14, 1840, son of John and Alice (Webster) Stewart.

David Washburn, a shoe [clerk?], aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a Natick, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA State Census. His household included Eliza J. [(Parker)] Washburn, a housewife, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), Mary E. Washburn, aged twenty years (b. MA), Oscar J. Washburn, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Almy C. [(Washburn)] Felch, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), Jennie A. Felch, aged eight years (b. MA), Joseph Currier, a soldier, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), and Emily R. Currier, aged twenty-four years (b. ME).

Samuel Washburn, a bookmaker, aged forty-one years (b. MA), headed a Milford, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA State Census. His household included Abby W. [(Haynes)] Washburn, a housekeeper, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), Edgar W. Washburn, aged fifteen years (b. MA), and Frank S. Washburn, aged ten years (b. MA).

Daughter Almy C. (Washburn) Felch married (2nd) in Natick, MA, December 12, 1866, George W. Lewin, both of Natick, ME. He was a pattern fitter, aged thirty-one years, and she was aged thirty-one years. Rev. W.C. Ayres performed the ceremony. Lewin was born in Swansea, MA, February 22, 1836, son of William and Fanny (Briggs) Lewin.

David Washburn, works in shoe factory, aged fifty-five years (b. MA), headed a Natick, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Eliza J. [(Parker)] Washburn, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), and Oscar J. Washburn, a dentist, aged twenty years (b. NH). David Washburn had real estate valued at $3,500 and personal estate valued at $250.

Samuel Washburn, a shoe factory cutter, aged forty-two years (b. MA), headed a Chicago, IL, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Abby W. Washburn, a dressmaker, aged forty years (b. MA), and Frank Washburn, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Samuel Washburn had personal estate valued at $500.

Son Edgar W. Washburn married in Waltham, MA, October 12, 1872, Helen Maria Avery, he of Framingham, MA, and she of Boston, MA. He was a layer, aged twenty-three years, and she was aged nineteen years. Rev. E.E. Strong performed the ceremony. She was born in Dedham, MA, January 24, 1853, daughter of John C. and Huldah M. (Allen) Avery.

David Washburn appeared in the Natick, MA, directory of 1873, as a leather cutter, with his house on Washburn street. Romanzo N. Washburn appeared as a bookkeeper, with his house on Washington street.

Son Oscar J. Washburn married in Sherborn, MA, January 6, 1876, Emma J. Leland, he of Natick, MA, and she of Sherborn, MA. He was a dentist, aged twenty-five years, and she was aged twenty-four years. Rev. E. Dowse performed the ceremony. She was born in Eden, ME, October 6, 1851, daughter of Amariah and Martha (Anderson) Leland.

Son Frank S. Washburne married in St. Joseph, MI, August 12, 1877, Clara Josephine Gentzler, he of Chicago, IL, and she of St. Joseph, MI. He was a clerk, aged twenty-three years, and she was aged twenty-two years. Rev. George S. Barnes performed the ceremony. She was born in Waukegan, WS [IL], circa 1854, daughter of Rev. John C. and Rebecca Gentzler.

PERSONAL. Mr. Frank S. Washburne, with J.V. Farwell & Co., of this city, will be married to Miss Clara Gentzler at the residence of the bride’s father, the Rev. J.C. Gentzler, St. Joseph, Mich., on Monday evening (Chicago Tribune, August 12, 1877).

David Washbourn, a grocer, aged sixty-five years, headed a Vassalboro, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eliza J. [(Parker)] Washbourn, keeping house, aged sixty-two years (b. MA).

Samuel Washburn, a grocer, aged fifty-six years (b. MA), headed a Chicago, IL, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Abby W. [(Haynes)] Washburn, a housekeeper, aged fifty years (b. MA), his sons, Edgar W. Washburn, a lawyer, aged thirty years (b. MA), Frank S. Washburn, a grocer’s clerk, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and his daughters-in-law, Clara Washburn, aged twenty-four years (b. IL), and Mariah Washburn, aged twenty-two years (b. IL).

Eliza J. (Parker) Washburn died in Natick, MA, March 12, 1884.

Son Romanzo N. Washburn died of paralysis in Orford, NH, March 22, 1887, aged forty-seven years, seven months, and eighteen days. He was a bookkeeper. E.E. Chase, M.D., signed the death certificate.

David Washburn died in Haverhill, MA, August 17, 1887.

Daughter Almy C. ((Washburn) Felch) Lewin died of pneumonia in Fall River, MA, October 9, 1888, aged fifty-three years, and twelve days.

Samuel Washburne, aged seventy-seven years (b. MA), headed a Chicago, IL, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-two years), Abbie W. [(Haynes)] Washburne, aged seventy years (b. MA), his son, Sidney W. Washburne, retired, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and his sister [-in-law], Emeline C. Haynes, aged seventy-six years (b. MA). Samuel Washburne owned their house at 1400 Clark Street, with a mortgage. Abbie W. Washburne was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Son Edgar W. Washburn died in Chicago, IL, February 24, 1905, aged fifty-four years.

Son-in-law Sylvanus Stewart died of acute bronchitis and pulmonary tuberculosis at 45 Columbia Park in Haverhill, MA, May 17, 1906, aged sixty-six years, one month. He was a retired restaurant keeper.

Daughter-in-law Anna (Church) Washburn died of a heart ailment in Salem, MA, March 23, 1907, aged sixty-three years, nine months, and nine days.

Mary E. (Washburn) Stewart of Merrimac, MA, died of cerebral apoplexy at 86 Fourteenth Avenue in Haverhill, MA, March 13, 1908, aged sixty-two years, eleven months. A.M. Hubble, M.D., signed the death certificate. She was the daughter of David and Eliza J. (Parker) Washburn, and widow of Sylvanus Stewart.

Samuel Washburne died in Chicago, IL, November 26, 1908, aged eighty-six years

OBITUARY. SAMUEL WASHBURNE, 86 years old, who had been a resident of Chicago since before the great fire, died yesterday at residence, 1402 North Clark street. Before coming to Chicago, he resided in Natick, Mass., and in New Hampshire, where he was a member of the legislature. He retired from business fifteen years ago. A widow survives (Chicago Tribune, November 27, 1908).

Abby W. (Haynes) Washburn died in Chicago, IL, April 28, 1914.

Son Oscar J. Washburn died of arsenical poisoning on Maple Street in North Brookfield, MA, March 1, 1915, aged sixty-five years, one month, and one day. He had been a dentist.

Son-in-law George W. Lewin died in Fall River, MA, February 10, 1923, aged eighty-six years.

FR230210 - George W LevinObituary. GEORGE W. LEWIN. George W. Lewin, of 86 Cherry street, a prominent member of Richard Borden Post, G.A.R., died at his home this morning after an illness of nearly two months. He was in his 87th year. George Washington Lewin was born Feb. 22, 1836, in Swansea, the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Y. Lewin. During Civil War he gave 37 months of service as a sergeant in the 22nd Massachusetts Regiment. He took part in important battles of the war, suffering wounds on several occasions. After the war he was employed in a foundry here. For the past 20 years of his life he operated a comb manufactory on Second street. Surviving him are a daughter, Miss Fannie E. Lewin, a step-daughter, Mrs. Jennie Winslow, a brother John Lewin of this city, a half-brother Gardner Lewin, and a half-sister, Mrs. Annie Strange, both of Pottersville (Fall River Globe, February 10, 1923).

Son Frank S. Washburn died in Chicago, IL, May 28, 1924.

References:

Find a Grave. (2011, April 11). Almy C. Washburn Felch. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/68204593/almy-c.-felch

Find a Grave. (2020, August 8). Mary E. Washburn Stewart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214203600/mary-e-stewart

Find a Grave. (2016, May 18). Edgar Warren Washburne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/162787510/edgar-warren-washburne

Find a Grave. (2022, January 4). Frank S. Washburne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/235561079/frank-s.-washburne

Find a Grave. (2011, September 28). Oscar Jedediah Washburn. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/77231281/oscar-jedediah-washburn

Find a Grave. (2011, September 28). David Washburn. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/77230502/david-washburn

Find a Grave. (2017, December 21). Romanzo N. Washburn. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/186047616/romanzo-n.-washburn

Find a Grave. (2016, May 8). Samuel Washburne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/162788004/samuel-washburne

Lord & Holbrook. (1852). Massachusetts Register and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=4u0CAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA137

NH Bureau of Labor. (1896). Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=dEQbAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA23

NH General Court. (1854). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=1f1BAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA4

Wikipedia. (2022, October 6). Kansas-Nebraska Act. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kansas%E2%80%93Nebraska_Act

Wikipedia. (2022, December 9). Missouri Compromise. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_Compromise

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