West Milton Manufacturer John E. Goodwin (1820-1893)

By Muriel Bristol | December 4, 2022

John Elkins Goodwin was born in Middleton, NH, September 14, 1820, son of Deacon Joseph and Anna (Hanson) Goodwin. (Joseph and Anna Goodwin would be in 1827 two of the ten founding members of Milton’s Christian Church, in which Joseph Goodwin would be a deacon).

Joseph Goodwin headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Anna (Hanson) Goodwin], and three males aged 15-19 years [John E. Goodwin, Shepard K. Goodwin, and Charles H. Goodwin]. Four members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

John E. Goodwin married (1st), probably in West Milton, September 14, 1844, Leah Hayes Wentworth. She was born in Milton, June 7, 1826, daughter of Joseph C. and Tryphena R. (Burnham) Wentworth.

Son Henry Clayton Goodwin, was born in Milton, May 14, 1846. (He seemed also to be known, at least initially, as Joseph Henry Goodwin or Joseph Henry Clayton Goodwin). Daughter Leah Helen Goodwin was born in Milton, September 18, 1848.

Milton - 1856 (Detail) - GoodwinvilleJohn E. Goodwin and his younger brother, Charles H. Goodwin, opened a shoe manufactory in the Goodwinville area of West Milton in the mid to late 1840s.

MILTON. Among the early manufacturers of shoes in this town were John E. Goodwin & Co., at West Milton, who gave employment to 25 or 30 hands in cutting and putting up stock, to be fitted and bottomed by the people of the town (NH Bureau of Labor, 1896)).

It seems unlikely that Goodwinville had the ability to run water-powered machinery. This description aligns with accounts of older hand methods. Their staff of 25-30 hands were employed to cut out the various shoe components from leather. Then those shoe components might be distributed to local households for assembly into shoes on a piece-work basis. This would have been a welcome part-time sort of job for agricultural workers, especially during any “down” periods, such as wintertime.

Leah H. (Wentworth) Goodwin died September 22, 1848.

John E. Goodwin married (2nd) in Milton, March 11, 1849, Eliza Hayes, both of Milton. Rev. James Doldt performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, July 23, 1825, daughter of Ichabod and Sarah “Sally” (Card) Hayes.

Brother Charles H. Goodwin married in Milton, September 8, 1849, Susan E. Wentworth, both of Milton. Rev. J.T. Colby performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, June 13, 1832, daughter of Joseph C. and Tryphena R. (Burnham) Wentworth. (She was a sister of the late Leah H. (Wentworth) Goodwin).

At West Milton, formerly called Goodwinville, John E. and Chas. Goodwin built and operated a shoe factory which soon made that village a prosperous place. After the business had been carried on with success for a dozen or fifteen years, the factory was closed, John E. Goodwin going to Dover to take charge of a factory there, and Charles to become a traveling salesman for a Boston firm (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). 

John E. Goodwin, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eliza [(Hayes)] Goodwin, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Joseph H. Goodwin, aged three years (b. NH), and Leah H. Goodwin, aged two years (b. NH). John E. Goodwin had real estate valued at $3,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles H. Goodwin, a trader, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Shepherd Goodwin, a shoemaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). (The household of his brother, Daniel B. Goodwin, a blacksmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), appeared higher up on the same page; and that of his father, Joseph Goodwin, a blacksmith, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), appeared lower down on the same page).

John E. Goodwin received an initial five-year appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, July 5, 1850. (Charles C. Hayes was also appointed that same day).

Daughter Laura May Goodwin was born May 26, 1851. Daughter Alice Eliza Goodwin was born in Milton, March 19, 1853.

John E. Goodwin and another twenty-one Milton inhabitants petitioned the NH legislature in July 1855, seeking removal of then Strafford County Sheriff, George W. Brasbridge (1784-1856) of Somersworth, NH. The Milton petition was only one of seven similar petitions seeking this Sheriff’s removal (NH General Court, 1855). Many other NH county officials, especially judges and sheriffs, were singled out for removal too. One might suppose it had something to do with their enforcement of the controversial Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. The officials petitioned against were possibly Democrats or pro-slavery Whigs. (See also Milton and Abolitionism).

Milton’s NH state representatives for the 1855-56 biennium were Eli Wentworth and David Wallingford. On Thursday, July 12, 1855, a majority of 169 NH State Representatives (71.9%), including Rep. David Wallingford, voted to concur with a NH State Senate vote to remove Sheriff Brasbridge from office. A minority of 66 NH State Representatives (28.1%), including Rep. Eli Wentworth, voted not to concur in removing Sheriff Brasbridge (NH House, 1855).

The Whig party was then in its death throes. An American or Native-American party – known also as the “Know-Nothing” party, due to its semi-secret nature – was one of the political entities that sought to fill the vacuum left by the collapse of the Whigs. The “Know-Nothings” were opposed to slavery, and proponents of women’s rights, temperance, increased government regulation, and inflationary government spending. But they are associated often with their opposition to immigration, especially any non-Protestant immigration. (The tide of largely Irish Catholic famine immigrants in the east and Chinese immigrants in the west was then flowing).

“Know-Nothings” had won 51% of NH state elections of November 1854. (But the Brasbridge removal proportion of 71.9% was greater than that “Know-Nothing” proportion alone).

An anti-“Know-Nothing” Washington editor characterized the NH legislative majority of 1855-56 as a “miserable, shameless faction”:

We feel some repugnance to allude to the general character and conduct of the New Hampshire legislature during its recent session. It was such a legislature as that noble little State never had before, and we are satisfied never will have again. She has had the misfortune, with many other northern States, to fall temporarily into the hands of a miserable, shameless faction, which the great majority of her people at this day both condemn and despise, and are only anxious to prove to the world how heartily they have repented of their political folly at their last election. We have neither the space nor the disposition to review the proceedings of this legislature during its recent session, much as it offers for useful comment; but the passage from its history imbodied in the “list of acts, resolutions, and addresses passed June session, 1855,” may serve to show not only what is the spirit, the elevation of purpose, the patriotism of know-nothing legislatures, but also how false is the allegation of the recent Commissioner of the Land Office. By the list above referred to, and which we give below, it will be seen that the legislature have adopted addresses for the removal of more than twenty officers, including judges, sheriffs, and others, whose term of service had not expired, and would not expire in many instances for years, and none of whom could be removed from office but by the extraordinary method of address – a proceeding so unusual and so unparalleled that no officers have thereby, except for incompetency, been removed in that State since the “reign of terror” in 1813, when many democrats – and among them Governor Benjamin Pierce, father of the present Chief Magistrate of the United States – were “addressed” out of office by the then federal legislature for their bold and persistent advocacy and defence of the principles which brought about, and the men who carried on, that second war of independence (Washington Union (Washington, DC), July 21, 1855).

A new anti-slavery Republican party was rising also at this time. Its initial adherents were an assemblage of former Whigs, Free-Soilers, Liberty party adherents, anti-slavery Democrats, and others, and would include even some admixture from the short-lived “Know-Nothing” party. The Republican party’s first presidential candidate, in November 1856, would be Sen. John C. Fremont, of California. (Their second presidential candidate, in November 1860, would be Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois).

Son John Fremont Goodwin was born in West Milton, January 12, 1857. (He was likely a namesake for Sen. John C. Fremont, of California).

Milton sent John E. Goodwin and Daniel E. Palmer to the NH House of Representatives for the 1859-60 biennium.

John E. Goodwin received a renewal of his five-year appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 27, 1860.

Goodwin, John E.John E. Goodwin, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“West Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza [(Hayes)] Goodwin, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), J.H. [Joseph H.] Goodwin, aged fourteen years (b. NH), L.H. [Leah H.] Goodwin, aged twelve years (b. NH), L.M. [Laura M.] Goodwin, aged nine years (b. NH), A.B. [Alice E.] Goodwin, aged seven years (b. NH), and J.F. [John F.] Goodwin, aged three years (b. NH). John E. Goodwin had real estate valued at $7,000 and personal estate valued at $5,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of George F. Nute, a shoe cutter, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and his brother, Daniel B. Goodwin, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH).

C.H. Goodwin, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“West Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Susan E. [(Wentworth)] Goodwin, aged twenty-five years. and Abba A. Goodwin, aged six years (b. NH). Charles H. Goodwin had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $600. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of [his brother,] George W. Goodwin, a merchant, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and a vacant house.

Daughter Eliza Hayes Goodwin was born and died in Milton, October 15, 1861. Her mother, Eliza (Hayes) Goodwin, died in Milton on that same day, October 15, 1861.

John E. Goodwin married (3rd) in Concord, NH, May 7, 1862, Pamelia N. (Davis) Pinkham, he of Milton and she of Concord, NH. He was a shoemaker, aged forty-one years, and she was aged thirty-three years. Rev. E.E. Cummings performed the ceremony. Mrs. Pinkham was born in Alton, NH, in 1829, daughter of Rev. Jacob and Lois (Kelley) Davis. (Her first husband, James H. Pinkham, had died of consumption in Milton, December 21, 1853, aged twenty-nine years, five months).

John E. Goodwin of Milton paid $9.96 as a 3% tax on 430 pairs of shoes (valued at $332) for the month of December in the US Excise Tax of 1862. (See also Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1862).

John E. Goodwin of Milton paid $20.63 as a 3% tax on 15 cases of shoes (valued at $687) for the month of January in the US Excise Tax of 1863. He paid $130.68 as a 3% tax on 4,440 pairs of shoes (valued at $4,356) in April 1863. He paid $66.23 as a 3% tax on 2,652 pairs of shoes (valued at $2,207.80) in June 1863.

John E. Goodwin of Milton, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty-two years (b. NH) registered for the Class II military draft in June 1863. Brother Charles H. Goodwin of Farmington, NH, registered there June 30, 1863.

John E. Goodwin of Milton paid $83.97 as a 3% tax on 3,050 pairs of shoes (valued at $2,799) for the month of August in the US Excise Tax of 1863. He paid $64.89 as a 3% tax on 35 cases of shoes (valued at $2,163) in November 1863. (See also Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1863).

John E. Goodwin & Co. transferred its shoe operations from Goodwinville in West Milton to Dover, NH, in the latter part of 1863. They had access perhaps to water power there or, at least, access to a larger labor pool.

The major shop locations [in Dover, NH,] were at the corners of Chestnut and Third, Chestnut and Fourth, Chestnut and Lincoln, Chestnut and Sixth, and 10 Grove Street. And like the Hayes Brothers, most of the men who ran these shops: John H. Hurd, John E. Goodwin, Alvah Moulton, Jonathan Bradley, Ira W. Nute, and E.C. Kinnear came here from Farmington (Dover Heritage Group, 1993).

John E. Goodwin & Co. of Dover, NH, paid $43.98 as a 3% tax on 1,500 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,466) for the month of January in the US Excise Tax of 1864. The firm paid $67.53 as a 3% tax on 2,520 pairs of shoes (valued at $2,251) in February 1864. It paid $82.47 as a 3% tax on 2,868 pairs of shoes (valued at $2,749) in March 1864.

John E. Goodwin & Co. paid $119.16 as a 3% tax on 3,768 pairs of shoes (valued at $3,972) in April 1864. The firm paid a $10 tax for a manufacturer’s license, in May 1864. Goodwin paid a $1 tax on his carriage (valued at $75), in May 1864. John E. Goodwin & Co. of Dover, NH, paid $218.64 as a 3% tax on 4,968 pairs of shoes (valued at $7,288) in June 1864. (See also Milton’s US Excise Tax of May 1864).

John E. Goodwin & Co. of Dover, NH, paid $492.65 as a 5% tax on 6,432 pairs of shoes (valued at $9,853) for the month of September in the US Excise Tax of 1864. The firm paid $69.05 as a 5% tax on 1,020 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,381) in September 1864. It paid $76.15 as a 5% tax on 1,320 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,523) in October 1864. It paid $59.90 as a 5% tax on 1,176 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,198) in December 1864.

Goodwin, J.E. & Co. - 1865John E. Goodwin & Co. (John S. Wheeler) appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1865, as shoe manufacturers in Pray’s building on Fourth Street, with John E. Goodwin having his house on St. John street, at its corner with Charles street. His partner, John S. Wheeler (1835-1909), boarded at Rev. J.F.G. Colby’s, on Brick street. (Wheeler would marry in Dover, June 12, 1866, Mary Emma Frost, he of Newmarket, NH, and she of Dover, NH).

Then, just around the middle of the 19th century, a new industry took hold in this part of Dover: shoe manufacturing. Up until this time, a boot or shoe was made throughout by one person who precisely measured the food of his customer: length, width around heel, ankle, and instep, around joints at toes “making allowances for corns and bunions” and then hunted through his pile of lasts for one the right length. Then the shoemaker glued on the pieces of leather till it made the exact shape of the foot. The cordwainer’s trade, often promoted door-to-door with whole families “footed out” at a time, ended in Dover in 1865 when John Goodwin and John S. Wheeler introduced steam-powered machinery at their shoe shop on Fourth Street: equipment that “could cut soles as rapidly as a dozen men could do by hand” (Dover Heritage Group, 1993).

John E. Goodwin & Co. of Dover, NH, paid $454.60 as a 5% tax on 6,768 pairs of shoes (valued at $9,092) for the month of February in the US Excise Tax of 1865. The firm paid $101.76 as a 6% tax on 1,476 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,696) in April 1865. It paid 307.92 as a 6% tax on 4,776 pairs of shoes (valued at $5,132) in June 1865. It paid $329.22 as a 6% tax on 4,788 pairs of shoes (valued at $5,487) in July 1865.

John E. Goodwin of Dover, NH, paid a $1 tax on his carriage (valued at $75), a $1 tax on his watch (valued at $75), and $17.55 as a 5% tax on his personal income of $351.00 in the US Excise Tax of August 1865.

John E. Goodwin & Co. paid $508.20 as a 6% tax on 7,908 pairs of shoes (valued at $8,470) for the month of August in the US Excise Tax of 1865. The firm paid $881.34 as a 6% tax on 14,689 pairs of shoes in November 1865. It paid $1,096.20 as a 6% tax on 9,900 pairs of shoes (valued at $18,270) in December 1865.

(Note the price increase of a pair of shoes, from 77¢ in December 1862 to a high of $1.35 in September 1864. The U.S. Treasury note (or “Greenback”) of 1862-63 was an inflationary “fiat” currency, i.e., backed by nothing, and its value fluctuated with sentiment regarding the war. Confederate paper currency (or “Grayback”) would collapse completely. Note also that the manufacturers’ excise taxes rose over the same period, doubling in fact, from 3% to 6%).

Brother-in-law William Hays, a shoemaker, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA State Census. His household included Lucy L. [(Crawford)] Hays, aged forty-two years (b. NH), [his two nieces:] Laura M. Goodwin, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Alice E. Goodwin, aged twelve years (b. NH), William Wosten, a shoemaker, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), Mira Wosten, aged twenty-eight years (b. MA), Eunice Coy, aged thirty years (b. ME), Caroline E. Austin, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), William H. Crawford, an engineer, aged thirty years (b. NH), Jefferson Hays, a shoemaker, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and Maria Stewart, aged twenty-two years (b. NH).

John E. Goodwin and Joseph D. Guppy were Dover Ward 2 aldermen in 1866. There were seven alderman in all and Mayor Joshua G. Hall (City of Dover, 1866)).

John E. Goodwin of Dover, NH, paid a $2 tax on his piano, a $1 tax on his watch, and $131.90 as a 5% tax on his personal income of $2,638.00 in the US Excise Tax of May 1866.

Daughter [Leah] Helen Goodwin married in Dover, NH, May 7, 1867, William Brown Dennis, both of Dover, NH. He was a clerk, aged twenty-three years, and she was aged nineteen years. Rev. I.D. Stewart performed the ceremony. Dennis was born in Dover, NH, May 18, 1844, son of Samuel and Lydia N. (Varney) Dennis.

John E. Goodwin received an initial five-year appointment as a Dover, NH, justice-of-the-peace, January 3, 1868.

Father Joseph Goodwin died in Milton, March 13, 1868, aged eighty-five years.

Peace Jublilee - BT690611Mrs. John E. Goodwin was a soprano singer in the Dover Choral Union in 1869. Her choral group traveled to Boston, MA, to perform in the National Peace Jubilee and Great Music Festival, which was held there for five days beginning June 15, 1869 (Gilmore, 1871). There were hundreds of performers with an audience of tens of thousands in attendance.

John E. Goodwin, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty-seven years, headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Pamelia [((Davis) Pinkham)] Goodwin, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), Henry Goodwin, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Alice Goodwin, attending school, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Fremont Goodwin, attending school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Erie Pinkham, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Lovey Ricker, teaching school, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH).

William B. Dennis, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), headed a Lynn, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included L. Helen [(Goodwin)] Dennis, keeping house, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Joseph H. Dennis, at home, aged two years (b. NH), Gideon Dennis, no occupation, aged forty-six years (b. RI), Lydia N. [(Varney)] Dennis, no occupation, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), and M. Lizzie French, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-two years (b. MA). They lived in a two-family dwelling with the household of N.H.P. Ireson, a bookkeeper, aged fifty-two years (b. MA).

William Hayes, works in shoe factory, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lucy L. [(Crawford)] Hayes, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), Laura L. Goodwin, works in shoe factory, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Richard Hayes, a school teacher, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and Jefferson Hayes, operates pegging machine, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH). William Hayes had real estate valued at $4,000 and personal estate valued at $300. (William Hayes was the maternal uncle of Laura M. Goodwin).

Charles Goodwin, a wholesale shoe store salesman, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA. household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan [(Wentworth)] Goodwin, keeping house, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), Abbie A. Goodwin, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Tryphonia [(Burnham)] Wentworth, at home, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH). They shared a two-family residence with the household of Josiah Vinton, a drill-maker, aged forty-six years (b. ME).

John E. Goodwin & Co.’s Dover shoe factory burned down in the early hours of Tuesday, November 1, 1870.

DESTRUCTIVE FIRE IN DOVER, N.H. – John E. Goodwin’s large shoe manufactory at Dover, N.H., was discovered on fire about half-past two o’clock yesterday morning and was totally destroyed, with its contents. The fire next caught a smaller shoe factory occupied by the same firm, which was also burned. The old Catholic church was next burned, and a building occupied by C.E. & S.C. Hayes. From the old church the fire caught the new Catholic church now building, and the priest’s residence, which were also burned. The high wind carried the cinders a long distance and roofs of buildings were repeatedly on fire. Had it not been for the rain on Tuesday the fire would have been much more disastrous. Goodwin & Co. were insured for $27,000 on their stock. The building was owned by Benjamin Pray and was insured for $4,000. There was no insurance on the churches (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), November 2, 1870).

Son Henry C. Goodwin married, June 25, 1872, Emma M. Horne. She was born in Dover, NH, in 1845, daughter of Dr. Jeremiah and Harriet (Chamberlin) Horne.

John E. Goodwin received a renewal of his five-year appointment as a Dover, NH, justice-of-the-peace, January 3, 1873. (In the column for his next renewal, which would have been in January 1878, there was instead a notation of “Mass.,” i.e., he was ineligible for a renewal as he had moved to Massachusetts at some time prior to 1878).

Mother Annie (Hanson) Goodwin died of pneumonia in Milton, March 20, 1875, aged eighty-seven years, ten months, and four days. (There is a question mark next to the “75” of 1875 on the death certificate).

Daughter Alice E. Goodwin married in North Brookfield, MA, September 4, 1878, Gilbert Thornton Webber, Jr., both of North Brookfield, MA. He was a tinsmith, aged thirty-six years, and she was aged twenty-five years. He was born in Chelsea, MA, March 3, 1842, son of Gilbert T. and Julia A. (Boothby) Webber. His previous wife, Amanda (Hudson) Webber had died in 1871.

Son John F. Goodwin married (1st) in Dover, NH, October 26, 1879, Vienna Belle Sanborn, he of North Brookfield, MA, and she of Dover, NH. He was a merchant, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged eighteen years. Rev. George B. Spaulding performed the ceremony. She was born in Pittsfield, NH, September 23, 1861, daughter of Charles H. and Vienna M. (Prescott) Sanborn.

John E. Goodwin, works in shoe factory, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a North Brookfield, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Pamelia N. [((Davis) Pinkham)] Goodwin, keeping house, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), his son, John F. Goodwin, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his daughter-in-law, V. Belle [(Sanborn)] Goodwin, at home, aged eighteen years (b. NH).

Henry C. Goodwin, an apothecary, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma M. [(Horne)] Goodwin, keeps house, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), his children, Maria B. Goodwin, aged six years (b. NH), Alice E. Goodwin, aged eleven months (b. NH), his father-in-law, Jeremiah Horne, a physician, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), his mother-in-law, Harriet [(Chamberlin)] Horne, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Frederick E. Horne, a clerk in store, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). They resided on Nelson Street.

William B. Dennis, a fancy goods dealer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Helen L. [(Goodwin)] Dennis, keeping house, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Joseph H. Dennis, at home, aged twelve years (b. NH), James S. Dennis, at home, aged seven years (b. NH), William V. Dennis, at home, aged eight months (b. MA), and his domestic [servant], Kate Boyle, does housework, aged eighteen years (b. NY). They resided on Maple Street.

Wm. Hayes, works in shoe factory, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucy L. [(Crawford)] Hayes, keeping house, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), his niece, Laura Goodwin, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his lodgers, Eunice Coy, works in shoe factory, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), and James Whepley, a farm laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. New Brunswick).

Gilbert T. Webber, a tinsmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA), headed a North Brookfield, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Alice E. [(Goodwin)] Webber, keeping house, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and Jennie I. Webber, at school, aged eleven years (b. MA). They lived in a two-family dwelling with the household of Enoch H. Jones, works in shoe factory, aged forty-four years (b. NH).

Chas. H. Goodwin, a commercial traveler, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and his wife, Susan E. [(Wentworth)], aged forty-six years (b. NH), were two of the ten boarders in the Somerville, MA, household of Nathaniel Millikin, a R.R. freight clerk, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census.

Son-in-law William B. Dennis died of rheumatism in Dover, NH, January 24, 1883, aged thirty-eight years. He had been a merchant.

TOWN TALK. Mrs. Geo. W. Boyden of Dover, N.H., and Mrs. John E. Goodwin of North Brookfield, Mass., are guests of Mr. and Mrs. M.G. Day (Vermont Tribune (Ludlow, VT), August 14, 1885).

A business publication published a sketch of son Henry C. Goodwin and his pharmacist’s shop in Dover, NH, in 1887.

Henry C. Goodwin, Pharmacist and Stationer, No. 1 Bracewell Building, Central Street, corner First. – This house was established by its present proprietor in 1874, and is included among the finer class of pharmacies in this city. The store is spacious in size, admirably fitted up, and replete with everything required to constitute a first-class drug and prescription establishment. The extensive and well-selected stock embraces a full line of pure drugs, chemicals and medicines, toilet and nursery articles, fancy goods and school books, confectionery and cigars, soda and mineral waters, and a carefully assorted stock of such patent or proprietary medicines as are known to possess virtues and curative properties devoid of deleterious or injurious elements. Mr. Goodwin also makes a line of preparations that are highly prized by his patrons and have a large sale, among which are sarsaparilla, tooth powder, all-healing ointment, anti-bilious bitters, kidney and liver medicine, stomach bitters, Lewis’ cholera cordial, cough mixture, etc., etc. The compounding of physicians’ prescriptions and family recipes receives that careful and intelligent professional attention which their important character so imperatively demands, and accuracy and precision invariably prevail in every department of the business. Mr. Goodwin is a native of Milton, N.H., and an accomplished pharmacist and a reliable and trustworthy business man (Intl. Pub. Co., 1887).

Son Henry C. Goodwin removed his pharmacy business to Malden, MA, circa 1890.

BOSTON. In Malden the aldermen have concluded to grant licenses to these druggists: Levi W. Rockwell, M.G. Croscombie, Henry C. Goodwin, Walter P. Sheldon, John J. McCarthy, J. Inglis Street, J.R. Colby, W.F. Weld, C.A. Charles, Albert B. Morgan, Winslow B. Southworth Jesse W. Sargent, Daniel W. Kelly and N.G. Cofran. Other licenses will soon be granted (Pharmaceutical Era, May 15, 1891).

John E. Goodwin of Malden, MA, made his last will, August 18, 1892. He devised $200 to his wife, Pamelia N. Goodwin for her immediate use. He bequeathed $25 to his son, Henry C. Goodwin; $25 to Eri W. Pinkham; $300 to daughter Leah Hellen Dennis; $200 to daughter Laura May Goodwin; $25 to daughter Alice E. Webber; and $500 and his gold watch to son John Freemont Goodwin. He bequeathed all the rest and residue to Gilbert T. Webber of North Brookfield, MA, Edward L. Goodwin of Boston, MA, and John Fremont Goodwin of Malden, MA, as a trust for the comfortable support and maintenance of his widow during her natural life. He devised his furniture to his widow, with the proviso that she should pass such as she did not want to his children. He devised one-fourth of his original estate, if any be remaining after her decease, to the Freewill Baptist Home and Missionary Society, and the other three-fourths to his son, John Fremont Goodwin. He appointed Gilbert T. Webber, Edward L. Goodwin, and John Fremont Goodwin as joint executors. Robert C. Fanning, Horace D. Gove, and Jesse M. Gove signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 104:428).

(Edward L. Goodwin (1839-1922) was a son of brother Daniel B. Goodwin); Eri W. Pinkham (1848-1904) was a son of Pamelia N. ((Davis) Pinkham) Goodwin).

John E. Goodwin died of heart disease in Malden, MA, May 29, 1893, aged seventy-two years, eight months, and seventeen days. He had been a shoe manufacturer, who had been born in Middleton, NH, son of Joseph and Annie (Hanson) Goodwin.

The last will of John E. Goodwin was proved in Middlesex County Probate court, July 11, 1893 (Middlesex County Probate, 531:442).

Daughter-in-law Vienna Belle (Sanborn) Goodwin died of septicemia in Malden, MA, September 6, 1893, aged thirty-one years, eleven months, and fourteen days. She had been born in Pittsfield, NH, daughter of Charles H. and Vienna (Prescott) Sanborn.

MALDEN. Henry C. Goodwin of Clifton is visiting at his old home in Rochester, N.H. (Boston Globe, September 3, 1895).

Son John F. Goodwin married (2nd) in Malden, MA, December 25, 1895, Grace C. Richards, both of Malden, MA. He was a clerk, aged thirty-seven years, and she was aged twenty-six years. Rev. Benjamin H. Bailey performed the ceremony. She was born in Melrose, MA, March 5, 1869, daughter of Charles E. and Elizabeth A. “Lizzie” (Dearborn) Richards.

Goodwin-Richards. MALDEN, Dec 25. Miss Grace C. Richards, a well-known young woman of this city, and Mr. John P. Goodwin of Boston were married this noon at the home of Mrs. S.O. Dearborn, on Pleasant st., by Rev. B. Bailey, pastor of the Unitarian church of this city, in the presence of the immediate friends and relatives of the bride and groom (Boston Globe, December 26, 1895).

Reed, John - BG980309Henry C. Goodwin of Malden, MA, was impaneled as a Middlesex County juror in a larceny fraud case against John Reed, the so-called “King of the Bunco Men,” in March 1898.

The Jury which was impanelled with the greatest care, was composed as follows: Hiram F. Bean of Hudson, Edward J. Ryan of Marlboro, Nelson W. Jenny of Lexington, Henry B. Badger of Reading, Edwin A. Bennet of Burlington, Edwin A. Brown of Belmont, Edward E. Chapman of Medford, Henry C. Goodwin of Malden, George T. Freeman of Arlington, George F. Heeland of Dracut, Harry C. Whlttemore of Cambridge, and Charles A. Sherburn of Tyngsboro (Boston Evening Transcript, March 8, 1898).

Reed was convicted and sentenced to not less than four years and not more than five years in prison. Other sentences would be added to his total. He would escape from custody in Worcester, MA, October 30, 1898, while being transported, and would resurface later in London, England.

Daughter Alice E. [(Goodwin)] Webber, of North Brookfield, MA, was selected to be a delegate to the Women’s Relief Corps National Encampment in Philadelphia, PA, in September 1899 (Boston Globe, February 26, 1899).

Henry C. Goodwin, a druggist, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Emma [(Horne)] Goodwin, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), his children, Maria B. Goodwin, a teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Elizabeth Goodwin, aged twenty years (b. NH), his [step-] mother, Amelia M. [((Davis) Pinkham)] Goodwin, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), and his boarders, Minna Parker, a bank clerk, aged thirty-nine years (b. Japan), and Marjorie G. Parker, at school, aged eight years (b. MA). Henry C. Goodwin owned their house at 207 Clifton Street. Emma Goodwin was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Amelia M. Goodwin was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living; and Minna Parker was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Leah H. [(Goodwin)] Dennis, a fancy goods dealer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Samuel J. Dennis, a teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). Leah H. Dennis owed their farm on Horne Street. She was the mother of six children, of whom five were still living.

William Hayes, aged eighty-two years, headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-four years), Lucy L. [(Crawford)] Hayes, aged seventy-seven years, and his niece, Laura M. Goodwin, a shoe factory stitcher, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). William Hayes owned their house at 17 Hancock Street, free-and-clear. Lucy L. Hayes was the mother of no children.

Gilbert T. Webber, a tinsmith, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a North Brookfield, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Alice E. [(Goodwin)] Webber, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), Frank G. Webber, at school, aged eighteen years (b. MA), Paul T. Webber, at school, aged twelve years (b. MA), and Alice E. Webber, at school, aged nine years (b. MA). Gilbert T. Webber owned their house on Gilbert Street, free-and-clear. Alice E. Goodwin was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

John F. Goodwin, an express agent, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of four years), Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), and his daughter, Annie M. Goodwin, aged sixteen years (b. MA). John F. Goodwin rented their house at 40 Gould Street.

Frederick G. Nickerson, a R.R. auditor, aged forty-four years (b. MA), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Abbie A. [(Goodwin)] Nickerson, a music teacher, aged forty-six years (b. NH), his daughter, Florence A. Nickerson, aged twenty years (b. MA), his boarders, Charles H. Goodwin, insurance, aged seventy-five years (b. MA [SIC]), [his wife of fifty years,] Susan E. [(Wentworth)] Goodwin, aged sixty-six years (b. MA [SIC]), and his servant, Katie Waldron, aged twenty-four years (b. Ireland). Frederick G. Nickerson rented their house at 29 Spring Street. Abbie A. Nickerson and Susan E. Wentworth were each the mother of one child, each of whom was still living.

Brother Charles H. Goodwin died of old age in Malden, MA, May 25, 1904, aged seventy-nine years, eight months, and fourteen days. He had been a retired merchant.

Pamelia N. ((Davis) Pinkham) Goodwin died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Malden, MA, October 11, 1904, aged seventy-five years, six months, and twenty-three days. She had been born in Alton, NH, daughter of Rev. Jacob and Flois (Kelley) Davis. Her step-son, Henry C. Goodwin, supplied the personal information.

Mrs. Pamelia N. Goodwin, widow of John E. Goodwin of Malden, died yesterday at the home of her son, Henry C. Goodwin, in the seventy-sixth year of her age. She was a native of Alton, N.H., and the daughter of Rev. Jacob Davis of Gilmanton (Boston Evening Transcript, October 12, 1904).

Sister-in-law Lucy L. (Crawford) Hayes died of old age in her home at 17 Hancock Street in Stoneham, MA, February 28, 1905, aged eighty-three years, seven months, and sixteen days.

Brother-in-law William Hayes died of apoplexy in his home at 17 Hancock Street in Stoneham, MA, February 5, 1908, aged eighty-nine years, ten months, and twenty-five days.

DEATHS. HAYES. – At Stoneham, Feb 5, William Hayes, 89 yrs., 10 mos., 25 dys. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 P.M., at late home, No. 17 Hancock street, Stoneham, Mass. Friends are invited. Kindly omit flowers. Train from North Station at 1.13 P.M. (Boston Evening Transcript, February 7, 1908).

(Their house at 17 Hancock Street in Stoneham, MA, passed to his niece, Laura M. Goodwin).

Henry C. Goodwin, a retail druggist, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Emma M [(Horne)] Goodwin, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), and his daughter, Maria B. Goodwin, a school teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. NH). Henry C. Goodwin owned their house at 207 Clifton Street, with a mortgage. Emma Goodwin was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

John A. Dennis, a glass works clerk, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Union, PA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Mary Dennis, aged thirty-four years (b. PA), Helen Dennis, aged four years (b. PA), John A. Dennis, Jr., aged four months (b. PA), his mother, Leah H. [(Goodwin)] Dennis, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), and his servant, Mary Mckinney, a housework servant, aged sixty-four years (b. PA). John A. Dennis rented their house on Monongahela River Road. Mary Dennis was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Laura M. Goodwin, a candy store saleslady, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. She owned her house at 17 Hancock Street, free-and-clear.

Gilbert T. Webber, a plumber, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA), headed a North Brookfield, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-one years), Alice E. [(Goodwin)] Webber, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and Ethel A. Webber, aged eighteen years (b. MA). Gilbert T. Webber owned their house on Gilbert Street, free-and-clear. Alice E. Goodwin was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

John F. Goodwin, a storage house storekeeper, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Pittsburgh, PA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, aged forty-one years (b. MA). John F. Goodwin rented their portion of a two-family residence at 12 Hemlock Street.

Son-in-law Gilbert T. Webber died in North Brookfield, MA, April 11, 1917.

Daughter Leah H. (Goodwin) Dennis died in Washington, DC, May 31, 1917.

DIED. Dennis – Leah Helen Dennis died at the home of her son, Samuel James, 6937 Georgia Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., June 1st, 1917. Her remains were taken to Dover, New Hampshire, and laid beside those of her husband, William Brown Dennis, who died in 1883. She is survived by four sons, Samuel James, of Washington, D.C.; William Varney, of Moorestown, N.J.; Lindley Hoag, of Harrisburg, Pa.; and John Alfred, of San Dimas, California. A devoted Christian mother and loyal member of the Dover Monthly Meeting for fifty years (The American Friend (Richmond, IN), January 21, 1917).

Henry C. Goodwin, a drug store salesman, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma [(Horne)] Goodwin, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), and his aunt, Mary Bangs, aged eighty-three years (b. NH). Henry C. Goodwin rented their house at 141 Clifton Street.

Laura M. Goodwin, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Laura M. Goodwin owned her house at 17 Hancock Street, free-and-clear.

John F. Goodwin, a printing shop shipper, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, aged fifty years (b. MA). John F. Goodwin rented their house at 18 Savin Hill Avenue.

Son Henry C. Goodwin died in Malden, MA, January 13, 1920, aged seventy-three years.

MALDEN. Funeral services for Henry C. Goodwin, a well-known druggist, will be held tomorrow afternoon at the home of the family, 141 Clifton st. He was 73 years old, a native of Milton, N.H., and had lived here 30 years. He was a member of the First Congregational Church and the Schubert Club (Boston Globe, January 15, 1920).

Mary Bangs died of accidental gas asphyxiation in the home of her step-niece, Emma (Horne) Goodwin, November 8, 1920, aged eighty-three years. She was a younger sister of Dr. Jeremiah Horne’s first wife, Maria (Bangs) Horne.

MALDEN. Miss Mary Bangs was found dead from gas asphyxiation yesterday at the home of her niece, Mrs. Henry C. Goodwin, 141 Clifton st., was 83 years old, a native of Dover, and had lived here the past three years. Death was accidental (Boston Globe, November 9, 1920).

Nephew (and co-executor) Edward L. Goodwin died in Roslindale, MA, January 14, 1922.

DEATHS. GOODWIN – In Roslindale, Jan. 14, Edward L., husband of Jane T. Goodwin. Services at residence, 6 Tappan st., Tuesday, at 1 p.m. Relatives and friends invited. Farmington, N.H., papers please copy (Boston Globe, January 16, 1922).

Sister-in-law Susan E. (Wentworth) Goodwin died in Malden, MA, April 22, 1929, aged ninety-six years.

Daughter Laura May Goodwin died in Stoneham, MA, May 1, 1929, aged seventy-seven years.

MRS. [MISS] LAURA M. GOODWIN. STONEHAM, May 1 – Miss Laura M. Goodwin, a resident of Stoneham since 1861, died today at the home of Mrs. Ada DeMariano, 112 Hancock st. Miss Goodwin was born in West Milton, N.H., in 1851. She was a member of the Eastern Star and of Evergreen Rebekah Lodge. A sister, Mrs. Alice E. Webber of Springfield, and a brother, J.S. [J.F.] Goodwin of Brighton, survive her. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at the home of C.E. Bockus, 17 Hancock st. (Boston Globe, May 1, 1929).

Emma [(Horne)] Goodwin, a widow, aged eighty-four years (b. MA), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. She owned her house on Clifton Street, which was valued at $6,500.

John F. Goodwin, a printery elevator operator, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-four years), Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, aged sixty-one years (b. MA). John F. Goodwin rented their portion of a two-family residence at 22 Allston Street, for $25 per month. They had a radio set.

Daughter-in-law Emma M. (Horne) Goodwin died in a fall in Malden, MA, November 29, 1935, aged ninety years.

FALL DOWN STAIRS KILLS MALDEN WOMAN, AGE 90. MALDEN, Nov 29. Mrs. Emma M. Goodwin, 90 years old, was killed late this afternoon when she fell down the cellar stairs at her home, 141 Clifton st. She was found by her daughter, Mrs. Frederick R. Perry, with whom she lived, when Mrs. Perry returncd home about 5 o’clock. Dr. Leo J. Lynch, who was called, said she had suffered a fractured skull and had been dead about two hours (Boston Globe, November 30, 1935).

Son John F. Goodwin died in Boston, MA, December 26, 1937 (given as 1938 on gravestone).

Death Notices. GOODWIN – In Dorchester, Dec. 26, John F. Goodwin, of 38 Mount Vernon st. Services at the Burroughs’ Funeral Home, 21 Virginia st., Uphams Corner, on Wednesday, Dec. 29, at 2 o’clock (Boston Globe, December 27, 1937).

Andrew R. Pomeroy, a retail milk owner, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Longmeadow, MA, household at the time of the (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ethel A. [(Webber)] Pomeroy, a housewife, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), his children. Edward R. Pomeroy, a public-school teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), and Richard W. Pomeroy, aged eighteen years (b. MA), and his mother-in-law, [Alice] Elizah [(Goodwin)] Webber, aged eighty-seven years (b. NH). Andrew R. Pomeroy owned their house at 1195 Longmeadow Street, which was valued at $7,500.

Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, a widow, aged seventy-one years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the (1940) Federal Census. She rented her apartment at 11 Everett Avenue. She had resided in the “same place,” i.e., Boston, MA, in 1935.

Daughter Alice E. (Goodwin) Webber died in Longmeadow, MA, in 1941.

Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, a widow, aged eighty-one years (b. NH [SIC]), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the (1950) Federal Census. She rented her apartment at 41 Rockland Street.

Daughter-in-law Grace R. (Richards) Goodwin died in 1953.


References:

City of Dover. (1866). Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Dover. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=LWkvAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA11-PA55

Dover Heritage Group. (1993). 1993 Heritage Walking Tour. Retrieved from www.dover.nh.gov/government/city-operations/library/research-learn/Heritage-Walking-Tours/1993-heritage-walking-tour/

Find a Grave. (2008, August 29). Leah Helen Goodwin Dennis. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/29398622/leah-helen-dennis

Find a Grave. (2020, January 5). Charles H. Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/205974618/charles-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2020, January 5). Henry Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/205974050/henry-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2008, March 3). John Elkins Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/25013298/john-elkins-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2008, August 25). John Fremont Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/29287167/john-fremont-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2021, December 16). Laura M. Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/234959644/laura-m-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2008, Augusr 25). Pamelia N. Davis Pinkham Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/29287220/pamelia-n-pinkham-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2015, April 29). William Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/145760462/william-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, November 1). Eri W. Pinkham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/138151762/eri-w.-pinkham

Find a Grave. (2017, June 22). Alice E. Goodwin Webber. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/180612033/alice-e.-webber

Find a Grave. (2015, May 27). John S. Wheeler. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147066948/john-s.-wheeler

Gilmore, Patrick S. (1871). History of the National Peace Jubilee and Great Musical Festival: Held in the City of Boston, June, 1869, to Commemorate the Restoration of Peace Throughout the Land. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=NcM5AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA723

Intl. Pub. Co. (1887). Leading Manufacturers and Merchants of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Hbwo8EbCc1kC&pg=PA81

NH Bureau of Labor. (1896). Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=dEQbAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA23

NH General Court. (1855). Journal of the Senate of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=fVJNAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA172

NH House. (1855). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=wzswAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA508

Wikipedia. (2022, October 30). Free Soil Party. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_Soil_Party

Wikipedia. (2022, November 27). Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_Slave_Act_of_1850

Wikipedia. (2022, November 19). Know Nothing. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Know_Nothing

Wikipedia. (2022, November 8). Whig Party (United States). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States)

Celestial Seasonings – December 2022

By Heather Durham | December 1, 2022

Happy holidays and winter solstice my friends! Welcome to the final edition of this blog for the year 2022. There is no shortage of meteor showers this month along with a planet that will glow in the evening sky as long as Mother Nature cooperates this time.

Winter solstice is near and as for me, I am happy about it for there is so much to enjoy whether you’re inside or out. I will be out and about as much and as often as possible!

Thanks everyone and enjoy yourselves New Year’s Eve as well!


December 1. The Moon and Jupiter will rise and travel close to each other.

December 6. The December φ-Cassiopeid meteor shower will be most prolific today. Coming from the Constellation Andromeda, the best prospects for viewing will be just before dawn on the 6th, but the brightness of the Moon might interfere.

December 7. The Puppid-Velid meteor shower will occur today, but once again, with the Moon so close to being full, they might not be easily visible. Today, the full Cold Moon should be viewable. The Moon and Mars will travel close to each other and rise to the right.

December 8. Tonight brings a special opportunity to view Mars. Mars will be opposite to the Sun. It will be at its largest and brightest this evening-weather dependent.

December 9. The Monocerotid meteor shower will be on display this evening. Coming from the Constellation Monoceros, this shower should put on its best display just before dawn.

December 12. The α-Hydrid meteor shower from the Constellation Hydra will peak on this date with the best show just before dawn. However, the Moon will be at last quarter and may be a viewing hindrance.

December 14. Today brings the Geminid meteor shower from the Constellation Gemini peaking at its best at 2:00 am.

December 16. The Comae Berenicid meteor shower will put on a show tonight. This one comes from the Constellation Leo may be visible from 11:30 pm the previous evening until the break of dawn. The Cold Moon will be in its final quarter.

December 20. Today brings our December Leonis Minorid meteor shower from Leo Minor. It should begin to be visible near 20:21 and remain active until the break of dawn around 6:35. am.

December 21. Mercury will travel to its furthest extent from the Sun during which time it should be very bright. This day also brings with it the December solstice, occurring as the Sun reaches its furthest southern point in the sky, a.k.a, the first day of winter.

December 22. The Ursid meteor shower from Ursa Minor will be at its peak, close to 17:00.

December 24. Mercury will shine very brightly tonight and will be at its highest in the sky.

December 26. The Moon and Saturn will rise and travel close to each other.

December 29. The Moon and Jupiter will rise to the right and orbit close to each other. The Moon will be at first quarter.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). November 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

YouTube. (14 November 2022). December 2022 Astronomical Events.Retrieved from https://youtu.be/bahPCu18hEU

South Milton Senator Eli Wentworth (1821-1863)

By Muriel Bristol |November 27, 2022

Eli Wentworth was born in Milton, February 19, 1821, son of Ichabod H. and Peace (Varney) Wentworth.

Ichabod H. Wentworth headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Peace (Varney) Wentworth], one male aged 20-29 years [Hiram V. Wentworth], one male aged 15-19 years [Eli Wentworth], one female aged 15-19 years, and one male aged 5-9 years. Four members of the household were engaged in agriculture. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Plumer, Jr., and William Wentworth.

Elder brother Hiram V. Wentworth married, circa 1842, Mary J. Nute. She was born Milton, circa July 1820, daughter of John C. and Sarah A. (Varney) Nute.

Eli Wentworth married in Milton, July 23, 1843, Mehitable Jane “Jane” Howe, both of Milton. She was born in Milton, in 1822, daughter of Jonathan and Mehitable (Twombly) Howe. Jacob Davis performed the ceremony.

Jonathan Howe of Milton made his last will, April 30, 1845. He devised to his beloved [second] wife, Abigail Howe, the sole use of the house, the use and income of the field in which the house was situated, one-half of the associated barn, pasturage for two cows, use of a horse and carriage, when necessary, four sheep, and whatever personal property she brought at the time of their marriage. He named his son Ira F. Howe, as executor, and devised to him the remainder of the real and personal estate, as well as his wife’s share after her decease. Ira F. Howe was also named as executor. He devised $12 each to his daughters, Lucy Durell, Hannah Cook, and Mehitable Jane Wentworth; and $1 to Stephen Twombly. Joseph Cook, Jacob Davis, and John H. Davis signed as witnesses (Stafford County Probate Docket 2771).

Daughter Clara Ann Wentworth was born in Milton, November 26, 1844.

Eli Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mehitable J. [(Howe)] Wentworth, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Clara E. Wentworth, aged six years (b. NH), and John C. Plumer, a shoe manufacturer, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). Eli Wentworth had real estate valued at $350. He shared a two-family residence with the household of [his elder brother,] Hiram B. Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), who also had real estate valued at $350. The household of [his father,] Ichabod H. Wentworth, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), appeared next door. His property was valued at $3,500.

Eli Wentworth received an appointment as South Milton postmaster in 1852.

Miscellaneous Items. A new post office has been established at Northfield Four Corners, Franklin county, Mass., and Moses Tyfield appointed; also at South Milton, Strafford county, N.H., Eli Wentworth, postmaster (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), June 5, 1852).

The Milton selectmen of 1852 were Asa Fox, Eli Wentworth, and Ichabod Hayes. Those of 1853 were Eli Wentworth, J.S. Hersey, and J.N. Witham.

Eli Wentworth received an initial five-year appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, July 1, 1853.

The NH Annual Register & US Calendar of 1853 identified Milton’s Justices of the Peace as being Stephen Drew, John L. Swinerton, Joseph Cook, John J. Plumer, Daniel Hayes, Jr., Daniel P. Warren, James Berry, Ichabod H. Wentworth, Joseph Pearl, Robert Mathes, Elias S. Cook, David Wallingford, John E. Goodwin, Charles C. Hayes, Jas. Jewett, Thos. Y. Wentworth, Asa Fox, James Connor, and Eli Wentworth (Lyon, 1853). (Justice Ichabod H. Wentworth was his father, and Justice Elias S. Cook was married to his sister-in-law, Hannah (Howe) Cook).

Son Charles Webster Wentworth was born in Milton, in April 1855.

Milton sent Eli Wentworth to Concord, NH, as one of its two NH State Representatives for the 1855-56 biennium. (The other was David Wallingford (1819-1903)). His mileage was rated as 100 miles. Rep. Eli Wentworth, acting for the House Committee on the State Prison, June 20, 1855, submitted its recommendation to the House.

The committee on the State Prison, have directed me to report the following resolution: ELI WENTWORTH for the Committee. Resolved, That the inventory of the State Prison be laid upon the table. and that the Clerk be directed to procure the usual number of copies for the use of the House. The resolution was adopted (NH General Court, 1855).

New Hampshire passed a prohibitory law on a third attempt in July 1855, only a month after the Portland Rum Riot. (See Milton Under “Semi-Prohibition” – 1855-02).

Eli Wentworth appeared in a State political manual of 1867, as having been the Strafford County Treasurer back in 1857 (McFarland & Jenks, 1866).

Eli Wentworth of Milton and Chester R. Robinson (1819-1858) of Enfield, NH, were appointed doorkeepers at the NH House of Representatives, June 4, 1857 (NH General Court, 1857).

Mr. Norris, of Danbury, introduced the following resolution: Resolved, That Eli Wentworth of Milton, and Chester R. Robinson of Enfield, be appointed door-keepers of the House of Representatives for the ensuing year. … It was decided in the affirmative. So the resolution passed. 

Mr. Hayes, of Milton, presented the account of Eli Wentworth.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened, That the sum of seventy-one dollars and thirty cents be paid C.R. Robinson, in full for his account; the sum of seventy dollars and fifty cents be paid Eli Wentworth, [in] full for his account, and that the same be paid out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated.

(Fellow door-keeper Chester R. Robinson received an appointment as an Enfield, NH, justice-of-the-peace, May 25, 1858. The same court roster indicated that he was “dead,” because he had died of a liver complaint in Enfield, NH, later that same year, aged thirty-nine years. He was a merchant).

Eli Wentworth received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 18, 1858. On this occasion he was also promoted to or designated as a “justice in quorum.”

Eli Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included M.J. [(Howe)] Wentworth, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Clara Wentworth, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Charles W. Wentworth, aged seven years (b. NH), and Martin L. Nute, a sh0emaker, aged twenty years (b. NH). Eli Wentworth had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of [his elder brother,] H. Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and George W. Jones, a shoemaker, aged twenty-six years (b. ME). The household of [his father,] Ichabod H. Wentworth, a farmer, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), appeared just after that of George W. Jones).

Eli Wentworth served then as a NH State Senator for the 1860-61 and 1861-62 biennia.

New Hampshire. Concord, N.H., 5th – The Republicans have nominated Eli Wentworth, of Milton, for President of the Senate, and E.A. Romans, of Somersworth, for Speaker of the House. The Democrats nominated A.P. Hale, of Nashua, for Speaker of the House. Preparations are being made for a grand celebration of election day which comes off tomorrow (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), June 5, 1861).

Eli Wentworth, of Milton, NH, a farmer, aged forty years, married, mustered into the U.S. Army as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Sixth NH Volunteer Infantry Regiment, November 28, 1861. (See Milton in the 6th NH Regiment – 1861-65).

The 6th New Hampshire regiment, at Keene, is full, and the 7th and 8th, at Concord, are nearly so; and all will be off to the war before the 15th inst. The Governor has therefore decided to issue commissions for the 9th regiment, intended for Butler’s brigade. New Hampshire has also four companies of cavalry full, intended for the New England regiment, Col. Lawton, organizing at Providence under the auspices of Gov. Sprague. Two companies of sharpshooters, the second of which is ready to leave, and a battery of artillery now in the service, complete the list of what New Hampshire has done, and is doing (Chicago Tribune (Chicago, IL), December 6, 1861).

The Sixth NH Volunteer Infantry Regiment left New Hampshire for Washington, D.C., December 25, 1861.

Arrival of the Arago, with Gen. Scott, &c. New York, 26th. The steamship Arago arrived at 5.30 this afternoon. News anticipated. She brought full files of papers, but no mails, which are on the Edinburg. General Scott and J. Clancey Jones are among the passengers. The Sixth New Hampshire Regiment passed through here [New York, NY] today for Washington; also, a battalion of Massachusetts cavalry for Annapolis (Boston Evening Transcript (Boston, MA), December 27, 1861).

MILITARY MOVEMENTS IN NEW YORK. ARRIVAL OF THE SIXTH NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. The Sixth New Hampshire regiment, Colonel Nelson Converse commanding, arrived in this city yesterday from Keene, N.H., and mustered 1,023 men. They departed for the seat of war late in the evening. The following are the leading officers: Staff Officers – Colonel, Nelson Converse; Lieutenant Colonel, Simon G. Griffin; Major, Charles Scott; Adjutant, Phin. P. Bixby; Quartermaster, Alonzo Nute; Commissary, Eli Wentworth; Surgeon, Wm. A. Tracy; Assistant Surgeon, Sherman Cooper; Chaplain, Robert Stinson (Universalist); Sergeant Major, Timothy K. Ames; Quartermaster Sergeant, Albert Kimball; Commissary Sergeant, John H. Varney; Hospital Steward, James H. Noyce. Line Officers – Company A, Captain Joseph Clark: Company B, Captain Samuel P. Adams; Company C, Captain H.H. Bierson; Company D, Captain Samuel D. Quarles; Company E, Captain O.G. Dort; Company F, Captain Geo. C. Starkwell; Company G, Captain John W. Putnam; Company H, Captain John B. Sanders; Company I, Captain Robert L. Ela; Company K, Captain E.H. Converse (NY Daily Herald (New York, NY), December 27, 1861).

The Sixth NH Regiment participated in an expedition into Hatteras Inlet, N.C., January 6–13, 1862, and remained on duty there until March 2, 1862.

Correspondence of the Baltimore Sun. Washington, Jan. 7. The Sixth New Hampshire regiment, which has just arrived here, has been ordered to join Gen. Burnside’s division at Annapolis. It is inferred that the operations of this expedition are not to be at remote points, since that Com. Goldsborough has chief command. It is understood in naval circles that no armed vessels have been sent in against any point on the Texas coast, and in respect to the stone fleet, the orders were that one channel should be left open to each harbor (Baltimore Sun (Baltimore, MD), January 6, 1862).

THE NEW-HAMPSHIRE SIXTH TO EXCHANGE PLACES WITH COL. HAWKINS’ ZOUAVES – DEATH OF SEVERAL PRIVATES. On Friday the order was given to land the New-Hampshire Sixth Regiment Volunteers, Col. CONVERS, who have been assigned the duty of garrisoning Camp Wool in place of Col. HAWKINS’ Zouaves, who are to take part in the expedition. The reason for this change, in part, is the condition of the New-Hampshire Sixth respecting drill and general health. Since it left camp at Keene, where it had little or no opportunity for drill, it has been constantly on the move, which has kept them exposed, so that, besides having no proper time for practice in the manual of arms, a large number, some 160, from time to time have been down with disease, mostly measles, from which it has suffered considerably. There are still between 30 and 40 cases of this disease in the regiment, which makes their situation a very trying one, being obliged to land on this desolate sand beach with very inadequate accommodations for the sick. The surgeon endeavored to have the order revoked, and have these unfortunate men placed on board of the Recruit or some other comfortable vessel until better accommodations could be provided than existed at Fort Clark. One man, Mr. PIERCE, died from a relapse; a Mr. AMMIDON died from inflammation of the brain; and WARREN D. FAY, of Walpole, N.H., died on the passage down, from an apoplectic fit on the 16th of January. Fay was buried on the point near Fort Hatteras. The regiment, on the 17th of January, marched to Camp Wool, and encamped during a heavy rain. It is composed of excellent materials, but they appeared much worn out by hard work. They are now in comfortable quarters. The list of officers is as follows: Colonel, NELSON CONVERS, Marlboro’; Lieutenant-Colonel, S.G. Griffin, Concord; Major, Chas. Scott, Peterboro’; Adjutant, P.P. Bigsby, Concord; Quartermaster, Alonzo Nute, Farmington; Commissary, Eli Wentworth, Milton; Surgeon, Wm. A. Tracy, Nashua; Assistant Surgeon, S. Cooper, Claremont; Chaplain, Robert B. Stinson, Croydon (NY Times (New York, NY), January 29, 1862).

A Disastrous Expedition – Below we give a list of the vessels belonging to the Burnside fleet reported lost and stranded together with their armament and the names of the regiments on board: Gunboat Zouave; 4 guns – one 30-pound Parrott gun, two 12-pound rifled guns and one 12-pound mountain howitzer. Reported lost. Steamer Eastern Queen has the Fourth Rhode Island regiment on board. In that regiment there are about forty persons belonging to this city and Fall River, Rhode Island. Reported ashore. Steamer City of New York is the Flag Ship of the First Brigade, and had on board the 25th Massachusetts regiment. Reported lost. Steamer Louisiana reported ashore, had on board the 6th New Hampshire regiment. Floating battery Grapeshot with two guns reported lost. Bark Voltigeur had the Eleventh Connecticut regiment on board, and is said to have gone ashore. The Pocahontas, which is reported lost, we believe was a gunboat (Fall River Daily News (Fall River, MA), January 29, 1862).

The Sixth NH Regiment captured Roanoke Island, VA, March 2, 1862, and remained on duty there.

Affairs at Roanoke Island. … Dr. BRYAN reports the troops on the Island in good condition, with the exception of the Sixth New Hampshire Regiment, who are still a good deal troubled with dysentery and diarrhoea, and other camp diseases. The wounded left upon the Island, after the engagement which resulted in its capture, are doing very well. The present number of sick and wounded in the hospitals, and elsewhere, is about one hundred and fifty, having been reduced to that number from three hundred and fifty on the 7th inst. On the 24th inst., one hundred and twenty were discharged cured to rejoin their different regiments. Of those remaining in hospitals, there were fifty-six from the Sixth New Hampshire, fourteen from the Eighty-ninth New York, and twenty from the Ninth New York (Hawkins’ Zouaves). A new fort is being erected on the Roanoke Sound, side of the Island, within about an eighth of a mile of the old Raleigh Fort, and on the shore of the Sound nearly opposite Nag’s Head. It will be about 180 feet in diameter, and the ditch surrounding it will be filled with water from the Sound. The guns will be mounted en barbette, and so arranged as to command three-quarters of a circle. There are about sixty contrabands engaged in wheeling sand for its construction; and it will be sodded with the turf or peat, easily obtained upon the Island (Philadelphia Inquirer, April 5, 1862).

The Sixth NH Volunteer Infantry Regiment went next on an expedition to Elizabeth City, VA, April 7–8, 1862.

Fortress Monroe, 25th. – A schooner was captured by the gunboat Cohasset this morning on suspicion of an intention to run the blockade and enter Elizabeth river. The captain said he was bound to Hatteras Inlet. He had a cargo of beef pork &c. His papers were taken from him. The flag of truce sent to-day returned with the schr. Mississippi which brought from Norfolk yesterday 17 of the wounded prisoners of the battle at South Mills. The Union troops in that battle consisted of part of five regiments, viz: 21st Massachusetts, 51st Pennsylvania, 9th and 89th New York, and 6th New Hampshire, under General Reno, numbering 500 or 600 men (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), April 26, 1862).

The Sixth NH Regiment rook part in the Battle of Camden, NC, April 19, 1862, as a part of Brigadier Gen. Jesse L. Reno’s Second Brigade. (Gen. Reno would receive a fatal wound while commanding a Corps at the Battle of South Mountain, September 14, 1862. Reno, NV, was one of the places that would be named for him).

CONGRATULATIONS OF GEN. BURNSIDE. HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT of NORTH CAROLINA, April 26, 1862. GENERAL ORDERS, No.30 The General commanding desires to express his high appreciation of the excellent conduct of the forces under command of Brig. Gen. Reno, in the late demonstration upon Norfolk. He congratulates them as well upon the manly fortitude with which they endured excessive heat and extraordinary fatigue on a forced march of forty miles, in twenty-four hours, as upon the indomitable courage with which, notwithstanding their exhaustion, they attacked a large body of the enemy’s best artillery, infantry and cavalry, in their own chosen position, achieving a complete victory. It is therefore ordered, as a deserved tribute to the perseverance, discipline and bravery exhibited by the officers and soldiers of the Twenty-first Massachusetts, Fifty-first Pennsylvania, Ninth New-York, Eighty-ninth New-York and Sixth New-Hampshire on the 19th day of April, a day already memorable in the history of our country, that the above regiments inscribe upon their respective colors the name, “Camden, April 19.” The General Commanding desires especially to express his approbation of Gen. Reno’s strict observance of his orders, when the temptation to follow the retreating enemy was so great. By command of Major-Gen. BURNSIDE. Lewis Richmond, Assistant Adjutant-General (New York Times, May 4, 1862).

New York, 9th. – Steamer Eastern Queen has arrived from Newbern and brings the sick and wounded of the 6th New Hampshire regiment. – Many of them have wounds received in the Newbern, Camden and Roanoke battles and many are sick. They are being cared for by Colonel Howe and other State agents at the New England rooms (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), May 9, 1862).

The Sixth NH Regiment participated in the capture of New Bern, NC, June 18-July 2, 1862. It moved from there to Newport News, VA, July 2–10, 1862, and remained on duty there until August 2, 1862. 2nd Lt. Eli Wentworth received a promotion to 1st Lt., July 4, 1862.

New York, 21. A force of our troops, at New Berne, dispersed a rebel force some six miles above on opposite side of the Nouse River, and destroyed their fortifications, bringing in Capt. Latham prisoner (Dawson’s Fort Wayne Daily Times (Fort Wayne, IN), June 23, 1862).

The Sixth NH Regiment moved to Aquia Creek and Fredericksburg, VA, August 2–7, 1862.

Steamboat Collision and Great Loss of Life. A collision occurred on the Potomac river, on Wednesday night of last week, between the steamers Peabody and West Point. The West Point was bound to Aquia Creek from Newport News, with 250 convalescent soldiers of General Burnside’s army. She sank in ten minutes after the accident. Seventy-three lives were lost, including the wife and child of Maj. Dort, the wife of Lt. Col. Scott and the wife of Capt. Cummings, all of the New Hampshire 6th regiment (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), August 23, 1862).

The Sixth NH Regiment participated in Gen. Pope’s campaign in northern Virginia, August 16-September 2, 1862. This included the Battle of Groveton, August 29, 1862, the Second Battle of Bull Run, August 30, 1862, and the Battle of Chantilly, VA, September 1, 1862. The Sixth NH Regiment formed a part of the First Brigade, Second Division, Ninth Army Corps. Its commander, Col. Simon G. Griffin (1824-1902), led the regiment in the battles of Second Bull Run, Antietam and Fredericksburg.

The Sixth NH Regiment participated in Maryland Campaign in September–October, 1862. This included the Battle of South Mountain, MD, September 14, 1862, the Battle of Antietam or Sharpsburg, MD, September 16–17, 1862, and duty in Pleasant Valley, MD, until October 27, 1862.

The Sixth NH Regiment moved to Falmouth, VA, October 27-November 19, 1862. It was at Corbin’s Cross Roads, near Amissville, VA, November 10, 1862, and Sulphur Springs, VA, November 14, 1862.

General James Nagle (1822-1866) led several regiments, including the Sixth NH Regiment, in a charge up Marye’s Heights at the Battle of Fredericksburg, VA, December 12–15, 1862.

GENERAL NAGLE LEADS A CHARGE. A heavy fire was concentrated upon it as it advanced, so much so that a part of the column faltered and might perhaps have fallen back in disorder had not the veteran Second Maryland, Sixth New Hampshire and Forty-eighth Pennsylvania, led by General Nagle in person, started at a charge which inspired enthusiasm throughout the line [and] dissipated the confusion (Perry County Democrat (Bloomfield, PA), December 25, 1862).

The Sixth NH Regiment participated next in Gen. Burnside’s second Virginia campaign, which was called the “Mud March”, January 20–24, 1863; and then moved to Newport News, VA, February 11, 1863.

It appears that portions of Burnside’s army have crossed the Rappahannock but undoubtedly the reports of a battle and the wounding of Gen. Hooker are premature. Gen Burnside has issued an order in which he states that he is about to give battle. The weather had moderated on the Potomac yesterday, to such an extent as to render the roads almost impassable. It is not unlikely that Burnside’s plans may be somewhat changed by the mild weather and bad roads. It is evident from Burnside’s order that he believes or knows that Lee has weakened his army a great deal since the last battle. If the weather shall permit there is no doubt that we shall hear to-day or to-morrow of another bloody straggle. God grant success to the Army of the Potomac! (Lewiston Sun Journal (Lewiston, ME), January 23, 1863).

The Sixth NH Regiment transferred next to Lexington, KY, March 26-April 1, 1863. From there it went to Winchester, KY, and then to Richmond, KY, April 18, 1863. Then to Paint Lick Creek, KY, May 3, 1863, and to Lancaster, KY, May 10, 1863.

BURNSIDE’S MOVEMENTS IN KENTUCKY. … LEXINGTON, Ky., June 4, 1863. … Brigadier General Nagle, lately commanding the First brigade, Second division, of the Ninth corps, has resigned. A chronic affection of the functions of the heart has compelled him to desist from active service, and he parts with regret from the soldiers who have shared with him the glories and dangers of so many battle-fields. Colonel Griffin, of the Sixth New Hampshire, is at present in command of the brigade (Daily Progress (Raleigh, NC), June 23, 1863).

The Sixth NH Regiment left Crab Orchard, KY, June 3, and traveled, first on foot and then by train, to Cairo, IL, arriving there, June 8, 1863. From there it traveled by steamship down the Mississippi River towards Vicksburg, arriving there June 14, 1863.

Movements of the Ninth Army Corps. A New Hampshire man connected with Colonel Griffin’s Brigade, Second Division, Ninth Army Corps, writes from Cairo, Illinois, under date of “Monday afternoon, June 8,” as follows: “We arrived here this forenoon. Got orders at Crab Orchard Tuesday evening (2nd inst.) about 8 o’clock to start the next morning at 4 with eight days rations. Started Wednesday morning and marched to Camp Dick Robinson the first day about twenty-two miles. Left the next morning at 4 and marched eighteen miles to Nicholasville. Took the cars Thursday night for Lexington, through there to Covington, arriving Saturday noon. Crossed the river to Cincinnati and had dinner, then took the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad, going the whole breadth of the State of Indiana way into Illinois to the town Landoloce (?) where we changed cars. Took the Illinois Central Railroad for this place; arrived this forenoon. We shall probably go aboard the steamers to-night, bound down the Mississippi to Vicksburg. Bully for that; Tell everybody the old Ninth Corps is going down to help wind up this rebellion. Hope you will hear good news from us soon. We are all in good spirits” (Daily Telegraph (St. Albans, VT), June 16, 1863).

Vicksburg had been besieged since May 18, 1863. Its Confederate defenders surrendered to the Union army, July 4, 1863 (which happened to be also the final day of the Battle of Gettysburg, PA).

After the fall of Vicksburg, the IX Corps – including the Sixth NH Regiment – was among the Union forces under General William T. Sherman (1820-1891) that advanced on the Mississippi state capitol at Jackson, MS, July 4–10, 1863. Jackson fell to them on July 17, 1863.

Eli Wentworth died of a fever at Snyder’s Bluff, Milldale, MS, July 18, 1863, aged forty-two years, six months. (He was a quartermaster in the U.S. Army). The Army death register had him as Lt. Eli Wentworth, a member of the Sixth NH Volunteer Regiment, which was then in the 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 9th Army Corps. The Sixth NH Volunteer Regiment’s assistant surgeon, F.N. Gibson, recorded his death, from Feb. [Febrile] Typhoid.

MEMOIR: Hon. Eli WENTWORTH was born in Milton, N.H., Feb. 19, 1821. He lived in his native town the most of his life, and received many marks of distinction from his fellow citizens, having filled the offices of Selectman, County Treasurer, Representative and Senator, serving his State and Town in public office before his enlistment eleven years. When the present rebellion broke out his patriotism was fully aroused and he felt it his duty to do all in his power for his country. He was commissioned in the 6th Regt. N.H.V., Oct. 19, 1861. During his service with the Regiment he acted first as Commissary and subsequently was appointed to act as Quartermaster of the Brigade. He died of disease after a short sickness of only three weeks at Milldale, Mississippi, July 1862, aged 42 years 5 months. Mr. Wentworth was a valuable man and in his demise his family are bereft of a dutiful son, a confiding brother, a kind husband and a devoted father. As a Mason he was an ornament, represented by the perfect [ashlar?] and had found a certain point within a circle which taught him to walk uprightly before God and man and square his actions by the square of virtue, and to remember that he was traveling to that undiscovered country from whose journey no traveler returns.

General Sherman’s forces remained encamped at Milldale, MS, until August 5, 1863.

Finally, on the 8th of August, transports were furnished, and the regiment embarked, with its brigade, and slowly made its way up the river to Cairo, and thence by rail, arriving at Cincinnati on the 20th. The sickness that prevailed on board the transports, as the troops ascended the river, was terrible, and almost universal. Almost every night, as the troops “lay up” on account of low water, and the consequent danger from sand bars, a little party would be seen with lanterns, sadly making its way on shore to bury some comrade who had fallen a victim to disease. Lieutenant Eli Wentworth, Regimental Quartermaster, was one of the victims, he having died at Milldale on the 18th, while the regiment was absent at Jackson. Halting a few days at Covington, it proceeded by rail to Nicholasville, and encamped near Camp Nelson, both officers and men still suffering terribly from the effects of that southern climate. Large numbers were sent to the hospital, and many died (NH Adjutant General, 1866).

On August 20, 1863, the Sixth NH Regiment left Cincinnati, OH, for Nicholasville, KY.

Over the course of war, the Sixth NH Regiment would lose a total of 418 men during service; 10 officers and 177 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 3 officers and 228 enlisted men died of disease (Wikipedia, 2021).

Daughter Clara A. Wentworth married in Farmington, NH, May 25, 1865, Daniel S. Burley, she of [South] Milton, and he of Middleton, NH. She was a lady, aged twenty years, and he was a farmer, aged twenty-three years. Rev. Ezekiel True performed the ceremony. Burley was born in Newmarket, NH, June 10, 1843, son of Frederick P. “Plumer” and Martha J. (Wentworth) Burley.

Father-in-law Jonathan Howe died of apoplexy in Milton, December 21, 1866, aged eighty-four years, five months, and nine days. He was a married farmer. His last will of 1845 was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held in Dover, NH, January 1, 1867 (Stafford County Probate Docket 2771).

Stepmother-in-law Abigail Howe died of old age in Milton, December 4, 1869, aged eighty years.

Mehitable J. [(Howe)] Wentworth, keeping house, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included Charles W. Wentworth, works for shoe factory, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Angeline Richards, runs stitching machine, aged thirty years (b. NH). Mehitable J. Wentworth had personal estate valued at $400. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of [her brother-in-law,] Hiram V. Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and Joseph B. Wakeham, works for shoe factory, aged forty-six years (b. NH).

Father Ichabod H. Wentworth made his will, presumably in Milton, October 28, 1871. He devised $200 and an undivided share in West Milton land to his son, Hiram V. Wentworth; $50 to Mary J. [(Nute)] Wentworth; $50 to Mehitable J. [(Howe)] Wentworth; $10 to Clara M. [(Wentworth)] Burley, wife of Daniel S. Burley; a life estate in all notes, bonds, money, and personal property to his wife, Peace [(Varney)] Wentworth; and, after her decease, the household furniture to Mary J. [(Nute)] Wentworth and Mehitable J. [(Howe)] Wentworth. He devised the remaining undivided share in the West Milton land to his grandsons, Henry H. Wentworth and Charles W. Wentworth, as well as any rest and residue not devised. (The land was bounded north by land of H.H. Pinkham, west by land of Joseph Horn, south by land of Joseph Barker, and east by land of David Furbush). John F. Hart, Ira S. Knox, and Ezra H. Twombly signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 83:99; Strafford County Probate Docket 3678).

Father Ichabod H. Wentworth died of paralysis and a fever in Milton, July 19, 1872, aged seventy-six years, seven months. (He was a son of Ichabod and Keziah Wentworth). His last will was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held in Dover, NH, in August 1872 (Strafford County Probate Docket 3678).

Mother Peace (Varney) Wentworth died of catarrh and age in Milton, August 14, 1873, aged seventy-six years, ten months. (She was a native of Dover, NH, and a daughter of Aaron and Annie Varney).

Brother-in-law Ira F. Howe died of dropsy in Milton, December 16, 1873, aged sixty-seven years.

Charles W. Wentworth, a farmer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his mother, Mehetabel J. [(Howe)] Wentworth, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of [his cousin,] Henry H. Wentworth, a butcher, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and George W. Jones, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. ME).

Civil War veterans had founded their own fraternal organization as early as 1866, calling it the Grand Army of the Republic (or G.A.R.). It was organized in state-based “departments,” with sequentially numbered chapters or posts within each department. Milton’s G.A.R. “Post” was the eighty-ninth one formed in the New Hampshire Department and was named the “Eli Wentworth Post, 89, G.A.R.”

LOCALS. Carlton Post received a friendly visit, last Friday, from about fifteen of the members of the Eli Wentworth Post of Milton. Our soldier boys were ready to receive them, and, after greetings were exchanged, a collation was served. The Women’s Relief Corps also participated in part of the exercises (Farmington News, November 4, 1887).

Under this system, the Carlton Post, No. 24, G.A.R., of Farmington, NH, would have been founded earlier than the Wentworth Post, No. 89, G.A.R., of Milton, NH. (The women’s auxiliary of the G.A.R. was called the Women’s Relief Corps (W.R.C.).

Mahetabale [(Howe)] Wentworth, widow of Eli Wentworth, appeared in the surviving Veterans’ Schedule of the Eleventh (1890) Federal Census. Her late husband had been a 1st Lt. in the Sixth NH Infantry Regiment.

Brother Hiram V. Wentworth died in Milton, September 12, 1890, aged seventy-one years, ten months, and seventeen days. C.D. Jones, M.D., signed the death certificate.

MILTON. Mrs. Wentworth of South Milton is very sick from the effects of a shock. Her daughter, Mrs. Dan Burley of Newburyport, is with her (Farmington News, April 26, 1895).

Mehitable Jane (Howe) Wentworth died in Milton, April 30, 1895, aged seventy-two years.

ELI WENTWORTH POST, NO. 89, Milton, November 19, 1896. – November 19. I inspected Eli Wentworth Post, and I found there the same condition as in the other Posts I have inspected. A long distance for many to come and increasing years make it hard for many attend. I found the records well-kept, orders properly filed, and that close attention to the detail work which keeps a Post healthy. The emphatic determination expressed by those present to hold the line, has given me new courage to believe our smaller Posts the equal of our large ones in pluck and endurance. – H.L. WORCESTER, Assistant Inspector (G.A.R., 1897).

Sister-in-law Hannah (Howe) Cook died of old age in Milton, January 11, 1899, aged eighty-two years, four months, and twenty-seven days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Daniel Burley, a shoe manufacturer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Newburyport, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty years), Clara A. [(Wentworth)] Burley, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), his brother-in-law, Charles W. Wentworth, a shoe cutter, aged forty-five years (b. NH), his boarder, John P. Stevens, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), and his servants, Nora Finnegan, a servant, aged twenty-five years (b. Ireland), and Hannah Finnegan, a servant, aged eighteen years (b. Ireland). Daniel Burley owned their house at 191 Summer Street, free-and-clear. Clara A. Burley was the mother of five children, of whom none were still living.

Son Charles W. Wentworth died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Newburyport, MA, August 5, 1908, aged fifty-five years, three months, and thirteen days. He was retired, residing at 191 High Street. (Mrs. D.S. Burley supplied the personal information).

Son-in-law Daniel S. Burley died of progressive paralysis in Newburyport, MA, March 10, 1909, aged sixty-seven years, and two months.

ESTATE OF ABOUT $750,000. Will of D.S. Burley of Newburyport Remembers Family Employes and Y.M.C.A. – Remits Church Debt. NEWBURYPORT, March 24 – The will of Daniel S. Burley, shoe manufacturer, reputed to have been worth about $750,000 has been filed in the probate court. The bequests include the following: Clara A. Burley, his wife, $150,000; John P. Stevens nephew, $50,000; John P. Stevens, Mr. Burley’s real estate and personal property at his summer home at Eastlake, N.H.; Elisabeth S. Stevens, wife of Jacob B. Stevens, $1,000; Jacob B. Stevens, Peabody, sister’s husband, $1,000; Lydia F. Mitchell, Union, N.H., $500; Charles Wentworth, Newburyport, $3,000; Helen B. Fierneman, Rochester, N.H., $500; Thomas E. Medcalf, Newburyport, for faithful services, $2,500; Isaac W.C. Webster and Augustus W. Garland, Newburyport, faithful employes, $1,000 each; Union Congregational Church, Union, N.H., all money due Mr. Burley; H.B. Little, L.B. Cushing and Charles Thurlow, $10,000 in trust for the Newburyport Y.M.C.A. The remainder of the estate is bequeathed to the testator’s wife, Clara A. Burley, who is named as executrix of the will (Boston Globe, March 24, 1909).

Clara A. [(Wentworth)] Burley, own income, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Newburyport, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her servant, Bessie Cronin, a private family servant, aged twenty-two years (b. Ireland), her boarders, Elma Stevens, a shoe factory finisher, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and Bennett J. Samson, a laundry manager, aged thirty-six years (b. MA). Clara A. Burley rented their house at 193 High Street.

Clara A. [(Wentworth)] Burley, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), headed a Newburyport, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her cousin, Angie Hanson, a widow, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), her maid, Katharine Carroll, a private family houseworker, aged thirty-five years (b. Ireland), and her boarder, Bennett J. Samson, a laundry manager, aged forty-four years (b. MA). Clara A. Burley owned their house at 191 High Street.

Daughter Clara A. (Wentworth) Burley died in Newburyport, MA, June 2, 1925, aged eighty years.

MRS. CLARA A. BURLEY DIES AT NEWBURYPORT. NEWBURYPORT, June 2 – Mrs. Clara A. Burley, 80, widow of Daniel S. Burley, formerly a prominent shoe manufacturer here, died today at her home, 191 High st. She was born in Milton, N.H. and came here nearly 40 years ago. Mrs. Burley was a member of Central Congregational Church and a generous contributor to the work of the Young Men’s Christian Association, of which her husband was a former president and benefactor and for whom the boys and girls’ Summer camp at Angle Lake, Hampstead, N.H., was named. Her nearest relative is a cousin, Mary Abbie Howe of West Milton, N.H. (Boston Globe, June 3, 1925).


References:

Find a Grave. (2021, October 21). Clara A. Wentworth Burley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/232913985/clara-a-burley

Find a Grave. (2011, December 31). Aaron Varney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82754067/aaron-varney

Find a Grave. (2009, August 27). Eli Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/41228173/eli-wentworth

G.A.R. (1897). Journal of Proceedings of the Thirtieth Annual Encampment of the Department of New Hampshire, Grand Army of the Republic. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=LpMpAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA81

Jackman, Lyman, (1891). History of the Sixth New Hampshire Regiment in the War for the Union. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=V2gUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA406

McFarland & Jenks. (1866). Statistical Almanac and Political Manual. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=gEA4AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA139

NH Adjutant. (1866). Extract of Report of the Adjutant General of the State of New Hampshire for the Year Ending June 1, 1866. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=TyUWAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA592

NH General Court. (1855). Journals of the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Ld03AAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA121

NH General Court. (1857). Journal of the House of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=yldNAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA36

Wikipedia. (2021. May 21). 6th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6th_New_Hampshire_Infantry_Regiment

Wakefield, NH, Adventist Ministers

By Muriel Bristol | November 20, 2022

The following is not intended to be an exhaustive list but is occasioned by the appearance in Milton city directories of Elder or Rev. Joseph Spinney (1812-1899) of neighboring Wakefield, NH, as having being Milton’s Adventist minister.

Elder Spinney began as a Freewill Baptist, who was persuaded to Millerism (see References), in 1843, and to its successor or its continuation, Adventism, in 1843. Thirty congregants followed him when he left the Freewill Baptist Church established a fully Adventist church in 1854.

Calvin S. Shattuck (1834-1902) and Emery A. Goodwin (c1852-1915) appear as having been, respectively, Elder Spinney’s sometime associate and his successor.

Joseph Spinney – 1854-99 

Joseph Spinney was born in Wakefield, NH, March 11, 1812, son of David and Lydia (Paul) Spinney. (David and Lydia (Paul) Spinney moved from Kittery, ME, to Wakefield, NH, circa 1808-09).

At the foot of Berry Hill Rd, near Oak Hill Rd was the South Wakefield School (District #5). Next-door was the Spinney Meeting House, originally built in 1834 by the Baptist Society. Elder Joseph Spinney, who lived on Jug Hill Rd, was the pastor here for 63 years. Members of the congregation came from Acton, Maine and Milton Mills as well the South Wakefield area. The Church was the center of social as well as religious activity. The building is on the State Register of Historic Places and is owned by the Wakefield Heritage Commission (Wakefield Planning Commission, 2010).

Joseph Spinney married in Milton, May 10, 1840, Elizabeth Spinney, he of Wakefield, NH, and she of Milton. Rev. Theodore Stevens performed the ceremony. She was born in ME, March 8, 1811, daughter of Charles and Alice (Rice) Spinney.

In this [Wakefield, NH,] neighborhood was the early home of that venerable minister, who, for full fifty years, has been almost our Town Minister, so wide has been his circuit and influence, and I regret today that he is not present, as I hoped he would be, to speak of olden days. I refer to Elder Joseph Spinney, of winning ways, and the appearance of a patriarch. Each year, nearly, some were excused. But the town only could excuse. It held that right, as well as to tax. It may not be proper for us, at this time, to criticise too sharply this right. We do not meet today to say that the First church should have remained the only one. But to rejoice that the good Lord permitted a FIRST church to exist in Wakefield. A variety in religious, as in political views, may be expected, even among a small population. Each view may be of hearts loyal to God or to the nation. And this variety is shown in the history of our town, as the number excused grew larger (Thompson, 1886).

ADVENT CHURCH. Meetings were held by the followers of Wm. Miller in 1842, and later, and April 5, 1852, Elder Joseph Spinney, and twenty-two members, followed later by twelve others, withdrew from the Free Baptist Church and became a separate society. The first minister, Elder Spinney, continued as pastor of the church at South Wakefield, which had been erected by the Free Baptists and Adventists, for very many years until his death. Rev. Joseph Libby and other clergymen have supplied. The present Adventist supply is Rev. E.A. Goodwin (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Mother Lydia (Paul) Spinney died in Wakefield, NH, August 7, 1842.

Daughter Mary E. Spinney was born August 3, 1844. Daughter Eliza A. Spinney was born May 11, 1846. Daughter Martha A. Spinney was born October 17, 1847.

Father David Spinney died in Wakefield, NH, July 19, 1848.

Daughter Martha A. Spinney died of a throat abscess in Wakefield, NH, January 22, 1850; and daughter Mary E. Spinney died of a throat abscess in Wakefield, NH, February 11, 1850, aged five years.

Joseph Spinney, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Elizabeth Spinney, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME). Joseph Spinney had real estate valued at $3,000.

Daughter Eliza A. Spinney died January 29, 1852.

SPINNEY MEETING HOUSE. In 1831, a small group of people in South Wakefield met and began a “Free Will Baptist Movement.” This group included Jacob Wiggin and Isaiah Wiggin. The land for this building was purchased for $8 and soon a church was built. The Rev. Joseph Spinney became pastor and served as Baptist minister from 1836 until 1854 when he became a zealous Adventist. Thirty members followed Elder Spinney into the new ministry, new by-laws were written and signers included Joseph and Luther Wiggin. Now Baptists and Adventists used the church alternately (Wakefield Heritage Commission, n.d.).

Second Adventism. — The first Advent meetings were held in Brookfield in 1840. Daniel Churchill and Elder William Thompson, of Wolfeborough, were the first to preach that doctrine. Mr. Churchill was born in Brookfield, but in early life went to Lowell, where he became acquainted with Elder William Miller when he held meetings in that city. Mr. Thompson was a lifelong resident of Wolfeborough, where he died a few years ago. Later [1854] Elder Joseph Spinney, a Freewill Baptist minister of Wakefield, adopted the Second Advent doctrine and preached in this town for nearly forty years. Owing to advanced age he seldom holds services except at his own church at South Wakefield. Within the last thirty years such men as Elder Miles Grant, H.L. Hastings, John Couch, A. Ross, L. Boutell, and a large number of the most prominent men in the Advent denomination have held conference and protracted meetings in the town hall, which have been attended by a larger number of people than those of any other religious society. At present Thomas L. Churchill and Charles Colman, both residents of Brookfield, hold religious services in the surrounding towns (Merrill, 1889).

Joseph Spinney, a clergyman (Advent), aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Elizabeth Spinney, aged forty-nine years (b. ME). Joseph Spinney had real estate valued at $1,600 and personal estate valued at $300.

Father-in-law Charles Spinney died in Milton, April 7, 1862.

Joseph Spinney, a clergyman, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Elizabeth Spinney, keeping house, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH [SIC]). Joseph Spinney had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $440.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. Friday of last week many people from Brookfield and vicinity, within a circuit of twelve miles, gathered at the late home of Joseph B. Buzzell, where his remains had been taken the evening before for interment, to witness the funeral ceremonies. Elder Joseph Spinney of Wakefield conducted the services. The remains were taken from the house by the bearers, followed by the mourners (his mother being quite infirm and somewhat deranged in her mind, did not follow). People to the number of four hundred formed a procession and marched to the grave. The text and hymns used on this occasion were selected by the deceased. The text was the same used at the funeral of Susan Hanson, by the same minister (Boston Post, July 17, 1879).

Joseph Spinney, a farmer, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His house included his wife, Elizabeth Spinney, keeping house, aged sixty-nine years (b. ME).

Joseph Spinney appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, 1889, as pastor of the Milton Mills [Wakefield] Adventist church. C.S. Shattuck appeared also in 1881, and 1882.

MARRIAGES. In Wakefield, Mar. 13, by Rev. Joseph Spinney, Mr. James E. Stevens and Miss Etta E. Everett, both of Farmington (Farmington News, March 26, 1886).

The Town of Wakefield, NH, paid Joseph Spinney $5.37 and James L. Wentworth $5.37, as their one-half proportions of the interest on the ministerial fund, due to the Advent society for the year ending March 1, 1887. James W. Garvin received $10.74 for the Episcopal society; Edwin Junkins received $5.37, and Satchell Weeks received $5.37, for the Congregational society; and Eliza Blake received $10.74 for the Methodist society. (Wakefield, NH, Town Report, 1887).

Joseph Spinney appeared in the Milton business directories of 1894, and 1898, as a Milton Mills Adventist clergyman.

Spinney, Elder Joseph and Elizabeth

DEDICATION AT SANBORNVILLE. Keys of New S20,000 Town Hall Presented the Selectmen by F.Z. Leavitt. SANBORNVILLE, N.H., Feb. 26 – The exercises of dedication of the new $20,000 Wakefield town hall took place here today. On arrival of the morning train from Boston a large contingent from that city and Portsmouth were met at the depot by the reception committee and escorted to the hall. The streets leading to the hall were crowded by townspeople and visitors, who soon filled the building to overflowing. At 1 o’clock Hon. John W. Sanborn, as chairman, called the assembly to order. After a selection by the Sanbornville band of 24 pieces, prayer was offered by Rev. Joseph Spinney, 84 years of age, and one of the oldest residents of the town. Frank J. Leavitt. chairman of the building committee, in a neat speech, presented the keys of the building. Hon. John W. Sanborn accepted the same, in behalf of the selectmen. Mr. Sanborn then delivered an interesting address on the history of the town. In his remarks he said that the first town meeting house was built on the shore of Lovell lake, by the original 30 proprietors of Wakefield, then called East Town. The second was built at the corner. This, like its predecessor, was also outgrown, and a larger one built at the same place. Short addresses were also made by Hon. Chas. B. Gaffney of Rochester, Hon. Joshua G. Hall of Dover, Hon. John B. Nash of Conway, Rev. A.B. Thompson of Raymond and others. The benediction closed the exercises. Dinner was served in the banquet and adjoining rooms. It is estimated that 800 people were fed. Arthur L. Foot, as chairman of the reception committee, with his corps of aids, left nothing undone to make the visitors’ stay pleasant. The building committee consisted of Frank J. Leavitt, Herbert G. Rodgers, William H. Willey, Joseph L. Johnson. This evening there will be a grand ball in the new hall, music being furnished by Blaisdell’s orchestra of Concord (Boston Globe, February 26, 1896).

Elizabeth (Spinney) Spinney died in Wakefield, NH, October 30, 1898.

Joseph Spinney died of general debility in Wakefield, NH, December 21, 1899, aged eighty-seven years, nine months, and ten days. He was a widowed clergyman.

ELDER JOSEPH SPINNEY. Joseph Spinney, one of the oldest and best-known preachers of the Advent faith in the state, died in Wakefield, December 21, 1899. Elder Spinney was born in Wakefield, March 11, 1812. He was educated at Limerick, Me., and Wakefield academies, and taught school winters from 1830 to 1850. He commenced preaching at twenty-one years of age, and was ordained to the ministry of the Free Baptist church, but in 1843 he associated himself with the Adventists with whom he continued up to the time of his death, preaching most of the time in Wakefield. He had united 225 couples in marriage, and officiated at between seven hundred and eight hundred funerals (Metcalf & McClintock, 1900). 

Calvin S. Shattuck – c1880-83

Calvin Styles Shattuck was born in Belvidere, VT, October 26, 1834, son of Daniel and Anna (Carpenter) Shattuck.

Calvin S. Shattuck of Massachusetts was a first-year student at Lane Theological Seminary, in Cincinnati, OH, in 1853.

Calvin S. Shattuck married in VT, circa 1859, Phila J. Gray. She was born in Montpelier, VT, December 13, 1840.

Calvin S. Shattuck, a Christian clergyman, aged twenty-five years (b. VT), headed a Starksboro, VT, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Phila Shattuck, aged nineteen years (b. VT).

Calvin S. Shattuck, a clergyman, aged thirty-five years (b. VT), headed a Colebrook, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Eliza [i.e., Phila,] J. Shattuck, keeping house, aged twenty-nine years (b. VT), Frank W. Shattuck, aged eight years (b. VT), Avis E. Shattuck, aged seven years (b. VT), Charles W. Shattuck, aged three years (b. NH), and Thomas W. Shattuck, a barrel maker, aged fifty-six years (b. VT). Calvin S. Shattuck had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $600. Thomas W. Shattuck has real estate valued at $900.

CAMP MEETINGS. Wednesday. At the same hour one person from Portsmouth, N.H., was baptised by Elder Calvin S. Shattuck of Beebe Plain, P.Q., in the lake near the railroad shops (Portland Daily Press (Portland, ME), August 29, 1878).

C.S. Shattuck appeared in the Milton business directories of 1880, 1881, and 1882, as a Milton Mills Adventist clergyman. (Joseph Spinney appeared as such also in 1881, and 1882).

Calvin S. Shattuck, a clergyman, aged forty-five years (b. VT), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Phila J. Shattuck, keeping house, aged thirty-nine years (b. VT), and his children, Frank W. Shattuck, at house, aged eighteen years (b. VT), Avis E. Shattuck, at house, aged seventeen years (b. VT), and Charles W. Shattuck, at house, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Moses H. Remick, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), and Eli Wentworth, a farmer, aged fifty years (b. NH).

Hardwick. Rev. Calvin Shattuck of Pittsfield, N.H., preached the dedicatory sermon at the new Adventist church in this place on Sunday, December 14th, from First Kings ix:3. The church was filled to its utmost capacity at the afternoon service. Revs. A.F. Drown (Adventist) and W.C. Robinson (Methodist) assisted in the service with the utmost cordiality and good feeling (Vermont Watchman and State Journal (Montpelier, VT), December 24, 1884).

WATERVILLE. Daniel Shattuck still lingers. Calvin Shattuck has been in town, called home by the sickness of his mother (News & Citizen (Morrisville, VT), December 25, 1884).

Hardwick. Rev. Calvin Shattuck of Pittsfield, N.H., preached at the Advent church on Saturday and Sunday last (Vermont Watchman & State Journal (Montpelier, VT), February 25, 1885).

WATERVILLE. Rev. Calvin Shattuck, of New Hampshire, was in town recently to attend the funeral of his father, Daniel Shattuck, whose death occurred at the residence of his son-in law, W.J. Wheelock, on the 24th ult., caused by receiving a fall on the ice two weeks before. His age was 83 years (News & Citizen (Morrisville, VT), February 2, 1888).

Waterville. Rev. Calvin Shattuck is holding tent meetings each evening this week near W.J. Wheelock’s house (Cambridge Transcript (Cambridge, VT), July 22, 1892).

On December 23, 1893, Mr. [James Frank] Roberts married Mrs. Avis E. Shattuck Ferry, daughter of the Rev. Calvin S. Shattuck, an evangelist of the Second Adventist faith. Mr. Shattuck has resided in Pittsfield, N.H., for many years. He married Phillis Gray, who bore him four children, of whom three are living. These are: the Rev. Frank Shattuck of Rochester, N.H.; Avis E., who is now Mrs. Roberts; and the Rev. Charles W. Shattuck of Lakeport, N.H. (Biographical Review, 1897).

Calvin S. Shattuck died of stomach cancer on Green Street in Bridgton, ME, November 23, 1902. aged sixty-eight years, twenty-seven days.

EAST CHARLOTTE. G.W. James went to Sugar Hill, N.H., Wednesday last, where he was summoned to attend the funeral of Rev. Calvin Shattuck, an intimate friend, which was held on Thursday (Bridgport Sun (Bridgport, VT), December 4, 1902).

Phila J. (Gray) Shattuck died in Vernon, VT, February 23, 1928, aged eighty-four years.

Mrs. Shattuck Dies at Vernon Home. Mrs. Phila Shattuck, 84, widow of Rev. Calvin Shattuck, died at the Vernon home Wednesday evening. She had lived at the Home only three months, her former home being at Alton Bay, N.H. She was a woman of beautiful Christian character and a lovable disposition. She leaves two sons, Rev. Frank Shattuck, whose home is in California, and Rev. Charles Shattuck, who is an evangelist in Newport, N.H., but whose home is in Lynn, Mass. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at the Home. Rev. G.E. Tyler officiated. The body was entombed in Northfield until spring, when it will be taken to Sugar Hill, N.H., for burial (Brattleboro Reformer (Brattleboro, VT), March 1, 1928).

Emery A. Goodwin – c1901-1908

Emery Augustus Goodwin was born in Moultonboro, NH, circa 1852, son of Charles and Elizabeth (Nutter) Goodwin.

Emery Augustus Goodwin married in Northampton, MA, November 13, 1873, Helen J. Angell, he of Moultonboro, NH, and she of Huntington, MA. He was a farmer, aged twenty years, and she was a teacher, aged thirty years. Rev. Edwin T. Hiscon performed the ceremony. She was born in Huntington, MA, August 13, 1842, daughter of James and Martha Angell.

Helen J. Angell graduated from Mount Holyoke with its Class of 1871, and her husband, Emery A. Goodwin, had graduated from the same school with its Class of 1873.

1871. GRADUATES. Angell, Helen J., Northampton; m. Emery A. Goodwin, ’73; P.O. address, Lake View, N.H. (Mount Holyoke College, 1895). 

Emory A. Goodwin, a farmer, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), headed a Moultonborough, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Helen J. [(Angell)] Goodwin, keeping house, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), and his daughters, Mary E. Goodwin, aged five years (b. NH), and Alma M. Goodwin, aged one year (b. NH).

Helen J. Goodwin write the following poem for the Mount Holyoke College semicentennial in 1888.

AT HOME.
MRS. EMERY A. GOODWIN, CENTER HARBOR, N.H. (Helen J. Angell, ’71).

Our mother calls her daughters home
To crown her year of jubilee;
From distant continents we come
And from the isles of every sea;
From mountain heights, from desert sands,
From city streets and lonely lands.

We come but some have come unseen,
So closely cling the little hands,
So frail the lives that on us lean,
So long the paths from foreign strands,
So large the work, so weak the frame;
But we in heart are here the same.

Our founder never knew how blest
Her name, her work, her life, should be,
Could she come back from her sweet rest
And sit with us beneath the tree
Whose germ she planted, she would cry,
“The Lord hath done this!
What am I?”

And gazing on her pictured face
Recall we all the blessed host
Whose home was once this hallowed place;
Our buried treasures – not our lost.
O that the stone for this one day

From every grave might roll away!

That both the living and the dead
At once might stand within these walls,

Where like the dew on Hermon’s head
The Spirit’s gentle presence falls;
Where souls are clothed with heavenly might
To win in every earthly fight.

Dear alma mater! in God’s hand
Thy future lies; for us a day
Of meeting, by no parting spanned,
Where God shall wipe our tears away;
For after night comes morning blest,
And after toil his perfect rest (Mount Holyoke College, 1888).

Emery A. Goodwin, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Moultonborough, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Helen J. [(Angell)] Goodwin, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), his children, Alice M. Goodwin, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), James E. Goodwin, at school, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Elmer C. Goodwin, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Robert H. Goodwin, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his father, Charles Goodwin, aged eighty-six years (b. ME). Emery A. Goodwin owned their farm, free-and-clear. Helen J. Goodwin was the mother of five children, of whom four were still living.

Emery A. Goodwin, a farmer, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Moultonboro, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-six years), Helen A. [(Angell)] Goodwin, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA), and his daughter, Alice M. Goodwin, a local primary teacher, aged thirty-one years (b. NH). Emery A. Goodwin owned their farm, free-and-clear. Helen J. Goodwin was the mother of six children, of whom four were still living.

Emery A. Goodwin died of valvular heart disease in Meredith, NH, March 19, 1915, aged sixty-one years, seven months, and twenty-six days.

Helen J. (Angell) Goodwin died in Meredith, NH, February 21, 1916.


References:

Biographical Review. (1897). Biographical Review: Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Strafford and Belknap Counties, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=C2sjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA274

Find a Grave. (2007, October 15). Emery Augustus Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/22230061/emery-augustus-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2011, February 19). Elder Calvin Styles Shattuck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/65865494/calvin-styles-shattuck

Find a Grave. (2013, July 27). Elder Joseph Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114457951/joseph-spinney

Merrill, Georgia D. (1889). History of Carroll County, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=xmMKyZxlU5MC&pg=PA504

Metcalf & McClintock. (1900). Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine Devoted to History, Biography, Literature, and State Progress. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=l344AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA124

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). Town Register: Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA174

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). Town Register: Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA177

Mount Holyoke College. (1888). Semi-centennial Celebration of Mount Holyoke Seminary, South Hadley, Mass. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=tX47AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA46

Mount Holyoke College. (1895). Quinquennial Catalogue of Officers and Students of Mount Holyoke College. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=_38hAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA117

Thompson, Albert H. (1886). Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Organization of the First Church and Ordination of the First Settled Town Minister of Wakefield, N.H. Wolfeboro Junction, NH: George S. Dorr

Wakefield Heritage Commission. (n.d.). Wakefield Historic Buildings. Retrieved from www.historicwakefieldnh.com/buildings.html

Wakefield Planning Commission. (2010). Wakefield, New Hampshire
Master Plan 2010. Retrieved from www.wakefieldnh.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif1366/f/uploads/master_plan.pdf

Wikipedia. (2021, September 28). Great Disappointment. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Disappointment

Wikipedia. (2021, September 6). Millerism. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millerism

South Milton Miller William P. Tuttle (1823-1911)

By Muriel Bristol | November 13, 2022

William Penn Tuttle was born in Dover, NH, June 26, 1823, son of Joseph and Sarah (Pinkham) Tuttle.

William P. Tuttle married (1st) in Farmington, NH, December 14, 1852, Mary Varney. She was born in Farmington, NH, May 21, 1829, daughter of William and Annie Varney.

William P. Tuttle, son of Joseph and Sarah P. Tuttle, of Dover, in the county of Strafford, and state of New Hampshire, and Mary Varney, daughter of William and Anna Varney, of Farmington, in the county of Strafford, married in Farmington, December 14, 1852 (NH Genealogical Society, 1905).

Son George E. Tuttle was born in Milton, circa 1859.

William P. Tuttle, a miller, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary B. Tuttle, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), George E. Tuttle, aged one year (b. NH), and William G. Jewett, a miller, aged eighteen years (b. NH). William P. Tuttle had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $2,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of George Lyman, a farmer, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), and L.D. Hayes, a shoemaker, aged thirty-six years (b. NH).

Son George E. Tuttle died in June 1860.

William P. Tuttle, a miller, aged forty years (b. NH), of Milton, registered for the Class II military draft, in July 1863. (See also Milton Class II Draft List – 1863).

William P. Tuttle was one of the ten prominent Milton citizens who incorporated a private secondary school – the Milton Classical Institute – at Three Ponds Village in Milton, NH, in July 1867. The incorporators included also NH Governor’s Councilor (and ex-officio NH State Board of Education member) Charles Jones, Strafford Sheriff Luther Hayes, manufacturer Hiram V. Wentworth, Dr. George W. Peavey, and others.

Mary V. (Varney) Tuttle died of consumption in Milton, March 2, 1869, aged thirty-nine years, nine months, and eight days.

The City of Dover, NH, paid William P. Tuttle $3.06 for road labor in District 12, in 1869-70 (City of Dover, NH, 1870).

William Tuttle, a shoemaker, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included William R. Tuttle, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and Stephen Tuttle, at home, aged fifteen years (b. NH). William Tuttle had personal estate valued at $300.

William P. Tuttle married (2nd), in Windham, ME, March 28, 1872, Lydia M. Cartland. She was born in Parsonfield, ME, October 26, 1831, daughter of Charles and Miriam (Robinson) Cartland.

MARRIED. In Deering, March 28, at Friends’ Meeting House, William P. Tuttle, of Dover, N.H., and Lydia M. Cartland, of Portland (Portland Daily Press (Portland, ME), March 30, 1872).

Dover, NH, employed William P. Tuttle as one of its field drivers in 1873. A field driver was a town official authorized to round up and impound domestic farm animals roaming at large.

FIELD DRIVERS. Jesse Whitehouse, Andrew J. Bodge, Charles Kimball, William P. Tuttle, Enoch T. Foss, Dennis A. Johnson, Augustus A. Davis, Joseph H. Hodgdon, Jacob J. Drew (City of Dover, NH, 1874).

William P. Tuttle served as a member of the Dover, NH, Board of Instruction, i.e., its school board, in the years 1875-76, 1876-77, 1877-78, 1878-79, 1879-80, and 1880-81 (Dover City Council, 1882).

Dover, N.H. The bill to redistrict the city also amended the city charter so that the old School Board was unseated, and the elections will hereafter be made by the Aldermen. The new Board thus elected consists of the Rev. George B. Spalding, John B. Stevens, Jr., Dr. Charles A. Tufts, William P. Tuttle, E.C. Kinnear, H.H. Hough, C.K. Hartford, O.C. Farrar, T.J. Smith, Thomas E. Sawyer, John R. Varney and C.A. Towne. The City Government has passed an ordinance which provides that hereafter all buildings erected within certain prescribed limits shall be of brick or other non-inflammable material (Boston Globe, July 21, 1876).

DOVER QUARTERLY MEETING. Jacob K. Puritan, Tobias Meader, William P. Tuttle, Timothy B. Hussey, William R. Dennis, Samuel Buffum, Otis Meade, Ira T. Jenkins, Thomas G. Roberts (Portland Daily Press (Portland, ME), June 16, 1879).

William Tuttle, a farmer, aged fifty-one years (b. Dover, NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lydia M. Tuttle, aged fifty years (b. Parsonfield, ME), his mother, Sarah P. Tuttle, aged eighty-six years (b. Dover, NH), and his servants, William F. Cartland, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. Parsonfield, ME), Willard Mansfield, a farm laborer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Etta Willard, housework, aged twenty years (b. Cambridge, ME). Their farm was situated on the Dover Point Road.

The grocery business has always been the leading factor in the mercantile life of Dover, and the leading grocer of the city to-day is William F. Cartland, a native of Parsonfield, Me., who came to Dover at the age of eighteen, entering the employ of his uncle, William P. Tuttle. Three years later he engaged with J. Roberts, to learn the grocery business. Subsequently, he was in employ of W.S. Wiggin, but cherishing an ambition to conduct business for himself in 1885 he bought the interest of John Kimball in firm of Kimball & Tasker, then in Freeman block, Washington street (Granite Monthly, 1900).

Strafford County purchased $6.00 worth of potatoes for its County Farm from William P. Tuttle in 1887-88 (Strafford County, 1888).

William P. Tuttle’s Dover Point wood lot appeared in an 1890 NH Dept. of Agriculture report, as an example of excellent tree growth.

On the William P. Tuttle farm in Dover, N.H., an acre in white pine grew over two hundred and thirty cubic feet a year for fifty years, the trees having been cut just half a century after the land had been cultivated for potatoes (NH Dept. of Agriculture, 1890).

Lydia M. (Cartland) Tuttle died of an abdominal tumor in Dover, NH, September 17, 1896, aged sixty-four years, ten months, and twenty-two days.

William P. Tuttle married (3rd) in Dover, NH, November 11, 1897, Hannah Coffin (Hanson) Canney, both of Dover, NH. He was a farmer, aged seventy-four years, and she was aged sixty-five years. Rev. George E. Hall performed the ceremony. She was born in Dover, NH, September 25, 1832, daughter of Samuel and Clarissa (Varney) Hanson.

William Tuttle, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Hannah Tuttle, aged seventy-one years (b. NH).

Hannah C. ((Hanson) Canney) Tuttle died in Dover, NH, November 26, 1908, aged seventy-six years.

William P. Tuttle, retired (own income), aged eighty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. William P. Tuttle owned his house on the Dover Point Road, free-and-clear.

William P. Tuttle died of senility on the Dover Point Road in Dover, NH, May 4, 1911, aged eighty-seven years, ten months, and eight days. He was a farmer, who had lived in Dover, NH, for “nearly” his whole life, his prior residence having been in North Berwick, ME. George P. Morgan, M.D., signed the death certificate.

References:

City of Dover, NH. (1870). Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=wzQtAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA41

City of Dover, NH. (1874). Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=1B4tAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA22

Dover City Council. (1882). Charter and Ordinances, with the Rules and Order of the City Councils and Related Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=UDMTAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA165

Find a Grave. (2012, April 27). William P. Tuttle. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/89213652/william-penn-tuttle

Granite Monthly. (1900). Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-F4SAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA227

NH Dept. of Agriculture. (1890). Forestry Report. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=_FAbzP7eOd8C&pg=PA388

NH Genealogical Society. (1905). Records of Dover Monthly Meeting. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ptAUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA30

Strafford County. (1888). Annual Reports of the County Commissioners. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mdlEAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA45

South Milton Commissioner George Lyman (1827-1900)

By Muriel Bristol | November 6, 2022

George Lyman was born in Milton, December 22, 1827, son of Micah and Mary (Kelly) Lyman. (Micah Lyman was a son of South Milton Miller T.C. Lyman (1770-1863)).

Michael [Micah] Lyman, a farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary [(Kelly)] Lyman, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and George Lyman, a farmer, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Micah Lyman had real estate valued at $5,000; and George Lyman had real estate valued at $1,000.

Jeremiah Plummer, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Tamson Plummer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), Hannah Plummer, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Jonas Plummer, a farmer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Ruth Plummer, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Jeremiah Plummer had real estate valued at $3,000.

George Lyman married in Rochester, NH, November 27, 1851, Hannah Plummer, he of Milton and she of Rochester, NH. Rev. J.E. Farewell performed the ceremony. She was born in Rochester, NH, in 1826, daughter of Jeremiah and Tamsen D. (Twombly) Plummer.

Son Harry S. Lyman was born in Milton, August 15, 1852.

Son John E. Lyman was born in Milton, March 11, 1854. He died in Milton, September 6, 1854, aged five months, twenty-six days.

Father-in-law Jeremiah Plumer of Rochester, NH, made his last will September 9, 1856. He devised to his beloved wife, Tamson [(Twombly)] Plumer, all his household furniture, excepting that devised to others, one-half of his provisions, one-half of his fatted hog, two cows, and four shares in the N.E.S.W. store, Division #186, for so long as she remained his widow, cut wood for her fire, $50 in money, one-sixth of the produce raised on his homestead farm, excepting hay, and one-half of the new part of the house (Strafford County Probate, 70:46).

Jeremiah Plumer devised $200 to his daughter, Hannah Lyman, wife of George Lyman. He devised $150 to his daughter, Ruth Plumer, as well as one bed and bedding, and one cow, the cow to be supplied at any time she might marry within three years, otherwise at the three-year mark. He devised to his son Jonas Plumer one bed and bedding, all his cider and cider casks, eight dry casks, two meat barrels, one desk, and a trunk, as well as all the rest and residue of the estate. Son Jonas Plumer was also named as executor. Peter M. Horne, Charles Wentworth, and Henry S. Horne signed as witnesses. The will was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held in Dover, NH, January 6, 1857 (Strafford County Probate, 70:46).

In these bequests to his son, Jonas Plumer, one may gain some insight into how a farmer might store his food at this time. Jeremiah Plumer had cider casks for his liquids, “dry” casks for his flour, sugar, dried fruits and vegetables, etc., and “meat” barrels for his preserved meat, such as the other one-half of the fatted hog.

Daughter Elizabeth Cushing Fall was born in Milton, May 10, 1859.

Sister-in-law Ruth C. Plumer married in Portsmouth, NH, January 3, 1860, Isaac S. Twombly, she of Rochester, NH, and he of Dover, NH. He was aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-five years. Rev. D.P. Leavitt performed the ceremony.

Tamson Plummer, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included Jonas M. Plummer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and George E. Jones, aged nine years (b. NH). Jonas M. Plummer had real estate valued at $4,000 and personal estate valued at $1,035.

George Lyman, a farmer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Hannah [(Plummer)] Lyman, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), H.S. Lyman, aged seven years (b. NH), and Elizabeth C. Lyman, aged one year (b. NH). George Lyman had personal estate valued at $500. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of his father, Micah Lyman, a farmer, aged sixty-three years, who had real estate valued at $4,000, and William P. Tuttle, a miller, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH).

Father Micah Lyman died in Milton, September 14, 1860, aged sixty-two years.

The Milton Selectmen of 1862 were Jos. Cook, Geo. Lyman, and J.N. Witham. The Milton Selectmen of 1863 were Geo. Lyman, J.N. Witham, and T.H. Roberts.

George Lyman of Milton, a farmer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), registered for the Civil War Class II military draft, in June 1863.

The Milton Selectmen of 1867 were Chas. Jones, Geo. Lyman, and E.W. Fox. The Milton Selectmen of 1868 were Geo. Lyman, E.W. Fox, and Chas. Hayes.

George Lyman appeared in the Milton business directories of 1867-68, 1868, and 1869-70, as being a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

Justices. Milton. Charles Jones, Luther Hayes, Elbridge W. Fox, Joseph Plumer, Ebenezer Wentworth, Ezra H. Twombly, Joseph Mathes, Charles A. Cloutman, Asa Jewett, Elias S. Cook, Joseph Cook, Robert Mathes, Eli Fernald, Asa Jewett, Daniel S. Burley, Ira C. Varney, George Lyman, George W. Peavey (Briggs & Co., 1868).

Milton sent George Lyman and Samuel G. Chamberlain to Concord, NH, as its NH State Representatives for the 1869-70 biennium. It would seem that Samuel G. Chamberlain did not complete his two-year term and was replaced in 1870 by Samuel W. Wallingford (NH General Court, 1870).

George Lyman was allotted round-trip mileage of 160 miles, while Samuel W. Wallingford was allotted 172 miles. Wallingford presumably lived a further six miles away from their Concord, NH, destination. Rep. Lyman served on the Fisheries Committee, while Rep. Wallingford served on the Education Committee (NH General Court, 1870).

Rep. Lyman had NH House seat 04-53 and Rep. Wallingford had seat 05-21, and both men lodged at J.Y. Boynton’s (NH House of Representatives, 1870). (These would be minority seats as House seating is currently arranged). John Y. Boynton appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1870 as a carriage maker at Abbot’s (i.e., Abbot, Downing & Co., coach and carriage manufacturers), with his house at 4 Call’s block, on State Street. John Y. Boynton, who was aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), had a wife, three daughters, and eight lodgers in his household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census.

George Lyman, a farmer, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Hannah [(Plummer)] Lyman, keeping house, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), Harry S. Lyman, a farm laborer, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Lizzie C. Lyman, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), and Mary [(Kelly)] Lyman, aged seventy-four years (b. NH). George Lyman had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $575.

Milton - 1871 (Detail) - G Lyman
Milton, 1871 (Detail) – Home of G. Lyman (indicated with red arrow) in School District #10 (South Milton). The homestead of his grandfather, T. Lyman, may be seen between the Lyman Cemetery (“Cem”) and the Hayes Sta. & Freight Sta. (where the railroad track crosses the road).

The Milton Selectmen of 1871 were Geo. Lyman, John Lucas, and G.H. Plumer. The Milton Selectmen of 1872-73 were Geo. Lyman, Geo. H. Plumer, and T.H. Roberts.

George Lyman was Milton treasurer in 1873, and 1874. He was preceded in that office by Thomas H. Roberts and succeeded by Elbridge W. Fox.

George Lyman appeared in the Milton business directories of 1873, 1874, 1875, and 1876, as being a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

MILTON. Justices. Luther Hayes, C.H. Looney, E.W. Fox, State; Joseph Mathes, Joseph Cook, George Lyman, G.W. Peavey, J.S. Hersey, J.N. Sims, B.B. Plummer, B.P. Roberts (Tower, 1876).

The Milton Selectmen of 1874-77 were Geo. Lyman, Geo. H. Plumer, and J.U. Simes.

Mother-in-law Tamsen D. (Twombly) Plummer died in 1878.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. NOMINATIONS. Dover, N.H., Oct. 3. – The Republican Convention for Strafford county to-day nominated Frank S. Tompkin of Dover for Register of Deeds, John R. Varney of Dover for Register of Probate, Henry H. Hough of Dover for Treasurer, John Greenfield of Rochester for Sheriff, C.R. Shackford of Dover for Solicitor, Cyrus Littlefield of Dover, Samuel A. Seavey of Somersworth and George Lyman of Milton for Commissioners (Boston Post, October 4, 1878).

George Lyman appeared in the Milton business directories of 1880, 1881, and 1882, as being a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

George Lyman, a farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hannah [(Plummer)] Lyman, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), his daughter, Lizzie Lyman, teaching school, aged twenty-one years, (b. NH), and his mother, Mary [(Kelly)] Lyman, at home, aged eighty-three years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Theodore Lyman, a farmer, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and Luther Hayes, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. ME).

Stephen Osgood, a policeman, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fannie B. Osgood, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. ME), his boarder, Harry S. Lyman, a policeman, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and his servant, Mary A. Hunt, a domestic servant, aged eighteen years (n. MA). They resided on Chestnut Hill Avenue.

George Lyman was elected as one of three Strafford County Commissioners in November 1880.

Commissioners. George Lyman, Milton; Cyrus Littlefield, Dover; Sam’l A. Seavey, Great Falls (Tower, 1881).

The Milton Selectmen of 1882-83 were Geo. Lyman, W.H.H. Pinkham, and J.U. Simes.

WEST MILTON. The school in the district known as Varneyville, that closed last week, was taught by Lizzie R. Burrows, who is a teacher of fine ability, thorough being the word with her. Three of her pupils Melissa Moore, Minnie Burrows and Carrie Pulsifer were given 1128 words to write, all of which were spelled correctly. The classes in Algebra, Arithmetic and Grammar excelled any thing of the kind that has come under my notice for many a day. Hoping that we may have more such teachers in the future is the wish of our Superintending Committee, Miss Lizzie Lyman, and all who are interested in the cause of education. C.U. Later (Farmington News, July 13, 1883).

Daughter Lizzie C. Lyman married in Milton, August 39, 1883, George C. Fall, he of Wakefield, NH, and she of Milton. He was a carpenter, aged twenty-seven years, and she was aged twenty-four years. Rev. George Sterling performed the ceremony. Fall was born in Lebanon, ME, August 10, 1856, son of Ebenezer and Dorcas (Horne) Fall.

Miss Lizzie Lyman and W.E. Pillsbury appeared in the Milton business directory of 1884, as the Milton school superintendents.

The Milton Selectmen of 1884 were Geo. Lyman, W.H.H. Pinkham, and C.T. Haines.

Son Harry S. Lyman married in Concord, MA, May 30, 1885, Laura Gertrude. Huckins, he of Boston, MA, and she of Concord, MA. He was a state prison officer, aged thirty-one years, and she was at home, aged twenty-one years. Rev. J.W.F. Barnes, state prison chaplain, performed the ceremony. Huckins was born in Dover, NH, January 12, 1864, daughter of Robert L. and Sarah J. (Tucker) Huckins.

Mother Mary (Kelly) Lyman died of old age in Milton, December 31, 1885, aged ninety years, six months.

LOCALS. Mary, widow of the late Micah Lyman, Esq., of Milton, and mother of Hon. John D. Lyman, and ex-County Commissioner Lyman of South Milton, died at her home in Milton, Thursday, aged 90 years, 6 months. She was the oldest lady in the town (Farmington News, January 8, 1886).

Hannah (Plummer) Lyman died of consumption in Milton, November 16, 1886, aged fifty-nine years, eleven months, and sixteen days. W.F. Wallace, M.D., signed the death certificate.

George Lyman, acting in his capacity of justice-of-the-peace, officiated at a Milton marriage in October 1887.

MARRIAGES. In Milton, Oct. 8, by Geo. Lyman, Esq., Luther H. Wentworth of Milton and Miss Flora J. Nelson of East Hardwick, Vt. (Farmington News, October 14, 1887).

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. George Lyman to J.E. Brown, Milton (Farmington News, March 29, 1889).

MILTON. George Lyman has returned from his trip to Boston (Farmington News, November 25, 1892).

The Milton Selectmen of 1893-94 were Geo. Lyman, G.H. Plummer, and C.W. Lowd.

MILTON. At the town meeting Tuesday the following officers were chosen: Selectmen, George Lyman, George H. Plummer, Charles Lowd; moderator, Elbridge Fox; town clerk, Charles D. Jones; road commissioners, Fred Chamberlain, Charles Ellis, W.H.H. Pinkham (Farmington News, March 24, 1893).

Mrs. Martha E. (Ricker) Mathes, widow of Joseph Mathes (1815-1883), died of LaGrippe, i.e., influenza, followed by typhoid pneumonia, in Rochester, NH, March 23, 1893, aged sixty-seven years, two months, and fourteen days.

MILTON. The household furniture of the late Mrs. Martha [(Ricker)] Mathes was sold at auction Saturday. George Lyman was auctioneer (Farmington News, June 30, 1893).

The Milton Selectmen of 1895 were Geo. Lyman, G.H. Plummer, and J.U. Simes.

LOCALS. The retiring board of selectmen have remarkable records in serving that town. Geo. Lyman has served in that capacity for 29 years, John U. Sims for 18 years, and George Plummer for 12 years. They are republicans. There was a cat-a-cornered fight this year against the “old board” – the “Milton Tammany” its opponents called it – and the following board, also republicans, were elected: Samuel H. Wallingford, Joseph H. AveryFreeman H. Loud. Luther Wentworth was foremost in the battle, and though there were four candidates against him, it required three ballots to defeat him for second place on the ticket. Evidently there were lively times at Milton town meeting (Farmington News, March 18, 1896).

[Ed.: We may note the circumstance that all three selectmen – each a member of long tenure – were replaced by an entirely new board. The Milton town government of that time apparently felt no pressing need for staggered terms in order to ensure “continuity”].

George Lyman, a farmer, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Lizzie L. [(Lyman)] Fall, aged forty-one years (b. NH), his granddaughter, Ruth L. Fall, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his servant, Woodbury Johnson, a farm laborer, aged forty years (b. NH). George Lyman owned their farm, free-and-clear. Lizzie L. Fall had been married for fifteen years; she was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Harry S. Lyman, a prison officer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Laura G. [(Huckins)] Lyman. aged thirty-six years (b. NH). Harry S. Lyman rented their house at 16 School Street.

George Lyman died of chronic Bright’s Disease in Milton, June 19, 1900, aged seventy-two years, six months. James J. Buckley, M.D., signed the death certificate.

LOCALS. Ex-county commissioner George Lyman of Milton died last Tuesday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Paul [Mrs. Fall], in that town, after an illness of Bright’s disease. He was about seventy-three years old. Mr. Lyman was a member of the grange and had held many town offices. He is survived by one son and one daughter and by his brother, the Hon. J.D. Lyman of Exeter, formerly of Farmington. Funeral this Thursday (Farmington News, June 22, 1900).

Brother John D. Lyman died of cystitis in Exeter, NH, July 31, 1902, aged seventy-nine years. (See Milton in the News – 1902).

Hon. John D. Lyman Dead. EXETER, N.H., August 1. Hon. John D. Lyman, known throughout the country as a writer upon agricultural subjects, died here today, aged 79 years (North Loup Loyalist (North Loup, NE), August 8, 1902).

Daughter Mrs. Lizzie O. [(Lyman)] Fall gave a report, in her capacity of Ceres, to the Eastern New Hampshire Pomona Grange meeting in Rochester, NH, – the largest ever held there – in December 1902. (See also Milton Delegate Bard B. Plummer (1846-1919) for a description of Grange offices).

Ceres in her report said: “What is harvesting now compared to what it used to be? Think of reaping, cradling, raking, binding and mowing, all by physical exertion, of threshing with the flail and winnowing with the wind; and then think of the reapers and binders, the mowing and threshing machines, the plows and cultivators upon, which the farmer can ride with comfort. Every agricultural implement tends to elevate the farmer, whether he knows it or not, for it gives him more time for thought and pleasure. We have the best country in the world, and farmers ought to be prosperous and happy, for happiness is the object of life” (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), December 27, 1902).

GRANGE NEWS AND NOTES. Items of Interest to Hollis Patrons. Eastern, N. II., pomona grange held a forenoon session with Dover grange, April 22. At the afternoon public meeting a very large audience attentively listened for three and one-fourth hours to a program of great merit arranged and conducted by Lecturer Mrs. Lizzie L. Fall of Milton. Greetings by Master E.M. Felker; invocation by the Rev. W.R. Clark; address of welcome by W.D.F. Hayden, master of Dover grange; response F.P. Wentworth, Rochester. Supper was served to 310 (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), April 28, 1905).

Harry S. Lyman, a state prison officer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Medford, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty [twenty-five] years), Laura G. [(Huckins)] Lyman, aged forty-six years (b. NH). Harry S. Lyman rented their house at 528 Main Street.

George G. Fall, an expressman, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Lizzie L. [(Lyman)] Fall, aged fifty years (b. NH). George G. Fall owned their house, free-and-clear. Lizzie L. Fall was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

BUNKER HILL DISTRICT. Officers Herbert E. Chellis, Stephen R. Anderson and Fred Pfluger of the State Prison force returned to duty this morning at the prison after their vacation. Guardroom officer Harry S. Lyman, one of the “oldtimers” at the institution, is off duty on account of sickness since he left on his vacation the latter part of July (Boston Globe, August 31, 1916).

Harry S. Lyam [Lyman], aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Medford, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Laura G. [(Huckins)] Lyam, aged fifty-six years (b. NH). Harry S. Lyam rented their house at 528 Main Street.

George G. Fall, a Boston & Maine R.R. express messenger, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-seven years), Lizzie L. [(Lyman)] Fall, aged sixty years (b. NH). George G. Fall owned their farm on the Wakefield Road [White Mountain Highway] (at its intersection with Charles Street).

Walter N. Burke defaulted on a mortgage that involved several tracts of land, one of which tracts had some of George Lyman’s land as an abutter.

Also another tract of land situate in Milton, in said County of Strafford, and bounded as follows, to wit: beginning at the easterly corner of land formerly of Beard P. Varney, and running westerly by said Varney land to land of George Lyman; thence northerly by said Lyman land to the road leading, from the house of Hiram W. Ricker to South Milton; thence easterly by said road to land formerly owned by Isaac Wentworth; thence southerly by said Wentworth land and the road leading from South Milton by the house of the late Beard P. Varney to the bounds begun at, containing five acres, be the same more or less (Farmington News, February 13, 1925).

Son Harry S. Lyman died in Haverhill, MA, September 23, 1929, aged seventy-six years. (Laura J. (Huckins) Lyman’s sister, Bernice H. (Huckins) Kimball, lived in Haverhill, MA, with her husband, Amos M. Kimball, and their mother, Sarah J. (Tucker) Huckins).

DEATHS. LYMAN – In Haverhill, Mass., Sept. 23, Harry S. Lyman of 528 Main st., Medford, Mass. Funeral services will be held from the chapel at Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett, Mass., Wed., Sept. 25, at 3 o’clock. Relatives and friends invited to attend. Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery (Boston Globe, September 24, 1929).

Laura G. [(Huckins)] Lyman, a widow, aged sixty [sixty-six] years (b. NH), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. She rented her apartment at 391 Broadway, for $65 per month. She did not have a radio set.

George G. Fall, a retiree, aged seventy-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-seven years), Lizzie L. [(Lyman)] Fall, aged seventy years (b. NH). George G. Fall owned their house, which was valued at $2,000. They did not have a radio set.

Son-in-law George C. Fall died of hypostatic pneumonia in his residence on the State Road, i.e., White Mountain Highway, in Milton, May 27, 1933, aged seventy-six years, nine months, and seventeen days. He was a retired express manager. Thomas K. Chesley, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Daughter Mrs. Lizzie [(Lyman)] Fall was on the Milton School Board in 1934, with Robert Page and Mrs. Grace Willey.

NUTE RIDGE. Nute Ridge school closed Wednesday, June 20, with exercises held at Nute chapel, which consisted of the following program. Song, “Hail, Glad Vacation;” school recitations, “Goin’ Fishing,” William Wilson, “A Boy’s Complaint,” Fred Boorack, “The Foolish Little Maiden,” Doris Goodwin; recitation and song, “The Bunnies Have a Visitor,” Myrtle Durkee; recitation, “Two Questions,” Virginia Peters; play, “Susanna’s Illness,” Norma Nute, Elsie Bigelow, Dorothy Perry, Charles Perry; recitations, “Rover in Church,” Elizabeth Perry, “My Live Dolly,” Emily Casey, “In Strict Confidence,” Paul Boorack, “Words,” Florence Bigelow; song, “School Days,” Myrtle Durkee, Paul Boorack; recitations, “A Mix Up in Days,” Dorothy Perry, “A Boy’s Troubles,” Francis Perry, “Growing,” Myrtle Durkee; “The Critic’s Advice,” Dorothy Goodwin; play, “Vacation Time,” school. One of the highlights of the program was six years old Robert Casey swinging his baton and directing the group singing which was done in a manner that suggested a veteran orchestra director. Robert Page, Mrs. Lizzie Fall and Mrs. Grace Willey of the Milton school board were present and made appropriate remarks. A goodly number of visitors were present, which included the present school nurse, Miss Northway, and past school nurse, Mrs. Stanley Tanner. The following children had perfect attendance for the entire year: John William, Florence, Elsie and Gerald Bigelow, Norma Nute and Myrtle Durkee (Farmington News, June 29, 1934).

WEST MILTON. Robert Page and Mrs. Lizzie Fall of the Milton school board were on the “west side” during the past week attending to transportation details, inspecting school buildings, etc. They were accompanied by E.A. Hodgdon (popularly known as Hoddy) who gave ample evidence that his jovial disposition still remains with him (Farmington News, September 7, 1934).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Lizzie Fall, member of the Milton school board, was a visitor at the Nute Ridge school in connection with the taking of the school census. Norma Nute was the lone pupil that obtained 100 per cent in spelling for the month of September (Farmington News, September 28, 1934).

WEST MILTON. Ferne McGregor attended a convention of rural teachers held at Chocorua, Tuesday, and found herself booked for a talk on “Public activities in a rural school.” She was accompanied by Mrs. Lizzie Fall of the Milton school board and Miss Alice Dennison of Boston (Farmington News, November 2, 1934).

SANBORNVILLE. Miss Belle Fall, who closed her house some weeks ago and visited her niece in Wakefield, Mass., for a while, is now at the home of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Lizzie Fall, Milton (Farmington News, January 18, 1935).

WEST MILTON. The many friends of Mrs. Lizzie Fall are pleased to learn of the progress made in recovering from her recent illness (Farmington News, June 28, 1935).

Daughter-in-law Mrs. Laura G. Lyman appeared in the Haverhill, MA, directory of 1938, as residing at 70 Hamilton avenue. (Amos M. (Bernice H.) Kimball, com. trav., had their house at 70 Hamilton avenue).

Daughter-in-law Laura G. [(Huckins)] Lyman died in the Phillips House, [Massachusetts General Hospital,] in Boston, MA, August 25, 1939, aged seventy-five years.

Death Notices. LYMAN – At Phillips House, August 25, Laura Gertrude, widow of Harry S. Lyman, formerly of Somerville. Funeral services will be held at the John E. Kauler Funeral Home, 67 Broadway, Somerville, Sunday, at 2 o’clock (Boston Globe, August 26, 1939).

Lizzie L. [(Lyman)] Fall, aged eighty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her grandson, Lyman Plummer, a [Strafford] county deputy sheriff, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). They had both resided in the “same house” in 1935. Lizzie L. Fall owned their house, which was valued at $2,000.

Daughter Elizabeth C. “Lizzie” (Lyman) Fall died at the Jackson Nursing Home in Rochester, NH, of hypostatic pneumonia (following a fractured hip), June 4, 1943, aged eighty-four years, twenty-five years.

IN MEMORIAM. Lizzie L. Fall. Many Farmington people learned with regret of the death of Mrs. Lizzie L. Fall of South Milton which occurred last Friday at the Jackson Nursing home in Rochester, where she had been cared for during several months’ illness. Mrs. Fall was born in Milton, May 10, 1859, the daughter of George and Hannah (Plummer) Lyman. She was a 60-year member of Lewis Nute Grange, an honorary member of Eastern New Hampshire Pomona Grange, and a member of Fraternal Chapter O.E.S., of Farmington. Delegations from all of these organizations attended the funeral services, which were held at her home Monday afternoon. Surviving relatives include one daughter, Mrs. Bard Plummer of Milton, three granddaughters and two grandsons, Tech 2/c Bard Plummer, serving overseas, and Pfc Lyman Plummer, stationed in Boston (Farmington News, June 11, 1943).


References:

Briggs & Co. (1868). New Hampshire Business Directory. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=IOUCAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA169

Find a Grave. (2014, May 28). Lizzie C. Lyman Fall. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130508514/lizzie-c-fall

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). George Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115611984/george-lyman

Find a Grave. (2013, August 19). John Dearborn Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115724592/john-dearborn-lyman

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). John E. Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612387/john-e.-lyman

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Micah Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612236/micah-lyman

NH General Court. (1870). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=SDstAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA159

NH House of Representatives. (1870). Manual for the Use of the General Court of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=eg9LAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA9

NH State Grange. (1903). Proceedings of the New Hampshire State Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=cRQ1AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA3-PA119

Tower, F.L., & Co. (1876). New Hampshire Register, Farmer’s Almanac and Business Directory. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=p_NWAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA173

Tower, F.L., & Co. (1881). New Hampshire Register, Farmer’s Almanac and Business Directory. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=tfsWAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA196

Celestial Seasonings – November 2022

By Heather Durham | October 31, 2022

Autumn by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Thou comest, Autumn, heralded by the rain,
With banners, by great gales incessant fanned,
Brighter than brightest silks of Samarcand,
And stately oxen harnessed to thy wain!
Thou standest, like imperial Charlemagne,
Upon thy bridge of gold; thy royal hand
Outstretched with benedictions o’er the land,
Blessing the farms through all thy vast domain!
Thy shield is the red harvest moon, suspended
So long beneath the heaven’s o’er-hanging eaves;
Thy steps are by the farmer’s prayers attended;
Like flames upon an altar shine the sheaves;
And, following thee, in thy ovation splendid,
Thine almoner, the wind, scatters the golden leaves!

November 1. The Beaver Moon will be at first quarter. The Moon and Saturn will rise and travel close to each other.

November 3. NASA will be providing an Artemis update today. (You can listen here: www.nasa.gov/live).

November 4. The Moon and Jupiter will rise to the right together and appear to travel close to each other.

November 8. There will be a total eclipse of the Moon, but our chances of viewing it are not great for the Moon will only be at -2 degrees on the horizon at the time of the beginning of the eclipse. Today also brings the full Beaver Moon.

November 11. Both the Moon and Mars will travel close to each other and seem to rise towards the right.

November 12. Today, the Northern Taurid meteor shower brighten up our evening sky with best viewing occurring around midnight. While normally a minor shower, this year will most likely be different for this particular shower becomes more prolific every 7 years and 2022 is the year. Fireballs may be seen throughout the night sky.

November 16. Our Beaver Moon will be in its final quarter today.

November 17. The Leonid meteor shower from Leo will liven up tonight’s sky. After 6:00 EST, this show will be at its best.

November 21. α-Monocerotid meteor shower from Canis Minor may be visible from 11:30 pm until the break of dawn.

November 23. Jupiter will stop appearing as if it were traveling backwards – commonly referred to as Retrograde. From today onwards, it will appear to travel towards the east.

November 28. The November Orionid meteor shower will be active. The best display should be around 1:00 EST, The Moon and Saturn will rise to the right today.

November 29. The Moon and Saturn will rise together.

November 30. The Moon will be at first quarter. Today will be the best day to view Mars.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (2022, October 27). November 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/Wixh93aiTo8

Milton Mills Merchant Freeman H. Lowd (1853-1933)

By Muriel Bristol | October 30, 2022

Freeman H. Lowd was born in Acton, ME, September 5, 1853, son of Sylvester and Dorcas (Hanson) Lowd.

Sylvester Lowd, a farmer, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed an Acton (“Milton Mills P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Dorcas Lowd, keeping house, aged fifty years (b. ME), Lizzie Lowd, a schoolteacher, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Clinton Lowd, aged nineteen years (b. ME), Charles E. Lowd, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Freeman H. Lowd, aged sixteen years (b. ME), and Haven Lowd, aged thirteen years (b. ME). Sylvester Lowd had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $175.

Mother Dorcas (Hanson) Lowd died June 11, 1871.

The Milton School Superintendents of 1876 were M.V.B. Cook, J.N. Lowell, Freeman H. Lowd. (Rev. John N. Lowell (1846-1903) was a Congregational minister; and Freeman H. Lowd (1853-1933) was a clerk and bookkeeper).

Milton’s town school committee members of 1877 were identified in the NH Education Report of 1877, as being J.P. Bickford (1844-1910) of Milton, Freeman H. Lowd (1853-1933) of Milton Mills, and Ambrose H. Wentworth (1832-1913) of West Milton.

Milton’s town school committee members of 1878 were identified in the NH Education Report of 1878, as being J.P. Bickford (1844-1910) of Milton, Freeman H. Lowd (1853-1933) of Milton Mills, and Martin V.B. Cook (1839-1891) of Milton.

Edward S. Simes, a carpenter, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Mary E. Simes, a housekeeper, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), his children, Fred Simes, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Laura E. Simes, at school, aged six years (b. ME), and his boarders, Freeman H. Lowd, a bookkeeper, aged thirty-two [twenty-seven] years (b. ME), and Haven Lowd, works in felt mill, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of John U. Simes, a trader, aged forty-three years (b. NH), and Bray U. Simes, a retired merchant, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH).

F.H. Lowd appeared in the Milton business directories of 1880, 1881, 1882, 1884, and 1887, as a Milton Mills grocer.

Freeman H. Lowd married (1st) in Milton, October 22, 1883, Fannie Miller, both of Milton. He was a clerk, aged twenty-nine years, and she was aged nineteen years. Rev. G.S. Butler performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, July 25, 1859, daughter of Ira and Frances W. (Merrill) Miller.

Daughter Grace M. Lowd was born in Milton Mills, NH, July 24, 1883 [?].

Father Sylvester Lowd died in Acton, ME, December 6, 1884, aged sixty-five years.

Daughter Alice M. Lowd was born at 168 Boylston Street, in West Roxbury, Boston, MA, July 7, 1886, daughter of Freeman H. and Fannie L. Lowd (both born in Acton, ME). Her father was a broker.

Lowd, Grace & Alice - c1890
Grace and Alice Lowd – circa 1890

Freeman Loud [Lowd] was secretary of the Milton Mills Electric Company in 1893.

Street Railway Review. New Hampshire. Manchester, N.H. Milton Mills Electric elects Edward P. Parsons, president; John E. Townsend, vice president; C.W. Gross, M.D., treasurer; Freeman Loud, secretary (Windsor & Kenfield, 1893).

S.W. Wallingford, Joseph H. Avery, and F.H. Lowd were the Milton selectmen of 1896-97. 

LOCALS. The retiring board of selectmen have remarkable records in serving that town. Geo. Lyman has served in that capacity for 29 years, John U. Sims for 18 years, and George Plummer for 12 years. They are republicans. There was a cat-a-cornered fight this year against the “old board” – the “Milton Tammany” its opponents called it – and the following board, also republicans, were elected: Samuel H. Wallingford, Joseph H. Avery, Freeman H. Loud. Luther Wentworth was foremost in the battle, and though there were four candidates against him, it required three ballots to defeat him for second place on the ticket. Evidently there were lively times at Milton town meeting (Farmington News, March 18, 1896).

[Ed.: We may note the circumstance that all three selectmen – each a member of long tenure – were replaced by an entirely new board. The Milton town government of that time apparently felt no pressing need for staggered terms in order to ensure “continuity”].

Mother-in-law Frances W. (Merrill) Miller died January 30, 1897.

S.W. Wallingford, G.E. Nute, and F.H. Lowd were the Milton selectmen of 1898.

Frances (Miller) Lowd died of acute enteritis in the Maine General Hospital in Portland, ME, May 25, 1898. C.O. Hunt signed the death certificate.

F.H. Lowd, G.E. Nute, and E.L. Leighton were the Milton selectmen of 1899.

Milton sent Freeman H. Lowd to Concord, NH, as its NH State Representative for the 1899-00 biennium. Freeman H. Lowd, a Republican, who had received 264 votes, defeated Stephen M. Bragdon, a Democrat, who had received 82 votes (NH Secretary of State, 1899). Rep. Lowd, whose lodgings were said to be at 9 Elm street in Concord, NH, was chairman of the Insurance Committee (NH General Court, 1899).

F.H. Lowd, W.F. Mills, and W.T. Wallace were the Milton selectmen of 1900-01.

Ira Miller, a merchant (retired), aged seventy-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his son-in-law, Freeman H. Lowd, a storekeeper (b. ME), aged forty-six years, his grandchildren, Grace M. Lowd, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Alice M. Lowd, at school, aged thirteen years (b. MA), and his servant, Susie B. Clarks, a housekeeper, aged twenty years (b. NH). Ira Miller owned their farm, free-and-clear. Their household appeared between that of Harriet H. F0x, a homekeeper, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), and Grace Griffin, a homekeeper, aged twenty-one years (b. CT), and that of John Hall, a weaver, aged thirty-eight years (b. Canada).

Milton delegates for the several conventions are as follows, State convention, Elbridge W. Fox, Freeman H. Lowd. Congressional, Charles H. Looney, Joseph H. Avery. Councillor, Wm. F. Wallace, B.B. Plummer. Senatorial, F.L. Marsh, Charles D. Jones. County, Charles D. Fox, Charles A. Jones (Farmington News, September 7, 1900).

F.H. Lowd & Co. appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, and 1904, as Milton Mills merchants. Among his offerings were fancy goods, toys, etc.

The NH General Court authorized incorporation of the Milton Water Works Company, March 21, 1901, with initial board members Malcom A.H. Hart, Charles H. Looney, S. Lyman Hayes, Charles D. Jones, Fred B. RobertsHarry Avery, George E. Wentworth, Joseph H. AveryIra W. Jones, Arthur W. Dudley, Everett F. Fox, Henry F. Townsend, Freeman H. Lowd, William T. Wallace, Frank G. Horne, Charles A. Jones, and Nathaniel G. Pinkham. It had established itself July 19, 1899, with Harry L. Avery as its treasurer (NH Secretary of State, 1901).

Father-in-law Ira Miller died in Milton Mills, December 12, 1902, aged seventy-five years, eleven months, and thirty days.

Daughter Grace May Lowd married (1st) in Somersworth, NH, December 29, 1902, Van Wallace Marston, she of Milton Mills and he of Portsmouth, NH. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-six years, and she was at home aged nineteen years. Rev. William H. Hutchin performed the ceremony. Marston was born in Greenland, NH, April 2, 1875, son of Frank H. and Lizzie (Johnston) Marston.

F.H. Lowd appeared in the Milton business directory of 1905-06, as a Milton Mills grocer and general storekeeper, at 7 Main street.

Daughter Alice M. Lowd married (1st) in Sanbornville, [Wakefield,] NH, September 15, 1905, Leon H. Goodwin, she of Milton and he of Wakefield, NH. He was a clerk, aged twenty years, and she was aged nineteen years. Rev. R.H. Huse performed the ceremony. Goodwin was born in Union, Wakefield, NH, March 28, 1885, son of Hilton S. and Estella (Campbell) Goodwin.

MILTON MILLS, N.H. Freeman H. Lowd has gone to Maplewood on business (Sanford Tribune (Sanford, ME), September 21, 1906).

MILTON MILLS, N.H. The four-act dramatization of Will Carleton’s poem entitled “Over the Hill to the Poor House” was presented Monday evening by home talent under the direction of J.A. McCarthy. The hall was crowded with an appreciative audience and their expectations were fully realized. The cast included Freeman H. Lowd, Forrest L. Marsh, J.A. McCarty, Dr. Frank Weeks, Chellis Smith, Fred Sturgeon, Hannah Lowe, Mildred T. Marsh, Dorothy Hurley, and little Rita. The new scenery painted by Mr. McCarthy was used for the first time at the presentation of this play; he is a born artist and his work deserves much credit (Biddeford Journal (Biddeford, ME), August 2, 1907).

Freeman H. Lowd appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a lumberman, with his house at 5 Highland street, Milton Mills.

MILTON MILLS. Mrs. [Flora B.] Williams, the wife of the pastor of the F.B. church; Miss Ruth Williams, Miss Mamie Wentworth, Miss Roxie Lewis, Alfred Lewis, Blaine Grant, and Freeman Lowd, attended the C.E. convention at Springvale and brought back fine reports of the gathering (Sanford Tribune (Biddeford, ME), July 9, 1909).

MILTON MILLS. Freeman Lowd was in town Sunday and attended the morning service at the M.E. [Milton Mills Methodist Episcopal Church]. He sang his favorite song “While His eye is on the sparrow, I know He watches me,” which was rendered in a pleasing manner (Sanford Tribune (Biddeford, ME), January 28, 1910).

Freeman H. Lowd, own income (lumbering), aged sixty-five [fifty-seven] years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Freeman H. Lowd rented his house.

Wallace V. Marston, a shoe factory shoe cutter, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Lynn, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Grace M. [(Lowd)] Marston, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), his daughter, Rita F. Marston, aged six years (b. MA), his brother-in-law, Leon H. Goodwin, a grocery store salesman, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and his sister-in-law [and Goodwin’s wife of four years], Alice M. [(Lowd)] Goodwin, aged twenty-three years (b. MA). William V. Marston rented their house at 23 Sewall Street. Grace M. Lowd was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Freeman H. Lowd appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a lumberman, with his house at 29 Main street, Milton Mills.

Personal. Freeman Lowd and Deputy Sheriff Willis Reynolds, both of Milton Mills, were in town Tuesday (Farmington News, May 30, 1913).

SOUTH ACTON. Freeman H. Lowd was in Effingham Center Monday on business (Biddeford Journal-Tribune (Biddeford, ME), June 5, 1914).

Freeman H. Lowd married (2nd) in Milton, September 19, 1917, Mary A. “Mamie” Wentworth, both of Milton Mills. He was a lumber dealer, aged sixty-four years, and she was a school teacher, aged thirty-eight years. Rev. Edwin P. Moulton performed the ceremony (under a special permit). She was born in Milton, circa 1919, daughter of Hiram and Clara J. (Hart) Wentworth.

Freeman H. Lowd, a lumberman, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary W. [(Wentworth)] Lowd, aged forty years (b. NH). Freeman H. Lowd owned their house on Western Avenue, free-and-clear.

Charles G. Eastman, a Navy Yard clerk, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Portsmouth, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Agnes A. [(Marston)] Eastman, a newspaper store clerk, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), his children, Avery C. Eastman, a Navy Yard messenger, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Eugene W. Eastman, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Wallace V. Marston, a Navy Yard machinist, aged forty years (b. NH). Charles G. Eastman rented their house at 202 Cabot Street.

Leon H. Goodwin, a Navy Yard machinist, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Portsmouth, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice M. [(Lowd)] Goodwin, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), and his niece, Rita F. Marston, aged sixteen years (b. MA). Leon H. Goodwin rented their part of a two-family dwelling at 88 Ashe Street.

Marston, Rita F. - 1923
Rita F. Marston, Salem Normal School, 1923

Daughter Alice M. Goodwin of Wakefield, NH, divorced her husband, Leon H. Goodwin of Wakefield, NH, in Carroll County Superior Court, June 26, 1922. She cited abandonment and refusal to cohabit for three years.

Mrs. Grace M. Marston appeared in the Lynn, MA, directory of 1925, as having her house at 4 Sisson terrace. Her daughter, Rita F. Marston, appeared also, as a phone operator at 173 Oxford street, with her residence at 4 Sisson terrace.

Daughter Grace M. Marston of Wakefield, NH, divorced her husband, Wallace V. Marston of Portsmouth, NH, in Carroll County court, November 29, 1926. She cited abandonment and refusal to cohabit.

Mary A. “Mamie” (Wentworth) Lowd died in Milton, in 1927.

Granddaughter Rita F. Marston, appeared in the Lynn, MA, directory of 1927, as a phone operator at 173 Oxford street, with her residence at 6 Bunker Hill street in Charlestown, MA.

Freeman Loud, aged seventy-six years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his housekeeper, Nellie Myers, a private family practical nurse, aged fifty years (b. NH), and his lodger, Helen Myers, aged fourteen years (b. MA). Freeman Loud owned their house on Western Avenue (at its intersection with Willey Hill Road), which was valued at $2,000. They did not have a radio set.

Grace M. Marston, a telephone office clerk, aged thirty-three [forty-six] years (b. NH), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her sister [i.e., her daughter], Rita F. Marston, a telephone operator, aged twenty-five years (b. MA). Grace M. Marston rented their apartment at 10 Union Street, for $35 per month. They had a radio set.

(From this point, Grace M. (Lowd) Marston tended to understate her age, often by quite a lot. She had also a habit of muddling her daughter’s relationship with her. In this instance, the 1930 Census, her daughter was reported as being her sister. The daughter would even be confused finally as being the wife, rather than step-daughter, of Grace’s second husband).

Grace M. (Lowd) Marston married (2nd) in Manhattan, New York, NY, April 26, 1930, William A. Cornetta. He was born in Boston, MA, September 20, 1896.

William A. (Grace M.) Cornetta appeared in the Somerville, MA, directory of 1933, as a manager, with his house at 514 Broadway (and telephone number of 4871W). Her daughter, Rita F. Marstom [Marston], appeared also, as telephone operator, resident at 514 Broadway.

Freeman H. Lowd died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Milton, May 1, 1933, aged seventy-nine years, seven months, and twenty-six days. He was a retired merchant, and lifelong resident of Milton Mills. Frank S. Weeks, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Daughter Alice M. (Lowd) Goodwin married (2nd), in 1940, William Morton Ellis. (His first wife, Annie (O’Donnell) Ellis, had died in Pasadena, CA, April 20, 1934). Ellis was born in Milton, December 6, 1877, son of Charles E. and Lucretia R. (Marsh) Ellis.

William A. Cornetta, a foreman (manufacturing) aged forty-three years (b. MA), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace C. [((Lowd) Marston)] Cornetta, aged forty-three [fifty-six] years (b. MA), and his daughter-in-law [i.e., his step-daughter], Rita F. Master [Marston], a telephone operator, aged thirty-six years (b. MA). William A. Cornetta rented their apartment at 512 Broadway (at its intersection with Hinckley Street), for $30 per month. They had all resided in the “same house” in 1935.

William M. Ellis, an inside salesman (for the S. California Gas Co.), aged sixty-three years (b. NH), headed a Glendale, CA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice M. [((Lowd) Goodwin)] Ellis, aged fifty-two years (b. MA). William M. Ellis rented their house at 117 N. Chevy Chase Drive, for $35 per month. He had resided in Pasadena, CA, in 1935, and she had resided in Boston, MA, in 1935.

Son-in-law William M. Ellis died in Glendale, CA, January 6, 1942.

Obituaries. ELLIS – William M. Ellis, husband of Mrs. Alice Ellis of 117 North Chevy Chase Drive, Glendale, passed away at his home, Jan. 6, 1942. He was a member of Pasadena Lodge of Elks, No. 672, and with the Southern California Gas Company for the past 20 years. Besides his wife, he is survived by two sons, John and William Ellis of Pasadena. Funeral services will be held Friday at 2 p.m., at Wendell P. Cabot & Sons Chapel, 27 Chestnut Street, conducted by the Pasadena Elks Lodge and Rev. William Hodson, pastor of First Methodist Church, Glendale. Private entombment, Pasadena Mausoleum (Metropolitan Pasadena Star-News (Pasadena, CA), January 8, 1942).

William A. Cornetta, a superintendent (restaurant syrup manufacturing company), aged fifty-three years (b. MA), headed an Arlington, MA, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace M. [((Lowd) Marston)] Cornetta, aged fifty-three [sixty-six] years (b. NH), his sister-in-law [i.e., his step-daughter], Rita F. Marston, aged forty-six years (b. MA), and his mother, Louisa Cornetta, aged seventy-three years (b. MA). They resided at 21 Piedmont Street.

Daughter Grace M. ((Lowd) Marston) Cornetta died in Arlington, MA, August 15, 1958.

MORNING DEATH NOTICES. CORNETTA – In Arlington, August 15, Grace M. Cornetta, wife of William A. Cornetta, of 21 Piedmont st. Services at the Saville Temple Chapel, 418 Mass. av., Arlington, Tuesday, August 19, at 10 a.m. Visiting hours Sunday and Monday (Boston Globe, August 18, 1958).

Daughter Alice M. ((Lowd) Goodwin) Ellis died March 19, 1971.

Son-in-law William A. Cornetta died in Revere, MA, March 20, 1977. (There is no documentary evidence to support the notion that his step-daughter, Rita F. Marston, had become his wife).

DEATHS. CORNETTA – Formerly of Arlington, recently of Revere, March 20, 1977, William A., husband [i.e., step-father,] of Rita F. (Marston). Service at Saville Funeral Home, 418 Mass. ave., ARLINGTON, Tuesday, March 22 at 11 a.m. Calling hours Monday 7-9 p.m. (Boston Globe, March 21, 1977).

Granddaughter Rita F. Marston died in Revere, MA, September 13, 1978. (There is no documentary evidence to support the notion that she had become the wife of her step-father, William A. Cornetta).

DEATH NOTICES. CORNETTA – Of Revere. September 13, Rita Frances (Marston), wife [i.e., step-daughter,] of the late William A. Cornetta. Funeral service at the Smith Funeral Chapel, 482 Main St., STONEHAM, on Friday, September 15 at 3 p.m. Friends may call on Thursday evening from 7-9 p.m. Those desiring may give in her memory to the American Cancer Society (Boston Globe, September 14, 1978).


References:

Carleton, Will. (1872). Over the Hill to the Poor House. Retrieved from www.bartleby.com/360/3/107.html

Find a Grave. (2013, August 13). Grace M. Lowd Cornetta. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115375737/grace-m-cornetta

Find a Grave. (2013, August 13). Alice M. Lowd Ellis. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115381301/alice-m-ellis

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Freeman H. Lowd. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115440298/freeman-h-lowd

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Sylvester Lowd. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115441363/sylvester-lowd

Find a Grave. (2020, September 29). Wallace Van Marston. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/216170801/wallace-van-marston

Library of Congress. (1908). Over the Hills to the Poor House. Retrieved from www.loc.gov/item/2018600178/

NH General Court. (1899). Manual for the Use of the General Court of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vu4RAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA37

NH Secretary of State. (1899). Manual for the General Court. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-Xo0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA250

Wikipedia. (2022, October 14). Tammany Hall. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tammany_Hall

Youtube. (2021, May 6). His Eye Is on the Sparrow. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ei84uOUI2SY

Milton Lumberman John F. Hart, 2nd (1855-1916)

By Muriel Bristol | October 30, 2022

John Fox Hart was born in Milton, May 1, 1855, son of Edward and Sally (Fox) Hart. (John F. Hart,”2nd” (1855-1916) should not be confused with Milton merchant John Francis Hart (1829-1896)).

Brother George Edward Hart was born in Milton, November 1, 1859.

Edward Hart a farmer, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sally Hart, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), and his children, Hattie H. Hart, works in woolen mill, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), John F. Hart 2d, a school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and George E. Hart, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. NH). John F. Hart 2d had attended school within the year. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Samuel G. Chamberlain, a farmer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and Daniel Philbrick, a farmer, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH).

J.F. and G.E. Hart appeared in the Milton directories of 1880, 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, as Milton Mills carriage merchants.

UNION. Mr. John Hart of Milton Mills has purchased an interest in the saw mill here, and, it is reported, contemplates going into the excelsior business (Farmington News, December 17, 1880).

UNION. The mills are running on full time. J.F. Hart & Co. have averaged to cut out over fifteen tons of excelsior a week since last February, which has not been enough to fill the orders received (Farmington News, June 27, 1884).

UNION. Seven thousand one hundred and ten pounds of excelsior were cut and put up at the mill of J.F. Hart & Co. on the 13th, in 13 hours, with four men and eight machines. The Messrs. Hart are running their mill day and night (Farmington News, January 23, 1885).

Father Edward F. Hart died in Lebanon, May 12, 1885.

John G. Hart married in Kankakee, IL, October 14, 1885, Susan Gilliatt. Both were aged thirty-one years. She was born in Cornwallis, Nova Scotia, Canada, December 1, 1854, daughter of Captain William and Frances S. “Fannie” (Starr) Gilliatt.

Daughter Maude Hart was born January 1, 1887.

Sister Harriet A. Hart married in Milton, August 20, 1887, Asa A. Fox, both of Milton. He was a widowed undertaker, aged forty-nine years, and she was a lady, aged thirty-five years. Rev. C.M. Anderson performed the ceremony. Fox was born in Milton, February 3, 1837, son of Asa and Harriet W. (Wood) Fox.

Brother George E. Hart married (1st) in Milton, September 1, 1887, Ita Belle Carter, he of Wakefield, NH, and she of Milton. He was a manufacturer, aged twenty-seven years, and she was a music teacher, aged twenty-one years. Rev. G.G. Butler performed the ceremony. She was born in Lyman, ME, circa 1865, daughter of Alba B. Carter.

Among the Woodworkers. On the tide flats at Tacoma, W.T. [Washington Territory], will be built at once a large saw-mill, which will run two circulars, one band-saw, and two 48-inch gangs, and will have a capacity greater than any mill on the Sound. The mill will be built by John F. Hart, E.N. Ouimette, S.M. Nolan, John E. Burns, and A.J. Littlejohn, and will be directly connected with the timber lands lying south of Tacoma by railroad – Pacific Lumberman (Wood Worker, May 1889). 

Son John Edward Hart was born in Tacoma, WA, September 9, 1889.

UNION. George E. Hart of Tacoma, Washington, arrived here Tuesday on his way to Milton Mills to see his wife, who has been very sick, but is now improving (Farmington News, February 7, 1890).

REAL ESTATE MARKET. Sales Recorded in the Auditor’s Office Yesterday Amounted to $50160. John F. Hart et ux to the Commencement Bay Land and Improvement company, lots 7 and 8, block 27, lots 3 and 4, block 54, Commencement Bay addition – $4000 (Tacoma Daily Ledger, April 11, 1890).

REAL ESTATE MARKET. Sales Reported Yesterday by the Fidelity Trust Company Amounted to $78462. George W. Byrd et ux to John F. Hart, lots and blocks in Southeast Tacoma – $16,000 (Tacoma Daily Ledger, May 2, 1890).

Mr. John F. Hart emphatically denies that he has entered into any arrangement with the Northern Pacific for a transfer of his right-of-way through the gulch extending from the head of the bay southward (News Tribune (Tacoma, WA), July 9, 1890).

Granite State Land Company. Articles of incorporation were filed today of the Granite State Land Company, capital $250,000, divided into 2500 shares of a par value of $100 each. John F. Hart, George P. Hart and L.W. Walker are the incorporators and Tacoma is named as the place of business (News Tribune (Tacoma, WA), July 12, 1890).

The Tacoma Eastern Railroad Company was recently incorporated by John F. Hart, George E. Hart and L.W. Walker with a capital stock of $250,000, divided into 2,500 shares of $100 each. The trustees are J.F. Hart, Geo. E. Hart, L.W. Walker, Charles Hotchkiss, and A.S. Kerry, residents of Washington, and R.H. Pike, of New Hampshire. It is said the company will build and operate a railroad over the franchise owned by J.F. Hart from the head of Commencement bay southward. This road has been partially graded and the ties for about ten miles are on hand (Western Shore, July 12, 1890).

The Tacoma Eastern Railroad enterprise had been a tempting lure to the voters [of 1890], and while they accused its promoters of deception the charge was not altogether fair. The road had been run up the gulch by John Hart, who owned a sawmill out Bismarck way. At first it was a mere tram, with wooden rails, but it answered Hart’s purpose of getting lumber to tidewater. There became interested with him Isaac W. Anderson, of the Land Company, Edmund Rice and the noted engineer, Virgil W. Bogue. They formulated elaborate plans and attempted to get money to carry them out, but the financial storm of 1893 prevented. Wright could not help them. He was no more able than others to lay hands on cash in that period. And so that upon which the community had set such a store of hope went glimmering and it was not until 1900, when John Bagley and the Ladd interests procured the line, that the earnest development of it began (Hunt, 1916).

UNION. John F. Hart of Tacoma, Washington, is spending a few weeks in this section visiting his sister and attending to business matters (Farmington News, November 14, 1890).

UNION. R.H. Pike, Esq., mine host of the Union House, was the recipient of a valuable gold watch as a New Year’s present from John F. Hart of Tacoma, Wash. Mr. Hart was formerly engaged in the lumber and excelsior business with Mr. Pike (Farmington News, January 16, 1891).

Daughter Elsie Mary Hart was born in Tacoma, WA, July 21, 1891.

John F. Hart appeared in the Tacoma, WA, directory of 1892, as secretary and manager of the Tacoma Eastern Railroad (tel. 607), with his residence at 3109 Pacific Avenue (tel. 369). The Tacoma Eastern railroad appeared as being at 611 Fidelity Building, with Edmund Rice as its president, John F. Hart as its secretary, and W.G. Gaston as its treasurer.

J.H. Hart, real estate, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Tacoma, WA, household at the time of the Washington State Census of 1892. His household included Susan G. Hart, wife, aged thirty-six years (b. Nova Scotia), Maude Hart, at home, aged five years (b. WA), Jno E. Hart, at home, aged three years (b. WA), and Elsie Hart, at home, aged one year (b. WA).

G.E. Hart, a lumberman, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), headed a Tacoma, WA, household at the time of the Washington State Census of 1892. His household included Ita B. Hart, aged twenty-five years (b. NH).

Companies Incorporated. Port Gardner, Lake Stevens & Eastern. – Incorporated in Washington to build a railway in Snohomish county Capital stock, $250,000. Incorporators John F. Hart and J.M. Davis of Tacoma. Principal office, Everett, Wash. (Railway Age & Northwestern, July 8, 1892).

Projects and Surveys. Port Gardner, Lake Stevens & Eastern – Projected. Everett to Lake Stevens, 5 miles. John F. Hart, Everett (Engineering News, December 8, 1892).

Tacoma Eastern. Completed from the head of Commencement Bay south, 6 miles. Will be operated as a lumber road for the present. Will be extended southwest of Tacoma to the Nisqually River. John F. Hart, Gen. Man., Tacoma Wash (Poor’s Railroad Manual, 1893).

The financial Panic of 1893 took hold in late February 1893. Brother George E. Hart was accused of burning his Tacoma sawmill for the insurance on November 30, 1893.

A TACOMA SENSATION. Suit to Recover Insurance Leads to Startling Allegations. DEFENSE CHARGES ARSON. Two Prominent Millmen Are Involved in the Case. TACOMA, May 8. – [Special.] – A big sensation promises to be the outcome of a suit instituted today by Snell & Johnson on behalf of George E. Hart, to recover $10,000 for insurance on the Hart sawmill, which was burned a few months ago. The insurance companies have refused to pay the insurance, and when Crowley & Sullivan, representing them, file their answer to Hart, the charge that Hart fired the mill, Mr. Sullivan says, will be one of the citations. But the charge of arson, if made as Mr. Sullivan says it will be, is only the beginning of the sensations which seem bound to develop. Shortly after the mill burned. Mr. Hart was all ready to leave for San Francisco on business of importance, when he was actually arrested and detained for some time, at the point of a revolver, it is said. Those causing the arrest and detention were promoted by the belief that Mr. Hart was about to flee and become an absconder. A member of the police force and a detective acting together caused the arrest, and for their pains they have been threatened with suit charging them with blackmail. They told Mr. Hart of their suspicions. and an order for $3,500 from him on the $10,000 insurance due the mill property was taken before he was released and allowed to proceed to San Francisco. Mr. Hart subsequently asserted that this order was secured forcibly from him, and his friends have assumed that it was nothing short of robbery to have compelled him to sign the order for the $3,500. Of course those securing the order held the same, it is claimed, as a sort of security for Hart’s person. Besides, it is held that Mr. Hart gave the order, or at least wanted to give it, in order to have the officers hush the matter up. At any rate, the order was taken, but the men who took it have not been made defendants in a blackmailing suit, as was promised. This action, however, is one of the several sensational things which are looked lor. The mill was burned early in the evening, almost in the afternoon. If it was set on fire the firebug did not choose a desirable hour for his work. Again, Mr. Hart was in this city at the time, and had to be taken out to the burning mill in the mill locomotive. It is said that only a few months before the mill burned he increased his insurance from $6,000 to $10,000. That is true, but at the time the increase made, a partner, Herman Jewell, was taken into the business, and it is said that he insisted on having the mill insured to its full value before he would become interested and would put $4,000 in the business. Witnesses, if they have not left the country, will be called to testify that overtures had been made to fire the property; also that a man was seen setting fire to the property; that the night watchman quit because he feared that when the property was fired he would be charged with being a firebug; that there are in existence stenographic notes describing an interview between Mr. Hart and another, in which the former made a proposition to burn the mill, etc. Mr. Hart is at Everett, where he has considerable property interests. The companies sued and the amounts sued for are: Hamburg-Bremen, $1,000; Providence, of Washington, $3,000; Niagara, $1,ooo; Phoenix (Brooklyn) $1,500; Connecticut, $1,500; New Hampshire, $1,000; American, $1,000, The Pacific insurance union sent a man here to investigate, and subsequently the attorneys were notified that it would not pay insurance. That decision was reached some two months ago. George E. Hart is a brother of John F. Hart, projector of the Tacoma Eastern railroad, which is known as the Hart road. Both are among the best known business men in the city. It is claimed that the mill foreman, one Carey, of Seattle, was to have burned the mill on Thanksgiving evening for S300, but that the fire was put out by a Mrs. Hurlburt and others witnessing the same. The mill was burned on November 30. On one occasion, it is alleged, cans of coal oil had been placed convenient for use; that the key to the oil safe had been given to the mill foreman by one of the interested parties, and it is assumed that if there had been any incendiary suspicions then the fact that the key was found on the foreman would have lodged the crime on him. Jewell became interested in the mill October 17, and at the same time assumed a third interest in the $1,000 mortgage held by the Pacific National bank on the mill property. This mortgage was to be covered to its face value by $10,000 insurance, and it is said that when the insurance was refused, the bank, in order to protect itself, would have had to take up the case even if Mr. Hart did not. In order to secure release during the night he was detained, it is said Mr. Hart made various overtures to his captors to gives notes for $1,000, and at another time for $2,ooo in addition to the order on insurance for $3,500 in the first instance and $2,000 in the latter instance, and also to secure the notes with stock in the Summer Excelsior Company. The arrest occurred on the night of January 11, when he was about to leave by the Portland train, although it is claimed he had agreed not to leave the city. In an affidavit made by one of the principal witnesses Hart is put in the light of having been anxious to arrange for burning the property, and the man making this affidavit brings Kerry into the case. Kerry now has charge of Hart’s mill at Seattle. Snell & Johnson say it will be shown that an attempt was made [to] blackmail Hart; that he was detained and arrested while en route to San Francisco to arrange for the sale of the Tacoma Eastern railroad to the Southern Pacific. There is evidence that the officer, who is not now a member of the police force, who arrested Hart, did not insist on throwing him into the city jail, but allowed him to remain all night in the office of the McNaughton detective service. At first both McNaughton and the officer opposed this, but after talking with Hart they were satisfied he would not attempt to escape, and took his order for the stock and notes on the theory, it is claimed, that such evidence would make a better and stronger case against Hart. It is claimed they were satisfied that the order on the insurance was no good as the Pacific Insurance Union, it was believed, would not pay the loss. Thomas McCarthy, special representative of the Pacific Insurance Union, investigated the case and with the result that the insurance union refused to settle. Hart never made proof of loss, but Jewell, his partner, did (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 1893).

Handed in a Sealed Verdict. Tacoma (Wash.), Nov. 20. – The jury in the George E. Hart millionaire suit handed in a sealed verdict this morning. The same will be opened to-morrow. It is stated that a verdict will be found for Mr. Hart and against several fire insurance companies, members of the Pacific Insurance Union, which refused to pay $10,000 insurance on the burned property. It was alleged that Hart either burned or caused the mill to be burned (Sacramento Record-Union, November 27, 1893).

The Tacoma Eastern Railroad’s planned expansion was struck down by the financial Panic of 1893. The Commercial Bank of Tacoma called in a promissory note given by John F. Hart of Tacoma, WA, in 1894 (Kreider, 1895). As mentioned above, the Tacoma Eastern Railroad would not proceed until taken over by other interests in 1900.

Nephew Victor K. Hart was born in Fall River, MA, January 9, 1897.

Mother Sally (Fox) Hart died in Milton, May 22, 1897.

John F. Hart, a lumberman, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Tacoma, WA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Susie J.G. Hart, aged forty-five years (b. Canada), and his children, Maud S. Hart, in school, aged thirteen years (b. WA), John E. Hart, in school, aged ten years (b. WA), and Elsie M. Hart, in school, aged eight years (b. WA). John F. Hart rented their house at 3024 Pacific Avenue. Susie J.G. Hart was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. She had arrived in the United States in 1875.

John F. Hart appeared in the Tacoma, WA, directory of 1901, as a lumberman, resident at 3024 Pacific Avenue.

Brother George E. Hart married (2nd), circa 1903, May E. Guertin. She was born in Liberty City, TX, May 1, 1876, daughter of Louis G. and Cecile C. (Key) Guertin. (She had married (1st) in New Bedford, MA, April 22, 1896, Arthur T. Jalbert, she of New Bedord, MA, and he of Fall River, MA).

Niece Sally J. “Juanita” Hart was born in Los Angeles, CA, March 20, 1904.

Brother George E. Hart and his wife bet and lost $15,000 on a whist game in August 1908.

FRUIT CROP STAKED ON A WHIST GAME. Los Angeles Society Woman, Her Husband, and Two Nevada Mining Men Dispose of Fifteen Thousand Dollars, Former Losing. THE fiercest game of cards since the wild poker days of forty-nine was played Tuesday night in a summer cottage at Corona Del Mar, near Balboa Beach. It was whist. The stake was a fruit crop worth $15,000. The players were Mrs. George E. Hart, a beautiful Los Angeles society woman; her husband, a prominent broker, and two Nevada mining men named Nelson.
LA080807 - Hart Card GameThe rough-and-ready cow-puncher luck of the Nevada men won the great prize in spite of the brilliant and bewildering game played by the Harts. The Harts had leads and return leads, and American and International whist signals at their fingers’ ends, but the Nevada men had the trumps. It was an exciting, dramatic contest. Although women are always said to be bad losers, Mrs. Hart saw her $15,000 go without a wince. As the winners grabbed the last trick, she gave a little laugh, and said lightly, “Now you are all my guests for a little supper.” And it was a fine supper, too.
OUTCOME OF LAND TRADE. The game was the outcome of a real estate trade. The miners traded a California town for a ranch owned by the Harts. The Harts had ninety-two acres in Simi Valley, thirty-seven miles north of Los Angeles, planted to 12-year-old prunes, peaches, apples, olives and other fruit. It is valued at about $60,000. The Nelsons – Hugh W. and George A. – owned the townsite of Winchester, Riverside county, consisting of 264 town lots, 105 acres of alfalfa land, and a two-story brick building. They agreed to swap, and the Nelsons agreed to assume a certain mortgage. But on one point they stuck: they both Insisted on having this year’s crop of fruit from the ranch. Hart and the two Nelsons met many times in the office of Arthur G. Munn, No. 202 Mason building. They talked trade and argued about the fruit crop, and between whiles they gossiped. The talk frequently turned to whist, all being enthusiasts. Finally, Mr. Munn, the agent, said to Mr. Hart, “Why don’t you play a game of whist with the Nelsons to settle this controversy about the fruit crop?” Hart’s eyes brightened, and he said he would talk it over with his wife. He came back next day and said his wife was willing. The Nelsons decided very briefly. Munn mentioned it to them and one of them sort of glanced out of the corner of his eyes at his brother and said, “It’s a go.”
MEET FAIR PLAYER. It was arranged that the game should be played Tuesday night at the Hotel Corona Del Mer, owned by the Harts, near Newport Beach. The Nevada man did not know exactly whom they were to play against, as Hart was to be allowed to choose his partner. Probably with some trepidation they boarded the trolley car in Los Angeles in the afternoon, arriving about sundown. They were met at the beach by an electric launch, one of whose passengers was a most attractive woman – Mrs. Hart – who, they learned for the first time, was to be her husband’s partner in the big game. They were taken at first to the hotel, but the news of the great game had crept out in some way and the summer people were in a great state of excitement. Consequently, they decided to go to a vacant summer cottage near the hotel. The public was shut out, but the summer people clustered around the front walks and tried to peek, and waylaid the bell hop every time he came to the cottage with ice water.
CUT TO FIFTY POINTS. Promptly at 7 o’clock they sat down, and the game began. “For 1oo points?” asked one of the Nelsons, as Hart brought out the new glistening deck. “Oh, no; that’s too long,” said Hart, putting down the deck in consternation. “I couldn’t stand it playing that long.” Mr. Hart’s health is not of the best. At his objection, the Nelsons good naturedly agreed that the game should be half as long – fifty points. “Our only idea,” they said, “was to make it long enough so neither side could win on a streak of luck.” As Mrs. Hart’s slender fingers reached out to cut the deck. It is probable that each of the four saw, in fancy, a great pile of gold coins the equivalent of $15,000 heaped on that table between them. They each picked up a little section of the deck and turned the bottom card upward. Mrs. Hart had won the deal. She shuffled the deck lightly and sent little flurrying card showers across the polished table as she rapidly dealt the four hands. Hearts were trumps.
PICTURESQUE CONTRASTS. The contrasts of the whist game were picturesque. The Nelsons settled deep down in their chairs and scowled blackly at their cards. Out in Nevada they don’t worry much about what partners are doing. They hang to the trumps to the last and bring them in with a thundering volley. Leads and returns and signals are unexplored mysteries. They played with their heads down never looking up. Mrs. Hart and her husband played with intricate science. Mrs. Hart’s is a game of great brilliancy. Every signal known to European or American whist experts was as plain as a child’s alphabet to the opponents of the Nevada whist players. When Mrs. Hart dropped a deuce to the table, the Nelsons only looked at it with mild indifference and moodily returned to an abstracted consideration of their hands; but Mrs. Hart’s partner, schooled in the Improved American Leads, understood as plainly as though printed on a hand bill that his wife was fortified with four trumps. When a queen came down from Mrs. Hart’s hand, the Nelsons glittered with premature triumph. Out in Nevada, you don’t lead an honor unless it’s the ace. If a Nevada man leads a queen, you suspect him of selling you out. But to Mrs. Hart’s husband it was the whist experts’ signal that the lady held four honor cards.
LUCK VS. SCIENCE. For about thirty-five points, that whist game was like a tiger cat fighting a bear. This fancy whist strategy was too much for Nevada. The Nelsons plugged doggedly along – continually losing. Every time the bell boy came out with an empty ice water pitcher, the summer people fell upon him and learned the same thing. “Yas ‘um,” said the bell hop, excitedly. “Yas ‘um, SHE’S in the lead. Them desert gents is sittin’ on the edge of the chairs and HER score card looks as long as a telephone line.” Every time his report to the besieging summer people was the same. They proudly fancied that She had the sage-brush whist-players blown clear off the roof. But about midnight the bellhop left the ice-water pitcher behind in his excitement “Them Goldfield men is hittin’ an awful pace,” he said, “One of em – that young-looking feller – has a bunch of trumps you couldn’t stuff into a trunk, and SHE haint got nuthin’ but dueces ‘n three spots.”
TENSE SITUATION. No more rings came for ice water, but the situation got so tense that one of the summer girls snatched up a pitcher of ice water; thrust It into the bellhop’s hands, and fairly shoved him into the house again. He came out with eyes starting from his head. “Them fellers ‘ll pass her sure in the stretch; they ain’t got nuthin’ but trumps; they are gaining a lap every minute.” The game had now become tense. They were almost tied at forty points. All four players were outwardly cool and self-contained; between hands, they exchanged a few words of light talk as indifferently toned as though they were playing for toothpicks.
MAKING IT BLACKER. When they were almost neck and neck, Mrs. Hart, who was keeping score, appeared to make an extra mark opposite the Nelsons’ names. “Excuse me, Mrs. Hart” said one of the Nevada men gallantly; “but I think you have given us one point too many.” “Oh, no,” said Mrs. Hart smiling; “I was only making one of your score points blacker.” From the thirty-fifth point at which time the Harts were way ahead, luck turned blindly for the Nevada men. It seemed though they couldn’t hold anything but trumps. Mrs. Hart and her husband struggled splendidly; everything known to whist science was thrown out to block the blind, headlong luck of the desert men. At forty points, they were even. Then the real struggle began. The Nelsons shot ahead; then the Harts slowly fought their score up. A few minutes before 1 o’clock in the morning, an avalanche of trumps seemed to fan into the Nelsons’ hands. They made a brilliant finish, – scoring 61 to the Harts 47. The big game was over. They all sat back and exchanged glances. How would the woman “take” the loss of $15,000 by four points? Without a sigh or an unpleasant word, Mrs. Hart swept the cards from the table; brushed off her dress and slightly yawned. “Aren’t you tired? Now you must all be my guests at a little supper?” she said lightly. “Honest truth,” said one of the Nelsons, yesterday, “we were ashamed to beat, but the cards all seemed to come our way.”(Los Angeles Times, August 7, 1908).

Susie G. Hart, aged fifty-five years (b. Canada), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included her children, Maude S. Hart, an electric stenographer, aged twenty-three years (b. WA), John E. Hart, a claims bureau stenographer, aged twenty years (b. WA), and Elsie M. Hart, a photograph studio retoucher, aged eighteen years (b. WA). They resided at Suite C of “The Peabody” on Ashmont Street. Susie G. Hart was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

George E. Hart, a real estate investor, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Los Angeles, CA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), May E. Hart, aged thirty-six years (b. Canada), his children, Victor Hart, aged thirteen years (b. MA), and Juanita Hart, aged five years (b. CA), and his servant, Marie Carlson, a private family servant, aged twenty-five years (b. Sweden). George E. Hart owned their house t 619 West Lake Avenue, free-and-clear. May R. Hart was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Niece Sally J. “Juanita” Hart died in Los Angeles, CA, March 21, 1912.

VITAL RECORD. DEATHS. HART. At Alhambra, March 21, 1912, S. Juanita, daughter of George E. and May E. Hart, aged 7 years, 9 months. Funeral private, at the residence, No. 201 Bouth Bonnie Brae, Saturday at 2 o’clock (LOs Angeles Times, March 23, 1912).

John F. Hart died in 1916.

Sister Harriet A. (Hart) Fox died in Wells, ME, December 13, 1918.

Susan G. Hart, a widow, aged sixty-five years (b. Canada), headed a Los Angeles, CA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Maude S. Hart, an oil company secretary, aged thirty-two years (b. WA), John E. Hart, an office auditor, aged thirty years (b. WA), and Elsie M. Hart, aged twenty-seven years (b. WA). Susie G. Hart owned their house at 2634 17th Street, with a mortgage. She had arrived in the United States in 1875 and had been naturalized in 1885.

Daughter Elsie M. Hart died of illuminating gas asphyxiation in Los Angeles, CA, February 17, 1920, aged twenty-eight years.

YOUNG WOMAN, ILL, INHALES GAS, DIES. FOUND LOCKED IN BATHROOM WITH REVOLVER BY HER SIDE. Apparently despondent over ill health, Miss Elsa M. Hart, 24 years old, ended her life by inhaling illuminating gas in the bathroom of her home at 2634 West Seventeenth street, last night, according to the report of detectives from University Police Station. The body was taken to the Ivy Overholtzer undertaking parlors. Miss Hart had been ill with influenza for some time, but appeared in good spirits yesterday afternoon, according to her mother. Mrs. Hart left her late in the afternoon to go the grocery store and upon her return, about an hour later, found all doors to the house locked. Thinking that her daughter had gone out for a few minutes, Mrs. Hart waited on the doorstep for her return, according to the police report. At 6 p.m. her son, John Hart, arrived home, and when told by his mother that all the doors were locked, he broke open the bathroom window and climbed through. He found his sister lying in the bathtub, with an automatic revolver in the bathtub beside her and the room full of illuminating gas from a tube attached to the gas heater. The revolver had not been discharged. Dr. A W. Hitt was summoned from his office in the Story Building. He used a lung-motor but the victim died within a few minutes. She is survived by her mother, her brother and a sister (Los Angeles Times, February 18, 1920).

Brother George E. Hart died in Los Angeles, CA, June 24, 1920. Sister-in-law May E. ((((Guertin) Jalbert) Hart married (3rd) in Long Beach, CA, September 30, 1920, Henry F. Burmester.

MRS. HART AND H.F. BURMESTER MARRIED. Cards received in this city today announce the marriage of Mrs. May Evelyn Hart and Henry Finch Burmester solemnized in Riverside last Thursday. Both have a wide circle of friends in this city. Burmester has resided at 1908 East Ocean boulevard since coming to this city a little less than two years ago. She has spent much of her time in Los Angeles of recent years and has been active in the Ebell and Friday Morning clubs of that city, and is a golf enthusiast and player of exceptional ability. Mrs. Burmester is a descendant of Francis Scott Key, author of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” and a member of the Key family of Maryland. Mr. Burmester is a graduate of the University of Utah and is one of the best-known newspaper men on the Pacific coast. He joined the staff of The Press two years ago and some months later became city editor, which position he held up to few weeks ago. He will rejoin The Press staff within a few months. Mr. and Mrs. Burmester are spending their honeymoon at Big Bear lake but expect to return to Long Beach to make their home by November 1 (Long Beach Press-Telegram (Long Beach, CA), [Thursday,] October 7, 1920).

Long Beach Man Sues for Divorce and Settlement. By a “Times” Staff Correspondent. LONG BEACH, Jan. 27. H.F. Burmester, former president of the local Chamber of Commerce yesterday filed two actions against his wife, May Evelyn Burmester. One asks a divorce, charging cruelty. The other asks $200,000, asserted to be half the rentals of her property since September, 1920, when they were married. An accounting and temporary restraining order are asked. Burmester asserts that at the time of their marriage, his wife induced him to leave his position as city editor of a local newspaper to manage and direct her property, then valued at $200,000. He says that largely through his efforts the property, which consists of a large beach cottage resort, is now worth $400,000. In his divorce action he says his wife nagged him, complained when he attended official dinners instead of coming home to eat, and on one occasion called her adult son to eject him from his home (Los Angeles Times, January 28, 1927).

Susan (Gilliatt) Hart died in Los Angeles, CA, March 4, 1929.

DEATHS. HART. At 2634 West Seventeenth street, March 4, Susan O. Hart, loving mother of Maude S. and John E. Hart of this city. Funeral services Wednesday, March 6. at 10:30 a.m., from the chapel of R.C. Dellenbaugh & Co., 630 Venice Boulevard (Los Angeles Times, March 5, 1929).

Daughter Maude S. Hart died in Los Angeles, CA, May 11, 1929.

DEATHS. HART. Funeral services for Maude Susan Hart will be held today at 1:30 p.m. from the chapel of R.C. Dellenbaugh & Co., 630 Venice Boulevard (Los Angeles Times, May 15, 1929).

Sister-in-law May E. ((((Guertin) Jalbert) Hart) Burmester) Pharr, aged fifty-nine years (b. TX), headed a Los Angeles, CA, household at the time of the (1940) Federal Census. She owned her house at 17 West Seaside Street. (Her son, Victor K. Hart, an apartment and hotel manager, aged forty-three years (b. MA), rented his family’s residence at 9 West Seaside Street).

Sister-in-law May E. ((((Guertin) Jalbert) Hart) Burmester) Pharr died in San Bernadino, CA, May 17, 1940.

Mrs. May Pharr Taken by Death. Mrs. May Evelyn Pharr, prominent for many years in women’s organizations of the city and who owned extensive real estate properties here, died this noon at her Lake Arrowhead home. Her son, Victor K. Hart and wife, were with Mrs. Pharr when the end came. The body is being returned to the J.J. Mottell Mortuary, which will announce funeral arrangements. The well-known club figure was a native of Texas and came to Long Beach in 1916. She also had resided in Los Angeles. The Venetian Square Apartments were among the many properties owned by Mrs. Pharr. Survivors include a brother, M.K. Guertin, Long Beach, and an aunt and uncle here, Mr. and Mrs. Samuiel D. Miller (Long Beach Press-Telegram (Long Beach, CA), May 17, 1940).

Son John E. Hart died in Los Angeles, CA, October 15, 1944, aged fifty-five years.

U.S. Employee Found Dead in Parked Auto. John Hart, 55, of 1909 W. Adams Blvd., yesterday was found dead in his car parked at an isolated part of Mulholland Cove in the Hollywood Hills in what police said apparently was suicide by carbon monoxide gas piped by a hose from his automobile’s exhaust. He had been employed as an accountant In the U.S. Bureau of Internal Revenue, officers said. He left no notes (Los Angeles Times, October 18, 1944).


References:

Find a Grave. (2012, October 13). George Edward Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98826261/george-edward-hart

Find a Grave. (2005, June 26). John Fox Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/11237361/john-fox-hart

Find a Grave. (2021, October 8). Robert H. Pike. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/232830852/robert-h-pike

Hunt, Herbert. (1916). Tacoma: Its History and Its Builders; a Half Century of Activity. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MYEUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA135

Krieder, Eugene G. (1895). Washington Reports: Cases Determined in the Supreme Court of Washington. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=VnwtAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA303

Wikipedia. (2022, June 20). Panic of 1893. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panic_of_1893

Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1826

By Muriel Bristol | October 16, 2022

Stephen Meserve Mathes was born in Milton, April 13, 1797, son of Robert and Polly (Meserve) Mathes.

Stephen M. Mathes was Milton town clerk in 1823-39. He was preceded in that office by Levi Jones, and he was succeeded by James M. Twombly.

Stephen M. Mathes married (1st) in Milton, August 24, 1823, Clarissa Watson, both of Milton. Rev. James Walker performed the ceremony. She was born in Rochester, NH, in 1802, daughter of Stephen and Mary “Polly” (Fogg) Watson. Clarissa (Watson) Mathes died in Milton, January 16, 1824.

Stephen M. Mathes married (2nd) in Milton, February 5, 1826, Theodosia Grant, he of Milton and she of Lebanon, ME. Rev. James Weston performed the ceremony. She was born in Lebanon, ME, August 5, 1797.

(The known children of Stephen M. and Theodosia (Grant) Mathes were: Mary E. Mathes (1826-1862), Sarah C.M. Mathes (1829-1829), Mandana T. Mathes (1833-1918), Stephen M. Mathes, Jr. (1836-1858)).

Hanson Hayes, John Kimball, and Ezekiel Wentworth recommended Milton Three Ponds trader Stephen M. Mathes for appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace in June 1826.

To His Excellency the Governor and Honorable Council of the State of New Hampshire convened at Concord, June A.D. 1826 ~

Humbly shews the subscribers, that at the Three Ponds, on the Salmon fall river in Milton in the County of Strafford, is situated a Village where a considerable business is done by water power, Merchandize, & c., that there is no acting Justice of the Peace near said place, that an appointment of some suitable person would be a great convenience to the inhabitants and public, we would Therefore recommend Stephen M. Mathes, (Trader,) of said Milton of known good talents, education and character to your Honor’s consideration.

H. Hayes, John Kimball, Ezekiel Wentworth

Stephen M. Mathes received his initial appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, July 1, 1826.

Justices of the Peace. Milton. Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remich, jr., J. Roberts, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes (Farmer & Lyon, 1826). 

Daughter Mary Elizabeth Mathes was born in Milton, December 1, 1826.

Stephen M. Mathes and other Milton Masons were remembered in an article on the lengthy lodge membership of Josiah B. Edgerly (1801-1888) of Farmington, NH.

Fraternal Lodge, A.F. & A.M., at Farmington. There is probably no other Masonic lodge in New Hampshire that has grown up with the rapidity of Fraternal, No. 71, and perhaps but few, if any, of its members are aware that one of their number has been a Mason longer and attended more lodge meetings than any other Mason now living in the county of Strafford, if not in the State. That member is Josiah B. Edgerly, who was made a Mason in Humane Lodge, No. 21 at Rochester, in the year 1826, and though the distance was eight miles his interest in the order became such that he was a frequent attendant at the monthly meeting. There he would meet his brother Masons from Milton –  Brothers Levi and Joshua Jones and the other Joneses, Dr. Stephen Drew, Theodore C. Lyman, Stephen M. Mathes, and many other brothers from that town, whose travel was about the same distance, and whose presence added very much to the interest of the meeting. … (Farmington News, March 26, 1886).

Daughter Sarah Cummings Merrill Mathes was born in Milton, August 25, 1829. She died the same day.

Justices of the Peace. Milton. Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remich, J. Roberts, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes, John Nutter, Thomas Chapman (Lyon, 1829).

Steph. M. Mathes headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Theodosia (Grant) Mathes], one female aged 20-29 years, and two females aged under-5 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Richd Gerrish and W.H. Brewster.

Milton sent Stephen M. Mathes to Concord, NH, as its NH state representative for the 1830-32 biennium. He served on the Public Lands Committee. As was then usual, the representatives lodged in Concord during the Spring and Fall sessions. Rep. Mathes lodged at J. George’s, as did other Strafford County representatives Jeremy B. Wingate of Alton, Luther Richardson of Burton, Stephen Danforth of Eaton, John Colley of Effingham, John Page of Gilmanton, J.R. Pilsbury of Middleton, John Perkins of Strafford, Jacob Burleigh of Tuftonborough, and Thos. J. Tibbetts of Wolfeborough, NH (NH General Court, 1829).

Stephen M. Mathes received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 21, 1831.

Justices of the Peace. Milton – Levi Jones, Daniel Hayes, John RemichJames Roberts, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, Samuel S. Mason, Stephen Drew, Israel Nute, John L. Swinerton, Thomas Chapman (Hayward, 1834).

Daughter Mandana T. Mathes was born in Milton, October 29, 1833. (Queen Mandana was the mother of King Cyrus the Great of Persia). Son Stephen Meserve Mathes, Jr., was born in Milton, February 21, 1836.

Stephen M. Mathes received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 11, 1836.

Justices of the Peace. MiltonLevi Jones, Daniel Hayes, John Remick, JAMES ROBERTS, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, Samuel S. Mason, Stephen Drew, John L. Swinerton, Thomas Chapman, Joseph Cook, John J. Plumer, Daniel Hayes, jr. (McFarland & Jenks, 1840).

Stephen M. Mathes received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 12, 1841. This appointment had an annotation that he was “gone,” i.e., he had left the district at some time prior to his next expected renewal in June 1846.

Stephen M. Mathes was among twenty-seven parishioners that purchased pews in the Rochester Congregational Church in August 1841.

Ezra Hayes, Jonathan T. Seavey, Widow Sarah McDuffee, Aaron Flagg, George W. Flagg, Benjamin Hayes, Widow Mehitable Young, one half share each; James Tebbitts, Benjamin Barker, Charles Henderson, Jonathan T. Dodge, John McDuffee, Jr., Lydia March, Stephen M. Mathes, John F. Folsom, Jacob Smart, N.V. Whitehouse, James Y. Hayes, Calvin Hale, Elizabeth Hale, Luther Hale, Alfred Hale, one share each; Samuel Stackpole, John Roberts, Jr., Francis V. Pike, Mrs. E. Hale, two shares each; and J.H. Woodman, three shares (McDuffee, 1892). 

Theodosia (Grant) Mathes died in Lebanon, ME, September 9, 1842, aged forty-five years.

Stephen M. Mathes, locating in Rochester, engaged in a general mercantile business, and became one of the most prominent men of the place before his death, which occurred at the age of three-score years. He was a leading member of the lodge of Odd Fellows organized in that town (Biographical Review, 1897). 

Rochester, NH, sent Stephen M. Mathes and Jacob Smart to Concord, NH, as its NH state representatives for the 1843-44 biennium (NH General Court, 1843).

Stephen M. Mathes married (3rd) in Milton, May 10, 1843, Lydia L. Watson. She was born in Milton, in 1812, daughter of Stephen and Mary “Polly” (Fogg) Watson (and sister of his deceased first wife Clara (Watson) Mathes). (The known child of Stephen M. and Lydia L. (Watson) Mathes was Clara L.W. Mathes (1848-1892)).

Stephen M. Mathes was moderator of the Rochester, NH, town meeting in 1844.

Stephen M. Mathes was a charter member of the Motolinia Lodge, No. 18, of the Odd Fellows, in Rochester, NH, when it was founded in March 1846.

Among benevolent organizations of modern origin, Odd fellowship is deservedly pre-eminent. March 16, 1846, Motolinia Lodge, No. 18, was instituted by Grand Master S.H. Parker, with Charles Dennett, Stephen M. Mathes, Jacob McDuffee, M.T. Curtis, and Edwin Bradbury as charter members. Asa P. Hanson, George B. Roberts, I.W. Springfield, and John Stott were initiated the same day, and Asa P. Hanson was the first Noble Grand. At the end of the first year there were 48 members, 39 residing in Rochester and 9 in Farmington. Woodbine Lodge of Farmington, and Miltonia Lodge of Milton both sprang from this Lodge, besides the other two Lodges in Rochester. The character of the membership and the management of this Lodge have secured to Oddfellowship a high standing in this vicinity (McDuffee, 1892).

Stephen M. Mathes received an appointment as a Rochester, NH, justice-of-the-peace, June 17, 1846.

Justices of the Peace. ROCHESTER – JAMES FARRINGTON – RICHARD RUSSELL, Noah Tebbets, Hatevil Knight, Jeremiah H. Woodman, Samuel Pray, Richard Kimball, Charles Dennett, Benjamin Hayes, John Hanson, Louis Mc Duffie, John Meder, George Hayes, Watson Hayes, Jonathan Hussey, William S. Ricker, Moses Roberts, jr., James Tebbets, jr., Stephen M. Mathes, Jacob Smart, Samuel Rogers, Joseph J. Leighton (Farmer & Lyon, 1844).

Daughter Clara L.W. Mathes was born in Rochester, NH, March 16, 1848.

Lydia L. (Watson) Mathes died circa 1848.

Stephen M. Mathes married (4th) in Rochester, NH, April 29, 1849, Louisa F. (Meserve) Davis. She was born in Milton, February 14, 1818, daughter of Hopley and Joanna (Twombly) Meserve. (Husband and wife were cousins, both being grandchildren of Stephen and Abigail (Yeaton) Meserve. She had been married before to David Davis, who died 1845-46.

(The known child of Stephen M. and Louisa F. ((Meserve) Davis) Mathes was: George F. Mathes (1856-1934)).

Daughter Mary E. Mathes married in Rochester, NH, December 23, 1849, Dr. John W. Pray, both of Rochester, NH. Rev. Silas Green performed the ceremony. Pray was born in Rochester, NH, in August 1814, son of Dr. Samuel and Frances B. (Farnham) Pray.

JOHN W. PRAY, son of Dr. Samuel Pray (p. 440), was born in Rochester, August 1814; studied medicine with his father; attended lectures at Dartmouth, and began practice at Barrington in 1840. In 1843 he returned to Rochester, where he was in partnership with his father for eleven years. He removed to Alexandria in 1861, but afterwards returned to East Rochester, where he died April, 1871. He married [Mary] Lizzie, daughter of Stephen Mathes, and had four children (McDuffee, 1892).

Stephen M. Mathes, a merchant, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Louisa [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Mandana Mathes, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Stephen Mathes, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Clara W. Mathes, aged two years (b. NH), Caroline Davis, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Cynthia Davis, aged eleven years (b. NH), and John Davis, aged seven years (b. NH). Stephen M. Mathes had real estate valued at $3,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Eben J. Mathes, a merchant, aged forty years (b. NH), and Herbert Stevens, a marble cutter, aged twenty-six years (b. NH).

John W. Pray, a physician, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included [Mary] Elisabeth [(Mathes)] Pray, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Their household was enumerated on the same page as John McDuffee, a banker, aged forty-six years (b. NH).

Stephen M. Mathes received a renewal of his appointment as a Rochester, NH, justice-of-the-peace, June 27, 1851. (This had an undated notation to the effect that he was “dead”).

Stephen M. Mathes’ shop goods sustained considerable damage in a large fire at Rochester. NH, in August 1851.

LARGE FIRE AT ROCHESTER, N.H. We learn by an extra from the office of the Great Falls Sketcher that a fire occurred in Rochester, N.H., on the 20th inst., which destroyed property to the amount of $15,000. It commenced in the stable of Jonathan T. Dodge, adjoining the Rochester Hotel, and destroyed the hotel, stable, and out-buildings, with their contents; the house occupied by Lorenzo D. Day, and some of his furniture; a shop occupied by Mr. Day as a marble manufactory; a blacksmith’s shop owned by Joseph Richardson, and occupied by Mr. Dicy; the barn and out-buildings, also a portion of the house of Benjamin Barker, Esq., and a horse and two carriages belonging to D.J. Parsons. The estimated losses are as follows; Mr. Dodge, $10,000, insured $3,000; Mr. Day, $700, no insurance; Mr. Barker, $2500, insured $1,800. Considerable damage was sustained by Messrs. Jones & Co., and S.M. Mathes & Co., in the removal of their stock of goods, but they were well insured. The fire was set by one Ezekiel Tebbets, about 19 years of age, who admitted his guilt, and has been lodged in Dover jail for trial (Boston Evening Transcript, August 22, 1851).

The original Rochester Bank of 1834 was sold when its twenty-year charter expired in 1854. A new Rochester Bank was chartered to replace it.

The new Rochester Bank was incorporated by an act approved June 30, 1853, and began business April 1, 1854, with a capital of $80,000. The directors were John McDuffee, Jr., Charles Dennett, James C. Cole, Dominicus Hanson, Stephen M. Mathes, Enoch Whitehouse, and Watson Hayes John McDuffee, Jr., was chosen president, and Franklin McDuffee, cashier; both of whom retained their offices through the existence of the bank (McDuffee, 1892).

Justices of the Peace. ROCHESTER – JAMES FARRINGTON – JEREMIAH H. WOODMAN, Stephen M. Mathes, Charles Dennett, Louis McDuffie, John Meader, Watson Hayes, Jonathan Hussey, Moses Roberts, James Tebbets, jr., Samuel Rogers, Daniel J. Parsons, James H. Edgerly, Sam’l Demeritt, Nicholas V. Whitehouse, Jeremiah M. Hackett, Daniel Lothrop, Wm. A. Kimball, Reuben Tilton, Jabez Dame, jr., John Nutter, Joseph Bunton, James Bodge, Samuel Meserve, Aaron P. Wingate (Claremont Manufacturing, 1854).

Stephen M. Mathes was moderator of the Rochester, NH, town meeting in 1855.

Son George F. Mathes was born in Rochester, NH, March 24, 1856.

George F. Mathes was but a year old when his father died. He received a practical education in the common schools. When about seventeen years old he began his term of service in the work with which he has since been identified (Biographical Review, 1897).

In the NH Executive Councilor’s race of November 1856, between Thomas Coggswell, Nicholas Whitehouse, and Eliphalet Locke, Stephen M. Mathes received a single vote, presumably a write-in one. Whitehouse won the District 2 seat with 7,016 votes.

Stephen M. Mathes was one of seven directors of the Rochester Bank, of Rochester, NH, in 1857.

ROCHESTER BANK. – Rochester. President, John McDuffie; Cashier, Franklin McDuffie; Directors, John McDuffie, Charles Dennett, James C. Cole, Stephen M. Mathes, Dominicus Hanson, Watson Hayes, Enoch Whitehouse (NH General Court, 1857).

Stephen M. Mathes died in Rochester, NH, May 13, 1857, aged sixty years.

In his will dated 21 May 1856 and proved in June 1857, Stephen M. Mathes named his wife Louisa F., to whom he left $1,000 and an undivided third of his homestead farm in Rochester, and four children: daughter Mandana T.C. (all the furniture of her mother Theodosia, deceased, half of the piano, and one-third of the farm), daughter Clara L.W. (all the furniture of her mother Lydia L., deceased, $1,000, half of the piano, and one third of the farm), son Stephen M. ($5), and son George Frederick ($1,000). Another daughter, Mary E. (Mathes) Pray joined the petition for administration of the estate, but was not named in the will. Also in June 1857, Mandana Mathes was appointed guardian of Clara L.W. Mathes, minor child under 14 of the late Stephen M. Mathes (Kruger, 1898).

Son Stephen M. Mathes, Jr., died in Milton, May 19, 1858, aged twenty-two years.

Louisia F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Farmington P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included George F. Mathes, aged four years (b. NH). Louisia F. Mathes had real estate valued at $666 and personal estate valued at $500.

John W. Pray, a physician, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Farmington P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary E. [(Mathes)] Pray, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Fanny I. Pray, aged nine years (b. NH), Helen L. Pray, aged four years (b. NH), and John W. Pray, aged two years (b. NH). John W. Pray had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $150. They were enumerated on the same page as her paternal uncle, Ebenezer J. Mathes, aged fifty years (b. NH), and her stepmother, Louisia F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, aged forty-two years (b. NH)

Mary Knight, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Farmington P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included Caroline Knight, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), Mary Knight, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Henry Wardwell, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Mandana Mathes, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Clara Mathes, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Stephen D. Wentworth, a trader, aged twenty-four years (b. NH).

Daughter Mary E. (Mathes) Pray died in Rochester, NH, March 3, 1862, aged thirty-four years.

Son-in-law Dr. John W. Pray married (2nd), in 1866, Esther Ann Ladd. She was born in Bristol, NH, November 30, 1834, daughter of John and Fannie G. (Collins) Ladd.

Daughter Clara L.W. Mathes married in Rochester, NH, October, 7, 1867, John Irving LeGro [LeGros]. He was born in Rochester, NH, in December 1842, son of John and Lucy (Jones) LeGro.

Betsy [((Meserve) Pinkham)] Lyman of Rochester, NH, made out her last will in Rochester, NH, July 21, 1868. In it she bequeathed a life estate in her Rochester house and furniture to Louisa F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes [(1818-1901)], widow of Stephen Mathes [(1797-1857)], which was to go next to the son, George Frederick Mathes [(1856-1934)]. She bequeathed her wearing apparel, beds and bedding to her nieces, May Pinkham, Abigail Twombly [(1809-1893)], and Betsy M. [(Twombly)] Minot [(1820-1904)]. She bequeathed the rest and residue to her nephews, Bidfield Meserve [(1807-1891)] and Samuel Meserve [(1808-1900)], who were sons of John Meserve [(1785-1871)]; Stephen M.Y. Meserve [(1811-1876)], who was a son of Hopley Meserve [(1789-1875)]; and the Methodist Church of Rochester, NH, in equal parts. She nominated John McDuffee [(1803-1890)] of Rochester, NH, as her executor. Dominicus Hanson [(1813-1907)], Ezekiel Wentworth [(1823-1905)], and Frankin McDuffee [(1832-1880)] signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 89:413).

Louisa F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included George F. Mathes, at home, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Ezecial Wentworth, a carpenter, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), and James Jenness, [a carpenter,] aged forty years (b. NH). Louisa F. Mathes had real estate valued at $400 and personal estate valued at $1,000. Her household appeared in the enumeration on the same page as that of her son-in-law, James Pirie, a tailor, aged thirty-eight years (b. Scotland).

James Pirie, a tailor, aged thirty-eight years (b. Scotland), headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Manda E. [(Mathes)] Pirie, keeping house, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), George Pirie, aged ten months (b. NH), and Hellen Pray, aged fourteen years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration on the same page as that of his mother-in-law, Louisa F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH).

John W. Pray, a physician, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Etta A. [(Ladd)] Pray, keeping house, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Hellen E. Pray, at home, aged fourteen years (b. NH). John W. Pray had personal estate valued at $6,000.

Irvin J. Legro, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Clara W. [(Mathes)] LeGro, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). They resided in a two-family residence with the household of his father, John Legro, an internal revenue agt., aged fifty-four years (b. NH).

Son-in-law Dr. John W. Pray died in Rochester, NH, in April 1871.

The first two months were spent as baggage-master in the station at Rochester. Then he [George F. Mathes] began braking on a freight train, subsequently becoming brakeman and baggage master on a passenger train of the Great Falls & Conway road, which is now a part of the Boston & Maine system. He was afterward to the position of conductor (Biographical Review, 1897).

Son George F. Mathes married in Rochester, NH, August 30, 1875, Fannie A. Parker, he of Rochester, NH, and she of Wolfeboro, NH. He was a baggage master, aged nineteen years, and she was aged twenty-one years. George S. Lindsay, justice of the peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Wolfeboro, NH, circa 1854, daughter of Charles H. and Sophia Parker.

Mr. [George F.] Mathes was married to Miss Fannie A. Parker, daughter of C.H. Parker of Wolfboro. They have one child, Charles A., who is now brakeman on the Boston & Maine Railroad. Mr. and Mrs. Mathes are not publicly identified with any religious organization; but liberal in their beliefs, and attend the Unitarian church (Biographical Review, 1897).

Loisa F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, at home, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. She shared a two-family residence on Wakefield Street with the household of Caroline E. Barker, keeping house, aged forty-seven years (b. NH). She appeared in the enumeration next to her stepdaughter, Mandana T. (Mathes) Pirie.

His wife, who was also born in Milton, is now spending her declining years in Rochester. She is a sincere Christian woman and a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church (Biographical Review, 1897).

James Pirie, at home, aged forty-eight years (b. Scotland), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mandana T. [(Mathes)] Pirie, keeping house, aged forty-six years (b. NH), and his niece, Helen E. Pray, at home, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH). They resided on Wakefield Street. Mandana T. Pirie was ill with a “lung trouble.” They appeared in the enumeration next to her stepmother, Loisa F. Mathes.

John I. Legro, a screw factory superintendent, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Franklin (“Village of Franklin Falls”), NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Clara W. [(Mathes)] Legro, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and John Legro, aged seven years (b. CT).

Geo. F. Mathes, a R.R. conductor, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fannie A. [(Parker)] Mathes, keeping house, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and his son, Charlie A. Mathes, at home, aged three years (b. NH).

Son-in-law James Pirie died in Rochester, NH, March 23, 1881, aged forty-nine years.

Daughter Clara L.W. (Mathes) LeGro died of malnutrition in Rochester, NH, March 29, 1892, aged forty-seven years, and thirteen days. R.O. Sweet, M.D., signed the death certificate.

In 1893 Mr. [George F.] Mathes accepted his present position in Dover, where he has established for himself a firm place among the most respected businessmen and citizens. He is a self-made man in every sense implied by the term, having by his own efforts steadily climbed the ladder of prosperity. Politically, Mr. Mathes is a sturdy Republican, and for many years was quite an active member of his party. He was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 1889, and in 1893 represented the town of Wolfboro in the State legislature. Socially, he is a member of Syracuse Lodge, No. 27, K. of P., of Salmonville; and of the Wolfboro Tribe of the Improved Order of Red Men (Biographical Review, 1897).

Son-in-law John Irving LeGros married (2nd) in Sanbornville, Wakefield, NH, November 20, 1897, Hattie R. Johnson, he of Rochester, NH, and she of Wakefield, NH. He was a manufacturer, aged fifty-four years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. Charles Bancroft performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, circa 1877, daughter of Thomas H. and Mary E. (Webster) Johnson.

Mandy [(Mathes)] Pirie, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her niece, Helen E. Dray, a tailoress, aged forty-four years (b. NH). Mandy Pirie owned their two-family residence at 32 Wakefield Street, free-and-clear. She was the mother of four children, of whom none were living. She rented the other part of the residence to Julia Wilkinson, a tailoress, aged forty-seven years (b. NH).

John Legro, hardware manufacturing, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Hallie [Hattie] Legro, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), his daughter, Dorothy J. Legro aged one year (b. NH), his mother, Lucy J. [(Jones)] Legro, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), his servant, Jane Kennedy, a housekeeper, aged twenty-eight years (b. Ireland), and his boarder, John Legro, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-six years (b. NH). Hallie LeGro was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Lucy J. LeGro was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living. Jane Kennedy had immigrated into the U.S. in 1887.

George F. Mathes, local agent of the B&M R.R., aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Fannie A. [(Parker)] Mathes, aged forty-five years (b. NH), his son, Charles A. Mathes, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his mother, Louise F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, a widow, aged eighty-two years (b. NH). George F. Mathes rented their house at 24 Sixth Street. Fannie A. Mathes was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living; Louise F. Mathes was the mother of four children, of whom two were still living.

Louisa F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes died of senility at 24 Sixth Street in Dover, NH, December 7, 1901, aged eighty-three years, ten months, and twenty-three days. She had resided in Dover, NH, for four years, i.e., since circa 1896-97. Her previous residence had been Rochester, NH.

Mandana T. [(Mathes)] Pirie, own income, aged seventy-six years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her companion, Helen Prey, a coatmaker and tailor shop, aged fifty-four years (b. NH). Mandana T. Pirie rented their house at 24 Wakefield Street. She was the mother of four children, of whom none were living.

John I. Legrow, retired (own income), aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed an East Bridgewater, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Hattie R. [(Johnson)] Legrow, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and his children, Dorothy J. Legrow, aged eleven years (b. NH), Irving E. Legrow, aged nine years (b. NH), Terese Legrow, aged seven years (b. NH), and Elizabeth Legrow (b. NH), aged six years. John I. Legrow owned their house on West Street, free-and-clear. Hattie R. Legrow was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

George F. Mathes, a railroad yard clerk, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Fannie [(Parker)] Mathes, a housewife, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and his roomer, Julia Smith, own income, aged seventy-three years (b. NH). George F. Mathes rented their house at 62 Sixth Street. Fannie Mathes was the mother of one child, who was still living.

Daughter Mandana T. (Mathes) Pirie died of hepatic cirrhosis at 24 Wakefield Street in Rochester, NH, December 3, 1918, aged eighty-five years, one month, and four days. She had lived in Rochester, NH, for seventy-four years, i.e., since circa 1843-44. A.S. Annis, M.D., signed the death certificate.

John I. LeGros, a cotton gin machinist, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH), headed an East Bridgewater, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hattie R. LeGros, a dressmaker, aged forty-one years (b. NH), his children, Dorothy J. LeGros, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), P. Edward LeGros, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Trese LeGros, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Elizabeth LeGros, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Edward Sullivan, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). John I. LeGros owned their house at 24 East Steet, with a mortgage.

George F. Mathes, a railroad yard clerk, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Frances A. [(Parker)] Mathes, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), his son, Charles A. Mathes, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Katherine T. Mathes, a trained nurse (private cases), aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and his granddaughter, Dorothy P. Mathes, aged twelve years (b. NH). George F. Mathes owned their house on North Main Street, free-and-clear.

Son-in-law John I. LeGros died of arterio-sclerosis in East Bridgewater, MA, December 24, 1923, aged eighty years, eleven months, and twenty-four days.

George F. Mathes, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-five years), Fannie A. [(Parker)] Mathes, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), and his son, Charles A. Mathes, aged fifty-three years (b. NH). George F. Mathes owned their house at 35 North Main Street, which was valued at $4,500. They did not have a radio set.

Son George F. Mathes died of angina pectoris in Wolfeboro, NH, February 3, 1934, aged seventy-seven years, eight months, and seven days. C.B. Cotton [M.D.] signed the death certificate.


References:

Claremont Manufacturing Co. (1854). New Hampshire Register and Farmer’s Almanac. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=l-cWAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA60

Farmer, John & Lyon, G. Parker. (1826). Curtis’s Pocket Almanack and Register of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=L8EwAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA44

Farmer, John & Lyon, G. Parker. (1844). New-Hampshire Annual Register, and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=BJIBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA51

Find a Grave. (2021, August 1). George F. Mathes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/230169864/george-f-mathes

Find a Grave. (2022, April 26). Robert Mathes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/239234385/robert-mathes

Find a Grave. (2020, September 7). Sarah Cummings Merrill Mathes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215332686/sarah-cummings_merrill-mathes

Find a Grave. (2020, September 7). Stephen Meserve Mathes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215330464/stephen-meserve-mathes

Find a Grave. (2020, September 7). Stephen Meserve Mathes, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215332905/stephen-meserve-mathes

Find a Grave. (2017, February 16). Mandana T. Mathes Pirie. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/176398397/mandana-t-pirie

Find a Grave. (2022, August 18). Mary E. [(Mathes)] Pray. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/242772587/mary-e-pray

Kruger, David. (1998). Jonathan Watson (1650?-1714) of Dover, New Hampshire: Who Settled There by 1672. Newbury Street Press.

Lyon, G. Parker. (1829). New Hampshire Annual Register and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Okg9AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA52

McDuffee, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rL0yAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA558

NH General Court. (1829). Manual for the Use of the General Court of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Ee8RAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA11

NH General Court. (1843). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=pvtBAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA4

NH General Court. (1857). Journal of the Senate of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=yldNAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA536

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