Milton’s Theatrical Designer: Robert E. Jones

By Muriel Bristol | September 20, 2020

Robert Edmond “Bobby” Jones was born in Milton, December 12, 1887, son of Fred P. and Emma J. (Cowell) Jones.

MILTON. Mrs. Fred P. Jones was in Durham last Thursday, to attend the meeting of the Eastern New Hampshire Pomona grange. Her son, Robert E. Jones, played a violin solo and she accompanied him on the piano (Farmington News, April 8, 1904).

MILTON. Principal and Mrs. Clarence E. Kelley gave a reception to the graduating class and alumni of the Nute High School last Thursday evening at their home on Farmington road. … Graduating exercises at the Nute High school occurred Wednesday evening. The graduates are Robert E. Jones, Karl E. Pinkham, Carl B. Tarbell, Stanley P. Nute, Annie B. Meikle, Ruth Fall, Addie C. Pike, Florence G. Runnels and Bessie Mayo (Farmington News, [Friday,] June 17, 1904).

POMONA GRANGE. Eastern New Hampshire Pomona Grange, No. 2, P. of H., has met this Thursday in Rochester. The exercises were: Song of Welcome; invocation by Rev. John Manter; address of welcome, F.F. Seavey, master of Rochester grange; response, G.R. Drake, State Secretary; violin solo, Robert E. Jones, Milton; address, Lecturer Richard Pattee of the state grange; music; essay, subject from Shakespeare, Katherine M. Jones; address on the Brown tail Moth, Professor E.D. Sanborn of the state college; violin solo, R.E. Jones; essay, Mrs. Anna G. Weeks; Cornucopia, Vol. 20 No. 20, Mrs. A. Scott Waldron; remarks, closing song; all these in the afternoon, and the closed session taking place in the evening, Mrs. Lizzie Lyman Fall of Milton, lecturer, in charge of the order of exercises (Farmington News, March 17, 1905).

Robert E. Jones entered Harvard College (now Harvard University) in September 1906.

MILTON. Robert Jones has been home on a vacation from Harvard college the past week (Farmington News, April 30, 1909).

MILTON. Robert Jones, who came from Harvard college to play first violin at the grammar school exercises Friday evening, the 19, returned Saturday morning (Farmington News, June 25, 1909).

Fred P. Jones, a general farm farmer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma C. Jones, aged fifty years (b. ME), his children, Robert E. Jones, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Philip C. Jones, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Elisabeth J. Jones, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Allice V. Jones, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his servant, Henry M. Bowens, a farm laborer, aged fifty-five years (b. CT).

Harvard College conferred an A.B. degree cum laude upon Robert E. Jones in Cambridge, MA, on an “uncommonly warm day,” June 29, 1910. Among the dignitaries present were ex-President Theodore Roosevelt and John Pierpont Morgan (Boston Globe, June 29, 1910).

Jones, Robert E - NY181013Robert Edmond Jones … One ought to tell something about “the man by the name of Jones.” He was born on a New Hampshire farm. He did the chores, played the violin (Hiram Kelly Moderwell, who has written an excellent biographical sketch of him, tells this) and went through the local school. And then by the usual sacrifices on the part of a none too prosperous American family, he was enabled to go to college. He did not distinguish himself especially there. He showed some taste for drawing, and when he was graduated he was given an instructorship in the art department. He was vaguely unhappy there. The academic art curriculum of the college took no grip on his imagination. Some modernistic posters stimulated him as nothing else had. A bit of rich material or a bizarre figure thrilled him. An occasional thing at the music halls released his creative faculties, and the first things he ever did were some costume designs for Valeska Suratt. All this could not help his work at college, and failure to make up his required work gave the faculty sufficient excuse to drop him. Then he went through the usual period of poverty and depression and aimlessness, somehow continually feeling the way toward his appointed goal. For a time this young Harvard ex-art teacher dressed windows at a Boston department store, and in the meantime made some bizarre costume sketches for Gertrude Hoffman’s revue. They fell into Morris Gest’s hands, who sent for Jones. The things he did at the time were wild and exotic, the untrained outpourings of his rich imagination, but Gest used a few of them with modification. Then his work came to the notice of one who saw in the revolutionary, exotic, posteresque things that Jones was doing something of the artistic fecundity that lay behind it, and he advised him to go to Europe and study with the best men there. So he went abroad, and the work he showed was an open sesame that admitted him as pupil to the Moscow Art Theatre and Reinhardt’s Theatre. At the Art Theatre in Moscow he learned the spirit of the modern theatre and with Reinhardt he learned craftsmanship. And long before the war drove him back to America we begin to hear of the quality of his work (New York Tribune, October 13, 1918).

Robert Edmond Jones registered with the American consulate in Berlin, Germany, February 18, 1914. He was born in Milton, N.H. December 12, 1887, and had left the United States, June 25, 1913, arriving in Berlin, Germany, September 15, 1913, where he was engaged in “studying paintings.” His local address was Goethestr 69, i.e., 69 Goethe Strasse [Street], and the person to be informed in case of death or accident was F.P. Jones of Milton, N.H.

Robert E. Jones of Milton, NH, aged twenty-six years (b. Milton, NH, December 12, 1887), sailed from Liverpool, England, on the S.S. St. Louis, September 26, 1914, arriving in New York, NY, October 3, 1914.

Diagheleff Ballet Russe. … In the repertory of twelve dances there will be four numbers which have never before been presented in this city. Foremost of these is “Mephisto Valse,” a ballet conceived by Nijinsky during his internment in Austria the summer before last. It is a mimodrama of the familiar scene of Faust and Mephisto in the inn, and will be danced to the well-known composition of Franz Liszt. The costumes and decors for this ballet were designed by Robert Edmond Jones, a young American artist. He is the first American ever invited to contribute to the output of the Diaghileff organization. “Mephisto Valse” will have its world premier in New York next week (Philadelphia Inquirer, October 15, 1916).

Robert Edmond Jones registered for the WW I military draft in New York, NY, June 5, 1917. He was a self-employed theatrical decorator & designer of community [theatre], aged twenty-nine years (b. Milton, NH, December 12, 1887), resident at 51 W. 10th Street. He was of tall height, with a slender build, brown eyes, and brown hair.

SEARCH FOR STAGE SETTINGS FOR TOLSTOI. Russian Atmosphere Lacking in New York, Says Manager. When Robert Edmond Jones was informed last spring that John Barrymore would act Feyda in Tolstoi’s “Redemption” at the Plymouth theatre some time in the autumn and that Mr. Barrymore and company would expect to find a production in which to act, at the appointed hour Mr. Jones set off to the four quarters of the city to see where best he could pick up the trail of Russia in the new world and how distinctive a Russian background he could assemble 4,000 miles from home. He went down on the East Side to the Russian quarter, where he spent weeks walking the streets and peering into windows. He found that here was Russia enough in New York to put on a hundred plays, but that most of the material immediately to hand was either too shoddy for his aristocratic drawing rooms or too new and too conventional for his gypsy haunts. Mr. Jones’ eleven scenes for “Redemption” went from wealthy homes in Moscow to wretched dives under the old city bridges. There was no faltering in the hero’s descent to Avernus and no place for a half way house. Found a Bench. Mr. Jones says that in these first days of trudging he used to thank his stars he had plenty of time. His first find was at the low end of his scale. It was an old bench dumped on the sidewalk before a shop in whose windows burnished new samovars asked for his attention. He went to the door of the shop and asked for the proprietor. An elderly Russian came out and Mr. Jones asked if he would exchange his old bench for a new one, made by a fine carpenter, and painted. The Russian’s smile faded and was replaced by a vacant stare. This in turn became distrust. “What you want bench about?” Mr. Jones explained that he was putting on a play in a theatre and that his scene needed just that bench for gypsies to sit on. The Russian shook his head and scowled. Mr. Jones explained all over again. After a moment the Russian beamed. “For pictures?” he demanded, and when the somewhat nonplussed Mr. Jones said yes he got the bench. In still later quests Mr. Jones had another piece of fortune. He found in a shop below Washington Square embroideries and extraordinarily old brasses in the window, but the door was locked and the shop was keeperless. He went back on four or five days until finally he found some one there. He rushed in impetuously and said: “I want the contents of your shop.” The startled little lady asked him where were his senses. He explained who he was and for what he wanted Russian treasures, and then and there made an ally. Miss Fania Mindell, whose trove he had invaded, had seen “Redemption” in Moscow, and knew the Russian Tolstoi had written there. She hauled out rare old shawls, bedspreads, all manners of brasses and pewter pieces, mirrors and such. Then she produced costumes. Now Mr. Jones hadn’t begun to worry about costumes yet, but he seized his moment. Miss Mindell knew how to design what had to be made, but better still she knew how to find what had to be found (Calgary Herald, November 16, 1918).

Robert Jones of the Plymouth Theatre, W. 45th Street, New York, NY, aged thirty-one years (b. Milton, NH, December 12, 1887), sailed from Le Havre, France, on the S.S. La Savoie, August 30, 1919, arriving in New York, NY, September 8, 1919.

Theater Gossip. George Washington will appear for the first time as the central figure of a drama, on his own birthday, at the capital city which bears his name, in the three-act prize play, “George Washington,” by Percy McKaye, with Walter Hampden in the title-role and with scenic productions by Robert Edmond Jones. Contracts have just been signed with the Shuberts for its opening at the Belasco Theater, Washington, to be followed by a New York run (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, January 25, 1920).

Fred P. Jones, a lumberman, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma C. [(Cowell)] Jones, aged sixty years (b. ME), and his children, Charles Jones, YMCA Physical Education work, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), Robert E. Jones, a theatrical costume designer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Elizabeth Jones (b. NH), aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Alice V. Jones, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Fred P. Jones owned their farm on the Plummer’s Ridge Road. The census enumerator recorded their household between those of Charles E. Perkins, a lumberman teamster, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and Bard B. Plummer, a farmer, aged forty years (b. NH).

Robert Edmond Jones, whose stage-sets have made him the most talked-of scenic artist in the country, is of a decidedly Messianic cast of countenance. He is, we should say, in his middle thirties. Artist and dreamer – these two terms are expressed everywhere in him. The Barrymore Macbeth, O’Neill’s “Anna Christie,” “Steamship Tenacity,” “Swords” and the Ben Ami flop, “The Idle Inn,” are among his recent settings. With him, as Kenneth MacGowan points out in his [article] lie what seem to be the higher possibilities for beautiful staging in this country. J.V.A.W. [John V.A. Weaver] (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, January 14, 1922).

Robert Edmond Jones of the Plymouth Theatre, an artist, applied for a replacement passport in New York, NY, March 14, 1922. He was born in Milton, NH, December 12, 1887, son of Fred P. Jones, and had resided previously in Italy and Germany, between July 1913 and November 1914; in England, between May 1919 and August 1919. His previous passport had been destroyed by him. He intended to sail on the S.S. Mauretania, on April 4, 1922, to do artistic work in France & Italy; Germany & Austria; and Sweden; and to travel in the British Isles, Denmark, Norway, Switzerland, and Gibraltar. He was thirty-four years of age, 6′ in height, had an oblong face, with a medium nose, grey-green eyes, a high forehead, reddish brown hair, and a fair complexion. He had a mustache and a bearded chin, with an indelible mark on his left mandible. Kenneth Macgowan, a journalist [for Vogue magazine], of Pelham Manor, NY, swore to having known him for fourteen years.

The invasion of Germany by American theatrical people continues. Close upon the heels of Brock Pemberton and Al Woods, New York producers, Kenneth MacGowan, critic, and Robert Edmond Jones, one of the best of America’s scenic decorators, have arrived in Berlin. William A. Brady, accompanied by Grace George, will be here within a month. According to indications, however, few results from these visits will be apparent on the American stage next season, save, perhaps, in the matter of scenic lighting equipment, for managers report there are few plays here that could be considered safe ventures for America. Among the outstanding transactions has been the purchase by the Selwyns of “Die Wunderlichen Geschichten des Kappellmeister Kreisler,” which embodies a unique two-level stage with six or seven separate rooms in view of the audience, and the purchase of “Die Ballerina des Koenigs,” by Simeon Gest. This play, which deals with the love affairs of Frederick the Great and Barberina, his Italian premier danseuse and mistress, is scheduled to be the vehicle in which Geraldine Farrar will appear under Belasco management in New York in the fall (Chicago Tribune, May 14, 1922).

Robert Jones of the Harvard Club, 27 W. 44th Street, New York, NY, aged thirty-four years (b. Milton, NH, December 12, 1887), sailed from Cherbourg, France, on the S.S. Majestic, June 28, 1922, arriving in New York, NY, July 4, 1922.

Robert Edmond Jones of Milton, NH, applied for a replacement passport in New York, NY, March 14, 1923. He was born in Milton, NH, December 12, 1887, son of Fred P. Jones, and had resided previously in Italy and Germany, between June 1912 and August 1914, i.e., until the start of WW I; in England, between May 1919 and August 1919; and in Germany, France, and Austria, in 1922. His previous passport, which had been issued by the Secretary of State, March 15, 1922, had been destroyed by fire.

SJones, Rober E - Passport, 1923ecretary of State, Washington, D.C. Sir: I hereby state that I obtained a passport from Washington about March 15, 1922, and used it in the countries mentioned in my application. On my return to the United States I destroyed this passport by fire, having no further use for it. Robert Edmond Jones, March 14, 1923.

Jones intended now to go to England, France, and Germany, for artistic work, and planned to depart on the Carmania, March 24, 1923. He was described as being thirty-five years of age, 5′ 11″ tall, with a high forehead, grey eyes, a square face, with a medium nose, brown hair, and a fair complexion. He had a moustache and goatee and wore glasses. Raymond Sovey, an artist, of 142 W 39th Street, confirmed his identity. He had known Jones for five years.

HOPKINS SAILING FOR ‘ANNA CHRISTIE’ LONDON OPENING. Arthur Hopkins will sail today on the Majestic to supervise the presentation of Pauline Lord in Eugene O’Neill’s “Anna Christie” at the Strand Theatre. The production will be made in association with Charles B. Cochran on Tuesday evening, April 10. Miss Lord, Robert Edmond Jones and members of the company sailed previously. The London production will be identical with the one offered by Mr. Hopkins at the Vanderbilt Theatre when “Anna Christie” won the Pulitzer prize (March 31, 1923).

Robert Edmond Jones was characterized in a review by St. John Ervine of the London Observer as a principal American proponent of Expressionist theatrical staging.

At the Play. THE MACHINE-WRECKERS. (By St. John Ervlne.) Last, Sunday I reviewed “Continental Stagecraft,” by Mr. Kenneth MacGowan and Mr. Robert Edmond Jones, the principal exponents in America of the theatrical theory known as Expressionism. In the same issue of The Observer, criticising “Angelo,” at Drury Lane, I asked whether this piece would satisfy the desires of the Expressionists. Since then I have received a copy of Mr. Ashney Dukes’s translation of Ernst Toller’s “Die Machinensturmer,” and the latest issue of the “Theatre Arts Magazine,” of New York. This magazine is edited by, amongst others, Mr. Kenneth MacGowan. My question about “Angelo” is answered in Mr. MacGowan’s article, in which he surveys recent productions in New York. “Angelo,” which ought to be named “Johannes Kreisler” – I suppose some Ruhrotic had barked at Mr. Arthur Collins and frightened him into changing the German name for an Italian one – does not satisfy Mr. McGowan. He says:- It is a feat in pure mechanics, and it wrecked whatever of play there was in “Johannes Kreisler,” … The American actors … were most effectively lost in the scurry of dodging about from one little stage to another, as they rolled out on the big stage and were illuminated. The forty-two episodes in the life of the composer Kreisler became merely a movie awkwardly mounted in a place where it should never have been seen. Machinery instead of dramatic art; tricks with lights instead of acting. I could not have expressed my contempt for some of the Expressionist theory more thoroughly than Mr. McGowan has here expressed it (London Observer, April 23, 1923).

Stage Designs by Robert Edmond Jones At Bourgeois Galleries. The Bourgeois Gallerles have opened their exhibition season with a collection of stage designs bv Robert Edmond Jones, comprising 38 drawings and water colors and one miniature model. The collection adequately outlines the achievements of our foremost stage designer, including the early designs made in 1915 for “The Man Who Married a Dumb Wife” down to his most recent stage designs for “Desire Under the Elms” and “A Love for a Love.” While many of us have followed Mr. Jones’ career as it appears in its final version on the stage, few of us have had the opportunity of seeing the designs as they are first conceived and worked out by the artist. It will, therefore, come as a surprise to many that a stage design can exist for itself as a work of art. Irrespective of whether or not that design will ever be developed in three dimensions. Stage designs such as those by Robert Edmond Jones are a crystallizing, a setting down in graphic calligraphy, of another artist’s idea. Later on stage technicalities must be considered, but in their initial state they are emotional, often mystical, statements in graphic form. Stark Young acutely synthesizes the stage designer’s function in the prologue which he has written for the catalogue; “Each of these drawings furthers and reveals the meaning and the characters and the events and conveys the shock of their vitality [as] they sing the dramatist’s song. But they sing the singer, too. He himself creates within the part assigned him” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 25, 1925).

Howland Memorial Prize. Announcement was made of the award of the Howland Memorial prize to Robert Edmond Jones, BA, Harvard ’10, designer for “The Man Who Married a Dumb Wife,” “The Jest,” “Richard III,” “The Birthday of the Infanta,” “Macbeth,” “Redemption,” etc. The Howland Memorial prize is awarded in recognition of some achievement of marked distinction in the field of literature or fine arts or the science of government (Boston Globe, June 23, 1926).

Director of Plays To Give Lecture. BERKELEY, July 5. Robert Edmond Jones, director of Eugene O’Neill’s plays, will give the first of a series of lectures on the modern play at 8 o’clock tomorrow night in room 11, Wheeler hall, under the auspices of the University of California summer session. The dates of his other lectures are July 8, 13, 15, 20 and 22, every alternative lecture, beginning Friday, to be given at 4 o’clock in the afternoon (Oakland Tribune, July 5, 1927).

Plymouth to Open. Arthur Hopkins will open his season at the Plymouth Theater on Wednesday evening, Sept. 4, when he will present “Blow the Man Down,” a comedy drama by Kate Parsons, with Walter Huston in the leading role. The settings and costumes have been designed by Robert Edmond Jones, and the play is being staged by Mr. Hopkins (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, August 15, 1929).

BOOKS for XMAS. THE GREEN PASTURES BY MARC CONNELLY. The Pulitzer Prize Play is now available in three editions: a limited signed edition, illustrated by Robert Edmond Jones, $25.00; regular illustrated edition, $5.00; unillustrated, $2.00 (Chicago Tribune, December 6, 1930).

Art. New Shows. The Bourgeois Galleries are now having something unusual in the way of exhibitions. This novelty consists of a display of the work of Robert Edmond Jones, a distinguished designer of stage scenery and costumes. Jones is an enormously prolific artist, having done the designing for forty-two plays, seven operas and five masques. In such a volume of work, one would expect to find at least here and there the stigmata of mere craftsmanship and mass production, but this artist has always maintained a high standard of individuality and sincerity. This record he has achieved through careful selection of the productions with which he has been allied; he has realized his responsibility as a pioneer in this new and potentially important field for art. The examples of his work shown in the present exhibit have a strange and haunting appeal. M.N. (Brainard Bulletin, April 1, 1932).

Robert E. Jones received a five-year contract to stage annual play festivals at the newly refurbished opera house in Central City, CO, in 1932.

Robert E. Jones married in Greenwich, CT, June 21, 1933, Margaret (Huston) Carrington. (She was the widow of millionaire financier William T. Carrington of Greenwich, CT, who died May 4, 1931). She was born in Toronto, Canada, August 29, 1879, daughter of Robert M. and Elizabeth (McGibbon) Huston.

Huston, MargaretMRS. W.T. CARRINGTON IS WED TO R.E. JONES. Widow of Financier and Sister of Walter Huston Is Bride of Noted State Designer. Special to the New York Times. GREENWICH, Conn., June 21 – Mrs. Margaret Huston Carrington, widow of W.T. Carrington of New York, formerly of North Greenwich, was married to Robert Edmund Jones of New York today. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Dr. Oliver Huckel, pastor of the Second Congregational Church, Greenwich, at the home of the bride’s sister, Miss Ann Huston, in North Greenwich. A small reception followed the ceremony. The couple will spend the Summer in Colorado and will make their future home in New York. Mr. Jones is one of the leading theatrical designers in this country. He first gained prominence in that field with his settings for “The Man Who Married a Dumb Wife,” produced in Wallack’s Theatre in 1915 by Harvey Granville-Barker, and has since added to his reputation with productions for Arthur Hopkins and the Theatre Guild. During the past season he did the settings and costumes for Katherine Cornell’s production of “Lucrece” and also for “Nine Pine Street.” He was also engaged until January as art director for the RKO theatres in Radio City. He has been actively interested in the productions of the Dramatic Festival at Central City, Col., where he will direct this season a revival of “The Merry Widow.” He is 45 years old, and is a member of the Harvard Club and The Players. Mrs. Carrington is the widow of William Theodore Carrington, financier. She is the sister of Walter Huston, the actor. Her home is 720 Park Avenue (New York Times, June 21, 1933).

Jones Arrives with Bride. Denver, July 3. – Robert Edmond Jones of New York, who will direct the production of “The Merry Widow” during the play festival at Central City opera house this summer, arrived here today with his bride, the former Margaret Huston Carrington. They were married last month in the east. Jones said he would remain here several days before proceeding to Central City (Greeley Daily Tribune (Greeley, CO), July 5, 1933).

“Of medium height, solidly built, with red-gold hair and compelling blue eyes, she [Margaret Huston] projected physical vitality, psychic intensity and an imperturbable air of authority” (Morrison, 1999).

Designer Will Return for “Becky Sharp.” Robert Edmond Jones, genius of the theater who conceived the color schemes for Radio’s outstanding short subject, “La Cucaracha,” soon to be distributed, will act in the same capacity on “Becky Sharp,” when the Thackeray novel (otherwise “Vanity Fair”) gets started. Jones recently staged his annual drama festival in Central City, the Colorado ghost town, doing “Othello” with Walter Huston. John Hay Whitney is producing the new picture, which will go before the cameras in October (Los Angeles Times, August 29, 1934).

Max Reinhardt May Be Signed By RKO To Direct Production. By LOUELLA O. PARSONS (Motion Picture Editor Universal Service.) (Copyright by Universal Service Inc.) LOS ANGELES Sept 27 – Well, it seems to be fairly certain one of the studios will corral Max Reinhardt before he leaves California what with all the publicity given Midsummer Night’s Dream and his interest in the movies. Just at the moment it looks as if RKO might be that studio. Robert Edmond Jones, well known scenic artist, who is now in Italy cabled his former teacher and asked him to take a look at La Cucaracha, the film made with the technicolor Invention. If Reinhardt likes the picture he will make arrangements with Kenneth MacGowan, associate producer, to direct an entire color production for Pioneer Pictures. Of course that means Jack Whitney’s money will be backing it (Sacramento Bee, September 27, 1934).

Robert Jones of 760 Park Avenue, New York, NY, aged forty-six years (b. Milton, NH, December 12, 1887), sailed from Genoa, Italy, on the S.S. Conte di Savoia, September 20, 1934, arriving in New York, NY, September 27, 1934. He was accompanied by his wife, Margaret Jones of the same address, aged fifty years, a citizen by marriage.

Today’s Birthdays. Robert E. Jones, New York theatrical designer, born at Milton, N.H., 47 years ago (Kokomo Tribune (Kokomo, IN), December 12, 1934).

“BECKY SHARP,” IN COLORS, SCENIC THEATRE, ROCHESTER. With the coming of color in motion pictures, the limited impressionism of the black and white screen become outmoded. No longer will it be possible by clever shifts to create a sense of the genuine. The technicolor camera photographs objects as they are. A fake of any kind is quickly recognized for what it is. On the black and white screen, line and cut of clothes determine their style. Today the coutourier of the films has to meet the demands of color and fabric. Robert Edmond Jones, designer for “Becky Sharp,” a full color feature, shows damask that is damask, and Miriam Hopkins and Frances Dee exactly, as they would look at an evening dansant. See “Becky Sharp” at the Scenic Theatre, Rochester, next Sunday, Monday and Tuesday (Farmington News, July 19. 1935).

Robert Jones of 760 Park Avenue, New York, NY, aged forty-nine years (b. Milton, NH, December 12, 1887), sailed from Liverpool, England, on the S.S. Franconia, August 7, 1937, arriving in New York, NY, August 17, 1937. He was accompanied by his wife, Margaret H. Jones of the same address, aged fifty years, a citizen by marriage.

Robert C. Jones, a stage design artist, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Greenwich, CT, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Margaret H. Jones, aged fifty-four years (b. Canada (Fr.)), his personal servant, Mae L. Anderson, a personal maid, aged fifty-five years (b. Sweden), and his housekeeper, Hilda Gullstrand, a housekeeper, aged forty-one years (b. Sweden). Robert E. Jones owned their house on Quebec Ridge Road, which was valued at $75,000.

Jones, Robert E - Dramatic ImaginationTHE BOOKSHELF. THE DRAMATIC IMAGINATION. by Robert Edmond Jones (Duell, Sloan & Pearce): Robert Edmond Jones probably knows as much about the American theater as any other living man. In this present volume he discusses costume, lighting, theater history, modem drama, acting and many other essentials of the theater. He goes beyond the present and describes the theater of the future. His historical account is most informative, and his forecast is provocative. An essential volume for anyone interested in the American theater (Birmingham News, March 29, 1941).

Robert Edmond Jones registered for the WW II military draft in New York, NY, April 27, 1942. He was a stage designer, aged fifty-four years (b. Milton, NH, December 12, 1887), resident at 760 Park Avenue. He was 6′ tall, weighing 165 pounds, with hazel eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. His telephone number was BU 8-5958, His personal contact was [his brother,] Charles Jones, 48 Caryl Avenue, Yonkers, NY.

Margaret (Huston) Jones died at her Summer home in Greenwich, CT, August 1, 1942, aged sixty-two years.

MRS. R.E. JONES, WIFE OF SCENIC ARTIST, DIES. Former London Concert Singer Was Sister of Walter Huston. SPECIAL TO THE NEW YORK TIMES. GREENWICH, Conn., Aug. 1 – Mrs. Margaret Huston Jones of 760 Park Avenue, New York, wife of Robert Edmond Jones, the scenic designer, and sister of Walter Huston, the actor, died here this morning at her Summer home on Quaker Ridge, after a long illness. As a young woman Mrs. Jones studied singing abroad and frequently appeared on the London concert stage in the years just before the first World War, receiving especial praise for her interpretations of Debussy and Hugo Wolff. Later she made herself an expert on the speaking voice, and was consulted by many experienced actors and actresses. In 1915 she was married to William T. Carrington, prominent grain broker and music patron, who was president and chief financial backer of the American Opera Company. He died in 1931 at the age of 76, leaving to his widow most of his estate of $1,639,731. Two years later the former Margaret Y. Huston was married to Robert Edmond Jones. She was a member of the Colony Club of New York. She was born in Toronto, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert Moore Huston of that city. Besides her husband and her brother, Walter, she leaves another brother, Alexander Huston, and a sister, Miss Nan Huston, both of Toronto (New York Times, August 1, 1942).

Obituary. MRS. MARGARET H. JONES. Sister of Walter Huston, Actor. Mrs. Margaret Huston Jones, wife of Robert Edmond Jones, the scenic designer, and sister of Walter Huston, actor, died yesterday at her Summer home in Greenwich, Conn. A native of Toronto, Mrs. Jones was a singer in her youth, and later, as an expert in diction, coached John Barrymore and other stars. Her home in New York was at 760 Park Ave. (Daily News (New York, NY), August 2, 1942).

Robert E. Jones collaborated in a charity performance of the Crucifixion of Christ to benefit starving children. Conductor Leopold Stokowski conducted the accompanying Bach’s St. Matthew Passion music at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York, NY, April 9, 1943.

Will Be Conducted By Stokowski. Leopold Stokowski is conducting the performance, with George Balanchine and Robert Edmond Jones as his collaborators. Soloists will be Eleanor Steber, soprano; Lucius Metz, tenor; Jennie Tourel, mezzo soprano, and Gerhard Pechner, basso. Glen Darwin, baritone, will represent the voice of Christ. The figure of Christ will not appear on the stage, but will be represented instead by a column of golden light. The Collegiate Chorale, an orchestra of 80, and a cast of mimes, all from the American Ballet School, will participate. Lillian Gish will portray Mary Magdalen (Daily News (New York, NY), April 4. 1943).

Robert Edmond Jones’ last production effort was preparing the sets and costumes for a second revival of Marc Connolly’s Green Pastures.

‘Green Pastures’ Returns Tonight. New York’s third production of Marc Connelly’s “The Green Pastures” opens tonight at 8 at the Broadway. Done first in 1930, the play was revived in 1935. Connelly has directed the Negro cast, Robert Edmond Jones has designed the sets and costumes and Hall Johnson will conduct the choir. The production is being offered by the Dwight Deere Wiman estate in association with Harry Fromkes (Daily News (New York, NY), March 15, 1951).

He cancelled a planned speaking tour in February 1951 “due to illness” (Journal and Courier, (Lafayette, IN), February 13, 1951).

Robert E. Jones died in the family home on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, November 26, 1954, aged sixty-six years.

Jones, Robert E - NY541127 - DetailR.E. JONES IS DEAD; STAGE DESIGNER, 67. Leader in Development of the Modern Theatre Did Sets for Many O’Neill Dramas. Robert Edmond Jones, considered one of the most influential forces in the development of the modern American theatre, died yesterday morning in Milton, N.H., at the home of his sisters, the Misses Elizabeth and Alice Varney Jones. His age was 67. He had been in failing health after undergoing an operation a year ago, but apparently had improved sufficiently to plan to return next week to New York, where, for nearly thirty years, he had been one of the theatre’s foremost stage designers. Mr. Jones was born at Milton, the son of Dr. and Mrs. Fred P. Jones, and lived in that village until 1906 when he left to attend Harvard. His artistic talent was expressed early, first in drawing, which attracted attention when he was 10 years old. His mother, a concert pianist before her marriage, taught him to play violin, and at Harvard he played in the college orchestra. After graduating from Harvard in 1910, Mr. Jones stayed on for two years as an instructor in the Fines Arts Department, and began to be interested in theatre. He worked for a time as a costume designer for Comstock and Gest in New York. Early in 1913, Mr. Jones went to Europe. He visited Italy, hoping to study theatrical art at Gordon Craig’s school in Florence, but was rebuffed. He went instead to Germany where he had the run of Max Reinhardt’s Deutsches Theatre for a year. Scored on Return. Back in New York, Mr. Jones designed the settings for Anatole France’s “The Man Who Married a Dumb Wife.” When the curtain rose on Jan. 27, 1915, at Wallack’s Theatre, audience and critics gasped with admiration. Thereafter Mr. Jones’ reputation as an artist-designer was secure and inspiring. Influenced by him, stage designing developed to the point where designers achieved equal importance with directors. Mr. Jones’ settings were designed to project more fully the playwright’s thought. Departing from the old realism epitomized by David Belasco, he drew on imagination, color and lighting to enhance the play visually, and he designed the costumes as well. Of his designs for “The Lute Song,” Lewis Nichols wrote, in The New York Times in 1946: “What has come from the easel and the soaring imagination of an artist is easily the most beautiful background given to any play in recent years.” “His colors flow across the stage in an ever-flowing pageant which seems to stretch out beyond the confines of the theatre. They swirl with the dancers and add majesty and dignity to the lives they touch.” Arthur Hopkins saw “The Man Who Married a Dumb Wife,” in 1915, and immediately engaged Mr. Jones, whose first production for him, “The Devil’s Garden,” in December of the same year, is still praised by theatrical historians. Worked for Arthur Hopkins. Successive designs for Mr. Hopkins’ productions were equally noteworthy and equally revolutionary. During the next five years, Mr. Jones designed the scenes for seventeen plays, two ballets and five masques, mostly for Mr. Hopkins. In 1921, Mr. Jones began working with Eugene O’Neill when Mr. Hopkins produced the latter’s “The Hairy Ape.” Subsequently Mr. Jones was the designer for O’Neill’s “Anna Christie,” “Desire Under the Elms,” “Morning Becomes Electra,” “Ah, Wilderness,” “The Ice Man Cometh,” and others. Mr. Jones also designed for many other plays, and for ballet and opera, including productions of the Metropolitan. His most recent production was a revival, in 1951, of Marc Connolly’s “Green Pastures,” whose original success was in part attributed to Mr. Jones’ designs. Yale University presented the Howland Memorial Prize to Mr. Jones, and in 1933 he received the Fine Arts Medal of the American Institute of Architects for conspicuous attainment as a designer for the theatre. He was a member of the National Institute of Arts. Mr. Jones’ writing included “The Dramatic Imagination,” a book published in 1941. In 1933, Mr. Jones married Margaret Huston Carrington, who dies in August, 1942. A singer, she had been the voice coach to John Barrymore and Lillian Gish. She was the sister of the late Walter Huston, the actor. Surviving, in addition to his two sisters, are two brothers, the Rev. Dr. Philip C. Jones of New York and Charles Jones of Yonkers (New York Times, November 27, 1954).

Obituary. Robert Edmund Jones. MILTON, N.H., Nov. 26. (AP) – Robert Edmund Jones, 66, a pioneer in modern stage design, died today after a long illness. Jones, born here, was associated early in his career with Eugene O’Neill in many productions of the Provincetown Playhouse. Jones designed sets for John Barrymore’s “Richard III” and “Hamlet.” He also designed sets for the productions of O’Neill’s “Desire Under the Elms” and “The Iceman Cometh.” His most recent production was a revival in 1951 of Marc Connelly’s “Green Pastures.” He also had designed the sets for the original production. Jones wrote several books on stagecraft and theater design, and had a hand in one of the earliest color motion pictures, a 1935 short called “La Cucaracha.” In 1933 he married Margaret Huston, a well known theatrical coach and a sister of Actor Walter Huston. She died in 1942. Jones is survived by two brothers, the Rev. Dr. Philip C. Jones of New York and Charles Jones of Yonkers, and two sisters, Miss Elizabeth Jones and Miss Alice Varney Jones, of Milton, at whose home he died (Hartford Courant, November 27, 1954).

References:

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Youtube. (2020). Becky Sharp (1935). Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkyZ_EB6tWs

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Milton Mills’ Methodist Ministers of 1904-24

By Muriel Bristol | September 13, 2020

Continued from Milton Mills’ Methodist Ministers of 1869-1904

Liberty Chapel
Liberty Chapel (formerly Milton Mills Methodist Church)

According to Scale’s History of Strafford County, the Methodist Church of Milton Mills organized itself in June 1869 and erected its “neat and tasty” meeting-house in 1871.

Liberty Chapel, the small Congregational Church on Highland Avenue in Milton Mills, also dates to the 1800s, and claims an unusual distinction: At the top of its spire is [was] a hand pointing a finger toward the sky. The building was originally the Milton Mills Methodist Church, and the original hand atop the steeple was carved from a single block of wood by Erastus Shaw. That hand is now in the collection of the Milton Historical Society (NH Magazine, July 2019).

The Milton Mills Methodist ministers of this period were Willis Holmes, William A. Hudson, Frederick H. Sleep, John H. Vincent, Lester E. Alexander, John E. Taylor, and Edwin B. Young.

Rev. Willis Holmes – 1904-07

Willis Holmes was born in Carroll, NH, September 5, 1855, son of Robert R. and Letitia J. (Phillips) Holmes.

He married, circa 1875, Ella Esmerelda Kimball. She was born in Hollis, ME, circa 1855, daughter of Edward and Joanna (Phillips) Kimball.

Willis Holmes, an engineer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Whitefield, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella Holmes, keeping house, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his children, William H. Holmes, at school, aged four years (b. NH), Clarence Holmes, aged two years (b. NH), and Laurence Holmes, aged nine months (b. NH).

The NH Methodist Conference appointed Willis Holmes as “supply” pastor for South Columbia, NH, in April 1890 (Boston Globe, April 29, 1890).

COLEBROOK, N.H. October 31. We are sorry, but not surprised, to learn that Rev. Willis Holmes is suffering from his too arduous labors in East Colebrook and Columbia, and is obliged to discontinue some of his services (Essex County Herald (Island Pond, VT), November 3, 1893).

AMONG OUR NEIGHBORS. BLOOMFIELD. January 2. Rev. J.H. Winslow was in town Saturday on his way to East Columbia to preach for Rev. Willis Holmes and assist him in holding a watch meeting (Essex County Herald (Island Pond, VT), January 5, 1894).

The NH Methodist Conference appointed Willis Holmes as pastor for Milan and West Milan, NH, in April 1897 (Boston Globe, April 12, 1897).

NORTH MONROE. The Concord District Preachers’ meeting and Epworth League convention will be held at the church next week commencing Monday evening, June 13, with a sermon by Rev. Willis Holmes. Papers on interesting subjects will be read throughout the day Tuesday; sermon in the evening by Rev. R.E. Thompson. Wednesday will be given to the interests of the Epworth League. In the evening there will be an address by Rev. E.N. Jarrett. Dinner and supper will be served at the chapel Tuesday and Wednesday. The meetings are open to all. Every Epworthian is especially urged to be present Wednesday (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), June 8, 1898).

MONROE, N.H. Revival services are to be held at the M.E. church here evenings this week and next. Rev. Willis Holmes of Landaff, N.H., will speak Wednesday, Thursday and Friday evenings of this week (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), June 7, 1899).

Willis Holmes, a clergyman, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Landaff, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included Ella E. Holmes, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Agnes A. Holmes, a schoolteacher, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Nella E. Holmes, attends school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Norris D. Holmes, aged nine years (b. NH), and Evelin Holman, aged three years (b. NH).

W. Holmes appeared in the Milton [Milton Mills] business directory of 1904 and 1905-06, as pastor of the Milton Mills Methodist church.

LUBEC. Rev. Willis Holmes, pastor of the M.E. church will accept a call in the New Hampshire conference and will take up his work in that section at the end of the conference year here. Mr. Holmes is a Christian man through and through and thoroughly alive to do any good work in or out of the church. He has made many friends during his stay here and many will regret to see him go (Bangor Daily News, March 4, 1909).

HAVERHILL. The baccalaureate sermon was preached to the graduating class on Sunday evening by Rev. John Irons assisted by Rev. Willis Holmes, pastor of the Methodist church. The words were clear cut and full of good, sound advice. The church was prettily decorated with white, green, red and gold. The graduating exercises will be held in Pierson’s hall Friday evening, June 18 (United Opinion (Bradford, VT), June 18, 1909).

Willis Holmes, a minister, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella B. Holmes, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), and his daughter, Nellie E. Holmes, aged thirteen years (b. NH). They resided in a rented house on Main Street.

Ella (Kimball) Holmes died in Landaff, NH, November 19, 1918, aged sixty-two years.

ELLA E. HOLMES. Mrs. Ella E. Kimball Holmes was born in Hollis, Me., July 11, 1856. Her parents were Edmund and Joanna Phillips Kimball. When about sixteen years of age she moved with her parents to Madison, N.H., where she resided for several years. She was married to Rev. Willis Holmes of the New Hampshire Conference April 11, 1875, at Carroll, N.H. They took up their residence in Whitefield, N.H., where they remained until Mr. Holmes entered the ministry and was appointed to South Columbia, N.H. Mrs. Holmes dearly loved the work of the pastorate and devoted both time and talents to the extension of the Kingdom. During her residence in Whitefield she united with the Methodist Episcopal Church and always maintained her membership in the Whitefield church. Early in October, 1918, she came with her husband to Landaff, N.H., to spend the winter with their daughter, Mrs. Harry Poore, and on November 19 she passed to her heavenly home. Mrs. Holmes is survived by her husband, three sons, William H., of Lincoln, N.H., Clarence W., of East Douglas, Mass., and Norris D., of Hoosac Tunnel, Mass.; three daughters, Mrs. Agnes Poore of Landaff, Mrs. Nettie Poore of Lincoln, and Mrs. Evelyn Downing of West Thornton, N.H.; and two sisters, Mrs. Etta Gillett of Wichita, Kan., and Mrs. Abbie Wallace of Whitefield, N.H. The funeral was held Nov. 21, and burial was in the Landaff cemetery (ME Church, 1916).

Harry E. Poor, farming, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Landaff, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Agnes A. Poor, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), his children, Dorothy E. Poor, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Winfield W. Poor, aged twelve years (b. NH), Robert W. Poor, aged eleven years (b. NH), Clifton H. Poor, aged eight years (b. NH), Everett H. Poor, aged four years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Willis Holmes, retired, aged sixty-four years (b. NH). Harry E. Poor owned their farm on Kid Avenue, with a mortgage.

Rev. Willis Holmes died in Landaff, NH (three months residence, previous residence, Lincoln, NH), January 6, 1921, aged sixty-five years.

REV. WILLIS HOLMES. Rev. Willis Holmes was born in Carroll, N.H., Sept. 5, 1855, and passed from this life at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harry E. Poor, in Landaff, N.H., Jan. 6, 1921. His parents were Robert R. and Letitia Baker Holmes. His father gave his life for his country in the Civil War. Mr. Holmes was united in marriage with Ella E. Kimball, April 11, 1875, in Carroll, N.H. They resided in Whitefield, N.H., for a number of years, where Mr. Holmes united with the Methodist Episcopal Church in July, 1885. On March 6, 1886, he was granted an exhorter’s license by the Whitefield Quarterly Conference, and in December, 1887, he was licensed a local preacher. At Newport, N.H., in April, 1891, he was received on trial in the New Hampshire Conference and ordained a local deacon by Bishop Foster. He was admitted to full membership in the Conference at Rochester in 1893. In April, 1895, he completed the conference course of study and was ordained elder by Bishop Merrill in Concord. His appointments were all in the New Hampshire Conference, and were as follows: East Columbia and East Colebrook, 1891-95; Milan and West Milan, 1896-97; Milan, West Milan and Dummer, 1898; Landaff and Lyman, 1898-1903; Milton Mills, 1904-07; Conference Evangelist, 1908; Haverhill, 1908-10; Supernumerary, 1911-12; Moultonville and Ossipee Mountain, 1913; Retired 1914-20 (ME Church, 1916).

Rev. William A. Hudson – 1908-09

William Arthur Hudson was born in Chestertown, MD, circa 1871, son of George and Margaret E. (Phoebus) Hudson.

William Arthur Hudson married (1st) in Southwick, MA, December 29, 1894, Emma Martin Hudson, both of Southwick. He was a student, aged 22 years (b. Chestertown, MD); she was a student, aged 20 years (b. Seaford, DE). She was born in Seaford, DE, circa 1874, daughter of Edgar and Emma (Haggard) Hudson).

Emma M. (Hudson) Hudson died of consumption in Lempster, NH, November 19, 1898, aged twenty-three years.

William A. Hudson married (2nd) in Lempster, NH, June 14, 1899, Ella M. Evans, he of Wakefield and she of Lempster. He was a widowed clergyman, aged 26 years (b. Chestertown, MD); she was a housekeeper, aged 29 years (b. Lempster, NH). She was born in Lempster, NH, daughter of James A. and Electa (Fay) Evans).

William A. Hudson, a preacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. MD), headed a Brookfield, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Ella M. Hudson, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his children, Olivia E.S. Hudson, aged five years (b. MA), Grace E.P. Hudson, aged three years (b. NH), and James G. Hudson, aged nine months (b. NH). William A. Hudson rented their house. Ella M. Hudson was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

William A. Hudson, a city missionary clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. MD), was one of seventeen lodgers in the Boston, MA, household of Fred M. Woodworth, at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Woodworth was an express teamster, aged forty-eight years (b. Canada (Eng.)). (His wife and children were either omitted or domiciled elsewhere for a time, perhaps in Laconia, NH).

Rev. William A. Hudson traveled to Laconia, NH, in late August 1913, seeking his teenage daughter, Grace E.P. Hudson, who had eloped with her boyfriend, Leon Deming of Tilton.

FAILS TO FIND DAUGHTER. Rev. William A. Hudson Runs Down a Clew From Laconia, N.H. LACONIA, N.H., Aug. 31 – Rev. William A. Hudson of Morgan Memorial Chapel, Boston, was here this afternoon, investigating a story that his eloping daughter, Grace Hudson was here with Deming. Mr. Hudson was accompanied by City Marshal Charles H. Harvell in his search. He found that apparently the only basis for the report that his daughter was working in a restaurant here was that a new waitress appeared at a local restaurant yesterday. Mr. Hudson has been staying at the home of Rev. A.M. Shattuck, pastor of the Methodist Church (Boston Globe, September 1, 1913).

GRACE HUDSON TWICE LOCATED. In Manchester and Lancaster, N.H. Missing Boston Girl Received Telegram Signed “Leon.” Left Lancaster Monday, Fearing Pursuit. MANCHESTER, N.H., Sept. 2 – Disclosures were made today that Miss Grace Hudson, the missing daughter of Rev. William A. Hudson, head of the Morgan Memorial in Boston and a member of the New Hampshire Conference, was in Manchester for four days last week, registering under her own name at 452 Pine st. It is alleged Leon Deming of Tilton was in this city at the same time and that he disappeared when Miss Hudson left Manchester. The girl, who apparently came to Manchester from her home at 85 Shawmut av., Boston, on Monday, made no effort to conceal her identity. She said, it is claimed, she had left her home because of trouble with her stepmother and was in search of work as a waitress. She was directed to a number of places and, failing to secure employment, finally went to work in the Breen Brothers’ store in Elm st., staying there for one day. Then she left town, after receiving a telegram and numerous telephone calls. The telegram was signed “Leon” and sent from Lancaster Wednesday. It read as follows “Grace, will be there tomorrow. Send answer if this is OK.” It has been learned the girl was seen on Saturday in Lakeport.

SEEN IN LANCASTER. Miss Hudson Engaged Room, Making No Attempt to Hide Identity Disappeared Suddenly. LANCASTER, N.H., Sept. 2 – Miss Grace Hudson, the Boston girl who disappeared from her home last week Monday, was undoubtedly in Lancaster from last Friday until Monday of this week. She engaged a room with Mrs. T.S. Ellis, paying a week’s rent in advance, and remained there quietly until Sunday, when her picture appeared in the Sunday papers. Apparently fearing identification, she left her lodgings and has not been seen since. She gave her name here hesitatingly as Grace Hudson and was without baggage. Miss Hudson left Mrs. Ellis’ home about 7:30 Monday night.

HER FATHER BAFFLED. Rev W.A. Hudson Covered 500 Miles in Search for Daughter in New Hampshire. After learning yesterday that his daughter, Grace, who disappeared a week ago, had been located in Lancaster, N.H., as late as 7:30 o’clock Labor Day night. Rev W.A. Hudson, pastor of the Morgan Memorial, is again completely in the dark as to her whereabouts and does not know what will be his next step in his search for her. Rev. Mr. Hudson covered a 500-mile journey through the country about Tilton, Sunapee, Lakeport, Laconia, The Weirs, Plymouth, Woodsville and other New Hampshire points over Sunday and Monday. “With police officials and lawyers I questioned everyone who claimed to have seen my daughter,” he said, “but in practically every instance they had mistaken someone else for her. I am completely baffled” (Boston Globe, September 3, 1913).

ATTEMPTS AT MARRIAGE FAILS. Couple Turned Down by Two Clergymen. Deming and Grace Hudson May Try Again Today. License Not Returned at Lancaster, N.H. LANCASTER, N.H., Sept. 5 – Several unsuccessful attempts to get married here were made today by Miss Grace Hudson, the 16-year-old Boston girl who disappeared from her home 10 days ago, and Leon Deming, her former employer in a restaurant at Tilton, N.H. Early this morning the couple called on Rev. Mr. Dorr, the local Methodist minister, and asked him to marry them, but he refused. They then visited the Congregationalist clergyman and he likewise refused to perform the ceremony for them. Disappointed, but not disheartened, the couple then called at the rectory of the local Episcopal Church, but the rector was not at home and they did not await his return. As far as could be learned tonight, the young people did not call on any of the local justices of the peace during the day or evening and those who have been following the activities of the couple here believe the marriage has been postponed until tomorrow or some later date until they can get a minister or a Justice of the peace to tie the knot. This belief was strengthened by the fact that the return of the license had not been made to Town Clerk Brown up to a late hour tonight. The license was issued Thursday night. Just before the expiration of the time limit which the couple had for getting it since filing their marriage Intentions. When last seen, which was at noon today, the couple were at the Boston & Maine Railroad Station, but it is not known that they have left town.

Grace Hudson married in Northumberland, NH, September 5, 1913, Leon Deming, she of Boston, MA, and he of Lancaster, NH. He was a laborer, aged twenty-six years, and she was aged nineteen years. (She reported a false age). Justice of the Peace William W. Pike of Northumberland, NH, performed the ceremony, Deming was born in Landaff, NH, son of Ira and Nellie (Brooks) Deming.

REV. MR. HUDSON TOLD. Declares He Does Not Expect to Hear From His Daughter Until After Her Marriage. The news that his daughter Grace and her sweetheart. Leon Deming. had made several vain attempts to get married at Lancaster, N.H. yesterday, was given Rev. William A. Hudson, pastor of Morgan Memorial, last night by the Globe. He refused to express any opinion about their unsuccessful efforts to become man and wife. He stated that the news from Lancaster was the first definite information he had had of his daughter’s actions since last Monday night when he learned she had been seen in Lancaster as late as 7:30 o’clock. He had since heard that the couple had filed intentions of getting married and that later he had been told another story to the effect that his daughter was not present when the Intentions were filed. He preferred to credit the latter story. Pastor Hudson also added that he did not expect to hear from his daughter until after her marriage, saving, how-ever, that this was only his belief (Boston Globe, September 6, 1913).

GRACE HUDSON WEDDED SEPT 5. By Civil Ceremony at Lancaster, N.H. Name of the Person Officiating Is Being Withheld. Her Father Was Sent Copy of the Certificate. TILTON, N.H., Sept. 11 – Word has been received here that Miss Grace Hudson, 16-year-old daughter of Rev. William A. Hudson of the Morgan Memorial Chapel, Boston, and Leon Deming of Tilton have been married at Groveton, the name of the person officiating being withheld. They are boarding at Burt Smith’s in Lancaster, having given ample evidence that they are married. Deming, who was formerly proprietor of a restaurant in Tilton, is now employed on highway work in Lancaster. Two Lancaster clergymen refused to marry them. The license was issued by Town Clerk Rollin J. Brown of Lancaster, who had previously received a message from the girl’s father asking when the marriage intentions had been filed. Mr. Brown replied at once, telling Mr. Hudson to notify him if he had any objections to the issuance of the license. Not receiving any reply the clerk felt obliged to issue the license. The girl gave her age as 19. She was formerly a Tilton Seminal student and left school to work as a waitress in Deming’s restaurant in this town.

FATHER GOT WORD. Rev. Mr. Hudson Refuses to Comment on Marriage Ceremony. Always Welcome Home, He Says. Rev. William A. Hudson, when asked last night if he had heard of the marriage of his daughter Grace to Leon Deming in Groveton, N.H., answered that he had. Deming and Miss Hudson, according to the girl’s father, were married in Groveton, Sept 5, the ceremony being a civil one. “I received a copy of the marriage certificate from the person who performed the ceremony,” said Rev. Mr. Hudson, “and I also received a letter from my daughter stating that she had been married.” Other than saying that the person who married the couple was not a minister, however, Mr. Hudson refused to comment upon the ceremony. When asked if he purposed taking any steps to annul the marriage he said that he understood that under the laws of New Hampshire there was nothing he could do now. “While the relations between my daughter and myself are our own private affair,” continued Rev. Mr. Hudson, “I will state that she will always find a welcome at my home. As regards her husband, I can only say that I do not know anything about him and have never seen him.” Since the marriage the girl and her father have exchanged correspondence frequently (Boston Globe, September 12, 1913).

William Hudson, a church clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. MD), headed a Wawarsing, NY, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella M. Hudson, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and his child, Margaret A.J. Hudson, aged seventeen years (b. NH). William Hudson rented their house on Church Street.

William A. Hudson, an M.E. Church clergyman, aged fifty-seven years (b. MD), headed a North Canaan, CT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-one years), Ella M. Hudson, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH). William A. Hudson owned, i.e., rented, their house, for $30 per month. They had a radio set.

Daughter Grace E.P. (Hudson) Deming divorced her husband, Leon Deming, in or around 1934.

William A. Hudson, a Methodist minister, aged sixty-seven years (b. MD), headed a Woodstock, NY, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella M. Hudson, aged seventy years (b. NH). William A. Hudson rented their house on Route 212, for $0 per month. They had resided in Wapinger’s Falls, NY, in 1935.

Daughter Grace Hudson Deming married (2nd) in Randolph, VT, May 31, 1941, William G. Martin. He was a widowed farmer, aged forty-five years, and she was a divorced housekeeper, aged forty-four years. Rev. F. Wilson Day performed the ceremony. William G. Martin was born in Marshfield, VT, in 1896, son of Harry H. and Ellen (Cate) Martin.

Ella M. (Evans) Hudson died in Kingston, NY, October 12, 1952, aged eighty-two years,

DIED. HUDSON – In this city, Sunday, October 12, 1952, Ella M. Evans in her 83rd year, wife of Rev. William A. Hudson. Funeral service will be held at Perrott’s Funeral Home, Number One Grand Ave., Newburgh, N.Y., on Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. Interment in Woodlawn Cemetery, Newburgh. Friends are invited to call Monday evening from 7 to 9 o clock at Perrott’s Funeral Home, Newburgh (Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, NY), October 13, 1952).

William A. Hudson died in Akron, OH, September 1959, aged eighty-six years.

Rev. William A. Hudson. The Rev. William A. Hudson, 86, a former pastor of the Woodstock Methodist Church, died Monday in Akron, Ohio. The Rev. Mr. Hudson was pastor of the Woodstock church for four years. He retired from active ministry 16 years ago. Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. George Miller of Akron, Mrs. Grace Martin of Randolph, Vt., and Miss Jeanne Bollin of Kerhonkson; a son James Hudson of Geneva; 14 grandchildren and 36 great grandchildren. His wife, Ella, died six years ago in Kingston. Funeral services will be held at the Pcrrott Funeral Homo, Newburgh, Friday at 2 p.m. (Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, NY), [Tuesday,] September 15, 1959).

Rev. Frederick H. Sleep – 1911-12

Frederick Herbert Sleep was  born in Buckfastleigh, Devonshire, England, March 22, 1887, son of Simon and Charlotte (Fogwell) Sleep.

Marshall C. Bowles, a laborer, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Thornton, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his (second) wife (of eighteen years), Lula E Bowles, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his son, Carl M. Bowles, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Frederick H. Sleep, a clergyman, aged twenty-three years (b. England). Marshall C. Bowles rented their house. Lula E. Bowles was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Frederick H. Sleep had immigrated in 1906.

Frederick Herbert Sleep married in Pepperell, MA, August 30, 1911, Louise Whittemore, he of Milton Mills, NH, and she of Framingham, MA. He was a clergyman, aged twenty-four years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-two years. She was born in Framingham, MA, circa 1889, daughter of Henry S. and Mary (Norton) Whittemore.

F.H. Sleep appeared in the Milton business directory of 1912, as pastor of the Methodist church at Milton Mills, resident at 8 Highland street.

Rev. Fredrick H. Sleep appeared in the Laconia, NH, directory of 1913, as minister of St. James Episcopal church, with his house at 68 Fair street.

At the Churches. Christ Church. Lenten service, Monday, 7.30 p.m. Sermon by Rev. Frederick H. Sleep, St. .lames’ Church, Laconia, N.H. (Portsmouth Herald, March 21, 1914).

Business Notices. Rev. Frederick H. Sleep preached a splendid sermon on ‘The power of the cross,’ at Christ church last evening, his text being ‘For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God’ (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), April 7, 1917).

Rev. F.H. Sleep Takes Mission Work. SPRINGFIELD, March 30. Rev. Frederick H. Sleep of Christ Church, Fitchburg. notified Bishop Thomas F. Davies today that he had decided to accept the position of diocesan missionary with headquarters in Lanesboro. The other diocesan missionary is Rev. Archibald S. Winslow of Bayonne, N.J., who is to be rector of St. Andrews Church, Ludlow. These missionaries will have charge of 20 missions in the two districts (Boston Globe, March 31, 1918).

Frederick H. Sleep, a church clergyman, aged thirty-two years (b. England), headed a Fitchburg, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Louise W, Sleep, aged thirty years (b. MA), his children, Mary L. Sleep, aged seven years (b. NH), Charlotte Sleep, aged five years (b. NH), and Dorothia Sleep, aged two years (b. MA), and his boarder, Annie S. Carter, a hospital nurse, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Frederick H. Sleep rented their house “off” Westminster Street. He immigrated in 1907, and became a naturalized citizen in 1912.

Frederick H. Sleep, an Episcopal church clergyman, aged forty-three years (b. England), headed a Fitchburg, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Louise W. Sleep, aged forty-one years (b. MA), his children, Mary L. Sleep, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Charlotte F. Sleep, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Dorothy G. Sleep, aged twelve years (b. MA), and Frederick H. Sleep, aged eight  years (b. MA). Frederick H. Sleep rented their house on Hill Street, for $15 per month. They had a radio set. He immigrated in 1906, and became a naturalized citizen.

Frederick H. Sleep, a clergyman, aged fifty-three years (b. England), headed a Fitchburg, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Louise W. Sleep, aged fifty-one years (b. MA), his children, Charlotte F. Sleep, a hospital lab technician, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Dorothy G. Sleep, a school teacher, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Frederick H. Sleep,  a paper manufacturing company beater man, aged eighteen years (b. MA). Frederick H. Sleep rented their house at 30 Hill Street, for $18 per month. He was a naturalized citizen. They had all lived in the same house in 1935.

Frederick H. Sleep died in Burbank hospital, in Fitchburg, MA, June 20, 1949, aged sixty-three years.

Rev. Fred. H. Sleep, Beloved Clergyman, Here 34 Yrs., Dies. Fitchburg lost one of its most beloved and respected clergymen when Rev. Frederick H. Sleep, 63, of 36 Parsons street, former rector of Church of the Good Shepherd, died of coronary thrombosis at Burbank hospital last night. During 34 years of residence in this city, and 29 years of service to the West Fitchburg church, the warm-hearted humanity and tolerance of Rev. Mr. Sleep had won him city-wide recognition. Esteemed by all faiths, he held record of having spoken in churches of nearly all denominations. For the past several years he had suffered heart ailments which had occasioned his retirement from active duty in 1945. On the advice his physician, he relinquished his responsibilities as rector. He suffered a heart attack in 1936 and a recurrence of the ailment in November 1945. Rev. Mr. Sleep untiringly devoted himself to the service of his parish members and community. During WW II when a First Aid class was held in the parish house of the Church of the Good Shepherd, he was a regular attendant and participant in all the activities of this group. Reluctantly accepting the doctor’s ultimatum, Rev. Mr. Sleep submitted his resignation to a parish he had seen triple in size under his conscientious guidance. It has ben said “Every institution is the lengthened shadow of a man.” The Church of the Good ia the lengthened shadow of Rev, Mr. Sleep, who first came to the West Fitchburg church July 1, 1915, when it was a parochial mission of Christ Episcopal church. He served for three years in charge of the of Church of the Good Shepherd and as assistant at Christ church. Bishop Thomas F. Dayies appointed him diocesan missionary, but he was recalled to the little parish in 1918, by Rev. Arthur J. Gammack, rector of Christ church. When Rev. Mr. Gammack died in 1928 the mission was set apart from Christ church and Rev. Mr. Sleep became its first pastor.  When Mr. Sleep took charge of the church it had 40 communicants. It now has about 200. Born in Buckfastleigh, Devonshire, England, Mr. Sleep came to this country at the age of 18. As soon as the law allowed, he became an American citizen. One of his fondest recollections was a 28-mile trip he made to Concord, N.H., from Laconia, N.H., to cast his first vote, Graduated from Tilton seminary, N.H., in 1911, he studied under the late Rt. Rev. Melville Parker, Episcopal bishop of New Hampshire, and Rev. Howard F. Hill, D.D. He was ordained deacon in 1914 in St. James’ church, in Laconia, of which he was in charge. Ordained to the priesthood at St. Paul’s church in Concord, in 1915, he came to the Fitchburg church in the same year. Because of Rev. Mr, Sleep’s belief in denominational tolerance, representatives of other faiths frequently spoke at the Church of Good Shepherd during his years of leadership. Interest in the welfare of labor prompted him to inaugurate a Labor-Management Forum about decade ago. He likewise served as president of the Fitchburg Ministerial Assn., and was one of the first to join with the Fitchburg Council of church in which he took an active part. On the occasion of a joint celebration of the 25th anniversary of the pastorate of Rev. Sleep and the 40th anniversary of the dedication of the church building, in 1941. Charles Hosea Temple, of Edgewood, R.I., said of him: “During these 25 years his thoughts have not been so much fixed on the eternal things that he has overlooked the present. ”He has taken his place as an outstanding citizen. He has been the friend of labor, not afraid to champion it when it has been right, equally unafraid to reprove it it has been wrong. ” Rev. Mr. Sleep untiringly devoted himself to the service of his parish members and community. Roland group. Reluctantly accepting the cessation of his religious duties, because of poor health, Rev. Mr. Sleep, in his letter of resignation in 1945 said with characteristic unselfishness: “First I ask for my successor the same degree of loyalty and cooperation you have given to me. . . . Surely it will be no kindness to me to insist that the worship and work of this parish be carried on according to present plans solely because I initiated them. “With the acceptance of my resignation I become one of the communicants of this parish and as such I hope to continue to worship and work, as far as I am able, in this church where so much of my happiness has come to me.” Rev. Mr. Sleep was a member of Loyal Progressive lodge of Manchester Unity Odd Fellows and Shakespeare lodge, Sons of St. George. Besides his wife, Mrs. Louise (Whittemore) Sleep, he is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Edgar Bugbee of Stamford, Conn, Mrs. Bradford S. Hubbard of Keene, N.H., Miss Charlotte F. Sleep of this city and Miss Dorothy G. Sleep of Westford, Conn.; a son, Frederick Sleep, Jr., of this city; three grandchildren and one great-grandchild. The funeral will be from the Sawyer funeral home tomorrow morning with a service at 11 o’clock in the Church of the Good Shepherd. The body will be taken to Rural cemetery in Worcester for cremation and burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery (Fitchburg Sentinel, June 21, 1949).

Rev. John H. Vincent – 1913-14

John Henry Vincent was born in Trevarth, Cornwall, England, March 28, 1848. He was baptized in Gwennap, Cornwall, England, March 11, 1849, son of Nicholas and Jane (Trelaggen) Vincent.

Methodism had many adherents in Cornwall. Rev. John Wesley preached eighteen times (between 1762-69) at Gwennap Pit, an earthen amphitheater caused by a subterranean subsidence.

John H. Vincent married in Walpole, MA, May 20, 1879, Annie Gilmore Hutchinson, he of Harwich, MA, and she of Walpole. He was a clergyman, aged thirty years, and she was aged twenty-four years. She was born in Walpole, MA, May 15, 1854, daughter of Aaron and Mary Hutchinson.

John H. Vincent, a minister, aged thirty-two years (b. England), headed a Harwich, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna G. Vincent, keeping house, aged twenty-six years (b. MA).

John Henry Vincent of North Chelmsford, MA, clergyman, aged thirty-four years, petitioned for U.S. citizenship in Boston, MA, March 13, 1882. He had arrived in the U.S. at Castle Garden, NY, September 22, 1867, and submitted his initial intention on Santa Clara County, CA, July 28, 1871. Orien S. Currier of Boston, MA, and Daniel O. Clark of Stoughton, MA, deposed that they had known him for five years past, during which time he had lived in Boston, Duxbury, Falmouth, Harwich, and Chelmsford, all in Massachusetts. Rev. Vincent swore an oath and was admitted as a citizen.

John H. Vincent, a clergyman, aged fifty-two years (b. England), headed a Stratford, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Annie G. Vincent, aged forty-six years (b. MA). John H. Vincent rented their house. He had immigrated into the U.S. in 1869.

John H. Vincent, a Methodist clergyman, aged sixty-two years (b. England), headed a Nelson, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-one years), Annie G. Vincent, aged fifty-five years (b. MA). John H. Vincent rented their house.

George [John] H. Vincent, a Methodist minister, aged seventy-one years (b. England), headed a Salem, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie G. Vincent, aged sixty-five years (b. MA). They resided on the No. Salem Road. John H. Vincent had immigrated into the U.S. in 1867, and become a naturalized citizen in 1875.

Anne G. (Hutchinson) Vincent died in Chichester, NH, November 20, 1924.

Eva Davis, a general farm farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Chichester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her hired man, George Sanborn, a general farm laborer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), and her boarder, John H. Vincent, a widower, aged eighty-two years (b. England). Eva Davis owned their farm on the Canterbury Road, which was valued at $2,500. They had a radio set. John H. Vincent had immigrated into the U.S. in 1867, and become a naturalized citizen.

John H. Vincent died in Chichester, NH, April 12, 1932, aged eighty-four years, and fourteen days. He had resided in Chichester for twelve years, coming there from Salem, NH.

REV. VINCENT DIED AT 84. Concord, N.H., April 12 (AP) – Rev. John Henry Vincent, 84, died today at Chichester, where he had been pastor of the Methodist church from 1920 to 1927. He joined the New England Methodist conference in 1878 and the New Hampshire conference in 1889 and had held several pastorates in the southern areas (Montpelier Evening Argus, (Montpelier, VT),, April 12, 1932).

Rev. Lester E. Alexander – 1917-21

Lester Ellsworth Alexander was born in Fitzwilliam, NH, August 25, 1862, son of Warren F. and Mary F. (Perham) Alexander.

Lester E. Alexander married (1st) in Walpole, NH, June 5, 1884, Carrie Estella Webster. She was born in Walpole, NH, November 1, 1862, daughter of Edwin E. and Emily E. (Upham) Webster.

Lester Alexander, a can finisher, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Keene, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Carrie E. Alexander, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), and his children, Lillian W. Alexander, at school, aged eight years (b. NH), Edwin L. Alexander, at school, aged six years (b. NH), and Mary E. Alexander, aged four years (b. NH). Lester Alexander rented their house on Beaver Street. Carrie E. Alexander was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Lester E. Alexander, an M.E. Church clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Henniker, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Carrie E. Alexander, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Lillian W. Alexander, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Edwin L. Alexander, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Mary E. Alexander, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Emily E. Webster, aged sixty-nine years (b. VT). Lester E. Alexander rented their house on Crescent Street. Carrie E. Alexander was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

L.E. Alexander appeared in the Milton business directory of 1917, as pastor of the Milton Mills Methodist church, at Highland street.

UNION. Walter Chesborough of North Rochester and Miss Gladys Wentworth of this village were married in Milton Mills by Rev. Alexander on Saturday evening, June 16 They will reside here (Farmington News, June 29, 1917).

Lester E. Alexander, a N.H. Conference clergyman, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie E. Alexander, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Emily E. Webster, aged seventy-eight years (b. VT). Lester E. Alexander rented their house.

ALEXANDER, LESTER ELLSWORTH. Milton Mills, 1918-19; Jefferson, 1921-22.

Lester Alexander, a Methodist clergyman, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Hillsborough, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-five years), Carrie Alexander, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Emily Webster, aged eighty-eight years (b. VT). Lester E. Alexander rented their house on Church Street, for $20.

Carrie E. (Webster) Alexander died in Franklin, NH, February 13, 1932, aged sixty-nine years.

Lester E. Alexander married (2nd) in Bethlehem, NH, March 23, 1933, Jennie W. (Withion) Fox, he of Franklin, NH, and she of Boston, MA. He was a clergyman, aged seventy years, and she was at home, aged sixty-eight years. Rev. Charles W. Frye performed the ceremony. Jennie W. (Withion) Fox was born in Nova Scotia, Canada, circa 1864, daughter of David and Sarah (Ellis) Withion

ALEXANDER-FOX. FRANKLIN, N.H., March 23 – Rev. Lester E. Alexander, pastor of the Methodist Church here, and Mrs. Jennie W. Fox of Boston, were married this noon at Bethlehem by the bridegroom’s son-in-law, Rev. C.W. Frye, pastor of the Durrell Memorial Church, Bethlehem. The bridegroom’s grandson attended them. Following a wedding lunch they motored to Franklin. Rev. Mr. Alexander announced recently that he was to retire from active preaching. He and his bride will reside in Franklin (Boston Globe, Match 24, 1933).

Lester E. Alexander died in Laconia, NH, May 22, 1950, aged eighty-seven years.

Rev. John E. Taylor – 1921-22

John Edwin Taylor was born in Carbonear, Newfoundland, Canada, February 9, 1866, son of Richard and Harriet (Waterman) Taylor.

John E. Taylor married in Saugus, MA, August 21, 1901, Hannah E. Terry, he of Somerville, MA, and she of Everett, MA. He was a marketman, aged thirty-five years, and she was a clerk, aged thirty-two years. She was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, circa 1869, daughter of William and Hannah (Garhard) Terry.

J.E. Taylor, an evangelical preacher, aged forty-three years (b. Newfoundland), headed a Kingfield, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Hannah E. Taylor, aged forty-one years (b. Nova Scotia), and his child, Richard E. Taylor, aged seven years (b. MA). J.E. Taylor rented their house on Church Street. Hannah E. Taylor was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. J.E. Taylor had immigrated into the U.S. in 1888; Harriet E. Taylor had immigrated into the U.S. in 1886.

John E Taylor, a shipyard rigger, aged fifty-one years (b. Newfoundland), headed a Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hannah E. Taylor, aged fifty years (b. Nova Scotia), and his child, Richard E. Taylor, aged seventeen years (b. MA). John E. Taylor rented their house on Mill Road. He had become naturalized in 1890; Harriet E. Taylor had immigrated into the U.S. in 1886 and had become naturalized in 1901, i.e., by virtue of her marriage.

RETAINS THREE DISTRICTS. New Hampshire Methodist Conference Decided. Nashua, N.H., April 11. The New Hampshire Methodist Episcopal conference will continue under a three district division, Bishop Ernest W. Richardson decided today. The laymen had voted in favor of two districts while the clergy favored retention of the present arrangement and the presiding bishop was called on to decide. The conference closed with the announcement of the appointments to pastorates which showed the following changes: Concord district E.S. Lasker, superintendent; Laconia, Trinity church, supplied by O.P. Wright; Littleton, C.M. Tibbetts; Milan and Dummer, H.R. Goodwin; Pittsburgh, supplied by A.J. Pierce; Warren, I. Mellor; Weirs and Ashland, E.J. Canfield; West Milan and Stark, supplied by F.J. Griffin; West Thornton, supplied by Lincoln Frye. Dover district Amesbury, M,L. Simpson; Epping, supplied by J.W. McMorris; Exeter, supplied by C.D. Maurier; Greenland, S.B. Enman; Merrimacport, Mass., Paul J. Tilton; Methuen, Mass., Oaklands church, supplied by E.T. Cooke: Milton Mills, supplied by J.E. Taylor; Salisbury. E.F. Newell. Manchester district Brookline, R.V. Ebbett; Hillsboro and Hillsboro Center, supplied by J.G. Joyce; Londonderry, supplied by George Thomas; Milford. O.J. Beardsley; Newport, C.F. Libby (Barre Daily Times (Barre, VT), April 11, 1921).

J.E. Taylor appeared in the New England business directory of 1922, as pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at Milton Mills.

John E. Taylor returned to Hampton, NH, which seems to have been his home base, circa 1922-23.

EPISCOPAL ORDINATION. Trinity Church Scene of Solemn Ceremonies As Candidates Are Raised. George W. Ferguson of Lenox, a Fellow of the General Theological seminary in New York, and Arthur Rogers of Wilkinsville were ordained to, the deaconate and Rev. J.E. Taylor of Longmeadow and Rev. Hiram Rogers of Wilkinsville were ordained to the priesthood at Trinity church yesterday morning by the Rt. Rev. Thomas F. Davies, bishop of the Episcopal diocese of western Massachusetts (Berkshire County Eagle (Pittsfield, MA), June 11, 1924).

EAST BETHEL. Rev. J.E. Taylor will be at East Bethel Baptist church with Rev. Frank Place Sunday, Feb. 22 (Barre Daily Times (Barre, VT), February 18, 1925).

John E Taylor, a poultry raiser, aged sixty-three years (b. Newfoundland), headed a Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Hannah E. Taylor, aged sixty years (b. Nova Scotia). John E. Taylor owned their house on Mill Road, which was valued at $4,000. They had a radio set. He had immigrated into the U.S. in 1889; Harriet E. Taylor had immigrated into the U.S. in 1887.

Rev. John E. Taylor last worked in his accustomed occupation (minister) in 1935.

John Edwin Taylor died on Mill Road in Hampton, NH, April 18, 1938, aged seventy-two years, two months, and seven days.

Deaths and Funerals. Rev. John Edwin Taylor. Funeral services for Rev. John Taylor, who passed away at his home on Mill road at the age of 72 years, were held at the Methodist Church at 2 o’clock, with the minister, Rev. W. Raymond Pierce, officiating, assisted by Rev. Woodcock of Kingsville, Me., a former parishioner of the deceased. Interment was made in the High Street cemetery, with the committal service at the grave in charge of Rev. Woodcock. The bearers were Myron Blake, Robert Brown, Hartley Kierstead and Herbert Beede. Rev. Taylor, who had been a resident of Hampton for the last 16 years, was a native of Newfoundland and since his retirement from the ministry has been engaged in farming. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Hannah Taylor, and one son, Richard, of Hampton. William Brown was the undertaker in charge (Portsmouth Herald, April 19, 1938).

Hannah E. Taylor, a widow, aged seventy-two years (b. Canada), headed a Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Hannah E. Taylor owned her house on Mill Road, which was valued at $1,500. She had resided in the same place in 1935.

Hannah E. (Terry) Taylor of Hampton, NH, died in the Mitchell Memorial Hospital in Brentwood, NH, March 14, 1959, aged ninety years.

Deaths and Funerals. Mrs. Hannah E. Taylor. HAMPTON — Mrs. Hannah E. Taylor, 90, of 204 Mill Rd., widow of the Rev. John E. Taylor, died Saturday at the Mitchell Memorial Hospital in Brentwood after a long illness. Born in Halifax, N.S., March 23, 1869, she was the daughter William Terry. Mrs. Taylor was a member of the Hampton Methodist Church. Survivors include a son, Robert E. Taylor of Manchester; sisters. Mrs. Herbert Hill of Dudley, Mass., and Mrs. William Girard, Barnstable, Mass.; two brothers. James Terry of Tewksbury, Mass., and Barry Terry of Saugus, Mass.; two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren (Portsmouth Herald, [Monday,] March 16, 1959).

Rev. Edwin B. Young – 1923-24

Edwin Brackett Young was born in Rochester, NH, August 10, 1883, son of John and Emma L. (Lord) Young. (His father was a Scottish immigrant).

Edwin B. Young, a North Wakefield clergyman, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. He rented his house.

Rev. Edwin B. Young married in Derry, NH, June 15, 1910, Florence E. [Ethel] Richardson, he of North Wakefield, NH, and she of Derry. He was a clergyman, aged twenty-seven years, and she was at home, aged twenty-seven years. She was born in Hampstead, NH, January 22, 1883, daughter of Naaman W. and Ella M. (Pavere) Richardson.

Edwin B. Young, a laborer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Goffstown, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ethel Young, aged thirty-six years (b. NH). Edwin B. Young rented their house.

YOUNG, EDWIN BRACKETT. Merrimacport, Mass., 1908; North Wakefield and East Wolfeboro, 1909-10; Laconia Trinity, 1911-12; Henniker and East Deering, 1913-15; Goffstown and Grasmere, 1916-17; Grasmere, 1918-19; Raymond and East Candia, 1920-22; Milton Mills, 1923-24

Edwin B. Young, a Methodist Church clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Florence E. Young, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his son, Edwin B. Young, Jr., aged ten years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Nasman W. Richardson, retired, aged seventy-nine years (b. MA). Edwin B. Young owned their house at 152 North Main Street, which was valued at $10,000. They had a radio set.

Rev. Edwin B. Young, a Methodist Church clergyman, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Hillsborough, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Florence E. Young, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and his son, Edwin B. Young, Jr., aged twenty years (b. NH). Edwin B. Young rented their house on Church Street, for $16 per month. They had resided in Strafford County, NH, in 1935.

Edwin B. Young died in Rochester, NH, December 2, 1949, aged sixty-six years.

Rev. Edwin B. Young Ex-Chaplain, Member of N.H. Legislature. ROCHESTER, N.H., Dec. 3. Rev. Edwin Brackett Young, 66, retired Methodist minister, former chaplain of the Legislature and past grand chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows in New Hampshire, died today at his home, 152 North Main st. Born in Rochester, he was graduated from Rochester High School, studied at the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago in 1904-05, and was graduated from the Boston University School of Theology in 1909. He was married June 15, 1910, to Miss Florence E. Richardson of Derry. He served in the House of Representatives as a member from Henniker in 1915 and from Goffstown in 1919. He was chaplain of the House in 1931 and again in 1941. Rev. Mr. Young was a member of Humane Lodge of Masons, and Custos Morum Lodge of Odd Fellows in Milford. He leaves a wife; a brother. Stanley L. Young of Whittier; a son, Edwin B. Young Jr., of Nashua and two grandchildren. Masonic services will be held Monday at 1:30 p. m. at the First Methodist Church. Rev. Ray H. Cowen of Haverhill, Mass., superintendent for the Southern District of the New Hampshire Methodist Conference, will officiate, assisted by other pastors. Burial will be in Rochester Cemetery (Boston Globe, December 4, 1949).

Florence E. (Richardson) Young died in NH, October 25, 1973.

References:

Carter, Nathan Franklin. (1906). The Native Ministry of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=NXgRAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA447

Find a Grave. (2015, June 16). Rev. Lester Ellsworth Alexander. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147951587/lester-ellsworth-alexander

Find a Grave. (2011, August 16). Willis Holmes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/75019324

Methodist Church (US). (1880). General Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the United Methodist Church in the United States, Territories, and Cuba. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=yr5JAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA75

M.E. Conference. (1894). Official Journal of the Sixty-Fifth Session of the New Hampshire Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Claremont, N.H., April 11-16, 1894. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=zOIpAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA4-PA549

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA517

Non-Public BOS Session Scheduled (September 14, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | September 12, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a BOS meeting to be held Monday, September 14.

The BOS meeting is scheduled to begin with a Non-Public session beginning at 6:00 PM. That session’s agenda has one item classed as 91-A3 II (c).

(c) Matters which, if discussed in public, would likely affect adversely the reputation of any person, other than a member of the public body itself, unless such person requests an open meeting. This exemption shall extend to any application for assistance or tax abatement or waiver of a fee, fine, or other levy, if based on inability to pay or poverty of the applicant.

The Public portion of the agenda has Old Business, New Business, Other Business, and some housekeeping items.


Under New Business are scheduled two items: 1) Presentation by Conservation Commission – Teneriffe Mountain Project and Casey Road Project, and 2) Possible Interest in Purchase of Town-owned, Tax Deeded Property.

Presentation by Conservation Commission – Teneriffe Mountain Project and Casey Road Project.

Possible Interest in Purchase of Town-owned, Tax Deeded Property. One imagines that there is an inverse relationship between possible interest and pre-conditions imposed by the BOS.

Under Old Business is scheduled one item: 1) Employee Wage Plan.

Employee Wage Plan. Some departments at least are paid already far in excess of the wages of the average taxpayer that pays them. It might be that the “plan” will be a moratorium that allows that gap to close a bit. (Warning: it could be dangerous to hold one’s breath while waiting for this eventuality).

Under Other Business there are no scheduled agenda items.


There will be the approval of prior minutes (from the quasi-Public session of September 2, 2020); Public Comments; an expenditure report; administrator comments, and BOS comments.


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

State of New Hampshire. (2016, June 21). RSA Chapter 91-A. Access to Governmental Records and Meetings. Retrieved from www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/VI/91-A/91-A-3.htm

Town of Milton. (2020, September 11). BOS Meeting Agenda, September 14, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/events/09-14-2020bos_agenda.pdf

Youtube. (1965). Cone of Silence. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1eUIK9CihA&feature=youtu.be&t=19

In Search of the Northwest Budget

By S.D. Plissken | September 11, 2020

In 1845 Sir John Franklin, with two ships and 129 men, went in search of the fabled “Northwest Passage” between Baffin Bay and the Pacific Ocean. He and his men disappeared into the Canadian Arctic and were never seen again.

We know now that their ships became entrapped in the ice of the Canadian Arctic over a series of unusually cold winters. Researchers theorize that, apart from the appalling and deadly Arctic conditions, the expedition’s food and water supplies were contaminated with poisonous lead solder. That would have both sickened them and impaired their cognitive function. Lord Franklin died. Part of the crew descended into cannibalism.

Survivors tried to escape overland. They loaded a heavy ship’s boat with a lot of useless paraphernalia, including a writing desk, silk handkerchiefs, scented soap, sponges, slippers, hair combs, and many books. That seemed to them to be a good idea. It can only be supposed that these unfortunates were half-crazed due to lead poisoning. One by one they died while trying to drag this useless burden across the Canadian tundra towards settlements lying hundreds of frozen miles to their south.

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) is seeking a budgetary passage through the economic recession triggered by the Covid-19 shutdown. What do they propose that we drag across this hostile environment to a sustainable place?

Most of the departmental presentations so far have led off with pay raises. Yes, we’ll need them, make sure that pay raises get stowed in the boat. That would be only prudential management. They are essential.

Put them under the writing desk, between the silk handkerchiefs, slippers, scented soap, and books.

References:

Dover, Connie. (2015, August 22). Lord Franklin. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIP5CaRky6s

Wikipedia. (2020, September 11). Franklin’s Lost Expedition. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin%27s_lost_expedition

Milton Businesses in 1922

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | September 6, 2020

The Milton entries only from the New England Business Directory and Gazetteer for 1922 are extracted below.

Many businesses have multiple entries, due to having multiple product lines or lines of business listed in different categories.


New England Business Directory and Gazetteer for 1922

Milton, Strafford Co., town on B&M R.R., 20 m. N.W. of Dover – pop 1428 – Post offices Milton, Milton Mills

Milton Mills, Strafford Co., p.o. in town of Milton, stage to Union 3 m.


Auctioneers

Drew, S.E., Milton

Automobile Garages

Banfill, W.L., Milton
Burke, C.L., Milton
Knight, W.C., Milton
Moore, G.C., Milton
Stevens, F.D., Milton Mills

Barbers

Burke, C.L., Milton
Page, Robert, Milton Mills

Bee Keepers

Fall, G.G., Milton

Billiard & Pool Rooms

Banfill, A.L., Milton
Burke, C.L., Milton
Page, R., Milton Mills

Blacksmiths (See Horse Shoers)

Burrows, Hiram (Acton, Me.), Milton Mills

Butchers (See Provision Dealers)

Horne, C.A., Milton
Hurlburt, C., Milton
Pike, R.S., Milton Mills

Clergymen

Thurston, J.F. (B.), Milton
Taylor, J.E. (M.E.), Milton Mills
Whitcomb, H.E. (B.), Milton Mills
Bennett, G.A. (Cong.), W. Milton

Clothing Dealers (See Tailors)

Horne, J.E., Milton Mills

Coal Dealers (See Wood Dealers)

Beede, R.R., Milton
Plummer, H., Milton
Fox, E.F., Milton Mills

Druggists

Willey, J.D., Milton
Emerson, E.W., Milton Mills

Dry Goods (See General Stores; also Fancy Goods)

Avery & Roberts, Milton
Horne, J.E., Milton Mills

Electric Contractors

Reynolds, W.L., Milton

Engineers. Civil

Spencer, Frank F., Milton Mills

Fertilisers

Jones, C.A., Milton
Willey, J.D., Milton
Chamberlin, M.G., Milton Mills

Fiber Goods

Kennebunk Mfg. Co., Milton
Spaulding, J. & Son Co. Inc, North Rochester

General Stores

Willey, J.D., Milton
Langley, C.A. & Son, Milton Mills

Grain Dealers (See Flour & Feed)

Drew, S.E., Milton
Buck, Herman L. (Acton, Me.), Milton Mills

Grocers (See General Stores)

Horne, C.A., Milton
Knight, W.C., Milton
Whitehouse, H.F. Estate, Milton

Hotels

Hodgdon: E.A. Hodgdon, Milton
Lake View: Hattie Hurlburt, Milton
Central: Fred Rowe, Milton Mills

Hotels (Summer)

Dorr, H.W. Mrs., Milton
Nutter, Belle Mrs., Milton
Wallingford, M.B. Mrs., Milton
Lowd, J., Milton Mills
Willey, J.D., Milton Mills

Ice Dealers

Beede, R.R. (retail), Milton
Boston Ice Co. (whol.), Milton
Metropolitan Ice Co. (whol.), Milton
Porter-Milton Ice Co. (whol.), Milton

[Metropolitan Ice Co. and Porter-Milton Ice Co. appeared also at The Weirs]

Insurance Agents

Finegan, H.F. (fire), Milton
Marsh, F.L. (fire), Milton Mills

Laundries

Milton Steam Laundry, Milton

Lawyers (Notaries are designated by a *)

*Marsh, F.L., Milton Mills

Leather Board Mfrs

Leather Board Co., Milton

Libraries

Nute Free Library, Milton
Milton Free Public Library, Milton Mills

Lumber Dealers (See Lumber Mfrs; also Saw Mills)

Avery & Roberts, Milton
Chamberlin & Miller, Milton Mills
Laskey, A.J., Milton Mills

Masons (See Plasterers)

Hayes, G.L., Milton

Milk Dealers

Drew, S.E., Milton
Lockhart, H., Milton
Buck, H.L., Milton Mills
Hobbs, Lester N. (Acton, Me.), Milton Mills

Painters. House

Carillis, Geo., Milton
Carpenter, J.H., Milton
Pinkham, J.H., Milton
Connolly, T., Milton Mills
Libby, A.D., Milton Mills

Photographers

Cate, A.J., Milton

Physicians

Hart, M.A.H., Milton
Weeks, F.S., Milton Mills

Provision Dealers (See Butchers)

Downs, A.F., Milton
Pike, P.G., Milton Mills

Sash, Door & Blind Mfrs (See Sawing & Planing Mills)

Edgcomb, C.R., Milton Mills

Shoe Dealers (See Shoe Mfrs)

McIntosh, R.A., Milton
Horne, J.R., Milton Mills

Teachers

Huse, E.S. (high), Milton

Teachers of Music

Jones, E.C. Mrs. (piano), Milton
Whitehouse, Edith M. (piano), Milton

Telephone & Telegraph Companies

N.E. Tel. & Tel. Co., Milton
Western Union Tel Co., Milton

Textile Mfrs. Woolen & Worsted Goods & Shoddy

Townsend, J.E. Est. (blankets), Milton Mills

Truckmen

Beede, R.R., Milton
Columbus, A.N., Milton

Variety Stores (See General Stores; also Five and Ten Cent Stores)

Lord, H.A., Milton

Wood Dealers (See Coal Dealers)

Hurlburt, C., Milton


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1917; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1927


References:

Sampson & Murdock Company. (1922). New England Business Directory and Gazetteer for 1922. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=u3Q1AQAAMAAJ

Celestial Seasonings – September 2020

By Heather Durham | August 31, 2020

Autumn Fires, by Robert Louis Stevenson

In the other garden.
And all up in the vale,
From the autumn bonfires
See the smoke trail!

Pleasant summer over,
And all the summer flowers,
The red fire blazes,
The grey smoke towers.

Sing a song of seasons!
Something bright in all!
Flowers in the summer,
Fires in the fall!

September 3. The Fruit Moon will be full. (Fruit Moon is a whimsical name for the Full Moon phase known also as the Corn Moon, or Barley Moon).

September 6. The Moon and Mars will rise closely to one another.

September 7. Venus will travel to it’s highest point in the sky.

September 9. The Perseid meteor shower will be prolific today when the celestial focal point shines above the horizon.

September 10. This brings us to the last quarter of the Fruit Moon.

September 14. The Moon and Venus will rise and travel close to each other.

September 21. Mercury will reach its highest point in the sky.

September 22. This is the first day of Autumn 2020 (the September Equinox). The Sun will rise due East and set due West.

September 23. This day will bring the first quarter of the Harvest Moon. It will be full on October 1. (The Full Moon following the Harvest Moon will be the Hunter’s Moon).

September 25. The Moon and Jupiter will ascend close to each other. The Moon and Saturn will do the same.

September 27. This will be the prime day for viewing the Daytime Sextantid meteor shower. These can be difficult to see as they appear on the eastern horizon near the rising Sun. (Do not look directly at the Sun). Just before sunrise might be best.

References:

In-the-Sky.org. (2020). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/newscal.php?year=2020&month=9

Pan McMillan. (2020, August 18). Ten Autumn Poems. Retrieved from www.panmacmillan.com/blogs/literary/poems-poetry-about-for-autumn-keats-frost-classic

Universe Guide. (2020). Daytime Sextantids Meteor Shower. Retrieved from www.universeguide.com/meteorshower/daytimesextantids

Wikipedia. (2020, August 26). Full Moon. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_moon

Wikipedia. (2020, August 12). Perseids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseids

Wikipedia. (2020, August 21). September Equinox. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_equinox

Milton’s Community Church Ministers of 1924-56

By Muriel Bristol | August 30, 2020

Continued from Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1891-24 and Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1908-24.

Community Church of Milton - Doug Kerr
Community Church of Milton (Photo: Doug Kerr).

Milton’s Community Church was formed during the pastorate of Congregational Rev. Newell W. Whitman, through a merger or federation of Milton’s Congregational and Free-Will Baptist congregations.

The Community Church of Milton was organized on September 16, 1924, after World War I, when conversations regarding federation between Congregationalists and Free Baptists matured. It was decided that committees of five from each church would convene and form a Community Church. The Baptist Church was used for worship, while the former Congregational Church was adapted into the Parish House. The members of these two churches believed the same things, doctrinally, and so no great theological division separated the people from their congregational neighbors (CCM, 2020).

Its services were (and are) held in the Free-Will Baptist Church building at the corner of Church (now Steeple) and School streets.

The Community Church ministers of this 1924-56 period (excluding Rev. Newell W. Whitman) were Arthur M. Jeffries, George C. Ervin, Fred Bannister, Leland L. Maxfield, Ralph V. Townsend, and George F. Currier.

Rev. Arthur M. Jeffries – 1924-29

Arthur M. Jeffries was born in Derby, England, December 29, 1880, son of Isaac and Mary E. (Hoult) Jeffries.

Arthur Jeffries married in Derby, England, October 26, 1904, Martha Elizabeth Massingham. She was baptized in St. Andrew’s Church, in Rugby, Warwickshire, England, May 14, 1880, daughter of George T. and Martha (Linton) Massingham.

Arthur M. Jeffries’ mother, Mary E. (Hoult) Jeffries, was one of the 1,012 people that died when the liner RMS Empress of Ireland sank at the mouth of the St. Lawrence river on May 29, 1914.

MEDWAY CHURCH CALLS REV. MR. JEFFRIES, BOSTON. MEDWAY, Oct. 13. Rev. Arthur Jeffries of Boston has received a call from the Baptist Church to become its pastor at a salary of $1000 and use of the parsonage. Rev. Mr. Jeffries has supplied the pulpit several Sundays (Boston Globe, October 14, 1919).

Arthur Jeffries, a minister, aged  thirty-nine years (b. England), headed a Medway, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Martha E. Jeffries, aged thirty-nine years (b. England), and his children, Arthur B. Jeffries, aged fourteen years (b. England), Elsie M. Jeffries, aged ten years (b. Canada), and Doreen F. Jeffries, aged eleven months (b. Canada). They resided in a rented house on Main Street. They were all resident aliens, said to have immigrated in 1909.

Church News by States. MASSACHUSETTS. AFTER A SHORT PASTORATE at West Medway, Rev. Arthur Jeffries has accepted a unanimous call to the First Church, Athol, and began his pastorate Aug. 1 (The Baptist, August 13, 1921).

LOCAL. Rev. Arthur Jeffries, pastor of the Baptist church in Athol, Mass., has been called to the pastorate of the community church in Milton. The church is a federation of the Baptist and Congregational churches and this is the first time that the two churches have united to secure a pastor (Farmington News, December 12, 1924).

ATHOL CHURCH CALLS REV. H.T. JOSLYN. Formerly Was Minister at Charlestown. Word has been received from Athol that Rev. Howard T. Joslyn, a former pastor at the First Baptist Church, Charlestown, has been extended a call to occupy the pulpit of the First Baptist Church in that town. Since the resignation of Rev. Arthur Jeffries, to accept a pastorate at Milton, N.H., the Athol church has been without a pastor (Boston Globe, April 4, 1925).

LOCAL. To the regret of many friends, Pastor Jeffries of Milton has announced his decision to leave his pastorate in that town. This was made known through the reading of his resignation at the communion hour on Sunday, January 6 (Farmington News, January 18, 1929).

ACTON. Rev. Ralph A. Barker, pastor of the South Acton Congregational Church, and Rev. Arthur Jeffries, pastor of West Acton Baptist Church, will exchange pulpits tomorrow (Boston Globe, September 7, 1929).

Arthur Jefferies, a Baptist minister, aged forty-nine years (b. England), headed an Acton, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Martha E. Jefferies, aged fifty years (b. England), and his child, Doreen F. Jefferies, aged eleven years (b. Canada (Eng.)). They resided in a house on Massachusetts Ave, which they rented for $30 per month.

CLARENCE V. TWITCHELL. WEST ACTON, April 20. Funeral services for Clarence V. Twitchell, 77, who died yesterday after a short illness, will be held at 3 tomorrow afternoon at his home on Church st., Rev. Arthur J. Jeffries, pastor of the Baptist Church in Manchester-by-the-Sea and formerly pastor of the West Acton Baptist Church, officiating. Burial will be in Mt. Hope Cemetery, West Acton. Mr. Twitchell had lived here all his life. He leaves a wife, Mrs. Martha Twitchell (Boston Globe, April 24, 1937).

Arthur Jefferies, a Baptist Church minister, aged  fifty-nine years (b. England), headed a Manchester, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census, (He resided in West Acton, MA, in 1935). His household included his wife, Martha E. Jefferies, aged fifty-nine years (b. England).

WEST FITCHBURG. Beth Eden Baptist Churches. Rev. Arthur M. Jeffries of Manchester, a candidate for the pastorate, will again supply the pulpit Sunday (Boston Globe, July 21, 1941).

Baptists Report Pastoral Shifts in Bay State. The Massachusetts Baptist Convention reports the following pastoral changes: [Excerpt:] Rev. Arthur M. Jeffries, from Chelmsford Street Church, Lowell, to Calvary Baptist, Worcester (Boston Globe, 1949).

Martha F.E. (Massingham) Jeffries died in Worcester, MA, December 11, 1954. He married (2nd), circa 1960, Elizabeth Peterson.

Arthur M. Jeffries of Arden, NC, died in Fletcher, Hendersonville, NC, December 2, 1967, aged eighty-six years.

Deaths and Funerals. Rev. A.M. Jeffries. ARDEN – The Rev. Arthur M. Jeffries, 87, died Saturday afternoon in a local hospital following a long illness. Thos. Shepherd and Son Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements (Asheville Citizen Times (Asheville, NC), December 2, 1967).

DEATHS. JEFFRIES. In No. Carolina, formerly of West Acton, Dec. 2. Rev. Arthur M., beloved husband of Elizabeth (Peterson): father of Mrs. Elsie Thomas of Westfield, and Mrs. Doreen Deliso of Agawam. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, Dec. 6, in the West Acton Baptist Church at 2 p.m. Calling hours at the Acton Funeral Home, 470 Mass. av., West Acton. Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 P.M. (Boston Globe, December 4, 1967).

New England Rites Set for Rev. Jeffries. ARDEN – Services for the Rev. Arthur M. Jeffries, 86, of 143 Linden St., who died Saturday, will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday in West Acton (Mass.) Baptist Church, under the direction of Acton Funeral Home. Burial will be in Mt. Hope Cemetery in Middlesex County Mass. Mr. Jeffries was a native of Derby, England, and a retired-the Baptist minister. He took his seminary training in England under the Salvation Army with the Wycliffe Preachers in England. He attended Gordon College in Boston, and served parishes in Massachusetts and New Hampshire for more than 50 years. Mr. Jeffries was editor of the magazine Inspiration for the past 11 years, and author of numerous other publications. He conducted vesper services at Lakeland, Fla. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson Jeffries; two daughters, Mrs. Elsie Thomas of Westfield, Mass. and Mrs. Doreen DeLiso of Agawam, Mass.; and four grandchildren (Asheville Citizen Times (Asheville, NC), December 5, 1967).

Rev. George Clifton Ervin – 1930

George Clifton Ervin was born in Troutman, NC, May 16, 1904, son of James O. and Estelle D. “Stella” (Conger) Ervin.

George Clifton Ervin married in Forsyth, NC, December 23, 1926, Lola Elizabeth Tanner, he of Mt. Airy, NC, and she of Rutherfordton, NC. Rev. J.O. Ervin, i.e., his father, performed the ceremony. She was born in Henrietta, NC, February 10, 1905, daughter of Andrew S. and Bernice (Hughes) Tanner.

G. Clifton Ervin (Elizabeth T.) appeared as Milton’s Community Church pastor in the Milton business directory of 1930.

G. Clifton Ervin, Community Church minister, aged twenty-five years (b. NC), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Elizabeth Ervin, aged twenty-five years (b. NC). They rented their house on Church Street, at its intersection with School Street, for $25 per month. They had a radio set.

He appeared also as Clifton G. Ervin, aged twenty-six years (b. NC), in the 1930 enumeration of his parent’s household in Charlotte, NC. His father, John O. Ervin, appeared as a Methodist Church pastor, aged forty-nine years (b. NC), and his mother, Stella Ervin, aged forty-nine years (b. NC).

Rev. Ervin had taken up the pastorate of Asheville, NC’s Hillside Street Methodist Church by late 1931, where he spoke on the economic depression.

ERVIN TO SPEAK. Series Of Sermons For Month Of January Announced. The Rev. G. Clifton Ervin, pastor of the Hillside Street Methodist church, will preach a series of “depression sermons” beginning Sunday morning at 11 o’clock and continuing through the last Sunday of January. Mr. Ervin said while the sermons are concerning the depression, he hopes they will not be “depressed or depressing.” Each sermon will be complete in itself, the series feature being the connection of each with the depression. The sermon titles and their dates follow: January 10: “Why Did Humpty Dumpty Fall?” January 17: “What Does Humpty Dumpty’s Fall Mean?” January 24: “Can Humpty Dumpty Be Put Back Again?’ January 31: “Time and the Timeless.” Concerning the sermons, Mr. Ervin said: “The first sermon will deal with the fundamental causes of our present economic paralysis, which we euphemistically call a ‘depression.’ The second will deal with the significance of the depression for the church and for existing social Institutions. The third will be an attempt to visualize a truly Christian socio-economic order, and the last sermon will deal with those abiding realities that endure through all change” (Asheville Citizen-Times (Asheville, NC), January 9, 1932).

George C. Ervine, a Methodist Church district superintendent, aged thirty-five years (b. NC), headed a Hannibal, MO, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elizabeth Ervine, aged thirty-five years (b. NC), and his children Elizabeth A. Ervine, aged seven years (b. MO), and Sarah L. Ervine, aged three years (b. MO). George C. Ervine rented their house at 411 N. Sixth Street, for $30 per month. George C. Ervine and Elizabeth Ervine had resided in Chillicothe, MO, in 1935.

George Clifton Ervin died in Rutherford, NC, December 19, 1993, aged eighty-nine years.

MECKLENBURG COUNTY DEATHS. Dr. G. Clifton Ervin, 89, of Charlotte died Dec. 19, 1993, at Carolinas Medical Center. Memorial service is 11 a.m. Wednesday at Providence United Methodist Church. Inurnment will follow in Rutherfordton Cemetery in Rutherfordton. Visitation is at the church’s parlor following the service. Hankins & Whittington Funeral Home is in charge. Dr. Ervin, a Troutman native retired after 40 years, as a Methodist minister serving churches in Winston-Salem, Asheville, Illinois and Charlotte and served as pastor and district superintendent in Missouri. He was senior associate pastor of St. Andrews United Methodist Church from 1972 to 1973. A member of the Charlotte chapter of Barbershop Singing, he served as head of Pfeiffer College’s sociology department from 1967 to 1972. He was also a contributing columnist for ‘‘Senior Directions.” A 1924 Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Trinity College, he also graduated from Boston University’s School of Theology. Survivors are his wife, Elizabeth; daughters Mrs. Ann Murry of Sun City Center, Fla., Mrs. Sara Erber of Birmingham, Ala., Mrs. Susan York; brothers Charles Ervin of Florida, Lamont Ervin; six grandchildren; four great-grandchildren. Memorials may be made to Paul Ervin Scholarship Fund in care of Providence United Methodist Church, 2810 Providence Rd., Charlotte, N.C. 28211 (Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC), December 20, 1993).

Lola Elizabeth (Tanner) Ervin died in Rutherfordton, NC, January 20, 1994, aged eighty-eight years.

MECKLENBURG COUNTY DEATHS. Elizabeth Tanner Ervin, 88, of Charlotte died Jan. 20, 1994, at Carolinas Medical Center. Memorial service is 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Hankins & Whittington Funeral Home. Visitation is following the service. Mrs. Ervin, a Henrietta native, was a homemaker and a member of Providence United Methodist Church and its Chipley Bible Class. She also was a life member of Women’s Society of Christian Service. Survivors are her daughters Mrs. Ann Murry of Sun City Center, Fla., Mrs. Sara Erber of Birmingham, Ala., Mrs. Susan York; brother Andrew Tanner; sisters Mrs. Lucille Phillips of Washington, Mrs. Mary McLain (Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC), January 24, 1994).

Rev. Fred Bannister – 1931-37

Fred Bannister was born in Cowling, Yorkshire, England, July 26, 1871, son of John and Sarah (Thornton) Bannister.

He married in Skipton, Yorkshire, in October 1894, Sabrina W. Whitaker. She was born in Cowling, Yorkshire, England, February 27, 1870, daughter of William and Ellen (Stow) Whitaker.

Fred Bannister, pastor of the United Methodist Church, aged forty years (b. Cowling, YKS), headed an Earby, Yorkshire, England, household at the time of the UK Census of 1911. His household included his wife, Sabrina Bannister, aged forty-one years (b. Cowling, YKS), and his children, Leslie Bannister, an office boy (limestone quarry), aged fifteen years (b. Cowling, YKS), Frank Cecil Bannister, aged eleven years (b. Cowling, YKS), and Sarah Ellen Bannister, aged nine years (b. Wilsden, YKS).

Rev. Fred Bannister Goes to Colebrook. On Sunday, Sept. 30, Rev. Fred Bannister closed a most successful pastorate of six years at Hillside, Cornish, Me. The services of the day were largely attended, particularly in the evening, when the Methodist people united. Mr. Bannister came directly from England to the pastorate of this church. Nothing more was learned of him than that he was a good man and an acceptable preacher. He has well proven the correctness of the information. In the community both he and his family have been valuable assets in every good work. On Monday, Oct. 8, a few days previous to their departure, there was held in the public hall a reception in their honor. A pleasant program of music, readings, etc., was given, followed with remarks by Rev. M.G. Plummer, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church, and the presentation to Mr. and Mrs. Bannister of a beautiful gold and crystal clock. The presentation speech was by William R. Copp, who spoke in praise of the labors of Mr. and Mrs. Bannister, both in church and community. Mr. Bannister goes to Colebrook, N.H. (Pilgrim Press, 1917).

BROOKS. Services at Union church were conducted 8undny afternoon by Rev. Wesley Wiggin of Boston and in the evening by Rev. Fred Bannister of Colbrook, N.H. (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), August 15, 1919).

Fred Bannister, a church minister, aged forty-nine years (b. England), headed a Colebrook, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sabrina Bannister, aged forty-nine years (b. England), and his children, Leslie Bannister, aged twenty-four years, Frank C Bannister, aged twenty years (b. England), and Nellie Bannister, aged eighteen years (b. England).

Rev. Fred Bannister performed marriages in South Paris, ME, during the year 1923 (Paris ME, Town Report, 1923).

Fred Bannister, a church minister, aged fifty-nine years (b. England), headed an Island Falls, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Sabrina Bannister, aged fifty-nine years (b. England), and his children, Leslie Bannister, aged thirty-four years, Frank C Bannister, aged thirty years (b. England), and Nellie Bannister, aged twenty-eight years (b. England). Fred Bannister rented their house on Burleigh Street, for “free.” They had a radio set.

REV. FRED BANNISTER QUITS SUNDAY IN ISLAND FALLS, ME. ISLAND FALLS, Me., Dec. 28. Rev. Fred Bannister of the Congregational Church announced today that he would preach his farewell sermon here next Sunday, closing a pastorate, of five years. He has accepted a call to Milton, N.H. (Boston Globe, December 29, 1930).

Island Falls. The Rev. Fred Bannister preached on Sunday morning, Dec. 28, at the Congregational church the subject of his discourse was Failure, taken from the parable of the Unfruitful Vine (Bangor News, January 31, 1931).

SANBORNVILLE. Rev. John Bryden preached at the Community church, Sunday, in place of Rev. Fred Banister, the regular pastor, who has resigned his preaching duties here after a service of six years (Farmington News, October 15, 1937).

LEBANON. Rev. Fred Bannister from Milton, N.H., occupied the pulpit at the North Lebanon Baptist church Sunday morning (Biddeford Daily Journal (Biddeford, ME), January 14, 1938).

Meredith F. Burrill, a geographer (Interior [Dept.]), aged thirty-three years (b. ME), headed a Montgomery, MD, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ellen B. Burrill, aged thirty-eight years (b. England), his children, Robert M. Burrill, aged six years (b. OK), and Elizabeth E. Burrill, aged two years (b. OK), and his in-laws, Fred Bannister, aged sixty-nine years (b. England), and Sabrina W Bannister, aged seventy years (b. England). Meredith F. Burrill rented their house at 105 Cedar Lane, for $75 per month. The Burrills had resided in Stillwater, OK, in 1935, while the Bannisters had resided at that time in Milton, NH.

Fred Bannister died in Milton, October 11, 1940, aged seventy years, two months, and eleven days. (A retired Congregational minister). Sabrina W. (Whitaker) Bannister died in Chevy Chase, MD, December 11, 1953.

Social and Personal News. The Rev. and Mrs. William R. Riddlough attended funeral services for the Rev. Fred Bannister in Milton, N.H., Monday, and a committal service in Cornish (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), October 18, 1940).

Rev. Leland L. Maxfield – 1937-43

Leland Louis Maxfield was born in Strafford, NH, circa 1909, son of Louis A. and Mildred B. (Howard) Maxfield.

NEW DURHAM RIDGE. Leland Maxfield and Alice Scruton are staying at Rev. and Mrs. Everett Scruton’s while helping at the Vacation school (Farmington News, August 3, 1934).

ALTON AND ALTON BAY. Mrs. Chester Littlefield, Rev. and Mrs. Earle attended the ordination council of Leland Maxfield at the True Memorial church in Rochester, Monday afternoon (Farmington News, July 5, 1935).

NEW DURHAM, Rev. Leland Maxfield, pastor of the Baptist church in Fitzwilliam, and his mother, Mrs. Maxfield of Rochester, were Sunday worshipers at the Ridge church. Rev. Maxfield was formerly a member of that church and is a cousin to Rev. Everett R. Scruton, a former pastor (Farmington News, October 1, 1937).

NEW DURHAM. Friends of Rev. Leland Maxfield are pleased to learn that he has accepted a call to the Community church in Milton. He formerly was a member of the local church and since his graduation from Gordon College of Theology and Missions has served the Baptist church in Fitzwilliam and taken graduate work in Gordon Divinity school (Farmington News, November 3, 1937).

Rev. Leland Maxfield felt the April Fools’ Day earthquake of 1938 at the Milton Community Church parsonage.

Leland Louis Maxfield married in Milton, July 21, 1938, Elizabeth Zilpha Bronson, he of Milton, and she of Boston, MA. He was a minister, aged twenty-nine years, and she was a nurse, aged twenty-five years. Her brother, Rev. J. Westfield Bronson, performed the ceremony. She was born in Windham, NY, July 21, 1912, daughter of Jesse B. and Rose M. (Tompkins) Bronson.

BOSTON NURSE WEDS MILTON, N.H., PASTOR. Miss Bronson Is Bride of Rev. Leland Maxfield. Special to the Globe. MILTON, N.H, July 21. Rev. Leland Maxfield, pastor of the Community Church, and Miss Elizabeth Z. Bronson of Boston were married this evening at 6 o’clock at the church by Rev. J. Westfield Bronson of Brookline, brother of the bride. Miss Ruth Butler of Whitman, Mass., was maid of honor and the best man was Rev. James Marshall of Medford, Mass. The ushers were Rev. Ernest D. Sillers, pastor of the Baptist Church, East Rochester; Rev. Leslie Beinstadt of Beverly, Mass., field secretary of the Christian Endeavor Societies of Massachusetts, and Rev. James Currie, pastor of the Baptist Church at Milton Mills, N.H. Mr. Maxfield is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Maxfield of Rochester. He graduated from Gordon College of Theology and Missions in Boston in 1935. Mrs. Maxfield is a graduate of the Memorial Hospital Training School for Nurses, Albany, N.Y., and Gordon College, Boston, and has been employed as a supervisor in the Deaconess Hospital, Boston (Boston Globe, July 22, 1938).

Rev. Leland Maxfield was part of a golf foursome when one of its members scored a hole-in-one at the Farmington Country Club golf course, July 6, 1939.

Guy A. Smith Makes “Hole in One” on Farmington Course. On the golf course of the Farmington Country club, June 6, was a feature day, for on that date Guy A. Smith, in the presence of Leland Maxfield, Fletcher Willey and Kenneth Stowe, all of Milton, had the distinction of making a hole in one at No 7. This entitles him to membership in the famous Hole In One fraternity and the accompanying honors. Mr. Smith is one of the few lucky ones in a great patronage which is accorded the Farmington course, and he is envied the honor as well as complimented for the achievement. The golf course is one of Farmington’s greatest assets in athletics and its patronage not only includes old and young among the townspeople, but a large number of visitors from neighboring communities, particularly during the vacation and tourist seasons. Among the latest improvements on the course is the erection of a flagpole, and the first official flag-raising took place this Wednesday (Farmington News, June 18, 1939),

Mrs. Elizabeth Maxfield was the driver of a Red Cross automobile that stalled at a Milton railroad crossing and was struck by a railroad train, July 8, 1939. She and her two passengers were injured.

NORTH BARRINGTON AND CROWN POINT. Visitors at church Sunday were Rev. and Mrs. Leland Maxfield of Milton, Mrs. Laura Scruton, Blanche Scruton, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Maxfield of Rochester. Mrs. Scruton is the oldest member of Crown Point church. She usually attends this church several times a year. At one time she sang in the choir (Farmington News, August 25, 1939).

Leland Maxfield, a Community minister, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elizabeth Maxfield, aged twenty-seven years (b. NY), and his boarders, Mary E. Willard, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), and Mary E. Sherborne, aged twenty-three years (b. ME).

GUEST CLERIC FOR BAPTISTS. The Rev. Leland L. Maxfield of Milton, N.H., will supply the Baptist pulpit Sunday at the 11 A.M. worship service. The Rev. Maxfield, who has served five years as pastor of the Baptist Church in Milton, holds a degree of Bachelor of Divinity from Gordon College of Theology and Missions in addition to the regular bachelor’s degree. Sunday school will be conducted at 10 A.M. Sunday with E.E. Griffith, superintendent, in charge. The union service at 7:30 will be in the Methodist Church. Union mid-week prayer service will be conducted at 7:30 P.M. Wednesday in the church. Classes in religious education will be conducted Wednesday afternoon and high school classes Friday afternoon (Post Star (Glenville, NY), March 6, 1943).

Rev. Leland L. Maxfield resided in Milford, NH, when he returned to perform several Milton marriages in August 1944.

Leland L. Maxfield died in Atlanta, GA, in June 1979. Elizabeth Z. (Bronson) Maxfield died in Palmetto, FL, May 10, 2007.

Ralph V. Townsend – 1944-50

Ralph Vernon Townsend was born in Barnard, VT, December 15, 1916, son of Frank G. and Genevieve T. “Jenny” (Greene) Townsend.

Frank Townsend, a leather splitter (welting mfg.), aged fifty-three years (b. VT), headed a [Roxbury,] Boston, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Genevieve Townsend, aged fifty-one years (b. CT), and his children, Ralph Townsend, aged twenty-three years (b. VT), Robert Townsend, a laundry helper, aged twenty-one years (b. VT), Charles Townsend, aged seventeen years (b. VT), and Grace Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. VT). Frank Townsend rented their house at 58 Lambert Avenue, for $28 per month. They had all resided in the same place, i.e., Boston, MA, in 1935.

He married Edythe Marie Trimmer. She was born in Buffalo, NY, April 21, 1917, daughter of Harry H. and Margaret E. (Smith) Trimmer.

Ralph (Edythe) Townsend appeared in the Boston directory of 1942, as a student, resident at 696 Huntington ave., in Roxbury.

Rev. Ralph V. (Edythe M.) Townsend appeared in the Fitchburg, MA, directory of 1965, as pastor of the Highland Baptist Church, with his house at 27 Cedar street. Robert W. Townsend appeared as a student, residing at 27 Cedar street.

Edythe M. (Trimmer) Townsend died in Hyannis, MA, August 5, 1989, aged seventy-two years.

Obituaries. Edythe M. Townsend. HYANNIS, Mass. – Edythe M. Townsend, a resident of Beacon from: 1968 – 1979, died Saturday at Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis. She was 72. Mrs. Townsend was a member of the Osterville Baptist Church on Cape Cod. Born April 21, 1917, in Buffalo, she was the daughter of Harry and Margaret Smith Trimmer. She married the Rev. Ralph V. Townsend who survives in Hyannis. Other survivors include three sons, Robert W. of Grover, Vt., Thomas P. of Natick, Mass., and Dr. James F. of Ashland, Va.; a brother, Richard Trimmer of Cheektowaga (Erie County); a sister, Mae Thompson of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. and six grandchildren. Calling hours will be from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at the Doane, Beal and Ames Funeral Home, 160 West Main St., Hyannis, Mass. Services will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday from the funeral home. Burial will be in Mosswood Cemetery, Cotuit, Mass. (Poughkeepsie Journal (Poughkeepsie, NY), August 7, 1989).

Ralph V. Townsend died in Mechanicsville, VA, December 5, 2005, aged eighty-eight years.

Obituaries. Reverend Ralph Townsend. MECHANICSVILLE, VA – Reverend Ralph Townsend, 88, of Mechanicsville, died Monday, December 5, 2005 after a short illness. A retired Baptist pastor, Rev. Townsend was born December 15, 1916 in Barnard, Vt. and moved to Roxbury, Mass., at a young age, where he was educated in the Boston Public Schools. He graduated from Nyack College, in Nyack, N.Y., and from the Gordon Divinity School in Boston, Mass. Rev. Townsend served congregations in Milton and East Rochester, N.H., Fitchburg, Mass., Beacon, N.Y., and on Cape Cod, Mass. He moved to Mechanicsville in 1997 to reside with his son, Rev. James Townsend and family. He worked part-time over the past six years for the Ukrop’s grocery stores. Rev. Townsend was a member of the Cool Spring Baptist Church in Mechanicsville, He was preceded in death by his wife, Edythe, in 1989 and is survived by three sons, Robert W. and wife, Sharon of Glover, Vt, Thomas R. and wife, Janis of Natick, Mass. and Rev. Dr. James and wife, Marcie of Mechanicsville; five grandsons, two granddaughters, and a brother, Robert Townsend of Stoughton, Mass. A memorial service will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, December 10, 2005 at Cool Spring Baptist, where the family will receive friends one hour prior to the service. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Cool Spring Baptist Church Recreation Facility, of which Rev. Townsend was an active committee member, 9283 Atlee Station Rd., Mechanicsville, Va. 23116 (Poughkeepsie Journal (Poughkeepsie, NY), December 8, 2005).

George F. Currier – c1950-56

George Franklin Currier was born at Dexter, ME, October 2, 1892, son of Lewis and Sophia (Frye) Currier.

Bradford. Miss Christine Worthen spent last week with her parents and friends in Corrina and Dexter. She returned Thursday and was accompanied by Rev. George F. Currier of Bates college, Lewiston (Bangor Daily News, January 7, 1918).

George F. Currier married in ME, June 22, 1918, Christine E. Worthen, he of Dexter, ME, and she of Corrina, ME. She was  born at Corrina, ME, April 17, 1895, daughter of Joseph H. and Mary M. Worthen.

George F. Currier, a Gospel minister, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Kingfield, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Christine E. Currier, aged twenty-four years (b. ME). George F. Currier rented their house on High Street.

George Currier, a Baptist clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed an Auburn, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eleven years), Christine Currier, aged thirty-five years (b. ME). George Currier rented their house at 135 Gamage Street, for $45 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Corrina Briefs and Personals. Rev. and Mrs. George Currier and children, Thedessa and Charles, left Thursday for their home in Crampton [Campton], N.H., after a visit of two weeks with Mrs. Currier’s mother, Mrs. Mary Worthen, and sister, Mrs. Hilda Ambrose (Bangor Daily News, August 24, 1937).

George F. Currier, a minister, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Campton, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Christine W. Currier, a housewife, aged forty-four years (b. ME), and his [adopted] children, Charles W. Currier, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and Thedessa W. Currier, aged fourteen years (b. ME). George F. Currier rented their house, for $15 per month. They had all resided in Rockport, ME, in 1935.

Social Brevities and Personals. Rev. George F. Currier has returned to his home in Swansea, Mass., after visiting with his mother, Mrs. Sophia Currier, and family at her home, 97 Fifth street. Mrs. Currier celebrated her 80th birthday Sunday and was the recipient of gifts, flowers and many cards. Other guests at the home on Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. John Frye of Guilford, C.W. Rich of Newport, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Bridges and daughter Judith of Dover-Foxcroft, and Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Hamlin of Milo (Bangor Daily News, November 25, 1947).

Wellington Plans “Old Home” Sunday. WELLINGTON, Aug. 2. Old Home Sunday will be observed at the Wellington Church, Aug. 14, at 11 a.m. Speaker will be Rev. George F. Currier of Melvin Village, N.H., whose mother is Mrs. Sophia Currier of Bangor, a native of Wellington. All old and former residents and any one wishing to attend will be welcome. A happy reunion of old neighbors and friends is planned. Each will bring their picnic dinner and table service and the lunches will be eaten in the dining room of the grange hall (Bangor Daily News, August 3, 1949).

Rev. George F. Currier gave the invocation at Milton’s sesquicentennial celebration, in August 1952.

Rev. George F. Currier died in Farmington, ME, October 23, 1960, aged sixty-eight years.

REV. GEORGE F. CURRIER. Funeral services will be held Friday at 2 p.m. at the First Baptist Church, Dexter, for the Rev. George F. Currier, 68, who died suddenly Tuesday at Farmington. The Rev. Walter B. Wakeman will officiate. Mr. Currier was a native of Dexter and was pastor of the Weld Congregational and the Carthage Union Church at the time of his death. Friends may call at the Crosby Funeral Home, Dexter, Thursday from 2 to 4 p. m. and 7 to 9 p.m. (The Eastern Gazette October 24, 1960).

REV. GEORGE F. CURRIER. Funeral services were held Friday afternoon, Nov. 25, at the First Baptist Church, Dexter, for the Rev. George F. Currier, 68, pastor of the Weld Congregational and the Carthage Union Church who died suddenly Tuesday at Farmington. The Rev. Walter B. Wakeman officiated. Bearers were George Safford and Clarence N. Pierce of Dexter; Glen Ring of Cambridge, and Burton Howard of Dover-Foxcroft. Interment was in Morse’s Corner Cemetery, Corinna. Mr. Currier was born at Dexter, Oct. 2, 1892, son of Lewis and Sophia (Frye) Currier. He was graduated from Dexter High School in 1912, Bates College in 1918, and Newton Theological Seminary in 1925. He had held pastorates in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont. Mr. Currier served both the Baptist and Congregational churches and was a member of the American Baptist Convention. While pastor of the Court Street Union Baptist Church, Auburn, he was instrumental in the union of that church with the Free Baptist Church of Auburn. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge and Mystic Star Chapter, O.E.S. of Weld and a member of the Grange of Stratford, Vt. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Christine (Worthen) Currier, formerly of Corinna; one son, Charles Currier of East Orange, N. J., one daughter, Mrs. Sidney L. Cheney of New Jersey; two sisters, Mrs. Elsie Whitney of Bangor and Mrs. Cuyler Rich of Newport; eight grandchildren, one uncle, several nieces and nephews (The Eastern Gazette, November 1, 1960).

Christine E. (Worthen) Currier died in Springfield, MA, January 24, 1971, aged seventy-five years.

MRS. CHRISTINE CURRIER. Mrs. Christine Evelyn (Worthen) Currier, 75, widow of the Rev. George Franklin Currier, formerly of Dexter, died Jan. 24 at a Springfield, Mass., hospital. Mrs. Currier, daughter of Mary M. and Joseph Henry Worthen was born April 17, 1895 at Corinna. She was a graduate of Corinna Union Academy; began studying piano in her early years and completed her piano studies in Boston at the studio of John 0rth, German composer and teacher. She married Currier June 22, 1918, shortly after he graduated from Bates College. Later he was graduated from the Baptist Theological Seminary at Newton, Mass. Mrs. Currier also studied at the seminary. Throughout the Rev. Mr. Currier’s career, she assisted as organist, soloist, Sunday school teacher, leader of women’s groups. She was chaplain of Rebecca Weston Chapter DAR, President of the Baptist Mission Circle and secretary of the Elizabeth Towle Guild. The Curriers served in various pastorates, mainly in the New England states, for 42 years. Currier died in 1960 while pastor of the Baptist Church at Weld. After his death Mrs. Currier moved to Dexter and was an active member of The First Baptist Church until a few weeks before her death. She is survived by a sister, Hilda Worthen of Basking Ridge, N.J.; an adopted daughter, Mrs. Sidney Cheney of Campton, N.H.; an adopted son, Charles Currier of Pennsylvania; by two nieces, and three nephews. Funeral services were held Wednesday at the First Baptist Church of Dexter, with the Rev. Philip Mather officiating. Burial will be in the Worthen Family lot at the Morses Corner Cemetery, Corinna (Eastern Gazette, January 28, 1971).


Previous in sequence: Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1891-24 and Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1908-24


References:

Bacon, Edwin Monroe. (1896). Men of Progress: One Thousand Biographical Sketches and Portraits of Leaders in Business and Professional Life in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=5HFPAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA650

Bates College. (1915). General Catalogue of Bates College and Cobb Divinity School, 1863-1915. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=VsBBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA222

Beecher, Henry Ward. (1888). The Christian Union. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=SxcP6vCQc1IC&pg=PA453

Burgess, Gideon Albert, and Ward, John T. (1889). Free Baptist Cyclopaedia. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3GXiAAAAMAAJ

CCM. (2020). Our Journey So Far … Retrieved from www.communitychurchofmilton.org/page/our-history

Find a Grave. (2013, November 9). Fred E. Carver. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/120061681

Find a Grave. (2011, May 17). Rev. George Franklin Currier. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/69984326/george-franklin-currier

Find a Grave. (2006, November 29). George Clifton Ervin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/16840553/george-clifton-ervin

Find a Grave. (2014, September 4). Arthur M. Jeffries. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/135425228/arthur-m-jeffries

Find a Grave. (2015. August 19). Rev. Newell W. Whitman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/150971142

Granite Monthly Company. (1894). Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=tVwSAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA141

Mitchell-Cony Company. (1908). Town Register: Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA102

Northern Baptist Convention. (1920). The Baptist. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=1CQV8HKZJhQC&pg=PA1536

Northern Baptist Convention. (1922). The Baptist. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=siFRAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA1444

Pilgrim Press. (1917). Congregationalist and Christian World. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Qzwc8mJlx1sC&pg=PA773

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire, and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA516

Vermont Baptist State Convention. (1912). Minutes of the Vermont Baptist Anniversaries for 1912. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=bdcpAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA148

Wikipedia. (2019, February 13). Lincoln Steffens. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Steffens

Wikipedia. (2020, July 23). RMS Empress of Ireland. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Empress_of_Ireland

Wikipedia. (2019, February 4). Washington Irving. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Irvinghttps://www.findagrave.com/memorial/135425228

Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1908-24

By Muriel Bristol | August 22, 2019

Continued from Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1882-07

Baptist Church, Milton, c1910
Milton Free-Will Baptist Church, circa 1910

Scales’ History of Strafford County did not list Milton’s Free-Will Baptist ministers after Rev. Cyrus L. Plummer’s pastorate closed in July 1881. His list is here extended out to 1924.

The Free-Will Baptist ministers of this 1908-24 period were George H. Grey, John T. Clow, Adelbert T. Everett, James W. Tingley, John F. Thurston, and George H. Chambers.

Rev. George H. Grey – 1908-10

Grey, Rev George H and Eva A
Rev. George H. and Eva A. Grey’s Wedding Picture

George Harold Grey was born in Sheffield, VT, March 29, 1862, son of Orin H, and Lydia M. (Simpson) Grey.

George H. Grey married in Sheffield, VT, September 23, 1893, Eva Arminda Gray. He was a minister, aged thirty-one years, she was aged twenty years. She was born in Sheffield, VT, February 20, 1873, daughter of Percival and Rachel (Sulloway) Grey.

Marriages. At Wheelock, September 26 [SIC], by Rev. P. Buker, George Gray and Eva Gray, both of Sheffield (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), September 28, 1893).

George H. Gray, a clergyman, aged thirty-eight years (b. VT), headed a New Gloucester, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Eva A. Gray, aged twenty-seven years (b. VT), his children, Eula B. Gray, aged five years (b. ME), Harold E. Gray, aged three years (b. ME), and Mildred T. Gray, aged six months (b. ME), and his sisters-in-law Josie R. Gray, a housekeeper, aged thirty-five years (b. VT), and Alice Meserve, a housekeeper, aged thirty-two years (b. VT). George H. Gray rented their house. Eva A. Gray was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

STRAFFORD. Since the sudden death of the valued Rev. J.B. Franklin a few months since the Free Baptist church at South Stratford has been without a pastor; but an invitation has been sent to Rev. George H. Gray of Burnham, Me., to assume charge of this church and he has accepted. It is expected he will begin his labors next Sunday (Daily Journal (Montpelier, VT), July 30, 1902).

LYNDON CENTER. Rev. George H. Gray of Strafford has been in this village recently calling on former friends (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), May 13, 1903).

Rev. George H. Grey was called to be pastor of the First Baptist Church, of Starksboro, VT, June 3, 1905. He was received there, September 2, 1905 and dismissed from there, March 8,  1908. Buell W. Maxfield of Starksboro, VT, remembered him:

George Grey was a very hard-working pastor who loved his people, but was not too effective in showing it. Men liked him as he was right to the point and matter of fact about everything. 

Rev. George Grey of Starksboro, VT, gave a sermon at the Orange County [Baptist] Association’s Quarterly Conference, at South Strafford, VT, in October 1907.

Sunday, at 11 a.m., there was a sermon by Rev. F. Perkins of Washington, followed by communion services; 2 p. m., sermon by Rev. W.F. Harding of Corinth; 7 p.m., sermon by Rev. George Grey of Starksboro. Much interest was manifested, it being one of the largest quarterly meetings for years. About 50 delegates from other churches were in attendance (Bethel Courier (Bethel, VT), October 10, 1907).

Daughter Eva Lydia Grey was born in Milton, June 4, 1908, and died here, of acute meningitis, September 28, 1908, aged three months. Dr. M.A.H. Hart signed the death certificate. She was buried in the Prospect Hill Cemetery in Lebanon, ME.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Hattie Knowles has been visiting Mrs. G.H. Hurd. Rev. G.H. Gray and wife spent one day this week with Mr. and Mrs. G.H. Hurd (Farmington News, December 1908).

Religious. March 14. – Announced that the Rev. G.H. Grey had resigned the pastorate of the Starksboro Free Will Baptist church to go to Milton. N.H. April 14. – The Rev. Franklin Blake, Sutton, accepts call to Starksboro church (St. Albans Daily Messenger, May 21, 1909).

Grey, Rev. George H.
Rev. George H. Grey

Geo. H. Grey appeared as pastor of Milton’s Free-Will Baptist church, at 4 Church street, in the Milton business directory of 1909.

George H. Grey, a Baptist Church clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. VT), headed a Kennebunk, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Eva A. Grey, aged thirty-six years (b. VT), and his children, Eula Grey, aged fourteen years (b. ME), Harold E. Grey, aged twelve years (b. ME), Mildred I. Grey, aged ten years (b. ME), and Marion S. Grey, aged seven years (b. VT). George H. Grey rented their house in the District of Alewife. Eva A. Grey was the mother of five children, of whom four were still living.

George H. Grey, a minister of the Gospel, aged fifty-seven years (b. VT), headed a Cornish, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eva A. Grey, a clothing shop seamstress, aged forty-seven years (b. VT), and his children, Harold Grey, a church sexton, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), Morton Grey, a school teacher, aged seventeen years (b. ME), and Lester Grey, aged nine years (b. ME). George H. Grey owned their house on Cumberland Street, free-and-clear.

VERMONT. REV. G.H. GREY, pastor of the churches at Huntington and Huntington Center, has recently been assisted in special meetings by State Worker Sturtevant and as a result thirteen have been received by baptism with others to come in by letter and experience and still others by baptism (N. Bap. Convention, 1922).

George H. Grey, a retired preacher, aged sixty-eight years (b. VT), headed a Cornish, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-three years), Eva A. Grey, aged fifty-seven years (b. VT), and his child, Lester Grey, in school, aged nineteen years (b. VT). George H. Grey owned their house at 7 Cumberland Street, which was valued at $1,500. They did not have a radio set.

George H. Grey died in Cornish, ME, May 28, 1935, aged seventy-three years.

Sheffield. Mrs. Wilman Davis received word recently of the death of Rev. George Gray of Cornish, Me., formerly of this place, who passed away last week. He was a brother of the late Amasa and Warner Gray, both of this place (Caledonian Record (St. Johnsbury, VT), June 8, 1935).

John J. Loxton, a post office janitor, aged forty-six years (b. MA), headed a Manchester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eula Loxton, aged forty-four years (b. ME), his children, John Loxton, aged nineteen years (b. MA), Muriel E. Loxton, aged seventeen years (b. NH),and Beatrice E. Loxton, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Eva Gray, aged sixty-seven years (b. VT). John J. Loxton owned their house at 574 Lake Avenue, which was valued at $3,200. Itwas a two-family building, which they shared with the household of Arthur Grammatikas, a wholesale fruit salesman, aged twenty-four years (b. Greece). They had all lived in the same place, i.e., a different house in the same city, in 1935, except Eva Gray, who had lived then in Cornish, ME.

Eva A. (Grey) Grey died at 574 Lake Avenue in Manchester, NH, October 16, 1941, aged sixty-eight years, seven months, and twenty-six days. (Mrs. John Loxton of 574 Lake Avenue supplied the personal information regarding her mother).

Rev. John T. Clow – 1909-14

John T. Clow was born in Rothwell, Northamptonshire, England, October 7, 1866, son of John T. and Dinah (Marriott) Clow.

He married, circa 1890, Mary H. Pushard. She was born in Dresden, ME, June 19, 1865, daughter of Charles H. and Susan H. (Matson) Pushard.

John T. Clow, a minister of the gospel, aged thirty-three years (b. England), headed a Rostraver, PA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Mary H. Clow, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), and his daughter, Arobine Clow, aged eight years (b. ME). Mary H. Clow was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. They resided on Speer Street.

Personals. The Rev. John T. Clow of Belle Vernon, Pa., has been engaged as pastor of the South church in Barrington which has been without a pastor Nov. 1, last, when the Rev. C.H. Tucker accepted a call in Portsmouth (Portsmouth Herald, January 24, 1902).

Religious. May 21. – Announced that the Rev. J.T. Clow, Madison, N.H., had accepted call to Sutton [Milton] church (St. Albans Daily Messenger, May 21, 1909).

Rev. John T. Clow of Milton, NH, preached the inaugural sermon at Madison, NH’s Old Home Week celebrations in August 1909.

The first formal opening exercises will take place tomorrow morning at the Baptist church, when Rev John T. Clow of Milton, formerly pastor of the Baptist church at Madison, is to preach the old-home sermon. A special musical program has been arranged by Mrs. Nellie Hubbard, Mrs. George Plummer and Mrs. S.B. Lawrence (Boston Globe, August 22, 1909).

John Clow, a F.B. Church clergyman, aged forty-three years (b. England), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Mary Clow, aged forty-three years (b. ME), and his daughter, Arobein Clow, aged eighteen years (b. ME). Mary Clow was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

John T. Clow appeared as pastor of Milton’s Free-Will Baptist church, at 4 Church street, in the Milton business directory of 1912.

Farewell Reception. Rev. John T. Clow, who comes to this village from Milton to preside over the local Baptist parish with the beginning of the new year, leaves pleasant associations and many regrets behind in the hearts of his former townspeople and parishioners. This fact took the form of official manifestation on last Saturday evening, the date preceding the pastor’s farewell service on the following day, when the officers and members of the society and many friends of the church gathered at the house of worship at 8 o’clock. Rev. and Mrs. Clow and daughter were summoned to the receiving line in front of the pulpit and for an hour were recipients of the good words of their friends. At the close of the reception, refreshments were served and a musical and literary program presented, followed by complimentary remarks by Rev. Pike of the Congregational church and responded to by Rev. Clow in an impressive and very feeling manner. Before he could leave his audience Mr. Clow was presented with an envelope containing a substantial amount of money as the gift of his parishioners. The good will which was extended Mr. Clow and family by his former parish, certainly will be accorded him in the local field (Farmington News, January 2, 1914).

John T. Clow, a clergyman, aged fifty-three years (b. England), headed a Hollis, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, aged fifty-three years (b. England [SIC]), and his border, Susan Burnham, a widow, aged seventy-six years (b. VT). They shared a rented three-family dwelling with the households of George Holland, a weaver, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), and Ethel E. Potter, boarders, aged forty-three years (b. ME).

NORTH YORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION MEETS. The seventh annual meeting of the North York United Baptist Association was held Saturday at the Free Baptist church at Springvale. The program started at 9.30 a.m. with a song and devotional service conducted by Rev. Ruth E. Walsh and Rev. John Clow of West Buxton (Portsmouth Herald, May 5, 1924).

John T. Clow died in Strafford, NH, November 26, 1927, aged sixty-one years, one month, twenty-one years. Mary H. Clow died in December 1960.

Obituary. MRS. MARY H. CLOW. STATE AP NEWS. Dover – Mrs. Mary H. Clow, 95, widow of Rev. John T. Clow, died in a Dover nursing home after a long illness. A native of Wiscasset, Me., Mrs. Clow spent most of life assisting her husband at Baptist churches in Maine and northern New Hampshire (Nashua Telegraph, December 20, 1960).

Rev. Adelbert T. Everett – 1915-19

Adelbert Truman Everett was born in the Waggoner Settlement, Nova Scotia, Canada, April 12, 1877, son of Jeremiah S. and Matilda (Tibbetts) Everett. He immigrated to the US with his parents in 1886.

Adjoniram W. White, a milk dealer, aged sixty-six years (b. MA), headed a Braintree, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Emma P. White, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), his hired men, Sherman Winott, a farm laborer, aged twenty-eight years (b. Canada), and Charles Johnson, a farm laborer, aged sixteen years (b. Sweden), and his boarders, Susie E. Porter, at school, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Emma R. White, at school, aged seventeen years (b. MA), Mary Seraven, a dressmaker, aged forty-seven years (b. VT), and Adelbert E. Everett, a minister, aged twenty-three years (b. Canada). Adjoniram W. White owned their farm, free-and-clear. Emma P. White was the mother of no children.

Rev. Adelbert T. Everett of Savoy, MA, was accused of misconduct on a complaint by Dr. William W. Pascoe, also of Savoy. The case against him caused quite a stir and ruined his pastorate and reputation, but collapsed when it was tested in court. (The principal accuser had been caught by him previously in a theft for which the accusation was a retaliation).

HUMS A HYMN AS HE LEAVES WITNESS STAND. Minister Denies Under Oath Charges Against Him. Practically the entire population of Savoy, including a great many women were in the district court room at  Adams this morning when the case against Rev. Adelbert Everett, the Baptist minister, was called. Dr. William W. Pascoe, the complainant in the case, charges immoral conduct and lewd and lascivious actions. Savoy is all wrought up over the affair which has taken the proportions of a feud. Sectional lines are clearly defined. On one side are the advocates of the minister, on the other the adherents of the doctor. Among the witnesses were four young men, one of whom is a member of the standing committee of the church. The burden of their story was that the pastor’s actions and conversation and suggestions in their company were immoral. Mr. Everett took the stand and made a sweeping denial of the charges. He was the last witness before the noon adjournment. As he left the stand he was humming a hymn. His friends congregated about him at one side of the court room while the friends of Dr. Pascoe gathered about him on the other. The hearing was resumed this afternoon (Berkshire County Eagle, February 27, 1907).

Dr. William W. Pascoe was born in Fogo, Newfoundland, Canada, May 31, 1869. He practiced in Savoy, MA, from 1894 until he relocated his practice to Adams, MA, February 3, 1913. He died there, December 2, 1928.

Rev. Adelbert T. Everett left Savoy, MA, as soon as practicable, and moved to Farmington, NH, where his sister lived. From there he took a pastorate at Gilmanton Iron Works, in Gilmanton, NH.

REV. ADELBERT T. EVERETT DISAPPEARS FROM SAVOY. Sends Household Goods to Charlemont Station Where They Now Are. Rev. Adelbert T. Everett who for some time has been pastor of the Baptist church in Savoy, has left that town and his present whereabouts is unknown. It is not expected that he is to return, however, as he has packed his household goods and sent them to Charlemont, where they are held at the railroad station awaiting orders for shipment. Rev. Mr. Everett sometime ago was the defendant in an unsavory court case and since that time his ministerial labors have been carried on at a disadvantage (North Adams Transcript, February 1, 1908).

REV. ADELBERT EVERETT GOES TO FARMINGTON, N.H. Savoy Minister Reported to Have Mysteriously Vanished Prepared for Departure Long Ago. Far from mysteriously disappearing from his little flock in Savoy, Rev. Adelbert Everett, who was reported to have left his household goods in the Charlemont station and vanished without leaving a trace behind, has gone to Farmington, N.H., taking his property and his family with him. A member of his church was in this city Saturday and he said that there was absolutely no mystery in the departure of Mr. Everett. According to the first plans the minister was to have gone to New Hampshire six weeks ago. Illness of his mother who is living with him prevented his going at that time and he remained, attending to his duties. A week ago Mrs. Everett became well enough to travel and then the minister left Savoy. His property was immediately placed in a car billed for Farmington, N.H. He has a sister living there. It is not expected that he will return to Savoy (North Adams Transcript, February 10, 1908).

The Farmington sister would have been Mrs. Elizabeth H. “Etta” (Everett) Stevens (1853-1914), wife of James E. “Eugene” Stevens (1858-1935). In 1910, she was a shoe factory vamper, and her husband was a shoe factory laster.

FATE ON THE HEELS O’ FORMER SAVOY MINISTER. Lawyer Goes “Way Back” in Search for Evidence. Rev. Adelbert T. Everett, who was pastor of this Baptist church of Savoy up to two years ago and who left the little town for parts unknown shortly after his trouble with a number of the younger members of his congregation had been aired in the Adams police court has been heard from in Gilmanton, N.H., and again he is figuring in court proceedings, the direct outcome of his trouble in Savoy. Allusion to the case was made by The Eagle yesterday. Edward A. Lane, an attorney of Pittsfield, N.H., has been in Berkshire for the past few days looking up Mr. Everett’s history and securing depositions of the various people who were responsible for his leaving Savoy. When Mr. Everett left Savoy, his goods were shipped to Charlemont but no trace of him could be found in that town. He drifted about for a short time and finally located in Gilmanton, N.H., having secured the pastorate of the Free Baptist church of that town. He had been there but a short time when it is said his whereabouts became known to people in Savoy. A letter was sent to Chief of Police Osborn of Gilmanton by one of Mr. Everett’s former parishioners in which it is said, were set forth in no uncertainty the reasons for Mr. Everett leaving Savoy. The charges in the letter being of a very serious nature, Chief Osborn took steps to substantiate them by writing to various people in Savoy. The letter was then circulated among the parishioners of the Free Baptist church with the result that Mr. Everett entered suit against the chief of police for $5000 alleging defamation of character. Chief Osborn employed Attorney Lane as counsel and Mr. Lane has been working on the case ever since. He has visited North Adams and Adams for the purpose of securing evidence to strengthen his case for the defense. Attorney Lane was in Adams yesterday taking the depositions of the ministers who were appointed by the Baptist conference to investigate the charges which bad been made against the minister at the time of the Savoy trouble and of the people of Savoy who testified in the case in the Adams court. It is said that the lawyer went even further back than the Savoy trouble to the time when Mr. Everett was in charge of a small church near Digby, N.S. It is also said that it has been learned that Mr. Everett was never regularly ordained and that in Nova Scotia anyone can preach who had the ability. It is understood that when Mr. Everett went to Gilmanton, he told the people there that the charges which had been preferred against him had never been proved and that when he left Savoy he left “honorably.” Just what the outcome of the suit will be is of course unknown but many of the people in Savoy became so incensed at the minister at the time he was there that they have expressed their willingness to go to Laconia and testify against him if wanted when the case comes up for trial (Berkshire County Eagle, October 23, 1909).

Everett, Adelbert T - J Pettigrew
Adelbert T. Everett (Photo: J. Pettigrew)

Adelbert Truman Everett married in Gonic, Rochester, NH, January 26, 1910, Elsie Mae Glidden, he of Gilmanton and she of Alton, NH. He was a clergyman, aged thirty-two years; she was a schoolteacher, aged twenty-four years. She was born in Alton Bay, Alton, NH, January 28, 1886, daughter of Fred E. and Mary L. (Jones) Glidden.

ALTON. Rev. Everett, pastor of the Free Will Baptist church of Gilmanton Iron Works, was united in marriage on Thursday of last week to Miss Elsie Glidden of Alton Mountain. Mrs. Everett is a graduate of Alton High school and the Plymouth Normal school, a successful teacher very highly respected by all who know her. Friends extend their congratulations and wish Rev. and Mrs. Everett much happiness in their married life (Farmington News, February 4, 1910).

Adelbert T. Everett, a Free Baptist clergyman, aged thirty-three years (b. (Canada (Eng.)), headed a Gilmanton, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of zero years), Elsie M. Everett, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and his mother, Matilda Everett, a widow, aged seventy-eight years (b. Canada (Eng.)).

Mrs. Matilda (Tibbetts) Everett died in Gilmanton, NH, September 29, 1911, aged seventy-nine years, four months, and twenty-one days. She had been a resident there for four years, having previously lived in Farmington, NH.

Alumni Notes. Rev. Adelbert T. Everett of Gilmanton Iron Works, New Hampshire, special student 1900-1, pastor of the Baptist church, on April 12 was surprised by a call from twenty-six young people, the organized class in the Sunday school, taught by his wife, summoning him to the vestry of the church for the celebration of the anniversary of his birth. During the evening a handsome four-piece silver service was presented to him (American International College, 1913).

A.T. Everett appeared as pastor of Milton’s Free-Will Baptist church, at 31-33 So. Main street, in the Milton business directory of 1917.

Adelbert Truman Everett of Milton, NH, aged forty-one years, registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was a subject of Great Britain, having been born in Canada, April 12, 1877. He was employed in Milton, NH, by the Free-Will Baptist Society. His nearest relation was Elsie May Everett of Milton, NH. He was of medium height, with a stout build, with blue eyes, and brown hair.

WEST MILTON. In a downpour of rain a little group assembled at Nute chapel last Sunday afternoon to listen to the farewell sermon of Rev. A.T. Everett, who has been the supply pastor in this parish during the past five months. At the close of the service Mrs. Lola Hyland presented Mr. Everett with a salad set, in token of esteem and appreciation of the parishioners here. Mr. Everett very feelingly responded, expressing hearty thanks in behalf of himself and Mrs. Everett, who was unable to be present. Their departure from Milton to the new pastorate in Lynn, Mass., is attended with good wishes of a host of friends to whom they have endeared themselves during their period of faithful service both here and in the village church (Farmington News, October 31, 1919).

Adelbert T. Everett, a church clergyman, aged forty-two years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed a Lynn, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elsie M. Everett, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and his boarder, Murilla Straw, a widow, aged eighty-six years (b. NH). They resided in a mortgaged house at 232 Lynnfield Street.

REV. A.T. EVERETT OF LYNN RESIGNS HIS PASTORATE. LYNN, Aug 29. Rev. Adelbert T. Everett has resigned the pastorate of the Lynnfield Street Baptist Church, his resignation being read at a special meeting of the official board. Rev. and Mrs. Everett are spending their annual vacation at Milton, N.H., and the pastor’s letter of resignation was forwarded to the board. The resignation was accepted with regret and Rev. Lewis Malvern, D.D., was engaged to fill the pulpit until the church can make arrangements for another minister. It is understood that Rev. Mr. Everett and his wife will leave soon for California, where the pastor has a sister, and it was stated that he will take a pastorate in that State. Rev. Mr. Everett preached his first sermon in Lynn, Nov 2, 1919. His early life was devoted to missionary work in Nova Scotia. He is a member of the Milton Lodge of Odd Fellows and of the Knights of Pythias (Boston Globe, August 30, 1921).

Adelbert T. Everett, a market meat cutter, aged fifty-two years (b. Canada), headed a Los Angeles, CA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. He rented his dwelling at 5226 Santa Monica Boulevard, for $20 per month. He did not have a radio set. (Adelbert T. Everett identified himself as a widower).

Meanwhile, Elsie M. Everett, a saleslady of corsets, etc., aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Lynn, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her roomer, Fred Harriman, a catering truck driver, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and her boarder, Willard Mudge, an express truck driver, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA). Elsie M. Everett owned their house at 232 Lynnfield Street, which was valued at $8,500. She had a radio set. (Elsie M. Everett identified herself as a widow).

Adelbert T. Everett died in Los Angeles, CA, August 6, 1934. Elsie Mae (Glidden) Everett married (2nd) in Lynn, MA, in 1937, Isaac Willard Mudge (1901-1993). She died in Salem, MA, September 17, 1945.

Rev. James W. Tingley – 1919-20

Tingley, James W - GM1901James William Tingley was born in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada, May 24, 1852, son of Joshua and Charlotte (Trenholm) Tingley.

James W. Tingley married, circa 1888, Naomi Grace Elliott. She was born in Nova Scotia, Canada, circa 1868.

Rev. James W. Tingley was pastor of the First Baptist church in Middleboro, MA, in 1887-88, and then again in 1890-92.

James W. Tingley, a Baptist clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. Nova Scotia), headed a Freeport, Digby, Nova Scotia, household at the time of the 1891 Canadian Census. His household included his wife, Naomi G. Tingley, aged twenty-three years (b. Nova Scotia), and his daughter Helen M. Tingley, aged one year (b. Nova Scotia).

Tingley-Smith. HYDE PARK, June 21. Hiram J. Tingley and Miss Eda L. Smith were married last evening at the home of the bride’s brother, Leslie J. Smith, 34 Everett st., by Rev. Guy C. Lamson, pastor of the First Baptist church, assisted by Rev. James W. Tingley of Berlin, N.H., brother of the groom. Murdock Mcleod of East Dedham was best man and Miss Marsina R. Smith, sister of the bride, the bridesmaid. The bride was attired m white silk muslin with applique trimmings, and carried a cluster of white carnations. The bridesmaid wore white muslin and carried pink carnations. A wedding march was played by Miss Harriet Bentley. The ushers were Miss Marion C. Morse. niece of the groom, and Miss Grace C. Corson. Mr. and Mrs. Tingley will reside at 2 Maple st. and will be at home after July 15 (Boston Globe, June 26, 1896).

Several Hopkinton Baptist Church parishioners paid for Rev. James W. Tingley’s perpetual membership in the General Theological Library, April 15, 1891. James W. Tingley was pastor of the First Baptist Church Hopkinton, MA, in 1893-95, and then again in 1899-190?.

James W Tingley, a clergyman, aged forty years (b. Canada), headed a Hopkinton, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Naomi G. Tingley, aged thirty-one years (b. Canada), and his children, Helen M. Tingley, aged ten years (b. Canada), and Harold E. Tingley, aged four years (b. Canada). James W. Tingley rented their house in Hopkinton Village. Naomi G. Tingley was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Rev. James W. Tingley appeared in the Hopkinton, NH, directory of 1904, as pastor of the Free Baptist Church of Hopkinton, with his house on Main street.

James W Tingley, a clergyman, aged fifty-three years (b. Canada), headed a Greenville, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Naomi G. Tingley, aged forty-two years (b. Canada), and his children, Helen M. Tingley, a public school teacher, aged twenty years (b. Canada), and Harold E. Tingley, aged fourteen years (b. Canada). James W. Tingley rented their house on River Street. Naomi G. Tingley was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Rev. James W. Tingley appeared in the Laconia, NH, directory of 1913, as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Laconia, with his house at 386 Union avenue. Miss Helen M. Tingley appeared also, as a teacher, with her home at 386 Union avenue. The directory of 1916 indicated that both had removed to Boston, MA.

Atlantic Coast. NEW HAMPSHIRE. RETURNING TO THE STATE. Rev. J.W. Tingley becomes the pastor at Milton. Mr. Tingley has held successful pastorates in New Hampshire. His last pastorate was at Weymouth, Mass. (Baptist, February 14, 1920). 

James W. Tingley, a city clergyman, aged sixty-six years (b. Canada), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Naomi Tingley, aged fifty-seven years (b. Canada), his son, Harold E. Tingley, a general practice dentist, aged twenty-three years (b. Canada), and his sister-in-law, Odessa Elliott, aged sixty-three years (b. Canada).

James W. Tingley died suddenly while conducting church services in Milton, July 11, 1920, aged sixty-eight years, one month, and eighteen days. (See also Milton in the News – 1920).

DEATHS. TINGLEY – In Milton, N.H., the Rev. James W. Tingley, suddenly. Funeral from the home of Dr. L.M. Crosby, 31 Avon st., Wakefield, Mass. Notice of time of funeral later (Boston Post, July 13, 1920).

WEST MILTON. The people of this parish were much shocked and saddened upon hearing of the sudden death of Rev. J.W. Tingley, which occurred Sunday evening while he was conducting service in the Free Baptist church in Milton. He commenced his pastorate there last November, since which time he also has supplied at Nute chapel Sunday afternoons. Those whose privilege it has been to know Mr. Tingley during the brief period of his ministry here will remember him very pleasantly, and in the hour when their hearts are touched with sorrow, they will share the feeling that a good and faithful servant has answered the summons that has bidden him to “enter into the joy of his Lord” (Farmington News, July 16, 1920).

Naomi Tingley, a widow, aged sixty-two years (b. Canada), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her sister, Odessa Elliot, aged seventy-five years (b. Canada). Odessa Elliot owned their two-family dwelling at 62 Hobson Street, which was valued at $6,800. They had a radio set. They shared the dwelling with the household of tenant Frank R. McKenzie, a Hood rubber supervisor, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA), who paid $50 per month.

Naomi Tingley, a widow, aged seventy years (b. Canada) headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Naomi Tingley owned her house at 62 Hobson Street, which was valued at $6,500.

Naomi G. (Elliot) Tingley died in Boston, MA, November 21, 1963.

DEATHS. TINGLEY – In Brighton, Nov. 21, Naomi (Elliott), of 62 Hobson st., widow of the Rev. James W. Tingley and mother of Helen T. Robinson of Wellesley, and Dr. Harold E. Tingley of Newton Center. Funeral from the Short & Williamson Funeral Home. 173 Brighton av., Allston, on Friday, Nov. 29. at 11:00 a.m. Kindly omit flowers. Memorial contribution! to the Heart Fund greatly appreciated. Interment at Lake Side Cemetery, Wakefield (Boston Globe, November 27, 1963).

Rev. John F. Thurston – 1920-22

John Franklin Thurston was born in Thornton, NH, in 1869, son of Franklin J. “Frank” and Julia A. (Merrill) Thompson.

He married (1st) in Starksboro, VT, May 20, 1903, Ida May Fuller, he of Starksboro, and she of Brattleboro, VT. He was a minister, aged thirty-four years, she was aged thirty-five years. She was born in Waterbury, VT, February 13, 1868, daughter of Ezra B. and Lucy A. (Minet) Fuller. She died in Lincoln, VT, February 21, 1907, aged thirty-nine years, six months, and twenty-five days.

LINCOLN. Mrs. Ida Fuller Thurston, whose death occurred Thursday morning, was a daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. Fuller, a well known Free Baptist clergyman, who preached in Starksboro, Huntington, Waterbury and other places in the Huntington Free Baptist association. She was born February 13, 1S68, in Waterbury, Vermont. She attended and later taught in Green Mountain Seminary and was a graduate of the University of Vermont. She taught in different places and was very successful. In June, 1903, she was married to the Rev. J.F. Thurston then located in Starksboro. Never very strong in the summer of 1904 cancer developed, for which she was operated upon. After a year she seemed to have regained her health. In May, 1905, her husband took charge of the church work in this place and for a year she was a most efficient co-worker with him in all branches of Christian work; She was taken sick last June after which time she was never dressed, a greater part of the time suffering beyond description. During all this time, no word of complaint passed her lips and her friends were always greeted with a smile when able to do so. She wrote letters to the sick, to her Sunday school class and others. She leaves besides her husband, an aged mother, from whom she had never been separated, a sister, Mrs. Wilcox, of Brattleboro. The funeral was held at the Union Church Saturday, the Rev. J.W. Burgin of Lyndonvllle officiating. The bearers were Luther Rhodes, John Benton, Clayton Bicknell and Mahlon Purinton. Music was furnished by Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Butterfield, Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes, Mrs. John Benton organist. Mrs. Thurston’s Sunday school class of young people, the Ladies’ Aid society and Industria in both societies of which she was an officer, attended in a body. Mr. and Mrs. George O’Bryan were present as representatives of the Baptist Church of Starksboro. Beautiful flowers were furnished by the Aid society, Industria, Good Templars and other friends. The remains were taken to Waterbury Center, Sunday and buried by the side of her father, the bearers accompanying the body. (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), February 28, 1907).

John F. Thurston married (2nd) in Wethersfield, NY, June 25, 1908, Sarah J. “Sadie” (Mansell) Neeley, he of Bliss, NY, and she of Wethersfield, NY. He was a clergyman, aged thirty-nine years, and she was a school teacher, aged thirty-nine years. She was born in Pauri, Uttaranchal, India, in May 1859, daughter of Rev. Henry S. and Anne E. (Benschoff) Mansell. (Her first husband, Arthur E. Neeley, had died in Syracuse, NY, January 27, 1899).

ADDISON. TO HEAR NEW PASTOR. Addison. April 30. The new Baptist pastor, the Rev. John F. Thurston, will preach tomorrow morning on “Fidelity and Authority”; Sunday School, 11:45; Christian Endeavor. 6:30; evening subject, “A Good Soldier” (Star-Gazette (Elmira, NY), April 30, 1910).

John F. Thurston, a Baptist minister, aged forty years (b. NH), headed an Addison, NY, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Sadie Thurston, aged forty years (b. India (American citizen)), and William Fergison Dadier, aged ten years (b. PA). John F. Thurston rented their house on Front Street.

ADDISON. RESIGNS PASTORATE. Addison, Feb. 22. The Rev. John F. Thurston, for the last two years pastor of the Baptist Church, has resigned. He does not say where he expects to go. Last Sunday Mr. Thurston preached in the Baptist Church in Elmira Heights and it is possible that he may be called there (Star-Gazette (Elmira, NY), February 22, 1910).

John F. Thurston, a Baptist minister, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Woodstock, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah M. Thurston, a piano teacher, aged fifty years (b. India (American citizen)). John F. Thurston rented their house.

CLASS OF 1904. MISSING LINKS IN THE CHAIN. SARAH M. NEELEY (Thurston). Mrs. Neeley taught in the high school, North Tonawanda, N.Y., 1904-5; Hempstead, Long Island, N.Y., 1905-6; Warsaw, N.Y., 1906-8. Contributor to the Educational Gazette and Northern Christian Advocate. Married Rev. John F. Thurston of Bliss N.Y., June 25, 1908. Last known address Woodstock, N.H. (Syracuse University, 1921).

Atlantic Coast. NEW HAMPSHIRE. REV. J.F. THURSTON of No. Woodstock has accepted the call to the Church in Milton. He will succeed Rev. J.W. Tingley, who died in the pulpit on Sunday evening, July 11 (Baptist, September 18, 1920).

Atlantic Coast. NEW HAMPSHIRE. REV. J.F. THURSTON has become pastor at Milton. Mr. Thurston recently closed his labors at Woodstock (Baptist, September 25, 1920). 

WEST MILTON. Religious services were conducted at Nute chapel at 2 p.m. last Sunday by Rev. Mr. Thurston, pastor of the Baptist church at Milton. It is expected that a service will be held at the same hour next Sunday and it is hoped that a larger congregation may be present (Farmington News, October 16, 1920).

Hampton News. The union meeting Sunday night at seven will be held in the Baptist church. The preacher will be Rev. John Franklin Thurston, who has been heard already by our community with pleasure (Hamptons Union (Hampton, NH), February 23, 1922).

John F. Thurston died at his home in Millville, NJ, July 1, 1923, aged fifty-four years.

J. FRANKLIN THURSTON DIED SUNDAY MORNING. Passed Away at His Home on Bridgeton Pike After a Long Illness – Was a Retired Minister and Member of the First Baptist Church. John Franklin Thurston died at his home on the Bridgeton Pike, Sunday. Mr. Thurston was a minister of the gospel and a member of the First Baptist Church of this city. He came to Millville from New England two years ago in search of a better climate for his health. He bought a property on the Bridgeton pike and conducted a poultry farm. Since coming to Millville his health improved and he had preached on several occasions at various churches in South Jersey. His profession, together with his pleasing personality, won many friends for him and his death will be a marked loss to all who. knew him. A few weeks ago he suffered a relapse and was removed to the Millville Hospital, under the care of Dr. Frank Sheppard. After a minor operation he was taken to his home, where he died, Sunday morning, from an illness which had afflicted him for many years. The deceased was 54 years of age and was born In Woodstock, N.H., April 23, 1869. He was a member of the Odd Fellows and Masonic lodges. towns He had held pastorates in half a dozen towns in New Hampshire and Main. Previous to coming to Millville he was at Milton, N.H., where he was pastor of the First Baptist Church. The funeral services will be held in the First Baptist Church on Thursday, July 5, at 10.30 A.M. The interment will be in Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Friends may call at his late residence Wednesday evening (Millville Daily, July 2, 1923).

VITAL STATISTICS FOR MONTH OF JULY. Deaths. 1 – Rev. John F. Thurston, Bridgeton pike, at Millville hospital, aged 54, cerebral hemorrhage (Millville Daily, August 11, 1923).

Sarah Thurston, a school teacher, ages sixty years (b. India), headed a Millville, NJ, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. She rented her house on East Main Street, for $25 per month.

Sarah J. ((Mansell) Neeley) Thurston died in Millville, NJ, January 10, 1935.

Rev. George H. Chambers – 1923-24

George Henry Chambers was born in Sharon, VT, October 18, 1875, son of Stephen W. and Ellen M. (Aldridge) Chambers.

Henry W. Hastings, a teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), headed a Gill, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Anna G. Hastings, aged thirty-three years (b. DE), his children, Hellen W. Hastings, aged four years (b. MA), Henry W. Hastings, aged two years (b. MA), his mother-in-law, Martha P. George, a housekeeper, aged sixty-two years (b. NJ), and his boarder, George H. Chambers, at school, aged twenty-four years (b. VT). Anna G. Hastings was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. The page was headed Mt. Hermon Boys’ School.

George H. Chambers married in Cavendish, VT, December 24, 1902, Olive May Jackson, both of Cavendish. He was a weaver, aged twenty-seven years, and she was aged twenty years. She was born in Mount Holly, VT, circa 1882, daughter of Cyrus H. and Nancy A. (Elliot) Jackson.

George H. Chambers, a congregational clergyman, aged thirty-four years (b. VT), headed a Hardwick, VT, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Olive M. Chambers, aged twenty-seven years (b. VT), his children, Ruth M. Chambers, aged five years (b. VT), and Floyd E. Chambers, aged two years (b. NH), and his hired girl, Jennie Barnett, a private family servant, aged twenty-one years (b. VT). Olive M. Chambers was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. They resided in a rented house on Church Street in East Hardwick.

REPORT OF MINISTERIAL CHANGES FOR 1912. DANVILLE ASSOCIATION. Rev. George H. Chambers. East Hardwick to Smithville, N.Y. (Vermont Baptist State Convention, 1912).

George H. Chambers, a clergyman, aged forty-four years (b. VT), headed a Sutton, VT, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Olive M. Chambers, aged thirty-seven years (b. VT), his children, Ruth N. Chambers, aged fifteen years (b. VT), Floyd E. Chambers, aged twelve years (b. NH), Ruby E. Chambers, aged seven years (b. NY), Clifford J. Chambers, aged two years (b. CT), and Pearl E. Clifford, aged nine months (b. ME). They resided in a rented house.

Atlantic Coast. VERMONT. THE SUTTON CHURCH, Rev. George Chambers, pastor, has recently made an every member canvass, raising enough money so that the salary hereafter will be $1200 and house. The young people recently had a social night and entertainment, given for the purpose of raising money to make improvements on church property, and the men of the church entertained all the ladies of the church and congregation with a chicken pie supper, clearing nearly $100. During the present pastorate thirteen have been received into the church, eight of them by baptism and the others by letter and experience (Northern Baptist Convention, November 20, 1920).

Atlantic Coast. VERMONT. REV. GEORGE H. CHAMBERS, for two years pastor at Sutton, has closed work on that field and removed to Newport Center where he has already begun his labor (Northern Baptist Convention, December 4, 1920).

Atlantic Coast. VERMONT. THE NEWPORT CENTER CHURCH, Rev. George H. Chambers, pastor, has suffered a severe loss through the death of one of the efficient young members, Mrs. E.B. Dickinson. She was one of the singers in the choir, a worker in the Sunday school, and was always present at the services of the church (Baptist, February 26, 1921).

NEWPORT CENTER. Rev. G.H. Chambers and family are leaving town this week to take up work in Maine. Floyd Chambers will remain behind until his school finishes. Miss Ruth Chambers will complete her year as teacher in one of the Westfield schools before joining her folks in South Parsonsfield, Maine (Express and Standard (Newport, VT), May 12, 1922).

NEWPORT CENTER. Rev. G.H. Chambers and family went to South Parsonville, Maine, Saturday where he has a pastorate. Damon Hyde took them by auto. Mr. Hyde also went to Old Orchard (Express and Standard (Newport, VT), May 26, 1922).

Rev. George H. Chambers performed the very first wedding ceremony ever held in Milton’s “new” Baptist church building, although it had been open for more than thirty years. (It replaced the earlier building that had burned in December 1890).

30-YEAR-OLD MILTON, N.H., CHURCH’S FIRST WEDDING. MILTON, N.H., June 26. Miss Gladys M. St. John, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Napoleon St. John, and Elwood M. Dixon, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen E. Dixon, were married Sunday morning at the Free Baptist Church here. They are the first to be married in this church, which has been built more than 30 years. Rev G.H. Chambers performed the ceremony and the double ring service was used. The picturesque little church was beautified with flowers and ferns. Miss Stella Wentworth played the wedding march. The bride wore white crepe de chine and carried a bouquet of pink peonies. Miss Enaise St. John, sister of the bride, and Paul J. Dixon, brother of the groom, were the attendants, with little Ruth Dixon as flower girl. The bride is a graduate of the Rochester High School, ’17, and for the past three years has been employed in the office of I.W. Jones & Co. The couple left for an automobile trip through Vermont and New York. They will spend the Summer at Camp Fairview, Milton (Boston Globe, June 26, 1923).

George H. Chambers, a Baptist Church clergyman, aged fifty-four years (b. VT), headed an Ira, VT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census, His household included his wife, N.O. May Chambers, aged forty-seven years (b. VT), and his children, Ruby E. Chambers, aged seventeen years (b. NY), Clifford J. Chambers, aged twelve years (b. CT), Pearl E. Chambers, aged eleven years (b. ME), and Olive R. Chambers, aged eight years  (b. VT). They resided in a rented house; they did not have a radio set.

Electrically Hatched Duck Lays 9 Oz. Egg. Rev. G.H. Chambers, owner of the electric hatchery, had on display this week an egg laid by one of his white Pekin ducks last Saturday which measured 10 1-2 inches lengthwise around, eight and one-half inches crosswise around, and weighed nearly nine ounces. The duck which laid this unusually large egg was hatched a year ago last April and began to lay in January of this year and with the exception of a few two or three day intervals has continued to lay up to the present time. Mr. Chambers sorts his eggs into five different grades according to weight and has one grade which he calls “Jumbo Eggs,” these weighing from 30-33 ounces per dozen and most of them. having a double yolk. He has recently sold over 1,000 pullets so has only about 700 hens at the present time. From this number of hens he is selling over 100 dozen eggs per week in Brandon and vicinity (Brandon Union (Brandon, VT), August 27, 1937).

George Chambers, a chicken dealer (own farm), aged sixty-four years (b. VT), headed a Brandon, VT, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Olive M. Chambers, aged fifty-eight years (b. VT). They owned their farm, on the Carver Street Extension, which was valued at $9,000. Olive M. Chambers supplied the information.

Rev. G.H. Chambers, Retired Pastor, 80, Feted On Birthday. BRANDON – Rev. George H. Chambers, who retired in 1934 as pastor of the Ira Baptist Church, observed his 80th birthday at his home here Sunday. His twin sister, Mrs. Gertrude Ralph of Warren, was unable to attend the family party. Present with Rev. and Mrs. Chambers were a son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Chambers of Glens Falls, N.Y., a grandson and his family, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Chambers and Brenda, Lawrence and Matthew, also of Glens Falls, and a daughter and her three children, Mrs. Pearl Hayes and Ronald, Richard and David, of Forest Dale (Addison County Independent (Middlebury, VT), September 23, 1955).

George H. Chambers of Brandon, VT, died in Waterbury, VT, January 17, 1961, aged eighty-five years

Obituary. REV. GEORGE H. CHAMBERS. BRANDON – The Rev. George H. Chambers, 85, of Brandon, retired Baptist Minister, died Tuesday. He was born in Sharon, Sept. 18, 1875, son of Stephen and Ellen (Eldridge) Chambers. He leaves his wife, [Olive] May Jackson Chambers of Brandon; two sons, Floyd Chambers of Glens Falls, N.Y., and Clifford Chambers of Bradford; three daughters, Mrs. Ruth Wolfe of New York City, Mrs. Roger Libby of Mountain Home, Idaho, and Mrs. Pearl Hayes of Brandon; and a sister, Mrs. Gertrude Ralph of Waterbury. The Rev. Mr. Chambers was pastor in Baptist churches in New England and New York State for 30 years. He belonged to the Neshobe Grange and St. Paul’s Lodge, F&AM, both of Brandon. The funeral will be conducted Friday at 2 p.m. at the Methodist Church in Brandon by the Rev. Alfred Johnson, pastor of the Baptist Church of Brandon. Entombment will be in Pine Hill Cemetery, Brandon, with burial to be at North Springfield in the spring. Friends may call at his home on Maple St., Brandon, Thursday afternoon and evening (Rutland Daily Herald, January 17, 1961).

Olive M. (Jackson) Chambers died in Brandon, VT, in February 1980, aged ninety-seven years.

Obituary Notices. Olive May Chambers. BRANDON – Olive May (Jackson) Chambers, 97. died Friday at Eden Park Nursing Home in Rutland. Mrs. Chambers was born on May 23, 1882, in Mt. Holly, daughter of Cyrus and Nancie (Elliott) Jackson. She was a former member of the Grange in Brandon and became a member of the King’s Daughters in 1938. She also belonged to the Brandon Baptist Church and had been a resident of Brandon since 1934. She was the widow of the late George Chambers, who died in 1961. Survivors include two daughters, Ruby E. Libby of Caldwell, Idaho, and Pearl E. Hayes of Brandon; two sons, Floyd E. Chambers of Glens Falls, N.Y., and Clifford J. Chambers of Bristol, N.H.; also 10 grandchildren, 27 great-grandchildren, and 9 great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held on Monday at 2 p.m. at the Forest Dale Wesleyan Methodist Church. The Rev. Arthur Getz, pastor of the Brandon Baptist Church, will officiate. Entombment will follow the services in the Pine Hill Cemetery in Brandon. Burial will be in Pine Grove Cemetery in North Springfield at a later date. Friends may call at the home of the daughter, Pearl Hayes, in Forest Dale on Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the Brandon Area Rescue Squad, P.O. Box 232, Brandon 05733. The Miller and Ketcham Funeral Home in Brandon is in charge of arrangements (Rutland Daily Herald, March 1, 1980).

Milton's Two Churches - 1888
The Milton Baptist Church location, to the left on Church Street (now Steeple Street), and the Milton First Congregational Church, to the right at 17 South Main Street (now Dawson Street)

During the pastorate of Congregational Rev. Newell W. Whitman, the Milton Congregational church and the Milton Free-Will Baptist church would amalgamate, merge, or “unite” as the Milton Community Church. The combined group held their meetings in the former Milton Free-Will Baptist church building. It stands today at 7 Steeple Street, then Church Street, at its intersection with what is now School Street but was then an empty field (until construction of the Nute High School and Library (1891) and the Milton Grammar School (1892)).

The combined group used the Congregational church building at 17 South Main street, now Dawson street, as its parish house.


Previous in sequence: Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1882-07; next in sequence: Milton’s Community Church Ministers of 1924-56


References:

Beecher, Henry Ward. (1888). The Christian Union. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=SxcP6vCQc1IC&pg=PA453

Burgess, Gideon Albert, and Ward, John T. (1889). Free Baptist Cyclopaedia. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3GXiAAAAMAAJ

Find a Grave. (2018, March 12). George H. Chambers. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/187970925/george-h_-chambers

Find a Grave. (2011, October 15). Rev. John T. Clow. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/78470694

Find a Grave. (2020, June 7). Adalbert T. Everett, Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/211027301

Find a Grave. (2014, August 17). Rev. George H. Grey. Retrieved from https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/134453638/george-h_-grey

Find a Grave. (2019, December 18). Rev. John Franklin Thurston. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/205546357/john-franklin-thurston

Granite Monthly Company. (1894). Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=tVwSAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA141

Mitchell-Cony Company. (1908). Town Register: Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA102

Northern Baptist Convention. (1920). The Baptist. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=1CQV8HKZJhQC&pg=PA1536

Northern Baptist Convention. (1922). The Baptist. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=siFRAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA1444

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire, and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA516

Syracuse University. (1904). The Class of 1904 of Syracuse University: A History. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=b0BFAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA108

Vermont Baptist State Convention. (1912). Minutes of the Vermont Baptist Anniversaries for 1912. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=bdcpAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA148

Wikipedia. (2019, February 13). Lincoln Steffens. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Steffens

Wikipedia. (2019, February 4). Washington Irving. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Irvinghttps://www.findagrave.com/memorial/135425228

Public BOS Session Scheduled (August 17, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | August 17, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a BOS Workshop meeting to be held Monday, August 17.

The BOS Workshop meeting is scheduled to begin with a quasi-Public session beginning at 5:30 PM.

Although this meeting is open to the public, everyone who attends must fill out a contact form and wear a face mask. Anyone refusing to do so will not be allowed entry. Furthermore, with social distancing, the capacity of the meeting room is approximately 14 people. If more than 14 people arrive, then the meeting will have to immediately be adjourned.


The BOS will hear budget proposals from three departments: Recreation Department (Recreation Director Karen Brown); Fire Department Budget Proposal (Fire Chief Nick Marique); Department of Public Works Budget Proposal (DPW Director Patrick Smith).


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

Town of Milton. (2020, August 17). BOS Meeting Agenda, August 17, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/events/aaa_08-17-2020_bosagenda_amended.pdf

Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1891-24

By Muriel Bristol | August 16, 2019

Continued from Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1847-90

Milton Two Churches - Detail
Milton Congregational Church

The sequence of Congregational ministers listed in Scales’ History of Strafford County concluded in 1890. This list has been constructed from other sources.

The Milton Congregational ministers of this 1891-1924 period were Robert T. Osgood, Myron P. Dickey, Joseph N. Walker, Clarence E. Pike, Simon F. Goodheart, Owen E. Hardy, and Newell W. Whitman.

Rev. Robert Treadwell Osgood – 1891-92

Robert T. Osgood was born in West Roxbury, MA, October 16, 1865, son of Edward T. and Hannah P. (Newell) Osgood.

Robert Treadwell Osgood. b. Jamaica Plain, Mass., Oct. 16, 1865; Harv. 1887; ord. June 16, 1891; p. Milton, N.H., 1891-92; res. lic. Yale Sem., 1893-94; p. Meredith, N.H., 1895-97; w.c. Biltmore, N.C.; Hadlyme, Ct., from 1903. Address Hadlyme, Ct. (Andover Theological Seminary, 1908).

Robert T. Osgood was ordained in Milton’s Congregational Church, June 16, 1891. His grandfather, Rev. Samuel Osgood, appears to have been in attendance.

HERE AND THERE. On Tuesday, June 16, Mr. Robert Osgood will be ordained and installed as pastor of the Congregational church at Milton Ponds [Three Ponds]. The Rev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D., of Cambridge, Mass., is expected to preach the sermon on this occasion, the distinguished divine having counted Mr. Osgood as one of his parishioners. The latter is a young gentleman of fine ability and training, his early life was spent in Europe, where his mother is at present directing the education of her younger children. He is the grandson of Dr. Osgood, who served as pastor to a church in Springfield, Mass., for a half century, and it is thought that the younger man is moved by the right spirit in coming to minister to the picturesque village across the hills. Messrs. Hall of Dover, Street of Exeter, Lewis of Salmon Falls, and Clark of Wolfboro and other neighboring pastors besides Lyman Whiting and Prof. Tucker, with the Senior Mr. Osgood, will be present at the ordination, on June 16, of Robert Osgood of Milton. The council will meet at 1 p.m. at the church, and Dr. McKenzie will preach at 2.30 (Farmington News, June 12, 1891).

Ministerial Personals. CONGREGATIONAL. R.T. Osgood was ordained and installed as pastor of the church in Milton, N.H., on June 16 (Christian Union, July 4, 1891).

Religious Intelligence. New Hampshire. Milton. Rev. R.T. Osgood is under treatment in New York for trouble with his eyes (Vermont Chronicle, November 18, 1892).

MILTON. Rev. Robert Osgood has been obliged to give up the pastorate of the Congregational church, on account of failing health (Farmington News, December 9, 1892).

Religious Intelligence. New Hampshire. Milton. The town and state loses an excellent minister through the resignation of Rev. R.T. Osgood on account of an obstinate and disabling disease of the eyes (Vermont Chronicle, December 16, 1892).

Rev. Robert T. Osgood went next to Yale University, for several years, and then to a pastorate in Meredith, NH.

WATERVILLE, N.H. Rev. Robert T. Osgood of Meredith is enjoying a few days at this resort (Boston Globe, August 16, 1896).

R.T. Osgood appeared in the Meredith, NH, business directory of 1897, as pastor of the Meredith Congregational church.

William Cheesborough, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. SC), headed an Asheville, NC, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his siblings, John Cheesborough, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. SC), and Elizabeth Cheesborough, aged forty years (b. SC), his servant, James Shorter, a farm laborer, aged thirteen years (b. SC), and his boarder, Robert Osgood, a preacher, aged thirty-five years (b. NY [SIC]).

SINGING LESSONS: Mr. Osgood will receive private pupils as beginners in singing. Especial attention to tone-production and reading.. Also lessons in French. Care in pronunciation, conversational method. Has studied in French schools. Apply post office box 16 or at Rose Villa (News-Herald (Morganton, NC), February 21, 1907).

Osgood, Robert T. - 1916
Robert T. Osgood, Passport Photo, 1916

John T. Pillsbury, a private school principal, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Newton, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-one years), Sarah E. Pillsbury, a private school teacher, aged fifty-six years (b. ME), his son, W. Robinson Pillsbury, a wholesale leather salesman, aged twenty-two years (b. MA); his assistants, Robert T. Osgood, a private school teacher, aged forty-four years (b. MA), Carl Killam, a private school teacher, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Earl A. Roadman, a private school teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. IA); his janitor, Hewitt W. Proctor, a private school janitor, aged twenty years (b. NH), his cook, Anna Johnson, a private school cook, aged thirty-nine years (b. Sweden), his laundress, Hilda Syred, a private school laundress, aged twenty-two years (b. Sweden), his maids, Elizabeth Johnson, a private school servant, aged twenty-two years (b. US), and Lillian Chute, a private school servant, aged twenty-one years (b. US); and his boarders, Carl C. Enebuske, a building architect, aged twenty-one years (b. NY), Louis Simon, aged seventeen years (b. Cuba), Ernest Simon, aged fifteen years (b. Cuba), Fangen Sim, aged seventeen years (b. China), Tsu Chang Kwanan, aged thirteen years (b. China). and Myron Lord, aged ten years (b. MA). John H. Pillsbury owned their residence at 1690 Beacon Street, but with a mortgage. The Wolcott School occupied that space in 1910 (now the Angier School).

News from the Classes. Class of 1887. R.T. Osgood writes an interesting letter from Paris. From 1900 to 1917 he was principally engaged in teaching, especially in French. In the spring of 1917 he went to France as a volunteer hospital aid and since then has been engaged in war activities before and after the Armistice until the present time. He hopes to return to this country in the fall (Harvard Graduate’s Magazine Association, 1923).

He Was Here. Robert T. Osgood of Valenciennes, France, a Latin teacher at Pittsfield High in 1887 and 1888, is looking for proof of his American citizenship. In a letter to the mayor yesterday, Osgood asked him to please certify he was a resident here in 87 and 88, A check by Superintendent of School Russell verified Osgood’s claim, and a letter of certification is on the way to Valenciennes. During the war, Osgood explained in his letter, his documents were lost when the consulate at Lille was closed and later merged with another office. Citizenship proof is necessary to put his personal affairs in order, he noted. Mr. Osgood’s family lived in Hancock years ago before he moved to France (Berkshire Eagle, July 8, 1948).

Robert T. Osgood would then have been about eighty-four years of age. Nothing has come to hand to suggest that he returned to the United States. (He likely died in France).

Rev. Myron Parsons Dickey – 1893-1908

Myron P. Dickey was born in Derry, NH, February 19, 1852, son of David W. and Sarah A. (Campbell) Dickey.

He married (1st) in Palmer, MA, August 2, 1876, Louisa R. Shumway, he of New Hampshire, and she of Palmer. He was a teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. NH); she was aged thirty-two years (b. Palmer). She was born in Palmer, MA, February 1, 1845, daughter of Asa and Orinda (Hall) Shumway.

Sophia Amidon, a widow, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Palmer, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Fayett Amidon, a laborer, aged eighteen years (b. MA), her boarder, Myron P. Dickey, a school teacher, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), [her boarder’s] wife, Louise Dickey, no employment, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), and [her boarder’s] son, Maurice Dickey, aged two years (b. NH). They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of Eli Smith, a dry goods merchant, aged forty-eight years (b. MA).

In February 1883, a unanimous call was given to Rev. Myron P. Dickey to become the [Ludlow, MA] pastor at a salary of $700 and the parsonage. A council convened the 14th of June to install Mr. Dickey. In 1887 his salary was increased $100. June 23, 1889 was observed as the one hundredth anniversary of the organization of the Church. At this time Rev. Mr. Dickey delivered a historical sermon in the afternoon. Others who took part were: Rev. J.W. Tuck, a former pastor; Rev. Mr. Buckingham and Rev. Mr. Cone of Springfield; Rev. Mr. Howard of Wilbraham; Rev. Simeon Miller of Ludlow and Dea. Elisha T. Parsons. Mr. Dickey resigned in 1893 to accept the pastorate of a church in Milton, N.H. (Noon, 1912).

Myron P. Dickey appeared as the pastor of the Congregational church in the Milton directories of 1894, 1898, 1901, and 1904. He appeared as pastor of the Congregational church, 17 So. Main street, in the Milton directory of 1905-06.

LOCALS. The pastor of the First church exchanged desks on last Sunday with Rev. M.P. Dickey of Milton, who presented to his audience a thoughtful and forcible exposition of Isaiah xxxii, 2. Mr. Dickey, a scholarly and original thinker, has been for five years the pastor of the church in Milton, and it is hoped that his parish may be so happy as to continue, for a long time to come, the relation with him which has been so valued and enjoyed (Farmington News, October 6, 1899).

Myron P. Dickey, a clergyman, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Louise Dickey, aged fifty-six years (b. MA), and his children, Morris Dickey, a grocery store salesman, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Orinda Dickey, at school, aged sixteen years (b. MA), and Mark Dickey, at school, aged fourteen years (b. MA). Louise Dickey was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. They appeared in the enumeration between the households of Stephen E. Twombly, a retired janitor, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), and Estella Rowe, a home keeper, aged forty years (b. ME).

Church and Ministerial Record. Bequests and Other Gifts. MILTON, N.H. Rev. M.P. Dickey. From Ladies’ Society, individual communion set (Congregationalist and Christian World, May 20, 1905).

Daughter Orinda S. “Ora” Dickey married in Milton, NH, November 15, 1906, Arthur T. “Thad” Smith. Smith had been earlier the second principal of Nute High School. Rev. Myron P. Dickey performed the ceremony.

Mrs. Dickey Falls to Her Death. KENNEBUNK, Me, Oct. 14 – Mrs. Myron P. Dickey, wife of Rev. Mr. Dickey, pastor of the Congregational church, fell downstairs today and was killed. Her neck was broken. She was about 60 years old and leaves several children (Boston Globe, October 15, 1908).

LOCAL. The tragic death of Mrs. Louise Dickey, wife of Rev. M.P. Dickey formerly of Milton, is greatly regretted by the many friends of the family in the vicinity. Mrs. Dickey had been in her new home in Kennebunk, Me., only a week when she fell down stairs and broke her neck. The funeral was held late Saturday afternoon, Rev. A.C. Fulton of Somersworth officiating. Mrs. Dickey was born in Palmer, Mass., Feb. 1, 1845, and besides a husband leaves a daughter, Mrs. Arthur T. Smith of Boston, and two sons. one being Mark S. Dickey, the pianist. She was the daughter of Asa and Orinda Shumway of Palmer. Mr. Dickey was pastor of the Congregational church at Milton for a number of years and only recently accepted a call to Kennebunk (Farmington News, October 23, 1908).

Dartmouth. Class of 1874. Dickey, Myron Parsons, A.M.; Yale Div. Sch., 1883; φβκ [Phi Beta Kappa], b. 19 Feb. 1852, Derry, N.H. Minister, res. Kennebunk, Me. (Dartmouth University, 1910).

Myron P. Dickey married (2nd) in Milton, NH, January 12, 1910, Nellie M. Wentworth, he of Kennebunk, ME, and she of Milton. He was a clergyman, aged fifty-seven years; she was a teacher, aged thirty-five years. Rev. R.M. Peacock of Milton performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, December 23, 1875, daughter of John A. and Hannah E. (Gray) Wentworth.

Myron P. Dickey, a Congregational clergyman, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Kennebunk, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of zero years), Nellie W. Dickey, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Mark S. Dickey, a musician and composer, aged twenty-five years (b. MA). They resided in a rented house on Main Street.

REV. MYRON P. DICKEY DEAD. Graduate of Dartmouth and Held Pastorates In Ludlow, Mass., Milton, N.H, and Kennebunk, Me. KENNEBUNK, Me, Aug 30 – Rev. Myron Parsons Dickey, pastor of the First Congregational Church, died at 3 o’clock this afternoon of complications following an operation for appendicitis. He was in his 63d year. He was brought home from the Maine General Hospital in Portland two weeks ago and seemed slightly improved for a time, but last Friday his condition grew serious and he failed steadily to the end. Mr. Dickey was born Feb 19, 1852, in Derry, N.H, the son of David Woodburn and Sarah (Campbell) Dickey. He attended Pinkerton Academy in Derry and was graduated from Dartmouth College in the class of 1874. For a time he was principal of the High School in Hampstead, N.H. Deciding to enter the ministry, he went to Yale Theological Seminary and after graduating he took up his first pastorate in 1883 over the First Congregational Church at Ludlow Center, Mass. He remained there 10 years, then accepting a call to Milton, N.H., where he stayed 15 years. In 1908 he went to Kennebunk. While teaching school in Palmer, Mass., Mr. Dickey met Miss Louise Shumway who became his wife. She died in 1908, soon after their removal to Kennebunk. He was married again to Miss Nellie Wentworth of Milton, who survives him. He also leaves three children, Maurice W. Dickey of West Roxbury, Mass., a news editor on the Boston Globe; Orinda S., wife of Arthur Thad Smith of Winchester, and Mark Shumway Dickey of Winchester; two brothers, Frank A. Dickey of Kansas City and George A. Dickey of Manchester, N.H.; and two sisters, Miss Nellie S. Dickey of Cambridge, Mass., and Miss Etta G. Dickey of Derry, N.H. The funeral services will be in the church at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon (Boston Globe, August 31, 1914).

Deaths. MRS NELLIE WENTWORTH DICKEY. At Milton, N.H., Dec. 4, 1918, after a very brief illness, Mrs. Nellie Wentworth Dickey, widow of Rev. M.P. Dickey, passed away. At the time of her death, Mrs. Dickey was living at her mother’s home and was acting as assistant in Nute High School, Milton, N.H. A graduate of this same institution and of the Framingham Normal School, she early proved herself a teacher of remarkable enthusiasm and value in Milton, Newington, Peterboro, and Rochester, N.H. A great company of pupils will look back to the awakening and inspiring touch of her personality as something never to be forgotten. While teaching at Rochester she became the wife of Rev. M.P. Dickey, who had been her pastor in Milton, and at that time was minister in Kennebunk, Me. In this new relation, no woman could be more useful and beloved than she proved herself to be, and during the illness and hospital experience of Mr. Dickey the beautiful devotion of Mrs. Dickey touched all our hearts. Then when she was left alone in her bereavement and went back with the same heroism and cheerfulness as of old to her work as a teacher, we could only marvel at her strength of soul. The survival value of such a personality as hers must bring to us all not only abiding comfort but abounding assurance of the immortal life. It must be that God has been pleased to call her to some other room in his immortal and eternal presence and service. C.H.P. (Pilgrim Press, 1919).

Rev. Joseph Newton “Joe” Walker – 1908-11

Joseph N. Walker was born in Moseley, Cheshire, England, August 10, 1851, son of William and Hannah (Newton) Walker.

He married in North Troy, VT, February 28, 1884, Mary Clayton. She was born in Manchester, England, in January 25, 1855, daughter of George and Mary Clayton.

Joseph N. Walker, a clergyman, aged forty-eight years (b. England), headed a Stewartstown, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Mary C. Walker, aged forty-four years (b. England), and his children, Charlotte C. Walker, at school, aged fourteen years (b. VT), Mary H. Walker, at school, aged thirteen years (b. VT), Samuel J. Walker, at school, aged eleven years (b. VT), Dorothea Walker, at school, aged nine years (b. VT), Paul W. Walker, at school, aged eight years (b. NH), and Ruth Walker, aged four years (b. VT). Mary C. Walker was the mother of six children, of whom six were still living. Joseph N. Walker was a naturalized citizen, who had immigrated in 1874; Mary C. Walker had immigrated in 1884. They resided in a rented house.

The Congregational church appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as being at 17 So. Main street. Its pastor was not identified.

Joseph Walker, a Cong. church clergyman, aged fifty-eight (b. England), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteen (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Mary Walker, aged fifty-six years (b. England), and his children, Charlotte Walker, aged twenty-two years (b. VT), Dorothea Walker, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Paul Walker, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Ruth Walker, aged fourteen years (b. NH). They resided in a rented house.

Ecclesiastical and Ministerial Register. CALLS. Walker, Joe K. Milton, N.H., to Mt. Desert, Me. Accepts (The Advance, June 1, 1911).

Mary (Clayton) Walker died in Mount Desert, ME, June 24, 1912, aged fifty-seven years.

Joseph Newton Walker married (2nd) in Portland, ME, October 18, 1918, Grace (Woodbury) Pilling, he of Windsor, MA, and she of Portland. He was a widowed clergyman, aged sixty-five years (b. Manchester, England); she was a divorced teacher, aged forty-six years (b. Island Pond, VT).  She was born in Brighton, VT, May 11, 1869, daughter of Louis A. “Augustus” and Lucy S. (Currier) Woodbury.

Windsor. Our local pastor, Rev. Joseph Newton Walker, has returned to the parsonage bringing with him a bride. Mr. Walker was married October 16 to Miss Grace Woodbury at Portland, Me. Previous to her marriage she conducted a girls’ private school at Portland. She will be a great help in the parish and community (Berkshire County Eagle, October 23, 1918).

Joseph N. Walker, a Congregational clergyman, aged sixty-seven years (b. England), headed a Windsor, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his housekeeper, Harriet E. Jones, a dressmaker, aged forty years (b. Canada (Nova Scotia)), and his boarder, Estelle A. Jones, a public school teacher, aged thirty-eight years (b. Canada (Nova Scotia)). Joseph N. Walker rented their house. He had immigrated in 1874 and become a naturalized citizen in 1884.

BAY STATE PASTOR FILES DIVORCE SUIT. Rev. J.N. Walker, Windsor, Alleges Desertion. Special Dispatch to the Globe. PORTLAND, Me., Sept. 7. Rev. Joseph N. Walker of Windsor, Mass., has filed a divorce libel against his wife, Grace W.P. Walker of this city, alleging desertion. He was exonerated recently from charges she filed, implicating a woman member of his congregation. They were married Oct 9., 1918, and he says she deserted him, April 7, 1919 (Boston Globe, September 8, 1922).

ALUMNI. [Class of] 1880. Joseph Newton Walker, (spec course), p. Lebanon Centre, Me., 1906-08; Milton, N.H., 1908-11; Mt. Desert, Me., 1911-14; Windsor, Mass., 1917-21. Address 10 Nutting Ave, Amherst, Mass (Andover Theological Seminary, 1927).

East Windsor. Rev. Joseph N. Walker, a former pastor here, and his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Roberts of Amherst, called on friends Sunday afternoon (Berkshire County Eagle, [Wednesday,] May 7, 1930).

Robert J Knightly, plumbing (own business), headed an Amherst, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary A. Knightly, aged sixty-three years, and his father-in-law, Joseph N. Walker, a retired minister, aged eighty-nine years (b. England). Robert J. Knightly owned their house at 14 Allen Street, which was valued at $4,000. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

Rev. Clarence E. Pike – 1911-15

Pike, Clarence E - Gail S. Pike
Rev. Clarence E. Pike (per Gail S. Pike)

Clarence E. Pike was born in Waterford, ME, December 18, 1857, son of Ezra B. and Elizabeth A. (Mitchell) Pike.

Clarence Pike married in Hyde Park, MA, July 6, 1887, Caroline E. Thompson, he of Amesbury, MA, and she of Durham, NH. He was a clergyman, aged twenty-nine years, and she was a teacher, aged thirty-nine years. She was born in Durham, NH, May 16, 1848, daughter of Daniel F. and Mary F. Thompson.

Clarence Pike, a clergyman. aged forty-two years (b. ME), headed a Mansfield, CT, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Caroline E. Pike, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), his daughter, Florence C. Pike, aged ten years (b. MA), and his housekeeper, Almyra Johnson, a housekeeper, aged forty-six years (b. CT). Clarence E. Pike rented their house. Caroline E. Pike was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Clarence E. Pike, a Congregational church minister, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed an Ashland, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Caroline E. Pike, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his child, Florence C. Pike, aged nineteen years (b. MA). Clarence E. Pike rented their house. Caroline E. Pike was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

ASHLAND. Rev. Clarence E. Pike, pastor of the Ashland Congregational church for the past five years, preached his farewell sermon yesterday. Mr. Pike goes to a Milton, N.H. pastorate (Boston Globe, May 22, 1911).

Ecclesiastical and Ministerial Register. CALLS. Pike, Clarence. Ashland, Mass., to Milton, N.H. Accepts (The Advance, June 1, 1911).

Clarence Pike appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as pastor of the Congregational church, at 17 So. Main street.

Church and Ministerial Records. Calls. PIKE, CLARENCE. Milton, N.H., to First, Royalston, Mass. Accepts to begin July 4 (Pilgrim Press, June 24, 1915).

[Dartmouth] CLASS OF 1880. Secretary Dana M Dustan, 340 Main St., Worcester, Mass. Rev. Clarence Pike became July 4 pastor of the First Congregational church, Royalston, Mass., going thither from Milton, N.H. (Dartmouth Secretaries Association, 1916).

Caroline E. (Thompson) Pike died in Dorchester, MA, September 12, 1918.

MANSFIELD CENTER. Mansfield people were grieved to read in the last number of the Congregationalist of the death of Mrs. Caroline E. Pike, wife of Rev. Clarence E. Pike of Royalston, Mass., at the home of her sister, Mrs. George Bates, at Dorchester, Mass. Burial was at Brentwood, N.H. Mr. Pike was for twelve years pastor of the local church, leaving here in answer to a call about twelve years ago. Mrs. Pike endeared herself to all who knew her. Although frail in body, she will long be remembered for her kindly and efficient services in many lines in the parish. The husband and daughter have the love and sympathy of a host of friends here (Norwich Bulletin (Norwich, CT), October 5, 1918).

Herbert A. Smith, aged forty-eight years (b. RI), headed a Princeton, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nellie M. Smith, aged fifty years (b. MA), his daughter, Natalie Smith, aged sixteen years (b. CT), and his boarder, Clarence Pike, a clergyman, aged sixty-two years (b. ME). Herbert A. Smith owned their house, free-and-clear.

Clarence E. Pike married (2nd) in Saugus, MA, November 10, 1922, Hattie M. (Holton) Hallowell, he of Royalston, MA, and she of Saugus. He was a minister, aged sixty-five years, and she was at home, aged sixty-five years. She was born circa 1858, daughter of John and Mary (Foye) Holton.

Clarence Pike, a Congregational minister, aged seventy-two years (b. ME), headed a Coventry, VT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hattie M. Pike, aged seventy-two years (b. ME). Clarence Pike rented their house, for $10 per month.

Hattie M. ((Holton) Hallowell) Pike died in Saugus, MA, in July 1936. Clarence E. Pike died in Saugus, MA, September 8, 1936, aged seventy-eight years.

DEATHS. PIKE. – In Saugus, Mass., Sept. 8, Reverend Clarence Pike, 78 years. Funeral services at the First Congregational Church, Cliftondale. Mass., Sunday, Sept. 13, at 3 p.m. Relatives and friends kindly attend (Boston Globe, September 10, 1936).

COVENTRY. Rev. Clarence Pike of Saugus, Mass., died at his home September 11. Funeral services were held Sunday, September 13. Mrs. Pike was buried in July. Her death was a severe shock to Mr. Pike from which he never recovered. Mr. Pike was a former pastor in this place, and he and his wife left many friends here, who are saddened by their deaths (Newport Daily Express (Newport, VT), September 24, 1936).

Rev. Simon Francis Goodheart – 1915-1918

Simon Francis Goodheart was born in Tilsit, East Prussia, in 1872, son of Herman G. and Freida (Walden) Goodheart. (His birthplace was also given as Rossein, Poland; Kovno, Russia; and Lithuania, in various other sources).

Alumni. 1898 Graduates. Simon Francis Goodheart. b. Rossein, Russian Poland, Sept. 28, 1872; Union Miss’y Training Inst., Brooklyn, NY, 1892-93; Ober, 1893-96; ord. Oct. 18, 1898; p. East Fairfield and Fairfield, Vt., 1898-99; De Smet, SD, 1899-1900; Redfield Coll., 1900 and instructor Hebrew and German 1899-1900; p. Lowell, Vt., 1901-04; Whiting from 1904. Address Whiting, Vt.

Simon F. Goodheart, a teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. Germany), was one of twenty-six boarders, and one servant, residing in the Redfield, SD, household of Dolly A. Fountain, at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Fountain was a college matron, aged sixty-one years (b. IN). Twenty-two boarders were students and four were teachers.

Simon F. Goodheart married (1st) in Lowell, VT, June 12, 1901, Josephine R. Hull, he of Lowell. He was a clergyman, aged twenty-eight years. She was born in Fairfield, VT, circa 1875, daughter of Joseph B. and Abbie (Sturtevant) Hull.

Record of the Week. Calls. GOODHEART, SIMON F., to remain a third year at Lowell, Vt. (Congregationalist, 1903).

Simon F. Goodheart, a country parish clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. Germany), headed a Whiting, VT, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Josephine R. Goodheart, aged thirty-five years (b. VT), and his child, Ester J. Goodheart, aged one year (b. VT). Simon F. Goodheart rented their house. Josephine R. Goodheart was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Josephine Robena (Hull) Goodheart died in St. Johnsbury, VT, April 27, 1914, aged thirty-nine years, one month, and fifteen days.

BETHEL. Intelligence came yesterday of the death Monday evening in Brightlook hospital, St. Johnsbury, of Mrs. Simon F. Goodheart of St. Johnsbury Center, wife of a recent pastor of the Bethel Congregational church. She underwent an operation Friday for several disorders and her heart failed to stand the strain of recovery. Much sympathy is felt here for the bereaved husband and daughter, Esther, aged five years. The funeral was held yesterday at St. Johnsbury Center, with interment at her old home, East Fairfield (Barre Daily Times (Barre, VT), April 30, 1914).

PUTNEY. Accepts Call to Milton, N.H. Rev. S.F. Goodheart has accepted a call to the First Congregational church of Milton, N.H., and will take up his duties Sunday, Oct. 24. He is packing what household things he has here and will go to St. Johnsbury Centre to prepare the rest of his goods for shipment Mr. Goodheart was acting pastor of the Congregational church here previous to his visit to San Francisco, and did good work in building up the Church. He is a deep student, with an unusually keen mind and a fluent speaker and leaves many firm friends in the parish, whose best wishes he has for his work in the new field (Brattleboro Reformer, October 14, 1915).

Bethel Local Intelligence. Bev. Simon F. Goodheart, a former pastor of the Bethel Cong’l church but lately located at Putney, Vt., assumed Oct. 24 the pastorate of the Cong’l church at Milton, N.H. (Bethel Courier (Bethel, VT), October 24, 1915).

UNION. Rev. Mr. Goodheart of Milton was in town recently, calling on Rev. E.P. Eastman and Rev. Harold Gould (Farmington News, June 2, 1916).

Simon F. Goodheart married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, August 24, 1916, Sarah A. Lester [(Jones)] Gane, both of Milton. He was a clergyman, aged forty-three years, and she was a housekeeper, aged forty-five years. She was born in Plumstead, Kent, England, circa 1871, daughter of Roger and Sarah E. (Poulter) Jones.

(It must have been something of a whirlwind courtship. An Englishwoman, Mrs. Sarah A.L. Gane, a teacher, aged forty-four, departed from Liverpool, England, February 2, 1916, bound for New York, NY, on the White Star liner Adriatic).

The Congregational church appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as being at 17 So. Main street. Its pastor was not identified.

Simon Francis Goodheart registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, NH, September 12, 1918. He resided in Milton, NH, where he was employed as a clergyman by the Congregational Society. He was forty-five years of age (b. September 28, 1872). He was of a medium height, medium build, with brown eyes and brown hair. His nearest relation was his wife, Sarah Lester Goodheart, of Milton, NH.

SHIRLEY. Rev. Francis Goodheart, the new pastor of the congregational church, is expected to arrive here the last of this week from Milton, N.H., his pastoral work in Shirley beginning on Oct. 15. He is to occupy the parsonage on Front street as soon as repairs now being made are completed (Fitchburg Daily Sentinel, October 17, 1918).

Both the Milton, NH, that Rev. Goodheart had left and the Shirley, MA, to which he was going were suffering then under the so-called Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918-19. The same Sentinel column that announced his arrival in Shirley noted that the boys of the Shirley industrial school, i.e., reform school, as well as one of its warders, all of whom had been confined to its infirmary with influenza, had all recovered and been discharged from the infirmary.

Simon F. Goodheart, a country parish clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. Kovno, Russia), headed a Shirley, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Sarah L. Goodheart, aged forty-eight years (b. England), and his child, Ester J. Goodheart, aged ten years (b. VT). Simon F. Goodheart rented their house on 7 Front Street.

Simon F. Goodheart, a Congregational church clergyman, aged fifty-seven years (b. Lithuania), headed a Riverhead, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, and Sarah L. Goodheart, aged fifty-eight years (b. England). Simon F. Goodheart rented their house on Main Road, for $30 per month. They had a radio set.

SHIRLEY. Rev. Simon Goodheart, a former pastor in Shirley, has accepted a call to the Congregational church m Jamestown, N.Y. For the past few years he has had a parish at Eading River, L.I., and his new pastorate is not so very far from there. Before going to Long Island Mr. Goodheart was located in Harvard, where he went after leaving Shirley (Fitchburg Sentinel, February 15, 1932).

Simon F. Goodheart, aged sixty-seven years (b. Lithuania), headed a Stratford, CT, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah Goodheart, aged sixty-eight years (b. England). Simon F. Goodheart rented their house at 16 Eleanor Street, for $35 per month. They had resided in James, Long Island, NY, in 1935.

Simon F. Goodheart died in Norwood, MA, April 26, 1951, aged seventy-eight years.

DEATHS. GOODHEART. – In Norwood, April 26, Goodheart, S.F., in his 79th year, beloved husband of Sarah L. Goodheart and father of Mrs. George H. Chitty. Services from the May Funeral Home, 85 Nichols St., Norwood. Saturday. April 28 at 2 p.m. Friends may call at the Funeral Home, Friday evening, 7 to 9. New York Times and Bridgeport, Conn., Post please copy (Boston Globe, April 26, 1951).

Sarah A.L. ((Jones) Gane) Goodheart returned to England. The widow Sarah Lester Goodheart, of 32 Leybourne road, Leytonstone, Essex, England, died August 10, 1956, leaving effects valued at £3,877 3s 9d. Probate was assigned to Lloyd’s Bank Ltd., September 12, 1956.

Rev. Owen E. Hardy – 1920-21

Owen Eaton Hardy was born in Wilton, ME, July 13, 1862, son of Eliphalet J. and Sabrina E. (Jennings) Hardy.

Owen E. Hardy, son of Eliphalet J. and Sabrina (Jennings) Hardy, was born July 13, 1862, at Wilton, Me. He was born on a farm, where he lived until attaining his majority, his lot the same as that of the average farmer’s boy, attending the district school as opportunity offered. He fitted for college at the May School, Strong, Me., graduating from there in June, 1887, entered Bowdoin College, and graduated in 1891. He says of himself that he obtained all of his education by his own efforts, working his way through college by teaching and in other ways. He entered Andover Theological Seminary in the autumn of 1891, and was graduated in 1894. He joined the church in 1881. This church was three miles from where he lived, and he says he “used to walk both ways most of the time.” He preached one summer at North Anson, Me., and the next summer at Alexandria, South Dakota (Donovan & Woodward, 1906).

Owen E. Hardy married in Alexandria, SD, June 28, 1894, Eva B. Bates. She was born in Van Buren, IA, September 24, 1868, daughter of Walter and Azulah M. Bates.

He served while in college on the “college jury,” the governing body of the students. He resigned his pastorate Feb. 5, 1899 and was dismissed March 6, 1899, serving about five years. He removed to West Peabody, Mass., becoming the pastor of the church there. While here [Lyndeborough, NH] Mr. Hardy labored earnestly for the upbuilding of the church in promoting lectures, courses, and in all ways striving for the best interests of the community (Donovan & Woodward, 1906).

Owen E Hardy, a clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Peabody, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Eva B. Hardy, aged thirty-one years (b. IA), and his child, Amy F. Hardy, aged five years (b. NH). Owen E. Hardy rented their house. Eva B. Hardy was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Owen E Hardy, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Townsend, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Eva B. Hardy, aged forty-one years (b. IA), his children, Amy F. Hardy, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Eva C. Hardy, aged four years (b. VT), his servant, Alice B Chamberlain, a private family servant, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and his boarder, Timothy Murphy, aged sixty-five years (b.MA). Owen E. Hardy owned their farm, with a mortgage. Eva B. Hardy was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Church and Ministerial Records. Calls. HARDY, O.E. Bardwells, Shelburne, Mass., to Milton, N.H. Accepts and is at work (The Congregationalist and Advance, March 4, 1920).

Owen E. Hardy, a Congregational Conference clergyman, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eva B. Hardy, aged fifty-one years (b. IA), and his child, Eva C. Hardy, aged fourteen years (b. VT). Owen E. Hardy rented their house on Lower Main Street, Milton Village.

Church and Ministerial Records. Calls. HARDY, O.E. Milton, N.H., to Alstead and Langdon. Accepts (The Congregationalist and Advance, April 14, 1921).

Owen E. Hardy died in Walpole, NH, February 14, 1924, aged sixty-one years. Eva B. (Bates) Hardy died March 28, 1953, aged eighty-four years.

Rev. Hardy of Alstead Dies of Pneumonia. Pastor of Congregational Church Had Slight Operation on His Nose. (Special to The Herold.) Alstead, N.H., Feb. 14. Rev. Owen E. Hardy, pastor of the local Congregational church, died today at the home of Dr. B.T. Mouseley in Walpole, where he had been for the past week. He had a slight operation a week ago on his nose and pneumonia developed rapidly, causing his death. For the past three or four years he had been pastor at Alstead, East Alstead and Alstead Center. He came here from Milton, N.H. where he was located two years and before that a much longer time at Shelburne, Mass. He leaves a wife and two daughters, Mrs. Owen Barrow of Barre, Mass., and Mrs. Leslie Kelley of Alstead (Rutland Daily Herald, February 15, 1924).

Newell W. Whitman – 1921-24

Newell Wordsworth Whitman was born Sarkis Apov Aprahamian in Marash, Armenia, then a part of the Turkish Ottoman empire, February 3, 1869, son of Apou and Taniom (Bushgarian) Aprahamian.

Sarkis Apon Aprahamian appeared in the Bangor, ME, directories of 1892 and 1893 as a student at the Bangor Theological Seminary, boarding at the seminary.

GRADUATES AT BANGOR. Where the Theological Seminary Men Will Go. BANGOR, June 6. The anniversary exercises of the Bangor theological seminary, were continued today. The annual examinations closed at noon. The annual meeting of the alumni was held at 12.30 p m, and the annual dinner at the library came at 1.15. The graduating exercises of the senior class took place at 7.30 p m in the Hammond st. church. The graduates are: Sarkis Apov Aprahamian, Marash, Turkey; Clayton Deering Boothby, Portland; Charles Grant Fogg, Roxbury, Mass; Edward Melville Kennison, Temple; Wilford Ernest Mann, Manhurst, N.B.; Herbert Lindsay McCann, South Norridgewock; William Leander Muttart, Atherton, P.E.I. Aprahamian goes to Merroll’s Mills. Boothby is called to Thomaston. Fogg takes a special course at Bowdoin college, Kennison goes to Rockport, Mann goes to Dexter. McCann’s future course is not decided: Muttart goes to Greens Landing, Deer isle. Of the middle class men, W.F. Barker goes to Vanceboro, A.S. Bole to Olamonn. R.F. Chambers to North Belfast, I.B. Conley to Outer Long island, J.D. Dingwell to Deer Isle 2d and Sunset, F.K. Ellsworth to Blanchard, C.W. Fisher to Sandy Point, H.F. Graham to Carratunk and the Forks, Hugh McCallum to Freedom, S.E. McGeehon to East Bangor and Essex st, and P.E. Miller to Monroe and Swanville. Of the junior class, R.H. Abercrombie goes to Abbot Village, A.S. Freeze to Northfield, F.A. Fuller to Lincoln, D.M. James to Letter B, A.E. Lambert to Jackman. H.E. Lombard to Whiting, R.R. Morson to Veasie, and B.A. Willmot to Marshfield and Whitneyville. A course in English Bible study and literature has been added the past year to the usual courses, Prof G.W. Gilmore in charge. It is especially for students who have not previously had collegiate education. Its trial has been very successful, and at the trustees’ meeting Monday evening a decision regarding making it permanent will be reached. Bangor theological seminary has received during the past year the following gifts: From Hon B.B. Thatcher of Bangor $5000, and from Rev Henry S. Loring of Sidney $1000, which have been Invested as additions to the permanent fund, and from T.C. Kennedy of Newcastle $250. which has been applied to current expenses. The following order of exercises was carried out at the graduation this evening: “The Work of our Father,” Herbert Lindsay McCann; “The Advantages of Historical Study,” Clayton Deering Boothby; “The Tendency of American Congregational Polity,” Charles Grant Fogg; “Scientific Study of the Bible,” Edward Melville Kennison: “The Institutional Church,” Wilford Ernest Mann; “The Bequest of the Spanish Moors,” William Leander Muttart; “What Have We Gained from the World’s Parliament of Religions?” Sarkis Apov Aprahamian (Boston Globe, June 7, 1894).

AT THE TURKS’ HAND. A Maine Pastor Receives Dreadful Tidings from the Armenians Stating Husband of His Sister and Brother Massacred by Moslems. Deer Isle, Me., February 19. – Rev. S.A. Apraham, pastor of the Congregational church at Green’s Landing, receives letters confirming the report of the suffering of his near relatives in Armenia. Some weeks ago Mr. Apraham received a letter from a missionary saying that his sister, with her five children, were in utter destitution. Later, Mr. Apraham received a letter from his sister confirming the worst. The husband and his brother were shot down before the eyes of his wife and children, and when the grief-stricken wife cried out in suffering to her Savior, one of the murderers, with an oath, struck her, saying “Do you still call on Jesus?” Two younger sisters of Mr. Apraham were robbed of all their possessions by the Moslems who protect them. An uncle of Mr. Apraham writes, “We are sitting naked in our shop, our house plundered and reduced to ashes. Read the 79th Psalm if you would get a faint idea of our condition.” Mr. Apraham is a recent graduate of Bangor Theological Seminary, and the Green’s Landing church is his first charge. He has sent money to his relatives in Armenia, but hardly dare hope that it reaches them (Portland Press Herald, February 20, 1896).

Sarkis A. Apraham married in Deer Isle, ME, November 30, 1898, Edith I. Fifield, both of Stonington, ME. He was a clergyman, aged thirty-one years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty years. She was born in Deer Isle, ME, circa 1877, daughter of Joseph and Catherine (Horton) Fifield.

Sarkis A. Abraham, a preacher, aged thirty-three years (b. Turkey), headed a Litchfield, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Edith I. Abraham, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), and his child, Paul A. Abraham, aged ten months (b. ME). They resided in the Congregational church parsonage. Edith I. Abraham was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Sarkis A. Abraham, a clergyman, aged forty-two years (b. Asia (Armenia)), headed a Suffield, CT, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eleven years), Edith I. Abraham, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and his children, Paul A. Abraham, aged ten years (b. ME), Levon F. Abraham, aged eight years (b. ME), Chester C. Abraham, aged six years (b. ME), Ward Abraham, aged four years (b. ME), and Murell Abraham, aged two years (b. CT). Sarkis A. Abraham rented their house in West Suffield. Edith I. Abraham was the mother of five children, of whom five were still living.

Sarkis A. Apraham sought Superior Court permission in Hartford, CT, in late October 1919, to legally change his name to Newell Wordsworth Whitman. He would seem to have been an admirer of poets William Wordsworth (1770-1850) and Walt Whitman (1819-1892).

Sarkis A. Apraham of Suffield. a Congregational clergyman, a native of Turkey, who has [had] parishes in this state, Maine and Vermont, received authority to take the name of Newell Wordsworth Whitman. He has eight children and he told the judge the name militated against himself and against his children (Hartford Courant, November 1, 1919).

Personals. APRAHAM, S.A., Suffolk, Ct., has had his name legally changed to Newall W. Whitman (Pilgrim Press, 1919). [Sarkis Apon Aprahamian]

Newell Wordsworth Whitman, a Congregational church minister, aged forty-nine [fifty-two] years, headed a Suffield, VT, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edith F. Whitman, aged forty-two years (b. ME), his children, Levon Whitman, an auto factory welder, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Chester Whitman, a farm laborer (working out), aged sixteen years (b. ME), Ward Whitman, aged fourteen years (b. ME), Muriel Whitman, aged twelve years (b. CT), Catherine Mae Whitman, aged three years, eight months (b. VT), and Edith Irene Whitman, aged one year, eight months (b. CT), and his mother-in-law, Catherine Fifield, aged eighty-one years (b. Canada). Newell Wordsworth Whitman rented their farm on Hill Street in the NW district.

REV. N.W. WHITMAN WILL GO TO UXBRIDGE CHURCH. HARTFORD, Conn., Feb 16. Rev. Newel! W. Whitman, formerly pastor of the West Suffield Congregational Church and later with a church in Willington, Vt. has accepted a call to the Evangelical Congregational Church at Uxbridge (Boston Globe, February 19, 1920).

HINSDALE, N.H. Mr. and Mrs. G.A. Robertson are entertaining Mr. and Mrs. W.F. White of Trumbull, Conn,, and Rev. N.W. Whitman of Milton, N.H. They are enjoying the Northfield conference (Brattleboro Daily Reformer, August 7, 1922).

Newell W. Whitman oversaw the merger or federation of Milton’s Congregational and Free-Will Baptist churches into a combined Community Church of Milton.

Milton's Two Churches - 1888
The Milton Baptist Church, to the left on Church Street (now Steeple Street), and the Milton First Congregational Church, to the right at 17 South Main Street (now Dawson Street)

The Community Church of Milton was organized on September 16, 1924, after World War I, when conversations regarding federation between Congregationalists and Free Baptists matured. It was decided that committees of five from each church would convene and form a Community Church. The Baptist Church was used for worship, while the former Congregational Church was adapted into the Parish House. The members of these two churches believed the same things, doctrinally, and so no great theological division separated the people from their congregational neighbors (CCM, 2020).

Rev. Newell W. Whitman received and accepted a call to a Congregational church in Ashby, MA, in 1924.

ASHBY. Rev. Newell Wordsworth Whitman, who was recently called to the pastorate of the Orthodox Congregational church in Ashby, has moved with his family into the parsonage. He came to Ashby from Milton, N.H., where during the three years as pastor of the Congregational church he has done constructive work building the church financially and numerically. His most notable achievement was the federation of the Baptist and the Congregational churches in town. Next Sunday Mr. Whitman will preach on “New birth: the greatest fact in a man’s life work. What it is; what it does; how to get it” (Fitchburg Sentinel, November 7, 1924).

TOWNSEND. Mr. and Mrs. Russell Walker and Lincoln and Stanley Walker of Peabody, and Rev. Newell W. Whitman of Ashby were visitors at the home of Arthur D. Barber, Turnpike road, Sunday. Rev. Mr. Whitman had preached in Peabody Sunday (Fitchburg Sentinel, November 9, 1926).

Newell Whitman, a church pastor, aged sixty-two years (b. Turkey (Armenian)), headed a Stonington, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edith Whitman, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), and his children, Katharine Whitman, aged thirteen years (b. VT), Irene Whitman, aged eleven years (b. ME). Newell Whitman owned their house on a Private Way (off the Sand Beach Road), which was valued at $2,500. They had a radio set.

Newell W. Whitman, a church clergyman, aged seventy-one years (b. Armenia), headed a Deer Isle, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. He had resided in the same house in 1935.

Newell W. Whitman died in Stonington, ME, October 5, 1948, aged seventy-nine years. Edith I. (Fifield) Whitman died in Penobscot, ME, October 28, 1971, aged ninety-four years.


Previous in sequence: Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1847-90; next in sequence: Milton’s Community Church Ministers of 1924-56


References:

Advance Company. (1911, June 1). The Advance. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=jHVMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA703

Andover Theological Seminary. (1908). General Catalogue of the Theological Seminary, Andover, Massachusetts. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=60gsAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA467

Andover Theological Seminary. (1908). General Catalogue of the Theological Seminary, Andover, Massachusetts. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=60gsAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA490

Andover Theological Seminary. (1927). General Catalogue of the Theological Seminary, Andover, Massachusetts. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=E1UAAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA40

CCM. (2020). Our Journey So Far … Retrieved from www.communitychurchofmilton.org/page/our-history

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