Celestial Seasonings – May 2022

By Heather Durham | April 30, 2022

Welcome to the astronomical event of the year … a full lunar eclipse!  This will create a Blood Moon. Hopefully, our weather will cooperate. Below is a snippet from Wikipedia about this event.

This occurs when the moon falls entirely within the earth’s umbra. Just prior to complete entry, the brightness of the lunar limb – the curved edge of the moon still being hit by direct sunlight – will cause the rest of the moon to appear comparatively dim. The moment the moon enters a complete eclipse, the entire surface will become more or less uniformly bright. Later, as the moon’s opposite limb is struck by sunlight, the overall disk will again become obscured. This is because as viewed from the Earth, the brightness of a lunar limb is generally greater than that of the rest of the surface due to reflections from the many surface irregularities within the limb: sunlight striking these irregularities is always reflected back in greater quantities than that striking more central parts, and is why the edges of full moons generally appear brighter than the rest of the lunar surface. This is similar to the effect of velvet fabric over a convex curved surface which to an observer will appear darkest at the center of the curve. It will be true of any planetary body with little or no atmosphere and an irregular cratered surface (e.g., Mercury) when viewed opposite the Sun. (Wikipedia, 2021, Total Lunar Eclipse).

Lunar Eclipse of May 16, 2022 - Dominic Ford


May 1. New Moon

May 3&4. Earthshine viewing a.k.a the Da Vinci Glow. Earthshine is caused by Sun reflecting off the surface of the Earth and back to the Moon.

May 6. N-Aquariid meteor shower. Our view of this shower, from the Constellation Aquarius may be best viewed just before dawn. These showers originate from Haley’s Comet.

May 8. There will be a n-Lyrid meteor shower today with best viewing, once again, is just prior to dawn. However, the Flower Moon will be at first quarter today and may interfere with shower viewing.

May 16. Today will bring a full Moon and a total lunar eclipse. It will begin at 10:28 pm through 1.55 am.  The total eclipse will be between 11:30 pm until 12.54 am. The Sun, Earth and Moon must be aligned for this to occur. As well, it can only occur with a full Moon and creates a reddish color – a Blood Moon.

May 22. The Moon and Saturn will rise to the right and closely approach one another.  The Moon will be in its final quarter.

May 24. The Moon and Jupiter will closely approach one another while rising to the right. The Moon, along with Mars will do the same on this date.

May 26. The Moon and Venus will rise to the right and orbit close to each other.

May 28. Mars and Jupiter will rise to the right together.

May 29. Mars and Jupiter will orbit close to each other.


References:

Ford, D. F. (2022). Astronomy. Retrieved from https://in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (February 2022). May 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/w1BR7UI3SAA.

Now Next. (March 2022). 15-16 May 2022 Total Lunar Eclipse. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/a93ckEDOm00

Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrances – June 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 24, 1820

A “number of respectable citizens” of Wakefield, NH, sought to split off the southerly part of Wakefield and the northerly part of Milton, and then join them together as a new town.

… in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this [Wakefield] town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this [Wakefield] town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

The pro-division petitions have not come to hand. But a few of Wakefield’s pro-division advocates can be found in other documents. Luther Dearborn has been mentioned as having been a principal actor.

J. Hall appeared in the title of the following renunciation as having been a pro-division signer, and four other formerly pro-division inhabitants would appear as signers of a November renunciation. (Their names appeared also in the June remonstrance petition).

A Certificate of Persons who signed a Petition of J. Hall and others wishing not to be considered as members

We the undersigned Inhabitants of the Town of Wakefield having signed a petition for the separation of the Towns of Wakefield & Milton to form a new Town without duly Considering the subject and after a more mature Consideration of the subject have signed a remonstrance against said separation and therefore wish the Legislature of the State to consider us as Strenuously opposed to said separation.

John Paul, Joseph Edgerly, Nathl Abbott, Jona Copp

Another twenty-seven Wakefield pro-division petitioners would sign a renunciation in November 1820. (See Wakefield Pro-Division Renunciation – November 1820).

The impetus behind the Wakefield and Milton pro-division petitions had been a desire to thereby split Milton’s militia company, which included southern Wakefield, into two parts for the benefit of those having to travel the greatest distances to militia musters and trainings. (The Wakefield anti-division remonstrance would open by describing the original pro-division signers as respectable citizens, but it would close by characterizing them as selfish and partisan disturbers of the peace).

Ten years earlier, the Third (1810) Federal Census had enumerated a rather generous number of Wakefield householders endowed with military, civil, or religious titles. They included Capt Benjan Cook, Jonan Copp, Esqr, David Copp, Esqr, William Copp, Esqr, Capt Jonathan Copp, Capt Jona Copp, Willm Sawyer, Esqr, Capt Joseph Manson, Capt Richard Dow, Elisha Sanborn, Esqr, Lt James Hutchens, Capt David Spring, Avery Hall, Esqr, Colo John Gillman, Colo John Palmer, Capt Andrew Gillman, Majr Joshua Hall, Dr Thomas Lindsay, Revd Asa Piper, and Luther Dearborn, Esqr. (Rev. Asa Piper and justice-of-the-peace Luther Dearborn, both advocates in 1820 of forming a new town, were in 1810 next-door neighbors).

Although Wakefield did have its own separate northerly militia company in 1810, it might still seem to have been a bit top-heavy in having two colonels, one major, one lieutenant, and seven captains all at the same time. It seems more likely that some at least of these military titles were courtesy ones, a residue of having held that rank at some time in the past. That is to say, some of them at least were likely former militia officers or even former Revolutionary War officers, rather than active ones.

Some rough calculations may give some idea of the relative sizes of Wakefield’s pro- and anti-division contingents. (The 1820 census was then in process only, and ultimately not preserved, except as aggregate totals. The 1810 census figures are used here as being those cited in the anti-division remonstrance). Wakefield had 1,166 inhabitants in 1810, of which 605 were male. Roughly 375 of these were below voting (and petitioning) age. That left roughly 230 potential petitioners. (N.B., 61 of those potential petitioners were above militia age). So, the 197 anti-division remonstrance petitioners represented roughly 85.7% of Wakefield’s 1810 electorate. (Leaving as many as 14.3% in the pro-division category).

(There was a companion remonstrance from the Milton voters that also opposed the division (representing roughly 65.3% of its 1810 electorate)).

As previously mentioned, Wakefield’s entries for the Fourth (1820) Federal Census are missing (as are those of Milton). The following anti-division remonstrance – signed by those 197 men opposing the proposed town division – supplies the names of at least a large portion of Wakefield’s householders (and those living with them). (There was a companion remonstrance from those Milton voters that opposed the division).

Such petitions employed a certain structure and style. Their overall tone is respectful. The authorities to whom they are directed are characterized as “honorable” and they are frequently asked – “we pray” – to consider some measure by virtue of “their wisdom.”

They begin with a salutation. The petitioners might identify themselves and their situation. There is usually then a recitation of facts, each one prefaced with “That.” Finally, the petitioners would “pray” that some proposed solution be adopted. (This term of phrase, although frequently employed in this type of writing, sounds somewhat archaic nowadays. The only higher authority to whom modern speakers might address a “prayer” is the ultimate one: God).

(Wakefield’s NH state representative for the 1820-21 biennium was William Sawyer (1774-1860)).

A Remonstrance of the Inhabitants of Wakefield praying that the southerly part of Wakefield and the northerly part of Milton May not be Incorporated into a separate Town.

To the Honorable Legislature of the State of New Hampshire convened at Concord June Session A.D. 1820.

Your memorialists, Inhabitants of Wakefield in the County of Strafford in said state; having lately learnt, that a number of respectable Citizens living at the Southerly part of Wakefield were about to present a Petition to the Honorable Legislature praying that the Southerly part of Wakefield and the Northerly part of Milton may be incorporated into a separate Town. Never having seen said Petition, nor heard of it untill since the last annual Town Meeting, we are wholly ignorant of the reasons they offer for the groundwork of their prayer. But we feel it a duty that we owe to ourselves and to Posterity to remonstrate against the prayer of said petition being granted. We do not deny, but cheerfully admit, that there may be cases, in which it is necessary, that the Legislature should incorporate new Towns, taken off from one or more old Towns. But we think and hope to be able to convince the Legislature, that this is not one of those cases.

The Town of Wakefield is small in Territory and its Inhabitants few in numbers compared with many other Towns in the State. It does not exceed six miles square, when brought into such form, and a large proportion of said surface is covered with Ponds, Heaths, and Stagnant waters, more than two thousand acres of the Northerly part of the Town is composed of poor gravelly Pitch pine plains of the worst quality on which neither Man nor Beast can make a living. The Town, according to the last enumeration, contains only Eleven hundred and sixty-six Inhabitants scarcely able to maintain their corporation. Increase of taxes is the natural consequence of the division of Towns. Public buildings are now erected fit and convenient for the Town, one of which called the old meeting-house is situated at the northerly extremity of the new contemplated Town and more than one mile South of the center of Population of the whole Town of Wakefield, in which the Town have always held their Town Meetings untill the last annual Meeting. The other, called the new Meetinghouse, is situated at the center of Population of the Town, in a handsome flourishing Village, to which all the roads in Town lead and center. If the Legislature should grant the prayer of the Petitioners, Wakefield will be deprived of nearly one-half of its cultivated soil, comprehending the ancient and best Settlements in the Town. It will subject the Inhabitants of the old Town, as well as the new, to many disadvantages and inconveniences, and to an expense more than they are able to bear. New Public Buildings must be erected or the old ones removed, new roads leading to new centers must be laid out, made and kept in repair. School Districts will be split & divided, school houses thrown off from their centers, farms divided partly into the new and partly into the old Towns.

There are other considerations which we beg leave to suggest. Property of almost every description has a local value; and in perhaps no instance more so than in those little Villages in the center of Country Towns. In the Village in the center of Wakefield, Traders, Mechanics, and others have purchased house lots and garden spots, some at the rate of more than a thousand dollars per acre, and erected Houses, Stores, and work shops thereon with the reasonable and well grounded expectation that the center of Town, public business and Buildings would there continue. But if the Town should be divided, this village will be situated at the Southern extremity of the Town and thereby its value and local situation destroyed. But what advantages and privileges do the Petitioners derive by a division; or in other words, what inconveniences and hardships do they now suffer? We apprehend none. The Public Buildings in which the Town assemble, either for Religious worship or Town Meetings are both from one to two miles nearer the Southerly part than the Northerly Yet the inhabitants of this quarter are very well [all] located and make no complaints.

We are aware that Petitioners for the new Town will point out by Carrigain’s Map, or some other Survey, what a handsomebeautiful five-mile square Town may be made out of Wakefield and Milton, and then attempt to show and make it believed, that the remaining part of those two Towns will be equally as good as the whole and in a better form.

But we apprehend that the wisdom of the Legislature will not warrant the practice or establish the principle of cutting up and destroying old corporate Towns for the sake of making handsome new-formed Towns, and thereby destroy the harmony and happiness of its inhabitants.

During nearly fifty years the inhabitants of Wakefield have lived in peace and harmony and conducted their public affairs with an unanimity not surpassed if equaled by any Town in the State. We now appeal to the Wisdom of the Legislature, as the Guardians of our rights, liberties & privileges, to keep us together in our corporate capacity and not permit the party feelings and selfish motives of the few to disturb the peace, interest and happiness of the many.

Jonathan Copp, Henry L. Wiggin, Elias Wentworth } Select Men

Reuben & Benjamin Something - 1820
Two signature surnames that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. They appeared in Column 1 of Page 3, both above and below those of Mason Dorr. Any ideas?

[Page Three]

[Column 1:]

William Sawyer, John M’Crillis, Spencer Wentworth, John Hill, John Roberts, James Young 2, James Dame, John S. Wentworth, Silvanus Wentworth, John Wentworth, Saml Sevrans, Saml Sevrans, Shadrach Folsom, Robert Quimby, Nathl M. Meserve, Reuben [Currier?], Mason Dorr, Benjamin [Dorr?], Benjamin Bickford, James Shepard, John Brooks, Ephraim G. Smith, John Nocks, Nicholas Nocks, Zachariah Nocks, Daniel M.D. Smith, Joshua Nock, Joseph Burbank, Isaiah Varney, Abner Nutter, John Dore, James Thompson, John Thompson, Daniel Smith, Eliphalet Clough, Samuel [Ames?], Israel Wiggin, Joseph Corson, Simeon Philbrick, Jeremiah Wiggin, Walter Cate,

Samuel Something - June 1820
A signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 1 of Page 3, between those of Eliphalet Clough and Israel Wiggin. Any ideas?

[Column 2:]

Moses Young, Mark Young, Mark Wentworth, Phineas Wentworth, Paul D. Young, John Campnell, Ephraim Wentworth, Thomas Cook, Daniel Young, Edmund Wentworth, Thomas Bickford, William Dame, Joseph Young, John Cook 2th [?], Stephen [Burbank?], James Young, Richard K. Young, Jesse Cook, James Cook, Peter Cook, John Blake, Thos Wiggin, Henry Wiggin, Benjamin Cook, John Blake, Jr, Joseph Bennet, Jonathan Quimby, Eliphalet Quimby, Amasa Quimby, Daniel Quimby, Jacob Clark, John Cook, Nathaniel Cook, Samuel C. Dame, Levi Dearborn, Simeon Dearborn, Thomas P. Clark,

Stephen Something - June 1820
A signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 2 of Page 3, between those of John Cook and James Young. Any ideas?

[Column 3:]

John Dame, David Allen, John Clark, Jr., Ambrose Swasey, John Wingate, Dodavah Copp, Isaac B. Chesley, Stephen Fellows, Jeremiah Dearborn, David Dearborn, Jona Dearborn, Levi Neal, Asa Dow, Jonathan Brown, Jonathan Copp, Richard Dow, Josiah Dow, Joseph [M’Coon?], John Campernell, Jr., Nathan Dearborn, Stephen Horn, Nathan Dearborn, Samuel his X mark Dearborn, James Perkins, John Sanborn, Jr., Samuel Chamberlin, Richard Cook, Ebenr Hill, Jonathan Burley, James Hill, William Burley, Benja Brown, William Brown, Noah Horne, Daniel Horne,

Joseph Something - June 1820
A signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 3 of Page 3, between those of Josiah Dow and John Campernell, Jr. Any ideas?

[Page 4]

[Column 1:]

Jacob Lock, John Lang, Richard Land, Caleb Weeks, John Weeks, Josiah Allen, Mark Allen, John Watson, Nathan Watson, Joshua Vickery, Samuel Vickery, John Clark, Phineas Weeks, Nathaniel Lock, Nicholas Tuttle, Joseph Pike, Joseph H. Pike, Moses Gage, Jonathan Gage, John Gage, Benjamin [—–], James [—–], Joseph Maleham, Nathan Mordough, Benjamin Dame, Josiah Warren, Peter K. Wiggin, Elisha Rollins, Jacob A. Chesley, Thomas Nudd, Jr, Daniel T. Carter, Alvah H. Sawyer, Ichabod Richards, Joseph Wiggin, Henry M. Lindsay, George Hill,

Benjamin & James Something - June 1820
Two signature surnames that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. They appeared in Column 1 of Page 4, between those of John Gage and Joseph Maleham. Any ideas?

[Column 2:]

Joseph Hill, Tobias Hanson, John Fellow, Nelson Nutter, Thomas Nudd, Nathaniel Evans, Stephen D. Hutchins, William Clark Frost, James Martin, Isaiah Hodgdon, Joseph Hodgdon, Otis V. Geodey, Joseph W. Sanborn, Eliphalet Philbrook, Joshua Edgerly, James Edgerly, William Parsons, James Garvin, John Paul, Miles Davis, Wentworth Davis, Wm French, Moses French, John Hanson, Wentworth Garvin, John Sanborn, Daniel H. Sanborn, Samuel R. Hutchins, Ezra M. Hutchins, Charles Carter, Nathl Cook, Jr, Timothy Watson,

[Column 3:]

William Perkins, Joseph Palmer, Shadrach Allen, John Copp, Noah Kimball, Noah Kimball, Saml Burbank, John Horne, Joseph Edgerly, George Lindsay, Nathl Abbot, Ebenr Garvin, Richard Russell, William Bennet, Daniel Hall, Elisha Sanborne, Joseph Hutchins, Nathan Weeks.


See also Milton Militia Dispute – 1820 and Milton Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820


References:

Find a Grave. (2007, October 15). Jonathan Copp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/22229979/jonathan-copp

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Luther Dearborn. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92171689/luther-dearborn

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Rev. Asa Piper. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92206616/asa-piper

Find a Grave. (2012, June 23). William Sawyer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92415030/william-sawyer

Find a Grave. (2012, June 24). Henry L. Wiggin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92466261/henry-l-wiggin

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Milton Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 17, 2022

A “number of respectable citizens” of Milton circulated a petition for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature, seeking to split off the northerly part of Milton and the southerly part of Wakefield, and then join them together as a new town. Their petition has not come to hand. (It might have been withdrawn).

... in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this [Wakefield] town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this [Wakefield] town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

Other documents, including this subsequent remonstrance petition, suggest that the impetus behind the original petition had been the simpler desire to split Milton’s militia company into two parts for the greater convenience of those having to travel the greatest distance to militia musters and trainings. (See Milton Militia Dispute – 1820).

Some rough calculations may give some idea of the relative sizes of Milton’s pro- and anti-division contingents. (The 1820 census was then in process only, and ultimately not preserved, except as aggregate totals. The 1810 census figures are used here as being those cited in the Wakefield anti-division remonstrance). Milton had 1,005 inhabitants in 1810, of which 476 were male. Roughly 276 of these 476 Milton males were below voting (and petitioning) age. That left roughly 200 potential petitioners. (N.B., 76 of those potential petitioners were above militia age). So, the 127 anti-division remonstrance petitioners represented roughly 63.5% of Milton’s 1810 electorate. (Leaving as many as 36.5% in the pro-division category).

(There was a companion remonstrance from the Wakefield voters that also opposed the division (representing roughly 85.7% of its 1810 electorate)).

As previously mentioned, Milton’s entries for the Fourth (1820) Federal Census are missing. The following remonstrance – by those 127 men opposing the proposed division – supplies the names at least of about two-thirds of Milton’s 1820 householders (and those living with them).

(Column 1 signer Daniel Hayes [Jr.] (1781-1856) was Milton’s NH state representative for the 1820-21 biennium).

Remonstrance of sundry Inhabitants of Milton agt. the prayer of certain petitions for a new town to be taken from Milton & Wakefield.

To the Honourable Legislature of the State of New Hampshire convened at Concord June session A.D. 1820 ~

Your memorialists, inhabitants and legal voters in the town of Milton in said state, having lately understood that a petition would be presented by a number of respectable citizens residing on the Northerly part of said Milton, praying that the Northerly part of Milton and the southerly part of Wakefield may be incorporated into a town, beg leave to remonstrate against the prayer of said petition being granted. A division of the town would subject the inhabitants of the old town as well as the new to many hardships and inconveniencies.

The town, though somewhat large in territory, contains but few inhabitants compared with other towns in this state ~

A large proportion of said town is composed of hills and Mountains or covered with ponds of water. Teneriff mountain and the three ponds, and almost all of the wast[e] land in said Milton lie in that part of the town not included in said petition. Should the town be divided according to the prayer of the petitioners, we are of opinion that much the best part of the town will be taken off, and Milton left without form or comeliness, within a few years the town has built a large handsome Meeting-house which is completely finished, in the center of the town, in which the inhabitants can conveniently assemble in town-meeting as well as for public Worship.

If the town should be divided this Meetinghouse will be situated on the North-Easterly section of the town, and of course must be almost (if not altogether) useless to those who have been at a large expense to complete it with the pleasing expectation that the same place would continue to be the center of said town ~

Should the prayer of the petitioners be granted it will be necessary to erect a Meetinghouse in the center of the territory that will be left, New roads leading to said center made and kept in repair; and a large increase in taxes must be the inevitable consequence ~

It is not to be expected that every individual in any town can possess and enjoy equal privileges. If towns are divided, split and subdivided there will be centers and extremities. But those living in the center purchase their privileges by giving more for their land on account of its local situation than those who live on the extremities give for land of the same quality ~

And we apprehend that it must be an extreme case in which the Legislature will take away those purchased rights by dividing the town and thereby transferring them to others ~

The public funds for the support of the Gospel and Schools, like the town are too small to be divided ~ Your memorialists, fully believing in the wisdom of that precept given us by the father of our country “United we stand; divided we fall” beg the Honourable Legislature to keep us together ~

[Column 1:]

Joseph Plumer, Levi Jones, Joseph Plumer, Jr, Benja Scates, Benjamin Scates, Jnr, Isaac Scates, Elijah Horn, James Twombly, James H. Horn, Daniel Emery, Timothy Emery, John Loud, John Palmer, Aaron Downs, John Scates, Nal Pinkham, Norton Scates, Pelah Hanscom, William Hatch, Gilman Jewett, Saml Jones, Ichabod Bodge, Isaac Worster, Wm Jones, Joshua Jones, Moses Nute, Ebenr Wakeham, James Goodwin, James Pinkham, Jedediah Ricker, Saml Ricker, Stephen Wentworth, Lemuel Ricker, Jonathan Dore, Dodovah Dore, James Hayes, Jr, Chesley Hayes, Micah Lyman, Daniel Hayes, Jr, Edward Tebbets, Stephen Drew, Wm Palmer, Theodore C. Lyman,

[Column 2:]

Richard Walker, Israel E. Nute, Jacob Nute, Benja Jenkins, Jeremy Nute, Joseph Walker, Samuel Bragdon, Isaac Wentworth, James Varney 3, John T. Varney, James C. Varney, J.C. Varney, Jr, John Jenkins, Ivory Bragdon, Lemuel Varney, Stephen Jenkins, Jr, Ezekiel Nute, Samuel Nute, Jotham Nute, Bidfield Hayes, Hayes Nute, John Twombly 3rd, James Y. Pinkham, William Wentworth, William [Hays?], Timothy Ricker, John Ricker, Richard Horn, Jonathan Ricker, Samuel Twombly, Jr, Robert Knight, Samuel Twombly, John Downs, Stephen Henderson, Daniel Wentworth, Phinehas Wentworth, Daniel Dore, Samuel Nute, Jr, Thomas Y. Wentworth, John C. Nute, William Downs, Samuel N. Chamberlin, Matthias Nutter, Hopley Varney, Joshua Knight,

William Something - 1820
The signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 2, between those of William Wentworth and Timothy Ricker. The initial letter might be a rather squiggly “H.” The next letter that looks like an “n” is also very like the rather similar open “a” of the “William.” The final two figure-eights could be the “y” and “s” of “Hays,” i.e., Hayes. Any other ideas?

[Column 3:]

James Varney, John C. Varney, Ezekiel Hayes, Stephen Hayes, Lewis Hayes, James Hayes, Ichabod Hayes, James Varney, Jr, Ephraim Plumer, John Meserve, Ephm Wentworth, Ichabod Wentworth, L.H. Wentworth, Isaac Varney, Wm Tuttle, Ambrose Tuttle, Jonathan Howe, Dudley Farnham, Jere: Cook, Isaac C. Young, William Sargent, Daniel G. Dore, James Bragdon, William Foss, John Foss, Ebenr Ricker, Charles Ricker, Wentworth Dore, Matthew Farnham, John Wentworth, John Wentworth, Jr, William W. Loud, Timo Roberts, Nathl Jewett, Merk Miller, John Blaisdell, George Dore, Nathan Jones, Joseph Corson.


See also Milton Militia Dispute – 1820 and Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820


References:

Find a Grave. (2016, September 20). Daniel Hayes, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170258230/daniel-hayes

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Thompson, Rev. Albert H. (1886). Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Organization of the First Church, and Ordination of the First Settled Town Minister of Wakefield, N.H. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EKm15quwMhsC&pg=PA42

Milton Militia Division Request – May 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 10, 2022

Jeremiah “Jeremy” Nute was born in Milton, October 25, 1788, son of Lt. Jotham Jr. and Sarah (Twombly) Nute. (Jotham Nute, Jr., had been a Revolutionary soldier, Milton militia lieutenant, and was at this time a Milton justice-of-the-peace (See Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1805)).

Jeremy W. Nute married, May 31, 1810, Martha Runnells. She was born in Farmington, NH, February 13, 1785, daughter of Joseph and Abigail (Pinkham) Runnells.

Lt. Jeremy Nute marched to Portsmouth, NH, in the Milton militia detachment commanded by Captain William Courson (1782-1863) in September 1814, during the War of 1812. (See Milton in the War of 1812).

Son Franklin W. Nute was born in Milton, in 1810. Son Henry Smith Nute was born in Milton, February 12, 1815. Son George W. Orange was born in Milton, circa 1816.

(Nephew Lewis W. Nute (1820-1888) was born in Milton, February 17, 1820, son of Ezekiel and Dorcas (Worster) Nute).

Jeremy Nute was captain of Milton’s militia company by 1820. He had been preceded in that position by Theodore C. Lyman (1770-1863) and would be succeeded by Norton Scates (1790-187[?]). Due to a vote taken by his militiamen, he and his officers sent the following letter to the regimental field officers above them seeking a division of their militia company into two parts. (See Milton Militia Dispute – 1820).

To the Field officers of the Second Regt of Militia in New Hampshire ~

Greeting

We the undersigned, belonging to the 7th Company in said Regt, have at finding about 134 enrolled in said company and having on the 30th instant taken a vote in said company upon the expediency of dividing it into two distinct companies, 69 of those present acted in favor of said division and 22 against ~ We therefore think it is expedient to divide the company agreeable to a line which was then agreed on and which you will have explained to you by the bearer and humbly request your honours, to Establish such division immediately ~

Milton, May 31st 1820

Jeremy Nute { Captain
James Hayes Jr { Lieut
Norton Scates { Ensign

Jeremy Nute and his company officers, James Hayes, Jr., and Norton Scates signed next the Milton anti-town division remonstrance petition of June 1820. He, and they, signed also the Milton company division petition of November 1820. (See Milton Militia Dispute – 1820).

While this was being settled Capt. Jeremy Nute petitioned to change his name to Capt. Jeremy W. Orange.

Petition of Jeremy Nute for the Alteration of His Name
To the Hon. the Senate and House of Representatives of New Hampshire now convened at Concord
Humbly Shew
Jeremy Nute of Milton in the County of Strafford begs leave to represent to your Hon. body that an alteration of his name and that of his family would be of benefit to him and his family in Consequence of some property which will fall into his hands provided an alteration should take place. He therefore prays that an Act may be passed authorizing him thereafter to assume and be known by the name of Jeremy W. Orange and that the rest of his family may assume the name of Orange instead of that of Nute ~ And as in duty bound will ever pray ~ Nov. 4th 1820
Jeremy Nute (NH Department of State, n.d.).

State of New Hampshire }
AN ACT EMPOWERING JEREMY NUTE TO HAVE AND ASSUME THE NAME OF JEREMY WASHINGTON ORANGE
[Approved December 21, 1820. Original Acts, vol. 26, p. 54; recorded Acts, vol. 21, p 529]
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened that the name of Jeremy Nute, of Milton in the County of Strafford be altered and changed to Jeremy Washington Orange, and that he be hereafter known and called by the name of Jeremy Washington Orange, and that the family name of the children of the said Jeremy, be in like manner changed and altered from Nute to Orange: any law usage or custom to the contrary notwithstanding (NH Secretary of State, 1920).

Jeremy W. Orange of Milton had risen to become Major of the newly-created 39th Regiment of militia by 1822, and Lt. Colonel by 1824.

39th Regiment { Colonel Joseph Ham, Farmington; Lieutenant Colonel Jeremy W. Orange, Milton; Major Joseph Cross; Adjutant Bedfield Hayes, Milton; Quartermaster William Allen, Rochester (Lyon, 1824).

J.W. Orange headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Martha (Runnells) Orange], one male aged 20-29 years, two females aged 20-29 years, three males aged 15-19 years, two females aged 15-19 years, and one female aged 10-14 years.

Father Jotham Nute, Jr., died in Milton, February 3, 1836.

Son George W. Orange married in Somersworth, NH, October 24, 1837, Emily H. Badger, both of Somersworth. Rev. Alfred Goldsmith performed the ceremony. She was born in Kittery, ME, March 5, 1820, daughter of William Jr. and Abigail J. “Nabby” (Plaisted) Badger.

Jeremy Orange headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years, one female aged 50-59 years, one female aged 30-39 years, one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 20-29 years, and one male aged 10-14 years. One member was employed in Manufacture and Trade and two members of his household were employed in Agriculture.

Son Henry S. Orange married (1st) in Lowell, MA, June 10, 1841, Sarah A. Bradley, both of Lowell. She was born in Dracut, MA, circa 1810, daughter of Joshua and Mary (Poor) Bradley.

Father-in-law Joseph Runnells died in Dover, NH, March 20, 1846.

Jeremy W. Orange was in 1848 chaplain of the Libanus Lodge, of Great Falls, Somersworth, NH (Moore, 1848).

Jeremy W. Orange and his son, George W. Orange, were among the political Whigs of Somersworth that subscribed to the following notice in September 1848,  seeking to select Whig convention delegates.

Pursuant to the above call, the Whigs of Somersworth, and all other persons, without any discrimination, who prefer Gen. Zachary Taylor for President, and Millard Filmore for vice President, will assemble at the Town Hall, this (Monday) Evening the 11th inst. at 7½ o’clock, for the purpose of choosing Delegates to attend said Convention. Great Falls, Sept. 4, 1848 (Knapp, 1894).

The Whig party (c1833-1856) was an amalgamation of several prior parties, such as the National Republicans (c1824-34), the Anti-Masons (c1828-40), Democrats who opposed Andrew Jackson, some remaining Federalists, and others. It would be succeeded eventually by the Republican party. Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore were elected as U.S. President and Vice President, respectively. Taylor died in the first year of his term and was succeeded by Fillmore.

Mother Sarah (Twombly) Nute died of dropsy in Milton, November 21, 1849, aged eighty-six years.

Jeremy W. Orange, a machinist, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Martha Orange, aged sixty years (b. NH), and Julia Welch, aged twenty years (b. ME). Jeremy W. Orange had real estate valued at $5,000.

Daughter-in-law Sarah Ann (Bradley) Orange died of dropsy on John Street in Lowell, MA, January 21, 1853, aged forty-three years.

Son Henry S. Orange married (2nd) in Gilmanton, NH, August 2, 1859, Elizabeth A. Kendall, he of Lowell, MA, and she of Gilmanton. He was a merchant, aged forty-one years, and she was aged twenty-four years. Rev. R.M. Sargent performed the ceremony. She was born in Pembroke, NH, December 3, 1832, daughter of Prescott V. and Mary (Dow) Kendall.

Martha (Runnells) Orange died February 3, 1860.

Jery W. Orange, a machinist, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth (“Great Falls P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Martha Orange, aged seventy-five years (b. NH). Jery W. Orange had real estate valued at $3,000 and personal estate valued at $1,500. (The late Martha (Runnells) Orange’s posthumous appearance was an intentional feature of the census enumeration, she having died within the census year).

Jeremy W. Orange married (2nd) in Somersworth, NH, April 27, 1865, Mrs. Lydia R. [(Roberts)] Mendum, both of Somersworth, NH. Rev. E.N. Hidden performed the ceremony. She was born in Great Falls, Somersworth, NH, circa 1805, daughter of George and Polly Roberts.

Daughter-in-Law Mary ([Dorr?]) Orange died in March 25, 1866.

Jeremy Orange, a wood machinist, aged eighty-one years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth (“Great Falls P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lydia Orange, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). Jeremy Orange had real estate valued at $10,000 and personal estate valued at $2,000.

Son Franklin Orange, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), resided in the Milton household of his paternal uncle, Jacob Nute, a farmer, aged eighty years (b. NH), at the time of the Tenth (1870) Federal Census. He was characterized as being at that time “insane.”

Franklin W. Orange died of paralysis, August 31, 1872, aged sixty-one years, nine months.

Strafford County. The Nute family in Milton is wonderful for longevity. Jotham, the father, was seven years in the Revolutionary war, beginning with the battle of Bunker Hill. There are six children living, whose united ages aggregate over 473 years. Jeremy Orange is in his 89th year, Jacob in his 86th, Sarah in her 82d, David in his 78th, Ivory in his 74th, and Andrew in his 72d (Vermont Journal, October 23, 1875).

Jeremiah W. Orange appeared in the Great Falls, i.e., Somersworth, NH, directories of 1876 and 1878, as having his house on Orange street.

Jeremy W. Orange of Somersworth, NH, made his last will February 23, 1877. He devised $1,500 to his wife, Lydia Orange, “in lieu and full satisfaction of all rights of dower and homestead.” Should she die within his lifetime, that money would revert instead to the estate, rather than pass to any heir or assign of hers. He devised $1,000 each to Emily Orange, wife of his son, George Orange, and to [his daughter-in-law,] Elizabeth A. Orange. His five shares of Somersworth National Bank stock were not to be liquidated for ten years, and the dividends paid over to the town for maintenance of his burial plot in Forest Glade Cemetery and, should the bank fail, his executor should pay $30 per year for that same ten-year period. After the ten years had elapsed, the executor was to pay to Somersworth $200 in trust. It was to have the annual interest on that trust sum for cemetery plot maintenance. The remainder of the estate was to be divided between his two sons. He named his son, Henry S. Orange of Gilmanton, NH, as his executor. Samuel James, Clarence L. Chapman, and George William Burleigh signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 89:491).

Jeremy W. Orange died of heart disease in Great Falls, Somersworth, NH, June 1, 1879, aged ninety years. He was a mechanic. His last will was proved in Rochester, NH, July 1, 1879 (Strafford County Probate, 89:491).

His widow, Lydia Orange filed for and received a War of 1812 veteran’s widow’s pension (#26430) after his death. It was based upon his service in Captain William Courson’s militia company.

Lydia R. ((Roberts) Mendum) Orange died of dropsy in Great Falls, Somersworth, NH, February 12, 1880, aged seventy-five years.

MARRIAGES. GLIDDEN-ORANGE. At Gilmanton, N.H., in the Congregational Church, 20th inst., by Rev. S.N. Greeley, Mr. Charles H. Glidden of Boston and Miss May G. Orange, daughter of Henry S. Orange of Gilmanton (Boston Evening Transcript, November 23, 1889).

Son Henry S. Orange died in Gilmanton, NH, October 26, 1894.

Death of a Former Lowell Citizen. Henry S. Orange, for many years a dry goods merchant in Lowell, died Friday at his home in Gilmanton, N.H., after a long illness, aged 80 years. He was born In Great Falls, N.H., and when a young man went to Lowell, where he soon after went into business, retiring some 20 years ago. He had served in the Lowell city government, but never took a very active part in politics aside from this. He was an Odd Fellow and belonged to the Lowell lodge. He was a republican from the formation of the party. He is survived by a widow and three children (Boston Globe, October 27, 1894).

Daughter-in-law Elizabeth A. (Kendall) Orange died in Gilmanton, NH, March 10, 1927.


References:

Find a Grave. (2011, December 21). Jotham Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82753837/jotham-nute

Find a Grave. 2013, October 3). Franklin Orange. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/118126603/franklin-orange

Find a Grave. (2019, November 4). Henry Smith Orange. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/202730856/henry-smith-orange

Find a Grave. (2013, October 3). Col. Jeremy W. Orange. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/118125086/jeremy-w-orange

Knapp, William D. (1894). Somersworth: An Historical Sketch. Somersworth, NH

Moore, Charles. (1848). Freemasons’ Monthly Magazine, Volumes 7-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mCAsAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA255

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820. Concord, NH

Wikipedia. (2022, March 24). Whig Party (United States). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States)

Milton Militia Dispute – 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 3, 2022

[Editor: Here follows Ms. Bristol’s description of the Milton militia dispute of 1820. It contains references to several petition documents which will be published separately over the coming months. It will serve then also as a sort of index to those documents].

New Hampshire relied upon a militia system for its defense from colonial times through 1847.

Each and every free, able-bodied white male citizen, between the ages of 18 and 45 years, is liable to do military duty (Lyon, 1824).

Militiamen were required to present themselves – to “muster” – with their weapons once or twice a year for company-level drills, as well as a final time in the Fall for a larger regimental-level drill.

The [Rochester regimental] muster field at its best presented a gay appearance. The various companies drawn up in line, with muskets and accouterments bright and clean, the officers scattered between the lines with fine uniforms and stately plumes, the Light Infantry much like the officers but with shorter plumes, and the Artillery Company with their formidable cannon, together with the motley crowd on every side must have been an attractive and interesting scene. Gingerbread carts, candy stands, and all sorts of variety shows, with an occasional fight between heated partisans from different towns afforded abundant merriment and diversion. Liquor and gambling booths grew more and more frequent so that one year Captain Samuel Jones and his company from Farmington made a charge upon them and pitched them and their belongings over the fence. The brisk step, the martial dignity and the clear distinçt orders of the morning had in those days generally become somewhat limp, languid and indistinct toward the close of the day. Many still living can remember the great contrast between the inspiriting, clear cut, exactly timed strains of fife and drum as the companies came marching to the field in the morning and the slip shod timeless whistle and fumbling taps as they started on their homeward way (McDuffee, 1882).

NH Militia Order Blank
NH Militia Muster Order Form. This example is blank, with its spaces to be completed by the company sergeant at the request of the captain.

Old Fashioned Muster Gingerbread. One cup of molasses, 2 large spoons of butter, 1 teaspoon of soda dissolved in 3 tablespoons of boiling water, 1 teaspoon of ginger and flour enough to knead well but not hard. Roll into 3 sheets, mark with a fork, and bake quickly; after baking, while hot, mix 1 teaspoon each of milk and molasses and wet the top. I have sent this recipe by request of Mrs. G.L.D. of Chelsea. Portland, Me. E.E.E. (Boston Globe, November 24, 1894).

[A woodburning “quick oven” would have a modern oven temperature of between 425 to 450 F. It would take about 20 minutes to bake. A toothpick inserted in the center should come out clean when done].

Muster ginger bread. Boil 1 pt. molasses and 1 tablespoon ginger; let cool, add ½ pt. shortening, mostly butter, 2 teaspoons soda dissolved in ¼ cup hot water, ½ teaspoon alum dissolved in ¾ cup cold water, flour to make a dough that can be handled. Roll about two inches thick. Mark the top with back of fork. Bake quickly, take out as soon as done, as too long baking spoils it. Put away in jar and keep a week or so. The longer it is kept the moister becomes. Somebody try in and report. Von Edirb (Boston Globe, August 24, 1906).

Milton’s militiamen and those from southern Wakefield made up the Seventh Company of New Hampshire’s Second Regiment of militia at this time. It was led then by Captain Jeremy Nute (1788-1879), with James Hayes, Jr. (1790-1845), as its Lieutenant, and Norton Scates (1790-187[?]) as its Ensign.

The Seventh Company’s area encompassed all of Milton and that part of neighboring Wakefield that lay south of Lovell Lake. Depending upon where one lived in this company area, travel to militia musters might be rather burdensome. (Milton Mills was at least a 15-mile hike, if not more, to the regimental muster location in Rochester, where one would then spend the day drilling and marching around, before making a weary 15-mile return hike. Union village in Wakefield was at least 13 miles distant (for a round-trip of at least 26 miles)). The militiamen traveling furthest to drills and musters grew restive.

Some 134 Seventh Company militiamen took a vote on May 30, 1820. They were likely assembled together for a company-level militia drill. By their vote, 69 [51.5%] militiamen chose to seek a division of their company into two parts, while 22 [16.4%] of them preferred to leave the situation as it was. The remaining 43 [32.1%] did not express a preference either way.

The company officers petitioned the regimental field officers above them, on May 31, 1820, seeking to divide the Seventh Company into two companies. There would be a northern company, encompassing Union Village, Milton Mills, and Milton south to a certain east-west division line – the Milton town meeting house would have been north of the proposed line – and a southern company from that division line to the Rochester line, encompassing Milton Three Ponds, as well as South and West Milton. (See Milton Militia Division Request – May 1820).

The field officers rejected this proposition, although their reply has not come to hand. (They likely rode horseback to the muster). But they seem to have been unaware that “there is more than one way to skin a cat.” If the field officers refused to divide the town militia company into two parts, there was another, more drastic solution available to the petitioners. The town itself might be divided into two parts, which might achieve the same thing.

... in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this [Wakefield] town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this [Wakefield] town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

Dearborne-Piper Signatures - Wakefield - 1813
Signatures of Luther Dearborne and Rev. Asa Piper on an earlier June 1813 petition by the citizens of the “pleasant village at Wakefield Corner” recommending William Sawyer (1774-1860) as a Wakefield justice-of-the-peace.

Wakefield’s three selectmen became aware that there was trouble in paradise, so to speak, at some time after their annual March town meeting and before June 1820.

We are aware that Petitioners for the new Town will point out by Carrigain’s Map, or some other Survey, what a handsome, beautiful five-mile square Town may be made out of Wakefield and Milton, and then attempt to show and make it believed, that the remaining part of those two Towns will be equally as good as the whole and in a better form.

Carrigain Survey Map - 1816 (Detail)
Carrigain Map of New Hampshire in 1816 (Detail). Division advocates pored over this map with prospective signers. The “Lisbon” or “Milfield” they envisaged would have run from Lovell Lake in Wakefield south to Meetinghouse Pond in Milton. It would have included what is now Union village in Wakefield, as well as Milton Mills and Plummer’s Ridge in Milton. Milton Three Ponds, South Milton, and West Milton would have been the remaining “rump” of Milton after such a division.

The “Carrigain map,” the most famous of New Hampshire maps, is named for Philip Carrigain (177[6]-1842), secretary of state of New Hampshire, who was granted much of the responsibility of compiling it. The map was authorized by the New Hampshire legislature in 1803. Carrigain may have engraved the cartographic portions, and he held the copyright. The map is based upon many individual surveys, and in its early stages, Carrigain, a lawyer, depended heavily upon the technical skills of Phinehas Merrill (1767-1815), a professional surveyor (WhiteMountainHistory, 2021).

Neither the Milton nor Wakefield pro-division petitions, although mentioned in other documents, have come to hand. If ever they were actually filed, they might have been withdrawn. Luther Dearborn (1771-1844) of Wakefield, NH, and John Remick, Jr. (1777-1840) of Milton, were said to have headed their respective lists of petitioners. (Remick was a Milton selectman and both men were justices-of-the-peace in their respective towns). Wakefield’s lifelong Congregational minister, Rev. Asa Piper (1757-1835), is said to have been also a proponent of division.

Some 127 Milton men filed an anti-division remonstrance petition intended for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature. Company officers Jeremy Nute, James Hayes, Jr., and Norton Scates all signed this remonstrance, as did former company officers Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, and future officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes (1789-1842). One may note that none of Milton’s selectmen signed. (See Milton Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820).

Wakefield selectmen Jonathan Copp (1792-1869), Henry L. Wiggin (1791-1844), and Elias Wentworth (1774-1852) filed their own anti-division remonstrance petition intended for that same June 1820 session. It was signed also by 199 Wakefield inhabitants (See Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820).

Some 88 Milton men filed a company division petition intended for the November 1820 session of the NH legislature. Company Captain Jeremy Nute signed this proposal, as did former company officers Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, future company officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes, and Milton selectman Hopley Meserve (1789-1875). (See Milton Militia Division Petitions – November 1820).

Some 27 Wakefield division petitioners later thought better of their having signed the division petition. They signed a retraction and anti-division petition, November 1, 1820. (See Wakefield Pro-Division Renunciation – November 1820).

One should note that Fourth (1820) Federal Census enumerations for Strafford County have not been preserved (although the aggregate totals have). They would have had the names of the household heads and age-based tick marks for the members of their households. The various petitions related to dividing or not dividing either the militia company or the towns are valuable in that they provide us with the names of a plurality at least of Milton’s adult male inhabitants of 1820, including many of its household heads.

Obviously, the proposed splitting of the towns never took place. Milton’s militia company was divided instead into two companies. The Milton company was reassigned to a newly-created Thirty-Ninth Regiment of militia in 1822. The new regiment included also companies from Rochester and Farmington, NH. Wakefield’s south company, which appears to have included also Milton Mills, was assigned to the Thirty-Third Regiment of militia, along with those from Alton, Brookfield, Middleton, and New Durham, NH. Its north company was assigned to the Twenty-Seventh Regiment of militia, along with those from Effingham, Ossipee, Tuftonboro, and Wolfeboro, NH.

The general muster of the militia at the same [Fall] time of year was a holiday of no less interest and importance to the people of two preceding generations. By a state law of 1792, able-bodied citizens between the ages of eighteen and forty-five were required to meet twice a year for military drill. To these spring and fall trainings for each company in its own town was afterwards added the annual muster of the Thirty-ninth Regiment. This regiment consisted of five companies of regular infantry, one from each of the villages of Farmington, West Farmington, Milton Three Ponds, Gonic, and Rochester, together with one Light Infantry Company collected from all parts of the district and the Rochester Artillery Company (McDuffee, 1892).

Luther Dearborn received a reappointment as a Wakefield justice-of-the-peace, June 14, 1828. His wife, Sarah “Sally” (Pike) Dearborn, died in 1831. His term as justice would have expired in June 1833. Instead of a reappointment, the court roster bears a marginal notation that he had “moved to Somersworth,” N.H. He was living there at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census.


See also Milton Militiaman’s Petition – 1807 and Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1820


References:

Colonial Quills. (2012, October 7). Muster Day Gingerbread Recipe. Retrieved from colonialquills.blogspot.com/2012/10/muster-day-gingerbread.html

Cow Hampshire. (2006, May 29). New Hampshire’s Militia: Gathering for Annual Muster Day. Retrieved from www.cowhampshireblog.com/2006/05/29/new-hampshires-militia-gathering-for-annual-muster-day/

Find a Grave. (2013, January 16). Phillip Carrigain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/103677228/philip-carrigain

Find a Grave. (2007, October 15). Jonathan Copp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/22229979/jonathan-copp

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Luther Dearborn. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92171689/luther-dearborn

Find a Grave. (2016, September 13). Col. Bidfield Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169872910/bidfield-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 22). Capt. James Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336842/james-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 2). Hopley Meserve. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114785277/hopley-meserve

Find a Grave. (2013, October 3). Col. Jeremy W. [Nute] Orange. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/118125086/jeremy-w-orange

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Rev. Asa Piper. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92206616/asa-piper

Find a Grave. (2012, June 24). Henry L. Wiggin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92466261/henry-l-wiggin

McDuffie, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RY0-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA551

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Lyon, G. Parker. (1824). New-Hampshire Annual Register, and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=O0g9AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA72

Secretary of State. (1920). Laws of New Hampshire: Second constitutional period, 1811-1820. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Cb9GAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA941

Thompson, Rev. Albert H. (1886). Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Organization of the First Church, and Ordination of the First Settled Town Minister of Wakefield, N.H. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EKm15quwMhsC&pg=PA42

WhiteMountainHistory. (2021). 1816 Phillip Carrigain Map. Retrieved from whitemountainhistory.org/1816_Philip_Carrigain_Map.html

Celestial Seasonings – April 2022

By Heather Durham | March 31, 2022

Hi everyone! Welcome to our April 2022 edition including the first meteor shower of the year, two occurrences of the black Moon, a partial eclipse that will not be visible to us along with Aprils Pink Moon which is said to have been named after the colors of flowers that bloom this time of year.

There are also two videos that enhance the events of this month including those that cannot be seen with the naked eye. The videos do contain interesting graphic depictions of a variety of events for your viewing pleasure.

Now let us look down this page to read about this month’s astronomical events!


April 1. New or black Moon.

April 4. Mars and Saturn will rise and come close to one another.

April 9. The new Moon will be at first quarter.

April 16. The full Pink Moon will be on display tonight.

April 22. Today, we will have the Lyrid Meteor Shower from the Constellation Hercules. This will be visible beginning just past 10:00 pm until a few minutes after 5:00 am during which time you may see around 17 meteors per hour. However, the last quarter of the Moon may interfere with early morning viewing.

April 23. The Moon will be in its final quarter.

April 24. The Moon and Saturn will rise closely together and towards the right.

April 26. The Moon and Venus will travel in close proximity to each other.

April 27. The Moon and Venus will rise to the right together. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to the right.

April 28. Mercury will travel to its highest point in the evening sky.

April 29. Mercury will be located at its furthest point from the Sun.

April 30. Venus and Jupiter will rise to the right together. There will also be a partial eclipse of the Sun but it will only be visible from South America or Antarctica. There will also be another black moon tonight.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (2022, January 17). April 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/RMl8bNI86q0

Secrets of Space. (2022, March). Astronomy Events April 2022. Retrieved from youtu.be/_HmU3jFcQYA

Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1820

By Muriel Bristol | March 27, 2022

Seventy-nine Milton inhabitants petitioned NH Governor Samuel Bell (1770-1850) and his Executive Council, April 3, 1820, seeking appointment of a Milton justice-of-the-peace. (Bell was a Democratic-Republican, i.e., a Democrat, as opposed to a Federalist-Republican).

The petitioners recommended James Roberts (1783-1839) of the village of Milton, i.e., Milton Three Ponds, for an appointment as their justice-of-the-peace. They described the businesses operating then at Three Ponds as being taverns, stores, and mechanic shops (all plural). And he was a trader, i.e., a storekeeper. (See Milton in 1817 and Milton in 1823).

Film tropes typically portray justices-of-the-peace as being awakened in the night to sleepily perform civil marriages for eloping couples. While they might be awakened for this purpose occasionally, a NH justice of this period might be compared more accurately to a modern district court judge (Bell, 1843).

Milton had no police force, not even temporary or auxiliary officers, nor would it have any for another seventy years. (See Milton Policemen – c1891-1914). Local justices-of-the-peace settled most issues. They were empowered to issue search, arrest and other types of warrants, which would be served, executed or enforced by a Strafford County sheriff’s deputy. (Elected county sheriffs appointed local deputy sheriffs for most of the towns within their jurisdictions). A local justice might adjudicate civil disputes and even lesser criminal offenses, but, for more serious matters, the matter or the suspects at hand would be “bound over” to a higher court.

The Three Ponds nominee, James Roberts, was born in Somersworth, NH, December 24, 1783, son of Timothy and Elizabeth (Hayes) Roberts. (Timothy Roberts (1759-1835) had been a 2nd Lieutenant in Col. Waldron’s Regiment during the Revolutionary War).

Timothy Roberts headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Elizabeth (Hayes) Roberts], one male aged 16-25 years [James Roberts], two male aged 10-15 years [John Roberts and Wentworth Roberts], one male aged under ten years [Hezekiah Roberts], and one female aged under-10 years [Mary M. Roberts]. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Father Timothy Roberts signed Rochester’s Northeast Parish division petition of May 28, 1802.

James Roberts married in Rochester, NH, July 2, 1804, Mercy Wentworth, both of Milton. Rev. Haven performed the ceremony (McDuffie, 1892). She was born in Milton, circa 1784, daughter of John and Rebecca (Horn) Wentworth.

Daughter Rebecca Horn Roberts was born in Milton, December 12, 1804. She was a namesake for her maternal grandmother, Rebecca (Horn) Wentworth.

James Roberts signed the August 1805 petition requesting appointment of Lt. Jotham Nute as a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

Daughter Susanna Roberts was born in Milton, December 4, 1806.

Twin sons John Watson Roberts and James Cutts Roberts were born in Milton, March 27, 1810.

James Roberts headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 16-25 years [Mercy (Wentworth) Roberts] two females aged under-10 years [Rebecca H. Roberts and Susanna Roberts], and two males aged under-10 years [John W. Roberts and James C. Roberts]. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of James Twombly and Jonathan Dore.

Son Owen Swain Roberts was born in Milton, April 4, 1813.

On 10 Mar. 1814 David [Farnham] sold lot #8, Middleton, NH, consisting of 100 acres, to William Palmer of Milton, NH, for $5 and five annual mortgage payments of $255; in which David Farnham (likely his father) and Daniel Palmer were witnesses. On 20 Jan. 1817 David repurchased this land for $200 from Caleb Wingate and Dodavah Palmer, of Milton, administrators [of] the estate of William Palmer, late of Milton, Esq. Witnesses were James Roberts and Levi Jones (Farnham, 1999).

Son Bard P. Roberts was born in Milton, June 26, 1815.

James Roberts was one of three Milton selectman in the years 1815-18. Selectmen Joseph Walker and James Roberts signed the Milton Road Weight petition of 1816. (For whatever reason, the third selectman, Josiah Witham, did not so sign).

The context of the April 1820 petition recommending James Roberts suggests that the petitioners hoped he would be a suitable successor to justice John Fish (c1760-1819[?]). Fish had been one of Milton’s original selectmen, then town clerk, and had received his appointment as a justice-of-the-peace, June 24, 1814. Both men were residents of Milton village, i.e., Milton Three Ponds, and Fish had recently been “removed by death.”

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable the Council in the State of New Hampshire.

Respectfully represent the undersigned inhabitants of the Town of Milton in the County of Strafford and State aforesaid ~

that John Fish, bg [being] late of said Milton, and one of the Justices of the peace in and for said County of Strafford, did while in full life reside in the village in said Milton where the principal part of the business – such as the business of Taverns, stores, mechanics shops has been and is usually done in said Town ~ that the said John Fish has recently been removed by death ~ that in consequence thereof there are now in Commission as Justices of the peace in said Town, no more than three persons, that those three persons reside in remote parts of the Town, so there is now no Justice of the peace in this State within four to five miles of the aforesaid village ~ that it would be conducive to the moral good of the Community and of great public utility in other points of view that some suitable person within said village, or in the immediate vicinity of same, should be appointed to conserve the public peace ~

That Mr James Roberts, who now resides and is a Trader in said village is an intelligent and moral man ~ that his fellow citizens in said Town have for many years past manifested their confidence in his Talents and integrity by frequently appointing him to some of the most arduous offices within their gift ~

We the undersigned, therefore, unhesitatingly beg leave to recommend the said James Roberts to your notice as a person, all things considered, the best qualified of any person of this village or vicinity, for the appointment to the important office of a Justice of the peace ~ and we further pray that the said James Roberts may be appointed to that office and as in duly bound &c ~ Milton, April 3, 1820.

Subscribers

[Column 1:]

Thos Leighton, William Sargent, Ichabod Bodge, Joseph Walker, Stephen Henderson, John Palmer, Ebenr Ricker, Benja V. Jenkins, Matthias Nutter, Stephen Jenkins, Jr, William Hatch, Richard Walker, James Varney, John Wentworth, Junr, Samuel Bragdon, Charles Ricker, Timothy Ricker, William W. Lord, David Wentworth, James H. Horn, Elijah Horn, Timothy Emery, David M. Corson, David Corson, John Lovel, Daniel Wentworth, Dodavah Dore, Phinias Wentworth, Daniel G. Dore,

[Column 2:] Wm Palmer, Aaron Twombly, John Wentworth, John Downs, James Bragdon, Thomas Ricker, John Ricker, Richard Horn, Joshua Jones, William Huntress, Ivory Bragdon, Timo Roberts, Nathl Pinkham, William Foss, John Foss, Jerediah Ricker, Isaac Wentworth, Robert Knight, John Fifield, Jonathan Dore

The petition bears the additional notation, in another hand, of “appointed 1821.” Court Rosters indicate that James Roberts, of Milton, received his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 23, 1821.

James Roberts was one of eighty-eight men that signed a Milton militia division petition of November 10, 1820.

In the interval between the April 1820 petition recommending Roberts and his June 1821 appointment, the Milton Selectman petitioned November 29, 1820, to have Gilman Jewett (1777-1856) appointed as the justice of the peace. Whether they were impatient or simply preferred another candidate is not clear. (None of them had signed the petition proffering Roberts). Jewett had been Milton’s first town clerk (1802-06) and a member of the townhouse building committee. He was a son of Milton’s original justice-of-the-peace, Paul Jewett (1744-1835).

To His Excellency the Governor and Honourable Council of the State of New Hampshire.

We the undersigned, your petitioners, beg leave respectfully to state that the inhabitants of the village at the three Ponds (so called) in Milton and its vicinity, complain of being very much aggrieved, since the death of John Fish Esquire, in consequence of not having a Justice of the Peace in the place ~ and it is very obvious that it is necessary to the convenience and interest of the inhabitants and would be conducive to the well-being of society to have one in that place ~

We would further state that we have for a long time been well acquainted with M. Gilman Jewett, and that he has ever conducted himself as a man of integrity & promoter of good order in society ~ his qualifications are such that should he have a Commission of the Peace, we have no reason to think we should ever blush for this recommendation, or our state be ashamed of the appointment.

Nov. 29, 1820. H. Hayes, Hopley Meserve, John Remick, Jr } Selectmen of Milton

Milton Selectmen - 1820

Hanson Hayes (1792-1851) signified his assent with a flourish, while the signatures of Hopley Meserve (1789-1875) and John Remick, Jr. (1777-1840), were a bit more plainspoken. (Remick was himself already a justice-of-the-peace, having been first appointed June 18, 1813).

James Roberts was again one of three Milton selectman in the years 1821-22, and 1826.

The NH Register and Farmer’s Almanac of 1822 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum, which was the higher office, as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and James Roberts.

Daughter Mary Ann Adams Roberts was born in Milton, March 4, 1822.

The NH Political Manual and Annual Register of 1824 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and J. Roberts. Jotham Nute was also identified as being Milton’s coroner (Farmer, 1824).

James Roberts was Milton town moderator for eight years from about 1824. He had been preceded in that office by John Nutter, and would be succeeded by Hanson Hayes (1792-1851) (Scales, 1914).

Daughter Rebecca H. Roberts died November 30, 1825.

The NH Annual Register and US Calendar of 1826 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and J. Roberts, Hanson Hayes, and Stephen M. Mathes (Farmer & Lyon, 1826).

Court Rosters indicate that James Roberts, of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on November 28, 1827.

Jas Roberts headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Mercy (Wentworth) Roberts, one male aged 10-14 years [Beard P. Roberts], one female aged 10-14 years [Betsy H. Roberts], one female aged 5-9 years [Mary A.A. Roberts], and one male aged under-5 years [Hezekiah W. Roberts]. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Wm W. Lord and Timo Roberts. (Ten years earlier, both of those neighbors had signed the 1820 petition asking for his appointment as justice).

Daughter Susanna Roberts died January 30, 1832.

Court Rosters indicate that James Roberts, of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on November 30, 1832.

Son John W. Roberts married in Milton, November 12, 1833, Margaret Nutter. She was born in Milton, April 7, 1816, daughter of Matthias and Sarah (Wentworth) Nutter.

Son James C. Roberts married, circa 1834, Lydia J. Scates. She was born in Milton, April 22, 1807, daughter of John and Mary Scates.

Justices of the Peace. MiltonLevi Jones, Daniel Hayes, John Remich, James Roberts, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, Samuel S. Mason, Stephen Drew, Israel Nute, John L. Swinerton, Thomas Chapman (Hayward, 1834).

Father Timothy Roberts died in Milton, N.H., August 3, 1835, aged seventy-six years (Columbian Centinel, October 27, 1835).

Son Owen S. Roberts married, in 1838, Harriet L. Foss. She was born in Milton in 1814, daughter of William and Mary (Downs) Foss.

Court Rosters indicate that James Roberts, of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on August 8, 1838. On this occasion he was “advanced” also to be a justice “in quorum.”

James Roberts drowned in Milton, July 6, 1839, aged fifty-five years.

Mercy Roberts headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. Her household included one female [herself] aged 50-59 years, one female aged 20-29 years [Betsy H. Roberts], one female aged 15-19 years [Mary A.A. Roberts], and one male aged 10-14 years [Hezekiah W. Roberts]. One member of their household was engaged in Agriculture. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of William Jones and James C. Roberts on the one side, and John W. Roberts and Aaron Dore on the other side.

Daughter Mary A.A. Roberts married in Rochester, NH, November 28, 1841, Daniel W. Dame, both of Rochester. Rev. E. Mason performed the ceremony. Dame was born in Sandwich, NH, February 8, 1820, son of Richard and Abigail (Page) Roberts.

Daughter Betsy H. Roberts married in Rochester, NH, May 22, 1842, Daniel Wentworth, both of Rochester. Rev. E. Scott performed the ceremony.

Mercy (Wentworth) Roberts died in Milton, September 10, 1845.

Daughter Mary A.A. (Roberts) Dame died in Lanark, IL, September 4, 1847, aged twenty-five years.

Mother Elizabeth “Betsy” (Hayes) Roberts died in Milton in 1849.

Son Owen S. Roberts died in Somersworth, NH, January 6, 1853, aged thirty-nine years.

Son Bard P. Roberts married (2nd) in South Newmarket, NH, April 5, 1860, Mary E. (Leavitt) Furnald, he of South Newmarket, NH, and she of Exeter, NH. He was a widowed [railroad] station agent, aged forty-four years, and she was a widow [of John C. Fernald (1823-1852)], aged thirty-three years. Rev. Winthrop Fifield performed the ceremony. She was born in Limington, ME, January 10, 1826, daughter of Benjamin and Mary (McKenney) Leavitt. (Bard P. Roberts and Mary E. (Leavitt) Fernald would seem to have parted company, as she married (3rd) in Newburyport, MA, 1871, Stephen Wiggin, both of Hampton, NH).

Son Bard P. Roberts married (3rd) in Candia, NH, April 19, 1862, Sarah J. Emerson, he of South Newmarket, NH, and she of Candia. He was aged forty-six years and she was aged thirty-six years. Rev. E.W. Hidden performed the ceremony. She was born in Candia, NH, circa 1825, daughter of John and Clarissa (Fitts) Emerson.

Son James C. Roberts died of consumption in Milton, March 3, 1865, aged fifty-four years, eleven months. Daughter-in-law Lydia J. (Scates) Roberts died May 3, 1866.

Son Baird P. Roberts received an appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, July 12, 1871. He married (4th) in Portland, ME, July 21, 1871, Nettie M. Mark, he of Milton, and she of Portland. Rev. A.H. Wright performed the ceremony.

Son Bard P. Roberts died of chronic cystitis in Milton, November 26, 1890, aged seventy-five years, five months, and two days. He was a traveling agent. Charles D. Jones, M.D., signed the death certificate.

DIED. In Milton, Nov. 26, Bard P. Roberts, age 75 years, 5 months, 2 days. New Hampshire and Vermont papers please copy (Farmington News, December 5, 1890).

Daughter-in-law Harriet L. (Foss) Roberts died of natural causes in Malden, MA, August 20, 1895, aged eighty-one years, four months, and fifteen days.

Son-in-law Daniel W. Dame died in Lanark, IL, December 10, 1895, aged seventy-five years.


References:

Bell, Samuel D. (1843). Justice and Sheriff: Practical Forms for the Use of Justices of the Peace, Sheriffs, Coroners and Constables; Containing Forms of Proceedings, and the Revised Statutes of New-Hampshire, Relating to the Duties of Those Officers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=52JKAAAAYAAJ

Claremont Manufacturing Co. (1822), NH Register & Farmer’s Almanac. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=KgIXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA36

Classic Actress. (1936). Robert Taylor Marries Janet Gaynor in Small Town Girl. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=QoSemS_HtfY

Farmer, John. (1824). NH Political Manual and Annual Register. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=FMEwAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA44

Farmer, John & Lyon, G. Parker. (1826). NH Register & US Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=L8EwAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA44

Farnham, Russell C. (1999). New England Descendants of the Immigrant Ralph Farnum of Rochester, Kent County, England, and Ipswich, Massachusetts. Portsmouth, NH: Peter Randall Publishing

Find a Grave. (2005, July 6). Mary Ann Adams Dame. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/11300686/mary_ann-adams-dame

Hayward, John. (1834). The New-England and New-York Law-Register, for the Year 1835. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RXc8AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA86

McDuffie, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RY0-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA615

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Wikipedia. (2021, December 19). Samuel Bell (New Hampshire Politician). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Bell_(New_Hampshire_politician)

Milton Mills Attorney Forrest L. Marsh (1872-1945)

By Muriel Bristol | March 20, 2022

Forrest Linwood Marsh was born in Milton, September 14, 1872, son of Oscar F. and Georgiana (Reed) Marsh. (Her parents were Lewis D. and Annette W. (Randall) Reed).

Although not listed as running a livery stable, confectioner Forrest L. Marsh offered to board horses over the winter of 1893-94.

HORSES, CARRIAGES, ETC. WINTER BOARD for horses, best of care; terms reasonable. F.L. MARSH, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, October 26, 1893).

Forrest Linwood Marsh married (1st) in Newfield, ME, December 19, 1899, Mildred J. Tebbetts, he of Milton Mills and she of Newfield, ME. He was an attorney, aged twenty-seven years, and she was a lady, aged twenty-two years. Rev. W.A. Nottage performed the ceremony. She was born in Newfield, ME, December 15, 1877, daughter of William N. and Mary J. (Wyatt) Tebbetts. (Her father was a carriage manufacturer).

Oscar F. Marsh, a blanket finisher, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-two years), Georgia Marsh, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), his son, Forrest L. Marsh, an attorney, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and his daughter-in-law, Mildred J. Marsh, aged twenty-two years (b. ME). Oscar F. Marsh rented their house. Georgia Marsh was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Their house appeared in the enumeration between those of George E. Simes, a carpenter, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and Calvin S. Haines, a hostler, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH).

Forrest L. Marsh appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as a Milton Mills lawyer, insurance agent, and notary public.

NEWS OF THE STATE. … Milton delegates for the several conventions are as follows: State convention Elbridge W. Fox, Freeman H. Lowd; Congressional, Charles H. Looney, Joseph H. Avery; Councilor, William F. Wallace, B.B. Plummer; Senatorial, F.L. Marsh, Charles D. Jones; County, Charles D. Fox, Charles A. Jones (Farmington News, September 7, 1900).

Daughter Doris L. Marsh was born in Milton, June 2, 1901. (Her father was a lawyer). Charles W. Gross, M.D., reported the birth.

MILTON. Town meeting passed off quietly, and the following officers were elected to serve the town for the ensuing year: Selectmen, Warren Jewett, Joseph H. Avery, and Charles A. Jones; town clerk, Harry L. Avery; constables, H.W. Downs and Hartley Nutter; school board, Frank G. Howe [Horne], Forrest L. Marsh, Dr. M.A.H. Hart (Farmington News, March 12, 1904).

MILTON. The delegates to the republican convention to be held at Concord, May 17, are, Forrest L. Marsh and William T. Wallace (Farmington News, May 13, 1904).

Acetylene Rays. At Milton Mills, N.H., the new store of W.S. Miller and that of N. Mucci as well as the home of Forrest L. Marsh and others, are having the benefit of a change from kerosene lamps. It is to acetylene (Acetylene Journal, 1907).

Son Ronald T. Marsh was born in Milton, December 11, 1909. (His father was a lawyer). Frank S. Weeks, M.D., reported the birth. (In later life, i.e., after 1920, he used the name Forrest Linwood Marsh, Jr. He would graduate as such from Rutgers University, with its Class of 1931).

LOCAL. Officers of the Woodbine lodge, No. 44, I.O.O.F., have been elected for the year 1910, as follows: Noble Grand, W.R. Parrock; vice grand, S.M. Tuttle; rec. secretary, A.R. Jones; fin. secretary, V.A. Libby; treasurer, Wilbur C. Jones. The installation will occur this Thursday night, Jan. 6, with Forest L. Marsh, D.D.G.M., of Milton Mills as the installing officer. After the work an oyster supper will be served. All come (Farmington News, January 7, 1910).

LOCAL. Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., No, 41, installed officers last Thursday evening. Deputy Grand Master Forest L. Marsh of Milton Mills doing the work. Officers are Shirly M. Tuttle N.G.; Wilbur C. Jones, V.G.; Arthur R. Jones, rec. sec.; H.S. Davis, treas.; V.A. Libby, fin. sec.; Fred W. Browne, chap.; F.W. Thurston, warden; Herbert D. Browne, conductor. The financial condition of the lodge is very satisfactory. There are 240 members (Farmington News, July 10, 1910).

Forest L. Marsh, a general practice attorney, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Mildred Marsh, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and his children, Doris L. Marsh, aged eight years (b. NH), and Ronald T. Marsh, aged three months (b. NH). Forest L. Marsh owned their house, free-and-clear. Mildred Marsh was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of William Pinfold, a woolen mill napper, aged forty-six years (b. England), and John Hall, Jr., a woolen mill watchman, aged forty-eight years (b. Canada).

Forrest L. Marsh appeared in the Milton business directories of 1912, and 1917, as a Milton Mills lawyer, insurance agent, and notary public. Mrs. M.T. Marsh appeared as a merchant of ladies’ furnishings and dry and fancy goods.

Governor Rolland H. Spaulding appointed Forrest L. Marsh as Trial Justice of Milton, April 30, 1915 (NH General Court, 1915).

COMMISSIONER’S NOTICE. The undersigned, Commissioner to receive, examine, allow and adjust the claims against the estate of Charles W. Gross, late of Milton, County of Strafford, State of New Hampshire, deceased, will attend to the duties of his office at his office in Milton Mills, N.H, County of Strafford, on the third day of November, 1915, and on the second day of February, 1916, from 10 o’clock A.M. to four o’clock P.M., on each of said days. FORREST L. MARSH, Commissioner (Farmington News, August 27, 1915).

PERSONAL. Forest Marsh of Milton Mills was a visitor in town Tuesday (Farmington News, September 1, 1916).

LOCAL. There was a long session of police court Monday, in Rochester before Judge Samuel D. Felker. The parties concerned were from Middleton. Barney Layman was charged with threatening to kill Fred L. and Helen M. Leighton by shooting. In each case Layman was found guilty and fined $10 and costs, with a suspended sentence of 30 days. Leighton was arraigned on the charge of assaulting Layman and was found not guilty. Layman was represented by Judge L.V. McGill and Forrest L. Marsh of Milton Mills, and E.J. Smart for the state (Farmington News, May 4, 1917).

Fred Lewis Leighton of Union, Wakefield, NH, registered for the WW I military draft in Union, September 12, 1918. He was a carpenter for the B&M railroad, aged thirty-eight years (b. September 14, 1879). His nearest relative was his wife, Helen M. [(Cook)] Leighton. He was of a medium height, medium build, with blue eyes and brown hair.

Mother Georgia W. (Reed) Marsh died of an unknown chronic disease (and aortic insufficiency) in Milton Mills, December 29, 1918, aged seventy-three years, two months, and one day. She had been resident in Milton Mills for fifty-nine years, having come there from Somersworth, NH. Frank S. Weeks, M.D., signed the death certificate.

GREENVILLE. Dunster Hill lodge, I.O.O.F. was especially favored, at its meeting Monday night, by a visit from the Grand Master, Forrest L. Marsh of Milton Mills, district Deputy Grand Master, Mark D. Carroll of Hudson, also three other grand officers, Forrest A. Garland, Fred L. Reed, and George H. Woodbury of Nashua; For their Inspection, the Noble Grand was Degree Master, and his well trained staff, worked the third degree on a class of five candidates, in an instructive and impressive manner. Members and visiting brothers, to the number of 43, filled the lodge room. The collation committee served refreshments, and a social time was enjoyed till a late hour. (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), June 6, 1919).

Forrest L. Marsh, acting as attorney for Mary T. [(Titcomb)] Laskey of Acton, ME, administratrix of the estate of Charles H. Laskey, late of Acton, ME, filed her petition with the Strafford County Probate Court, July 29, 1919. She sought license to sell a Milton property at auction to raise sufficient funds to meet the demands upon his estate (Farmington News, September 5, 1919).

Oscar F. Marsh, a state road patrolman, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his son, Forrest L. Marsh, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Mildred T. Marsh, aged forty-two years (b. ME), and his grandchildren, Doris L. Marsh, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Ronald T. Marsh, aged ten years (b. NH). Oscar F. Marsh owned their house on Main Street, free-and-clear. Their house appeared in the enumeration between those of Frederick H. Simes, a woolen mill superintendent, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and Eugene W. Emerson, a druggist (owner), aged sixty-three years (b. NH).

Mildred J. (Tebbetts) Marsh died of a goitre (and a contracted heart blockage) in Milton Mills, November 11, 1921, aged forty-three years, ten years, and twenty-six days. Frank S. Weeks, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Forrest L. Marsh appeared in the Milton business directory of 1922, as a Milton Mills lawyer, and fire insurance agent.

SANBORNVILLE. Forrest Marsh and daughter of Milton Mills recently were brief visitors m the village (Farmington News, August 15, 1924).

SANBORNVILLE. Forrest Marsh and son of Milton Mills were recent visitors in the village (Farmington News, February 6, 1925).

Forrest L. Marsh, acting as administrator of the estate of Charles E. Mills, late of Farmington, NH, filed his final account with the Strafford County Probate Court, November 1, 1926 (Farmington News, November 5, 1926). (Charles E. Mills had died of arterio-sclerosis in Farmington, NH, January 1, 1924, aged seventy-six years, nine months, and five days. He had resided in Farmington, NH, for forty-one years, having come there from Milton Mills).

Daughter Doris L. Marsh married in Chatham, MA, in 1927, Douglas L. Eaton.

Father Oscar F. Marsh died of a cerebral hemorrhage in the Hayes Hospital in Dover, NH. December 13, 1928, aged eighty-two years. (He had been there for six months). James J. Buckley, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Forrest L. Marsh married (2nd), probably in New Jersey, circa 1928, Anna M. (Hopkins) Martin. She was born in Bergen, NJ, June 19, 1885, daughter of Andrew J. and Winifred (Casey) Hopkins. (She had married (1st), in 1905, James A. Martin, who had died in 1917).

Forrest L. Marsh, a general lawyer, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed an East Orange, NJ, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna M. Marsh, aged forty-three years (b. NJ), and his [step-] son, James A. Martin, [Jr.,] a schoolteacher, aged twenty-one years (b. NJ). Forrest L. Marsh rented their apartment (#1036) at 305 Park Avenue, for $55 per month. They had a radio set.

Forrest L. (Anna M.) Marsh appeared in the Newark, NJ, directory of 1938, as a buyer, with his house at 100 3d Avenue. Mrs. Anna M. Marsh appeared as providing furnished rooms at 100 3d Avenue, residing also at that address.

Forrest L. Marsh, a gas & electric co. agent, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Newark, NJ, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anne M. Marsh, aged fifty-three years (b. Keyland, NJ), his [step-] son, [James A.] Martin Marsh, a real estate agent, aged thirty-one years (b. Arlington, NJ), his [step-] daughter-in-law, Vivian Marsh, a doctor’s nurse, aged twenty-eight years (b. Irvington, NJ), and his lodgers, Vera Bianco, a hotel restaurant waitress, aged twenty-eight years (b. NY), Francis Griffin, a restaurant waitress, aged [–] years (b. NY), Betty Lemacina, “out of town, no information.” Forrest L. Marsh rented their house at 258 Highland Avenue, for $75 per month.

Forrest L. Marsh died in Bloomfield, NJ, July 17, 1945, aged seventy-two years.

Deaths in Jersey. Bloomfield – Forrest L. Marsh, 65 [SIC], time study engineer at the Pollak Manufacturing Co., Kearny (Courier-News (Bridgewater, NJ), July 19, 1945).

Anne M. ((Hopkins) Martin) Marsh died in October 1976.


References:

Acetylene Journal. (1907). Acetylene Journal: Devoted to Acetylene Lighting and Kindred Topics. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=2RhaAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA377

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Charles Herbert Laskey. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115421806/charles-herbert-laskey

Find a Grave. (2013, March 24). Fred Lewis Leighton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/107236880/fred-lewis-leighton

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Forrest L. Marsh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115493759/forrest-l-marsh

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Oscar F. Marsh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115493700/oscar-f-marsh

Find a Grave. (2015, May 24). Charles E. Mills. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/146921697/charles-e.-mills

NH General Court. (1915). Reports, 1915. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=_EcbAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA116

Wilber Mercantile Agency. (1872). Directory of Associate Attorneys of the Wilber Mercantile Agency. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=4lQ7AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA364

Milton Road Weight Petition – 1816

By Muriel Bristol | March 13, 2022

Ten Milton men – the petition seemingly originated with them, – together with nine men from Farmington, six from Rochester, and four from Middleton, NH, petitioned the NH General Court for a weight-based road tax to be levied on two and four-wheeled carts, as well as regulations or requirements regarding the width of their wheel rims.

Details of this 1816 petition would seem to explain a bit more regarding the next link in the resource export chain sketched out by the Salmon Falls Sawmill petition of twenty years earlier. Milled lumber was then being floated down the Salmon Falls River and across Milton’s Three Ponds. (See Salmon Falls Sawmill Petition – 1797).

Here one may learn that locally milled lumber was loaded, as was local farm produce, onto two and four-wheeled carts or wagons carrying weights of between twelve hundred and thirty hundred pounds, and transported, judging by the habitations of the petitioners, from Farmington, Middleton, and Milton, then in through Rochester, and from there to points beyond. (Some of the sawmill petitioners of 1797 had been men from the more navigable Dover, NH, and the coastal ports of Portsmouth, NH, and even Boston, MA).

Thirty years earlier, in August 1785, petitioners Joshua Allen, Ichabod Hayes, William Jones, William Palmer, Joseph Plumer, and Joseph Walker had been among three hundred ten Rochester inhabitants that had petitioned the NH legislature for repeal of an act requiring milled boards to be square-edged and an inch thick (and other lumber in proportion). Those inhabitants described themselves then as being “largely Concerned in Lumber.” They sought also repeal of an act forbidding transport of lumber to the British West Indies (Hammond, 1884).

But the weight of those carts, exacerbated by too much weight on too-narrow wheels, was ruining the unpaved roads. The petitioners of 1816 proposed a schedule or system of weight-based taxes to supplement existing road taxes in maintaining roads. (The existing tax would seem to have been $1 for every $400-500 of value). Those with wider wheels would receive a remission or abatement of a part of their tax. They alluded to the already existing alternative of working off one’s taxes by performing town road work, at the rate of 75¢ per day. (Those would have been long, hard days).

To the Honorable the Senate and house of Representatives in General Court assembled ~

Respectfully shew,

The subscribers, citizens of Milton, Farmington & c., that living in a section of the country where much wheeling is done in transporting produce and lumber to market, they have witnessed the fatal effects of the narrow rimmed wheels to the roads over which they pass ~ that so fatal are those wheels to the roads, that notwithstanding the laws of the State are executed in assessing and collecting in some instances, the yearly tax of from four to five hundred dollars to each dollar of their proportion to the public taxes, for the repair of highways, those highways are for many months of the year nearly impassable, whereby the people are often much injured, besides being subject to prosecutions by way of information, indictments & c., which latter, from patriotic, or some other motives, often come upon us with no sparing hand ~ And that we are satisfied from long experience, that under existing laws, we never can have good and passable roads altho~ we are liable to exhaust our property in their repairs. Your petitioners therefore beg leave to call the attention of the Honorable Legislature to this subject, hoping that your wisdom will prescribe some salutary law that may effectually remedy an evil under which your petitioners, in common with thousands of others, have too long suffered ~

Your petitioners would beg leave to express their belief that a law expressing the principles hereinafter mentioned, with such others as may the Honorable Legislature may think expedient, would have the desired effect: To wit ~

That the owners of a two wheeled and cart used in transporting a weight, not exceeding thirty hundred, the rims of which shall be six inches wide on the face thereof, shall be have remitted out of his annual highway tax, the sum of two dollars ~ Those of eight inches, two dollars and one half ~ The owners of those carts having four wheels, for the purposes of transporting at one time thirty hundred weight, which wheels will be five inches on the face of them, shall have remitted two dollars ~ And those of six inches two dollars & fifty cents ~ That the owners of all carts having two wheels, whose rims are less than five inches on the face of them, used in transporting a weight at one time, not exceeding twelve hundred, at one time to be taxed two dollars yearly, which sum shall be laid out on the public highways at seventy-five cents for a day’s work ~ those having four wheels whose rims are less than four & three fourths of an inch on the face of the rims shall be taxed two dollars to be laid out as last aforesaid.

All of which is respectfully submitted ~

To the General Court of State of New Hampshire

[Column One:]

Of Farmington
Jeremiah Waldron, John Wingate Junr, Aaron Wingate, Joseph Jones Jr, Wm Barker, Nh Eastman, John Paine, James Davis, Benjamin Canney

Of Rochester
Joshua Allen, Jonathan Wingate, Jacob McDuffee, Leavitt Barker, Samuel Pray, Thomas McDuffee

[Column Two:]

[Of Milton]
Ichabod Hayes, Joseph Walker, James Roberts, Joseph Plumer, Isaac Scates, Levi Jones, Simon Chase, William Jones, Dodavah Palmer, Daniel Hayes

From Meddleton
Daniel Wingate, Joseph Goodwin, John Torr, Jona Buzzell

When such petitions were titled or summarized by legislative clerks, they would be characterized usually as the petition of this person, that person, and others. The persons signing at the top or, if there were multiple columns, at the top of the right-hand column, were often characterized as the “this person” and “that person” when titling. In this case, one might call this the petition of “Ichabod Hayes, Joseph Walker, and others.” It would seem that those initiating petitions usually signed in this position, and, in this case, the Milton signatures occupy that upper right-hand position. Additionally, the Milton signatures are the only ones not headed by a town label. One might suppose that they signed first. If so, the distinguishing location labels of Farmington, Rochester, and Middleton were needed only when the petition passed on to those other towns.

Milton petitioners Ichabod Hayes (1770-1830), Isaac Scates (b. 1785), and Levi Jones (1771-1847) were former selectmen. Petitioner Daniel Hayes [Jr.] (1759-1846) was the elder brother of petitioner Ichabod Hayes (1770-1830).

(Petitioners Aaron Wingate, Daniel Hayes [Jr.], and Jacob McDuffee, were subscribers at the Rochester Social Library Company (which had been established in 1792), as were Milton’s Levi Jones, Jotham Nute, Barnabas Palmer, Lt. William Palmer, Beard Plumer, and Joseph Walker (McDuffee, 1892). This private library remained active until about 1823, by which time it had acquired 400 volumes (McDuffee, 1892; NH State Librarian, 1892). (See also Milton Social Library – 1822)).

Petitioner Levi Jones was then Milton’s town clerk and its justice-of-the-peace in quorum. William Jones (1769-1845) was his elder brother. Joseph Plumer (1752-1821) was Levi Jones’s father-in-law and a brother-in-law of Farmington petitioner Aaron Wingate.

Petitioners Joseph Walker (1769-1850) and James Roberts (1783-1839) were two of Milton’s three then selectmen. (James Roberts would be appointed a Milton justice-of-the-peace in 1820).

Petitioner Dodavah Palmer (1794-1824), son of William Palmer, was a brother-in-law of Isaac Hayes (and a brother-in-law of Caleb Wingate).

On 10 March 1814 David [Farnham] sold lot #8, Middleton, NH, consisting of 100 acres, to William Palmer, for $5 and five annual mortgage payments of $255; in which David Farnham (likely his father) and Daniel Palmer were witnesses. On 20 Jan. 1817 David repurchased this land for $200 from Caleb Wingate and Dodavah Palmer of Milton, administrators [of] the estate of William Palmer, late of Milton, Esquire. Witnesses were James Roberts and Levi Jones (Farnham, 1999).

Petitioner Simon Chase (1786-1878) would move to Rochester in 1822. Simon Chase, Stephen Drew, and Joseph Walker would be among the thirteen men that in 1825 recommended Ebenezer D. Trickey (1799-1887) for appointment as a justice-of-the-peace for northwesterly Rochester, NH. (Trickey was so appointed July 1, 1826).

He [Simon Chase] removed to Rochester in 1822 and went into business, in company with Jonathan Torr. In 1825 he bought Torr’s interest in the business and built a new brick store. The same year he bought the house on Central Square which was his home until his death, which occurred January 31, 1878. His wife died June 14, 1870. Together with Charles Dennett and James C. Cole he was instrumental in building the first Methodist Church in Rochester, of which he was an active member (McDuffee, 1892).

Farmington petitioners Rev. Jeremiah Waldron, Esq. (1769-1851) and attorney Nehemiah Eastman (1782-1856) had been its NH state representatives in 1804-06 and 1813 respectively.

Squire Waldron, whose wife was Mary Scott, of Machias, Maine, lived in the northern part of the town where he built a handsome residence in 1812 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908) (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

The titles “Squire” and “Esquire” indicate that Rev. Waldron was also a justice-of-the-peace. Petitioner Eastman would become a NH state senator (in 1821-25), a U.S. representative (in 1825-27), and president of the Strafford Agricultural Society (in 1829-30). His wife, Anstress (Woodbury) Eastman, gave a bible to a young Henry Wilson (1812-1875), who would eventually become Vice President of the United States (1873-75).

When he was eight years old Mrs. Eastman, wife of the Hon. Nehemiah Eastman and sister of the Hon. Levi Woodbury, gave him some clothes and promised to give him a Testament when he had read it through. Being anxious to have a book of his own, he read it through in seven days and passed a creditable examination. This little volume Mr. Wilson always kept, and asserted that the reading and the examination, with the encouragement given by the lady, constituted the starting-point of his intellectual life (Vermont Journal, November 27, 1875).

Petitioner Benjamin Canney (1772-1827) was married to Margaret Henderson, whose brother was married to a daughter of petitioner Thomas McDuffee (1784-1851).

… Benjamin Canney [(1772-1827)] was another early builder in the [Farmington] village (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). 

Petitioner Aaron Wingate (1744-1822) lived on the Chestnut Hill Road (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). He had been a Rochester selectman in 1783, an assessor in 1791, a NH state representative in 1792-95, Farmington’s first moderator in 1799 and was at this time a Strafford County Court of Common Pleas judge. (His wife, Elizabeth (Plumer) Wingate (1750-1841), was the elder sister of Milton petitioner Joseph Plumer (1752-1821)).

Petitioner Joseph Jones, Jr., Esq. (1779-1858) was a brother-in-law of petitioner Thomas McDuffee, having married in Rochester, NH, November 19, 1801, McDuffee’s older sister, Lydia McDuffee, he of Farmington, NH, and she of Rochester. He was a Farmington justice-of-the-peace. (She died in Farmington, NH, July 1, 1802).

Petitioner James Davis (1781-1861) was a farmer and stock raiser. He would be appointed a Farmington justice-of-the-peace, June 26, 1822. Petitioner John Wingate, Jr., would be appointed a Farmington justice-of-the-peace, June 13, 1818. When petitioner James Davis, Esq., moved to Somersworth, NH, John Wingate, Jr., recommended Job Varney in 1825 to cover the district of Farmington and Rochester at Chestnut Hill. (Nehemiah Eastman, Daniel Hayes, Hopley Meserve, and Jemmy Wingate recommended Varney also).

Rochester petitioner Dr. Samuel Pray (1769-1854) had practiced medicine in Rochester since 1792 and had been a founding member of the Strafford District Medical Society. (He had attended Milton militiaman Norton Scates when he was wounded in 1806).

Petitioner Col. Joshua Allen (1757-1817) had been a Rochester selectman, with Richard Dame and Beard Plumer, when they petitioned for incorporation of Rochester’s first parish in January 1799, and when they laid out the bounds of Rochester’s graveyard in August 1800. He commanded the NH Second Militia Regiment in 1812. He was a maternal uncle of petitioner Levi Jones (and brother-in-law of both Samuel Lord and Theodore C. Lyman).

Petitioners Jacob McDuffee (1770-1848) and Dr. Samuel Pray, together with Rev. Joseph Haven, John P. Hale, James Tebbetts, and Moses Roberts, Jr., had been Rochester’s first school committee in 1809. McDuffee would be on the executive committee of the Strafford Agricultural Society in 1825 (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), November 18, 1825). He took a prize for the best Merino buck in its annual cattle show in October 1829 (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), November 6, 1829).

Petitioner Thomas McDuffee (1784-1851), who was familiarly known in Rochester, NH, as “Selectman McDuffee,” was a cousin of petitioner Jacob McDuffee and a brother-in-law of petitioner Joseph Jones, Jr.

Petitioner Jonathan Wingate (1793-1882) was a carpenter, who resided in Rochester, NH, as late as 1829, but had removed to Somersworth, NH, by 1831.

Middleton petitioner Daniel Wingate (1755-1825) had been moderator of the Middleton-Brookfield election meeting in March 1779.

March 18. The voters of Brookfield and Middleton met according to act of the general court, and chose Daniel Wingate moderator; and William Chamberlin to represent said district of Brookfield and Middleton in the general court (Merrill, 1889).

Petitioner Jonathan Buzzell (1761-182[8]) had been a Revolutionary soldier in Col. Reed’s regiment. He was one of sixty-four Middleton inhabitants that petitioned, on February 10, 1790, to have Capt. Archelaus Woodman appointed as a Middleton justice-of-the-peace.

Petitioners Daniel Wingate and Jonathan Buzzell had signed also an earlier road-related petition, in 1796, asking that a 4¢-per-acre tax be levied in Middleton for maintenance of its roads.

Daniel Wingate had been appointed a Middleton justice-of-the-peace, June 16, 1802. He had been also Middleton and Brookfield’s NH state representative in 1806 and 1810.

Petitioners Daniel Wingate, Joseph Goodwin (1782-1868), and Jonathan Buzzell would also petition, on May 29, 1817, to have Lt. John Hill appointed as a Middleton justice-of-the-peace. Joseph Goodwin was among a lengthy list of inhabitants of Middleton, New Durham and Wakefield, NH, recommending appointment of Hill again, in 1820, for appointment to that post.


See also Salmon Falls Sawmill Petition – 1797


References:

Find a Grave. (2005, March 1). Col. Joshua Allen. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/10543195/joshua-allen

Find a Grave. (2021, March 13). Pvt. Jonathan Buzzell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/224407295/jonathan-buzzell

Find a Grave. (2012, June 18). Simon Chase. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92136668/simon-chase

Find a Grave. (2012, April 4). James Davis. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/88056178/james-davis

Find a Grave. (2005, December 12). Nehemiah Eastman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/12713268/nehemiah-eastman

Find a Grave. (2016, September 13). Daniel Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169872705/daniel-hayes

Find a Grave. (2011, December 31). Ichabod Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82754137/ichabod-hayes

Find a Grave. (2017, October 24). Levi Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184574201/levi-jones

Find a Grave. (2021, October 5). Joseph Jones, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/232735795/joseph-jones

Find a Grave. (2020, October 22). William Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217586882/william-jones

Find a Grave. (2015, April 6). Jacob McDuffee. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/144655656/jacob-mcduffee

Find a Grave. (2015, March 11). Thomas McDuffee. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/143599348/thomas-mcduffee

Find a Grave. (2021, November 4). Joseph Plumer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/233700428/joseph-plumer

Find a Grave. (2009, November 19). Dr. Samuel Pray. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/44559317/samuel-pray

Find a Grave. (2011, May 20). Rev. Jeremiah Waldron. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/70129409/jeremiah-waldron

Find a Grave. (2010, June 5). Joseph Walker. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/53278620/joseph-walker

Find a Grave. (2017, March 13). Daniel Wingate. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/177320380/daniel-wingate

Find a Grave. (2019, May 13). Jonathan Wingate. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/199095333/jonathan-wingate

Hammond, Isaac W. (1884). Town Papers. Documents Relating to Towns in New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-4dQAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA341

McDuffee, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RY0-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA428-IA5

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 44: 1816-Dec 1816. Concord, NH.

Wikipedia. (2022, February 16). Henry Wilson. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Wilson

Milton Merchant Nathaniel G. Pinkham (1834-1906)

By Muriel Bristol | March 6, 2022

Nathaniel Gilman “Gilman” Pinkham was born in Milton, September 10, 1834, son of James and Sarah D. (Jewett) Pinkham. (His mother, Sarah D. (Jewett) Pinkham, was a daughter of Milton’s first town clerk, Gilman Jewett (1777-1856)).

NATHANIEL G. PINKHAM, Postmaster of Milton, Strafford County, N.H., was born in this town, September 10, 1834, son of James and Sally (Jewett) Pinkham. His grandfather was Nathaniel Pinkham of Dover Point, N.H. James Pinkham was a custom shoemaker, and followed that business in Milton, for the greater part of his active period. He lived to be seventy years old. In politics he was a Whig. His wife Sally (Jewett) Pinkham became the mother of eleven children, five of whom are now living (Biographical Review, 1897).

James Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sarah Pinkham, aged fifty years (b. NH), Lucy Pinkham, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Hannah Pinkham, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Nathaniel G Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged fifteen years, and John P. Pinkham, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and Thomas Nutter, a shoemaker, aged thirty-five years (b. NH).

Nathaniel G. Pinkham was educated in the public schools of this [Milton] town (Biographical Review, 1897).

Nathaniel G. Pinkham married in Milton, October 28, 1855, Emily C. Corliss, both of Milton. He was aged twenty years, and she was aged sixteen years. Rev. James Doldt performed the ceremony. She was born in Sandwich (elsewhere said to be Wolfeboro), NH, November 25, 1838, daughter of John C. and Louisa W. (Hubbard) Corliss.

Mr. Pinkham married Emily Collins [Corliss], a native of Wolfboro, and has two children – Hattie L. and James D. (Biographical Review, 1897).

Daughter Lilean E. Pinkham was born in Milton, January 20, 1857. She died in Milton, March 28, 1858, aged one year, two months.

Mother-in-law Louisa W. (Hubbard) Corliss died in Milton, April 13, 1857, aged forty-six years, two months. Daughter Lilean E. Pinkham died in Milton, March 28, 1858, aged one year, two months.

Daughter Hattie L. Pinkham was born in Milton, January 28, 1859.

James Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah D. Pinkham, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), James B. Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Gilman Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Emily Pinkham, aged twenty years (b. NH), Clara [Hattie] Pinkham, aged two years (b. NH), and John D. Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). James Pinkham had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $200. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Dearborn Ellis, a shoemaker, aged forty years (b. NH), and Joseph Jenness, a landlord, aged thirty-six years.

Father James Pinkham died in Milton, February 4, 1861, aged seventy-one years.

Nathaniel G. Pinkham began working for the Great Falls Manufacturing Company at just about that time.

When a young man he entered the employ of the Great Falls Manufacturing Company, and for the past thirty-five years he has been in charge of the water-power of that concern (Biographical Review, 1897).

The [Great Falls Manufacturing Co.] orators are a corporation established at Great Falls, Salmon river, in Somersworth, and own five cotton mills with suitable machinery, and to enable them to use the mills, they need the water of Salmon river. For this purpose, they have kept up a dam for some years past, across the riyer, at the outlet of the Three Ponds, so called, partly in Milton in this county, and partly in Lebanon in the State of Maine, and thereby accumulated the water in rainy seasons and have it in seasons of drought (NH Superior Court of Judicature, 1854).

One supposes Pinkham managed their dam at Milton, and perhaps those in other places, including the water levels and releases. (Perhaps he succeeded his late father in that job).

An unnamed infant son was born and died, presumably both in Milton, on an unspecified date (but apparently during this 1860-65 period between the births of children Hattie L. and James D. Pinkham).

Son James D. Pinkham was born in Milton, August 20, 1866. (His father was a shoemaker).

Mother Sarah D. “Sally” Pinkham died of consumption in Milton in July 1869, aged sixty-nine years. She was a widowed housekeeper.

Nathaniel G. Pinkham, works in shoe factory, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Emily Pinkham, keeping house, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Hattie L. Pinkham, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), and James D. Pinkham, aged three years (b. NH). Nathaniel G. Pinkham had real estate valued at $500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ira L. Knox, works in shoe factory, aged forty years (b. ME), and Joseph Sayward, a retail grocer, aged fifty-two years (b. ME).

Father-in-law John C. Corliss died of palsy in Moultonborough, NH, March 31, 1875.

Nathaniel G. Pinkham, works on shoes, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Village of Milton 3 Ponds”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emily Pinkham, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and his children, Hattie L. Pinkham, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), and James D. Pinkham, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Daniel R. Fall, a carpenter, aged forty-one years (b. ME), and John L. Wing, works on farm, aged fifty years (b. ME).

Nathaniel G. Pinkham became Milton’s postmaster, May 21, 1885. (He succeeded Charles H. Looney in that office). He received his appointment during the first term of President Grover Cleveland. As they assignments were at this time political plums, one might infer that Pinkham was also a Democrat.

In 1885 he was appointed Postmaster by President Cleveland, and served through that administration. He was again appointed in 1893, and his courtesy and efficiency as a public official are recognized and appreciated by all parties irrespective of politics (Biographical Review, 1897).

Washington Notes. Washington, May 22. The postmaster-general today appointed sixty-one fourth class postmasters. Among them were George W. Smith at Mattawamkeag, Penobscot county, Me., and Nathaniel G. Pinkham at Milton, Strafford county, N.H. (Boston Globe, May 23, 1885).

Son James D. Pinkham married in Milton, October 13, 1885, Sarah A. McDonigle, both of Milton. He was a shoeworker, aged nineteen years, and she was aged twenty-two years. Rev. Frank Haley performed the ceremony. She was born in Ireland, circa 1863.

The Great Falls Manufacturing Company have decided to rebuild the mill at Milton which was destroyed by lightning last August, and will begin work as soon as the frost is out of the ground (Farmington News, April 16, 1886).

N.G. Pinkham appeared in the Milton business directories of 1887, and 1889, as a Milton boot & shoe merchant, as well as being Milton postmaster. N.G. Pinkham appeared in a U.S. Postal Department report of July 1, 1887, as having received $568.17 in compensation (US Secretary of the Interior, 1887). (With the advent of Republican President Benjamin Harrison, Ralph M. Kimball replaced Pinkham as Milton postmaster, May 10, 1889).

Postmasters Appointed. WASHINGTON, May 10. Fourth class postmasters were today appointed as follows: G.A. Dickinson, Haddam, Conn.; H.C. Brewer, Freeport. Me.; J.H. Littlefield, Ogunquit, Me.; David Walker, South Symington, Me.; William P. Newman, West Falmouth. Me.; J.H. Leighton, West Pembroke, Me.; R.M. Kimball, Milton, N.H.; J.S. Adams, Union, N.H.; D.H. Bennett, Bridgeport, Vt.; Jerome T. Flint, Derby Line, Vt.: A.M. Ruble, East Berkshire, Vt.: Stephen Grout, East Dorset, Vt.; E.A. Beach, Essex Junction, Vt.; D.K. Simonds, Manchester, Vt.; M.M. Parker, Woolcott, Vt. (Boston Globe, May 11, 1889).

The construction of the A.O.U.W. hall in 1890, on land leased from the Great Falls Manufacturing Company land, changed the stretch of Main Street on which Nathaniel G. Pinkham’s shoe store stood. (It might be that his store stood also on Great Falls Manufacturing Company land, he being in their employ for dam management purposes).

MILTON. The Ancient Order of United workmen have leased a lot of land from the Great Falls Manufacturing company and commenced the foundation of a building, with a frontage of seventy-five feet, on Main street and thirty-five feet deep. This occupies the ground for several years taken up by Duntley’s blacksmith shop and two small buildings owned by John F. Hart, and will be devoted to business and lodge purposes. The plan provides for three stores and a grand entrance on the ground floor, a large hall for dramatics and other entertainments on the second floor, with Lodge room and necessary ante room on the upper floor. The small building used by F.A. Mark as a jeweler’s shop has been moved across the street and now stands on the hill just south of Kennett market. The blacksmith shop is on its journey and will stand partially in the rear of N.G. Pinkham’s shoe store (Farmington News, October 10, 1890).

N.G. Pinkham appeared in the Milton business directories of 1892, and 1894, as a Milton boot & shoe merchant.

Nathaniel G. Pinkham became again Milton’s postmaster, July 17, 1893. (He succeeded Ralph M. Kimball in that office). He received his appointment during the second term of President Grover Cleveland. (Democrat President Cleveland’s two terms were not contiguous: Republican President Benjamin Harrison’s single term was sandwiched between them). As with his first appointment, one might infer from this one that Pinkham was also a Democrat.

NEW POSTMASTERS APPOINTED. The Weeding-out Continues at Lively Pace – 119 More Yesterday. Washington, July 18. One hundred and nineteen fourth-class postmasters were appointed yesterday of whom seventy-nine were in place of postmasters removed. Among the appointments were the following: New Jersey – T.R. Boeman, Annandale; Anmon Wright, Cape May Point; J.A. Eick, Everittstown; S.S. Johnson, Hainesport; J.B. Coughle, Hamden; Stewart Opeyke, Little York; J.B. Neale, Rio Grande, W.R. Love, Three Bridges. Pennsylvania – J.A. McArthur, Freehold; H.M. Snyder, Hickory Corners; L.H. Johnson, Lottsville; C.E. Reed, New Sheffield; W.F. Devers, Parkwood; C.F. Gibson, Washingtonville. New Hampshire – F.E. Emerson, Andover; J.W. Foster, Bath; O.W. Carter, Boscawen; J.C. Webster, Danbury; Alvin Jackson, Durham; W.F. Time, East Haverhill; H.E. Eaton, East Weare; Harvey Brown, Georges Mills; O.N. Sumner, Goffstown; C.M. Batchelder, Hampton; C.H. Fox, Hill; Samuel Head, Hookset; N.G. Pinkham, Milton; Thaddeus Tarlton, Newcastle; I.M. Locke, North Barrington; Frank Tucker, North Weare; W.H. Hobbs, West Ossipee. Vermont L.S. French, Barnard; Patrick Halpin, New Haven Mills (Carlisle Sentinel (Carlisle, PA), July 18, 1893).

Burglars broke into several stores in April and May 1894. They struck next at the N.G. “Gilman” Pinkham and J.D. Willey stores at Milton Three Ponds during the night of June 14-15, 1894.

Burglars Visit Dover, N.H. Dover, N.H., June 15. The store of Gilman Pinkham at Milton, which is also the post office, was entered last night and some stamps and money taken. The store of Joseph D. Willey, at the same place, was also entered, and a sum of money stolen. The safes in both places were wrecked (Boston Evening Transcript, June 15, 1894).

LOCALS. June 14. Thieves broke into the store of Gilman Pinkham where the post office is at Milton, wrecking the safe by an explosion and getting a large amount of money and stamps. They also visited the store of J.D. Willey, where they got considerable money from the safe. No clew to the thieves (Farmington News, June 22, 1894).

Joseph D. Willey (1854-1931) kept a grocery and dry goods store at Milton Three Ponds, across the street from Pinkham. (See also Milton in the News – 1914 and Milton Versus the Yeggmen – 1923).

MILTON. Mrs. Gilman Pinkham, Miss Addie Duntley, and Miss Clara Drew were the guests of Farmington friends over the Sabbath (Farmington News, September 28, 1894).

MILTON. Mrs. Gilman Pinkham came home last week after a month’s visit to Boston (Farmington News, November 16, 1894).

Daughter Hattie L. Pinkham married in Milton, November 17, 1894, Harry L. Avery, both of Milton. He was a clerk, aged thirty-one years, and she was a clerk, aged thirty-five years. Rev. Frank Haley performed the ceremony.

Nathaniel G. Pinkham appeared in the Democrat slate for the Town office of Supervisor of the Checklist (NH Secretary of State, 1897).

CANDIDATES FOR TOWN OFFICES. The candidates nominated under the provisions of the new ballot law and printed in the official ballots for the several towns and wards in this state are here given complete. The politics of the candidates is indicated and those elected are distinguished by an asterisk. The vote for each candidate for representative is stated.
MILTON. Representative to General Court. Frank G. Horne, r – 267; Frank E. Norton, d – 82.
Supervisors of the Check List. George D. Canney, r*; Elbridge W. Fox, r*; Timothy Connolly, Jr., d; Nathaniel G. Pinkham, d; Ira A. Cook, d; William T. Wallace, r*.
Moderator. Leroy F. Corson, d; John U. Simes, r*.

If the strength of the Democrat vote might be judged by the numbers reported for the NH State Representative race, it would seem to have gone three-to-one against he and his associates on this occasion.

He is a member of the lodge of Odd Fellows at Milton Mills, and the family attend the Congregational church (Biographical Review, 1897). 

Joseph H. Avery replaced Nathaniel G. Pinkham as Milton postmaster, June 14, 1897. N.G. Pinkham appeared in the Milton business directories of 1898, as a Milton boot & shoe merchant only.

Nathaniel G. Pinkham, a shop keeper (shoes), aged sixty-six years (b. NH) headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-five years), Emily C. Pinkham, aged sixty-one years (b. NH). Nathaniel G. Pinkham owned their house, free-and-clear. Emily C. Pinkham was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Harry L. Avery, a storekeeper, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and Joseph P. Pinkham, a salesman (groceries), aged sixty-three years years (b. NH).

N.G. Pinkham appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, 1904, and 1905-06, as a Milton boot & shoe merchant.

A Milton water system had been in the wind for over a decade at this point. A story had been told years earlier of a Milton store clerk named “Herb” that traded a new suit of clothes from his store for a horse and wagon “team.” He dreamt that night of the advantages that might accrue to him from his having acquired that team, thereby setting him on the path to becoming a rich man.

And to all appearances his dream is soon to be realized for he has since traded his team for an interest in the Milton Water Works, which is supposed to have millions in it as soon as Milton becomes a city (Farmington News, May 9, 1890).

The NH General Court authorized incorporation of the Milton Water Works Company, March 21, 1901, with initial board members Malcom A.H. Hart, Charles H. Looney, S. Lyman Hayes, Charles D. Jones, Fred B. RobertsHarry Avery, George E. Wentworth, Joseph H. AveryIra W. Jones, Arthur W. Dudley, Everett F. Fox, Henry F. Townsend, Freeman H. Lowd, William T. Wallace, Frank G. Horne, Charles A. Jones, and Nathaniel G. Pinkham. It established itself July 19, 1899, with Harry L. Avery as its treasurer (NH Secretary of State, 1901).

The offer of the gift of a town clock for Milton, by an out of town citizen, if the people will raise money for a bell, has stimulated an effort to this end, and an organization was effected at a meeting Saturday evening, Dr. M.A.H. Hart being president, Harry L. Avery, secretary, and N.G. Pinkham treasurer. It is proposed to place this clock and bell in the tower of the Congregational church as the most conspicuous place in the village (Farmington News, [Friday,] November 29, 1901).

Nathaniel G. Pinkham died of chronic nephritis in Milton, May 29, 1906, aged seventy-one years, eight months, and nineteen days. He was a merchant and a lifelong Milton resident. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Emily (Corliss) Pinkham died of Bright’s Disease in Milton, January 27, 1913, aged seventy-four years, two months, and two days. She had resided in Milton for fifty-eight years, i.e., since the time of her marriage, having come there from Sandwich, NH. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.


References:

Biographical Review. (1897). Biographical Review: Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Strafford and Belknap Counties, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=C2sjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA371

Browne, George M. (1886). Essays and Addresses. Report on the Affairs of the Great Falls Manufacturing Co. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=fQAiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA130

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Hattie L. Pinkham Avery. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214557903/hattie-l-avery

Find a Grave. (2021, July 3). Infant Pinkham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/229119070/infant-pinkham

Find a Grave. (2020, September 8). James Pinkham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215360156/james-pinkham

Find a Grave. (2015, June 10). James D. Pinkham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147697510/james-d-pinkham

Find a Grave. (2020, September 8). Lilean E. Pinkham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215366870/lilean-e-pinkham

Find a Grave. (2015, June 10). Nathaniel Gilman Pinkham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147696986/nathaniel-gilman-pinkham

NH Secretary of State. (1897). Manual for the General Court, 1897. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=uzktAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA270

NH Superior Court of Judicature. (1854). Great Falls Manufacturing Company Vs. Worster. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=0LJLAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA462

US Census Office. (1885). Statistics of Power and Machinery Employed in Manufactures: On the Water Power of the United States. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=jFhYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA65

US Secretary of the Interior. (1887). Official Register of the United States. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=_6JLAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA581

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