Milton Businesses in 1909

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | April 5, 2020

The Milton entries for this Milton section of the Dover business directory began to be much more comprehensive than those published previously.

Some merchants paid extra for bolded uppercase entries, and still more for supplementary advertisements on the advertisement pages (“See page …”).

Many have multiple entries, due to having multiple product lines or lines of business listed in different categories.

These entries may be compared with Milton Automobiles of 1909-10. The Carl E. Pinkham listed here under both the Bakery and Grocers categories would hire Dana Tuttle as a delivery driver at about this time. (Pinkham’s business would be called the Sunset Grocery Co. in subsequent years). Drug store clerk George N. Corson likely made Apothecary deliveries for J. Herbert Willey’s drug store on his Indian motorcycle.


MILTON BUSINESS DIRECTORY 1909

Twenty miles northwest of Dover. R.R. stations at Milton, Union and Hayes, on B.&M. R.R. northern division. Milton Mills four miles from Union, stage twice daily. It was originally a part of Rochester. Incorporated June 11, 1802. Farming and manufacturing are the principal employments. Area 25,000 acres. Population, 1,401.

Selectmen – Edgar A. Wentworth, Hazen Plummer, Chas. A. Jones. Town Clerk – Harry L. Avery. Treasurer – Everett F. Fox. School Board – Dr. M.A.H. Hart, E.W. Fox, Harry D. Coles. Postmasters – Joseph H. Avery, Milton; E.T. Libby, Milton Mills. Deputy Sheriff, Chas. E. Remick, Milton Mills. Constable – Hazen W. Downs.

Agricultural Implements.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton Mills – See page 815.
MURRAY, D., Milton Mills – See page 815.
PLUMMER, B.B., Plummer’s Ridge – See page 813.

Apothecary.

EMERSON, E.N., 44 Main, Milton Mills – See page 816.
MILLS DRUG CO. THE, 44 Main, Milton Mills – See page 816.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main – See page 813.

Architect & Designer.

(Water Power Plants).
JONES, I.W., Main, Opp. Leb. bridge – See page 812.

Bakery.

PINKHAM, C.E., Main, near p.o. – See page 813.

Blacksmiths.

Benoit, Leon, Lebanon side.
DUNTLEY, IRA W. – See p. 812.
MOODY, H.B., 71 Main, M. Mills – See page 815.
RUDD, ALFRED A., 20 Main, Milton Mills – See page 814.

Blanket Mfr.

TOWNSEND, JAMES E., 1-2 Main, M. Mills – See p. 815.

Boarding Houses.

Blaisdell, S.G. Mrs., Charles, on hill.
Finegan, H.F. Mrs., 7 So. Main.
Holbrook, Nellie A. Mrs., Leb. s., M.
Hodgdon, E.A. Mrs., 22 South Main
Kimball, R.M. Mrs., 6 Kimball.
Lindsey, M.E. Mrs., 14 French, Acton side, Milton Mills.
Ramsell, E.E. Mrs., A.S., at bridge, Milton Mills.

Boats to Let.

Brown, Everett E., B.&M. depot
Page, C.H., Main, near p.o.

Boot and Shoe Dealers.

FLYE, A.M., 41 Main, M.M. – See page 816.
FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 815.
Libby, E.T., 17 Main, M.M.
Mason, H.S., Main.
WILLEY, J.D., Main – See p. 812.

Boot and Shoe Machinery and Repairer.

PLUMMER, H., 28 Silver – See page 812.

Boot and Shoe Makers and Repairers.

Bousquin, W., 34 So. Main.
Locke, J.T., 96 No. Main, M. Mills.
Shaw, A.B., Union rd., M.M.

Boot and Shoe Mfrs.

Thayer, N.B. & Co., Charles.

Building Material.

AVERY, JONES & ROBERTS, Main – See page 812.

Butchers.

Horne, C.A., Main.
Pike, R.S., Milton Mills.

Carpenters and Builders.

AVERY, JONES & ROBERTS – See page 812.
Harriman, F.L., 97 No. Main.
HAYES, GUY L., 7 Far. rd. – See page 812.
Rines, Mark, Milton Mills.
Simes, Geo. E., Milton Mills.
WEBBER, ROYAL K., So. Main – See page 813.
WENTWORTH, HIRAM, 31-35 Church, Milton Mills – See page 814.

Carriage Repairers.

DUNTLEY, IRA M., Main, M. – See page 812.
RUDD, A.A., 18 Main, M.M. – See page 812.

Churches and Clergymen.

Cong., 17 So. Main, Milton.
Cong., ——, pastor, M. Mills.
F. Bap., Geo. H. Grey, pastor, 4 Church, Milton.
F. Bap., E.W. Churchill, pastor, Milton Mills.
Methodist, W.A. Hudson, pastor, Milton Mills.
Union Nute Chapel, Robert M. Peacock, pastor, Nute Ridge, Milton.

Cider Mill.

WHITEHOUSE, D.A., Leb. side, at bridge – See p. 813.

Cigars and Tobacco.

Libby, E.T., 17 Main, Milton Mills.
MUCCI, N., 46 Main, Milton Mills – See page 814.
MILLS DRUG. CO. THE, 44 Main, M. Mills – See page 816.
Page, Robert, 14 Main, Milton Mills.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main, Milton – See page 813.

Civil and Hydraulic Engineer.

JONES, I.W., Main, opp. Leb. bridge – See page 812.

Clothing.

Horne, J.E., Milton Mills.
Mason, H.S., Main, Milton.

Coal and Wood.

Downs, H.W., 7 Silver, Milton.
Townsend, J.E., Milton Mills.

Coffins and Caskets.

FOX, ASA A., 10 School, Milton – See page 815.

Confectionary and Fruit.

Knight, W.C. Mrs., 6 Toppan.
Libby, E.T., 17 Main, Milton Mills.
MILLS DRUG CO. THE, 44 Main – See page 816.
MUCCI, N., 46 Main, Milton Mills – See page 814.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main – See page 813.
Woodman, M.C., Main, opp. Lebanon rd.

Conveyancer, Claim and Collection Agents.

FOX, E.W., Milton Mills – See page 815.
MARSH, F.L., Milton Mills – See page 816.

Crockery and Glassware.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 815.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., Main – See page 812.
WILLEY, J.D., Main – See page 812.

Deputy Sheriff.

REMICK, CHARLES E., 42 Main, over The Mills Drug Co., Milton Mills – See p. 815.

Designer of Water Power Plants.

JONES, I.W., Main, opp. Leb. bridge, Milton – See p. 812.

Dressmakers.

Stevens, C.L. Mrs., Union rd., near School, Milton Mills.

Dry and Fancy Goods.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 815.
FOX, CHAS D., 10 School, M. Mills – See page 815.
HART, LENA M., Main, n. p.o. – See page 813.
Jones, C.D. (estate,) Main.
McIntosh, Ada C. Mrs., 4 Charles, near So. Main.

Embalmer.

FOX, ASA A., 10 School, M. Mills – See page 815.
FOX, CHARLES. D., 10 School, Milton Mills – See page 815.

Engineer (Civil).

JONES, IRA W., Main, opp. Leb. bridge – See page 812.

Express Company.

AMERICAN EXPRESS CO., H.A. Beaton, agent, Milton, C.H. Fox, M.M. – See page 818.

Fish and Oyster Dealer.

Wentworth, E.L., 14 Mill, n. Charles.

Flour and Grain.

WHITEHOUSE, H.F., Main – See page 812.
WILLEY, J.D., Main – See p. 812.

Furniture.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 815.
MILLER, W.S., Main, M.M. – See page 814.

General Stores.

FLYE, ARTHUR M., 41 Main, Milton Mills – See page 816.
FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 815.
WILLEY, J.D., Main – See p. 812.

Gent’s Furnishings.

FOX, ASA & SON, M.M. – See page 815.
Flye, A.M., 41 Main, M.M.
Horne, J.E., 25 Main.
Nason, H.S., Main, Milton.

Grain and Feed.

Horne & Marsh, 38 Main, M. Mills.
Laskey, A.J., Milton Mills and Union rd.
WHITEHOUSE, D.A., Main, Milton – See page 813.

Grocers.

FLYE, A.M., 41 Main, Milton Mills – See page 816.
FOX, ASA & SON, M. Mills – See page 815.
PINKHAM, C.E., Main, n. p.o. – See page 813.
MUCCI, N. (fancy,) 46 Main, M.M. – See page 814.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., Main – See page 812.
WILLEY, J.D. – See page 812.

Hairdressers.

HARTFORD, FRED S., Main, Milton – See page 812.
Mathews, O.S., 5 Main, M.M.
Marshall, Arthur, Main.
Page, Robert, Milton Mills.

Hardware.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 815.
FRYE, A.M., 41 Main, M.M. – See page 816. [FRYE being a typographical error for FLYE]
MURRAY, DANIEL, Milton Mills – See page 815.
WILLEY, J.D. – See p. 812.

Harness Makers and Repairers.

Bousquin, Wm., 34 So. Main.
Locke, J.T., 96 No. Main, Milton Mills.

Hats, Caps, etc.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 815.
Horne, J.E., Milton Mills.
Mason, H.S., Main

Hay Dealers.

WILLEY, J.D., Main – See page 812.

Horseshoers.

Benoit, L., Leb. side, Milton.
DUNTLEY, IRA W., Main – See page 812.
MOODY, H.B., 71 Main, M. Mills – See page 815.
RUDD, A.A., 20 Main, M.M. – See page 814.

Hotels.

CENTRAL HOUSE, Fred Rowe, M. Mills – See page 814.
Chamberlin Hotel, Mrs. C.E. Chamberlin, prop., Main, opp. depot.
MILTON HOTEL, H.C. Grover – See page 813.
“The Sands” (summer,) Milton Pond, Mrs. C.E. Chamberlin.

Ice Cream and Soda.

Libby, E.T., Milton Mills.
MUCCI, N., 46 Main, corner Church, M.M.- See page 814.
WILLEY, J.H., Main, corner Silver – See page 813.

Ice Dealers (Retail.)

Columbus, O., Charles, corner Kimball, Milton.

Ice Dealers (Wholesale.)

Boston Ice Co., No. Main.
Downing Ice Co., No. Main.
Lynn Ice Co., Leb. side, Milton.
Marblehead Ice Co., No. Main.
Union Ice Co., Leb. side, M.

Insurance Agents.

Gage, J.M., Main, opp. drug store.
MARSH, FORREST L., 30 Main, M.M. – See page 816.

Jewelry and Watches.

Libby, E.T., Main, M. Mills.

Justices of the Peace.

Avery, B.F., 21 South Main.
AVERY, H.L., Main – See page 812.
FOX, E.F., Milton Mills – See page 815.
FOX, E.W., Milton Mills – See page 815.
Goodwin, G.H., West Milton.
JONES, CHARLES A., South Milton, 1 mile out – See page 818.
MARSH, F.L., Milton Mills – See page 816.
PLUMMER, B.B., Plummer’s Ridge – See page 813.
Wentworth, L.H., W. Milton.

Ladies’ Furnishings.

HART, LENA M., Main, near p.o. – See page 813.
McIntosh, Ada C., 4 Charles, near South Main.

Laundry Agents.

HARTFORD, FRED S., Main, Milton – See page 812.
Libby, E.T., Milton Mills.
Page, Robert, 23 Main, M.M.
WILLEY, J.H., Main, corner Silver – See page 813.

Lawyers.

MARSH, FORREST L., 30 Main, M. Mills – See p. 816.

Leather Board Mfrs.

Milton Leather Board Co.
SPAULDING, J. & SONS CO. – See page 17.

Libraries.

Milton Free Public Library, John U. Simes, librarian (1110 volumes,) M. Mills.
Nute Library, Mrs. S.P. Haley, librarian, Milton.

Lumbermen.

AVERY, JONES & ROBERTS – See page 812.
Edgecomb, C.R. (dealer and sawyer,) Milton Mills.
Plummer, G.L. (p.o. Union).

Machinist.

PLUMMER, HAZEN, 28 Silver – See page 812.

Manufacturing Companies.

SALMON RIVER PAPER CO., fine box board and specialties, at R.R. track, opp. Toppan.
SPAULDING, J. & SONS CO., (leather board and counters) – See page 17.
TOWNSEND, JOHN E., (blankets,) Milton Mills – See page 815.

Masons and Plasterers.

Page, Geo. W., 6 Remick ave., Milton.

Milkmen.

Avery, B.F., 21 South Main.
Buck, Herman L., Springvale rd., Acton side, Milton Mills.
Drew, Samuel E., 80 Main.

Millinery.

Foss, Gertrude M., 24 So. Main, Milton.
Fellows, Nettie E., Jones blk., Main, Milton.
Horne, Olive A. Mrs., M.M.
Jones, Nettie W., at I.J.W., Lebanon side, Milton.

Music Teachers.

Jones, F.P. Mrs. (piano,) Plummer’s Ridge, Milton.
Jones, I.W. Mrs. (piano,) Leb. side, Milton.
Wentworth, Mary A. (piano,) 35 Church, Milton Mills.

Newspapers and Periodicals.

Libby, E.T., at p.o., Milton Mills.
Pinkham, James D., Main, at the dam.

Notaries Public.

FOX, E.F., Milton Mills – See page 815.
FOX, E.W., Milton Mills – See page 815.
Looney, Walter E., 54 South Main, Milton.
MARSH, FORREST L., 30 Main, M. Mills – See p. 816.
Wentworth, G.C.S., Main, M.

Oysters, Clams, etc.

Horne, C.A., Main, n. p.o.
Wentworth, E.L., 14 Mill, M.

Painters (Carriage, Automobile and Sign.)

SCHULMAIER, H.R. & SON, 15 Allen, Berwick, Me. – See Somersworth, page 324.

Painters and Paper Hangers.

CONNOLLY, T., 88 Main, M. Mills – See page 814.
Libby, A.D., 17 Main, M.M.
Gilmore, C.A., 14 So. Main.
Pinkham, Thomas H., Main, M.
Smith, J.L., 29 South Main.
THOMPSON, MARK L., Milton – See page 818.

Paints and Oils.

FLYE, A.M., 41 Main, M.M. – See page 816.
FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 815.
WHITEHOUSE, H.E., Main – See page 812.
WILLEY, J.D., Main – See page 812.

Paper Mfrs.

SALMON RIVER PAPER CO., off South Main, Milton.

Physicians.

Buckley, J.J., 16 South Main.
GROSS, C.W., Central House, Milton Mills – See page 815.
Hart, M.A.H., 30 South Main.
WEEKS, F.S., 102 No. Main, M. Mills – See page 814.

Plumber.

MURRAY, D., Milton Mills – See page 815.

Pool Rooms.

Laughlin, James, Main, M.
Marshall, Arthur, Main, Milton.
Page, R., 14 Main, M. Mills.

Provisions.

HORNE, C.A., Main, at p.o. – See page 818.
Pike, R.S., Milton Mills.

Railroad.

BOSTON & MAINE R.R. – See page 34.

Sawmills.

AVERY, JONES & ROBERTS – See page 812.
Edgecomb, C.R., 41 Leb. rd.
Plumer, G.L., near Union.

Schools.

Milton Grammar School, R.M. Looney, principal, 8 Church, Milton.
Milton Mills High School, Geo. E. Leatherbarrow, principal, 15 School, M.M.
Nute Free High School, C.E. Kelly, principal, 15 Far. rd., M.

Soap Mfrs.

Chamberlin, S.G., Milton M.

Stables.

Chamberlin, F.M., Main.
GROVER, H.C., Charles – See page 813.
ROWE, FRED, Central House, M.M. – See page 814.

Stock Farms.

CHAMBERLIN, M.G. & S.G., M.M. and U. rd. – See page 818.
HAYES, L.C., So. Main, So. Milton – See page 813.
NUTE, GEORGE E., N. Ridge.

Stoves and Tinware.

MURRAY, D., Milton Mills – See page 815.

Teamsters and Truckmen.

Downs, H.W., 7 Silver.
Laskey, C.H., A. side, M. Mills.

Telephone Company.

N.E. TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CO. – See page 35.

NETT - 1909
Milton Public Telephones, 1909

Toilet Articles.

MILLS DRUG CO. THE, 44 Main, M.M. – See page 816.
WILLEY, J.H., Main, Milton – See page 813.

Undertakers.

FOX, ASA A., Milton Mills – See page 815.
FOX, CHARLES D., 10 School, Milton Mills – See page 815.

Upholsterer and Carpet Work.

Jenness, C.G., 41 So. Main. M.

Wheelwrights.

DUNTLEY, IRA B., Main – See page 812.
MOODY, Henry B., 71 Main – See page 815.
RUDD, A.T. (iron work,) 20 Main, M.M. – See page 814.

Wood Dealers.

AVERY, JONES & ROBERTS, Main, M. – See page 812.
BODWELL, C.S., Toppan.
Clements, John B., Milton.
HAYES, L.C., So. Milton – See page 813.
JONES, C.A., So. Main – See page 818.
Jones, F.P., Plummer’s Ridge.

Woolen Goods Mfr.

TOWNSEND, JOHN E. (blankets) – See page 815.


The Salmon River Paper Company mill burned down on Thursday, June 10, 1909. (See under Paper Mfrs.). One hundred men were thrown out of work.

Fire at Milton. The plant of the Salmon River Paper Company at Milton belonging to William S. Lowe of Portsmouth was destroyed last Thursday night and the loss is estimated at $100,000. The fire is supposed to have originated from the big chimney in the boiler house, but nobody was in the building at the time the fire was discovered. As a rule the mill employed a day and night shift but the mill was not running Thursday night. The mill was the principal industry in the town, with a weekly payroll of from $500 to $800, and its destruction will be a serious blow (Farmington News, [Friday,] June 18, 1909).


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1905-06; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1912


References:

Bass & Co. (1909). Dover, Somersworth, Rochester, and Strafford County Directory, 1909. Dover, NH: 466 Central Avenue.

 

 

Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47

By Muriel Bristol | April 3, 2020

Milton’s Nute Ridge schoolhouse stood on the Nute Ridge Road, between the Nute Ridge chapel and the home of F.A. Nute. (The Hare Road schoolhouse was quite close to it).

Nute Ridge School - 1892
Location of Nute Ridge School, 1892

The Nute Ridge school was Milton’s last active one-room schoolhouse, and Miss Ferne C. McGregor was its last one-room school teacher.

Nute Ridge School - 1880s
The Nute Ridge School, at an earlier period (the 1880s) (Per Sarah Ricker).

The academic year seems to have been divided into two terms. School began its Winter term in early September and ran through late December or early January (including a week’s vacation at Thanksgiving). The Nute Ridge school depicted in the 1880s photograph has a chimney, probably for a pot-belly stove, but these one-room schools were notoriously cold. So, from late December or early January, there was then a month or six weeks off, with school resuming in late February or early March. The Spring Term ran from then until late June.

There was no Kindergarten anywhere in town (or anywhere else). Rural students attended such schools from their first year (Grade I) through their seventh year (Grade VII). In this period, they would have gone on to complete their eighth and final year (Grade VIII) at the Milton Grammar School.

The teachers lived usually in close proximity to their schools. Some towns – not including Milton – kept a “teacherage” residence close to or even attached to the school in which they might reside. Those teachers not originating locally would board usually with someone in the neighborhood.

The NH Board of Education reported on the existing NH rural, village, city and high schools in 1920. They were particularly interested in the teachers, especially their educational attainments, ages, turnover rates, and salaries. Suffice to say, they were not impressed with what they found. (The authorities would have classed the Nute Ridge school as a “rural school”).

One hundred forty two of these schools are taught by immature girls and nearly all of these schools are rural schools. It must be apparent to all that few girls of 16 to 19 have sufficient education, maturity and judgment to hold the responsible position of teacher of a school. It will be seen that the majority of the teachers, 62 per cent, in all classes of schools are young women 20 to 34 years of age and the number of elderly persons is surprisingly small. It is assumed that the 158 teachers who have furnished no record of their age are doubtless between 35 and 44. 

… It can be seen that the least stability is among rural and high school teachers. The overturn is high among rural teachers because in these most vacancies are filled by young girls with but a few weeks of training. They are unprepared for their work and the many who fail quickly seek other occupations. It is large among high school teachers for a similar reason. Vacancies are usually filled by untrained graduates from institutions in other states. Their interest in New Hampshire is small and if they succeed they seek schools nearer home or at least in larger cities than those in New Hampshire (NH Board of Education, 1920).

And yet, most of the people who built Milton – and New Hampshire – did so with eighth-grade educations, or even less.

The Nute Ridge School teachers of this 1897-1947 period were: Laura S. Huckins (1897-99), Fannie I. Hayes (1901-02), Hattie M. Campbell (1902-03), Emily C. Davis (1904-05), Hattie M. Campbell (1905-07), Miss Hayes (1907-08), Josie M. Calkins (1908-09), Georgia A. (Gerrish) Wentworth (1911-12), Oscar G. Morehouse (1912-13), Ferne C. McGregor (1914-15), Ferne C. McGregor (1916-17), Georgia A. (Gerrish) Wentworth (1919-20), and Ferne C. McGregor (1924-47).

(This sources for this list have lacunae for the years 1900-01, 1909-11, 1913-14, 1915-16, 1917-19, and 1920-24. These gaps might represent other teachers not yet identified, or they might be explained simply through longer tenures of the teachers identified. Revisions will be made if additional source material comes to hand).

Miss Laura Susan Huckins – 1897-99

Laura Susan Huckins was born in Farmington, NH, March 24, 1868, daughter of John I. and Abbie W. (Whitehouse) Huckins.

She worked for the Rochester Courier newspaper in 1893, and taught the South school in New Durham, NH, in the 1895-96 academic year.

LOCALS. Miss Laura Huckins, an employe in the Rochester Courier office, is ill at her home in South Farmington (Farmington News, September 1, 1893).

LOCALS. The fall term of schools in New Durham are all to commence Tuesday, September 3rd, with teachers as follows: Plains school, Miss Ella N. Bickford of Farmington; South school, Miss Laura Huckins of Farmington; Ridge school, Mrs. Mary Young of New Durham; Corner school, Miss Georgia O. Berry of New Durham; Centre school, Miss Nellie E. Mitchell of New Durham; Rines school, Miss Myra J. Davis of New Durham; Powder Mills school, Miss Emma C. Varney of Alton (Farmington News, August 30, 1895).

Miss Huckins taught at Milton’s Nute Ridge school in at least the 1897-98 and 1898-99 academic years. Milton employed her as a school teacher also during the 1899-00 year, likely also at Nute Ridge, and she continued as a school teacher up to the time of her June 1901 marriage.

LOCALS. The roll of honor of the Nute Ridge school, Miss Laura A. Huckins, teacher, for the term ending January 10, was: Clyde R. Wallace, Harold L. Peacock. For the whole year: Clyde R. Wallace, Harold L. Peacock (Farmington News, January 14, 1898).

LOCALS. The roll of honor for Nute Ridge school, Laura A. Huckins, teacher, for term ending June 30: Luella Tanner, Helen E. Ward (Farmington News, July 7, 1899).

NEWS OF THE STATE. The Friends’ church at Meaderboro has a new pastor, Albert Syze of New York, who has been in the Malone training school in Cleveland, Ohio (Farmington News, December 29, 1899).

Laura A. Huckins appeared in the Farmington directory of 1900, as a Milton teacher, with her house at Merrill’s Corner.

John I. Huckins, a widowed farmer, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his son, John A. Huckins, a farm laborer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), his daughter in law (John A. Huckins’ wife of fourteen years), Ethel M. Huckins, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), his grandchildren, Everett G. Huckins, at school, aged twelve years (B. NH), Laura E. Huckins, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), Mary E. Huckins, at school. aged ten years (b. NH), and Alden D. Huckins, at school, aged nine years (b. NH); and his daughter, Laura S. Huckins, a school teacher, aged thirty-two years (b. NH).

Laura S. Huckins married at Merrill’s corner in Farmington, NH, June 12, 1901, Albert Syze, she of Farmington and he of Yorktown Heights, NY. Rev. R.M. Peacock of Milton performed the ceremony. She was a school teacher, aged thirty-three years; he was a clergyman, aged thirty-three years. He was born in Baldwin Place, NY, November 30, 1867, son of James T. and Martha B. (Griffin) Syze.

Happy Occasion. Wednesday afternoon, June 12, a pretty wedding took place at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John I. Huckins, at Merrill’s Corner, which was an occasion of interest not only to Farmington and Rochester people but to the people of neighboring towns. The bride was Laura S., only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Huckins. The bridegroom was Rev. Albert Syze, pastor of Friends’ church at Merrill’s. The ceremony was performed by Rev. R.M. Peacock of Milton and was witnessed by about twenty-five couples. After a short visit to Portland, Me., Mr. and Mrs. Syze will take up their residence at Merrill’s (Farmington News, June 21, 1901).

MARRIAGES. SYZE-HUCKINS. At the house of the bride’s father, Rochester, N.H., Albert Syze, a minister of Yorktown Meeting, NY, to Laura S. Huckins, daughter of John I. Huckins and a member of the Rochester Meeting, N.H. (American Friend, Sixth Month 20, 1901).

Laura S. Huckins appeared in the Farmington directory of 1902, as Laura S. Huckins, now Mrs. Albert Syze.

Dexter. Mrs. Laura Syze of Merrill’s Corner is visiting relatives at Dexter (Farmington News, May 16, 1902).

OUR BLUE MONDAY CLUB. (Any clergyman admitted to membership who will send us at least one original story a year which will help to dissipate the Monday blues). I was confined to my house for several weeks by an injury from which I was rapidly recovering. I was in the habit of receiving, each week during my illness, the gift of a generous bouquet from the Junior Christian Endeavorers. One was received with a Scripture text attached which was expected to be one of comfort, and a few days later the mother of the chairman, a little miss of twelve summers, gave the history of the finding of the text. “And what have you found?” inquired the mother as she noticed her little girl writing after some searching. “I won’t tell,” she replied. But the mother read, “For I am now ready to be offered, and the time of my departure is at hand.” “Well, you won’t send that.” “I will too.” But searching again this resulted, “They shall still bring forth fruit in old age; they shall be fat and flourishing.” Certainly comforting, very comforting, being yet far from old age, and, I must confess, being tall, slender, and angular. The final result, however, was Psalm xciv:22. ALBERT SYZE, Bolton, Mass. (Funk, et al., 1903).

Laura S. Syze (b. NH) received an appointment as a substitute letter carrier for Bolton, MA, in 1905.

Albert Syze, an R.F.D. mail carrier, aged forty-two years (b. NY), headed a Bolton, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Laura S. Syze, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and his children, Carl I. Syze, aged seven years (b. NY), and Clyde A. Syze, aged one year, four months (b. MA). Albert Syze owned their farm in the Quakerville District, with a mortgage. Laura S. Syze was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Albert Syze, a rural delivery mail carrier, aged fifty-two years (b. NY), headed a Bolton, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Laura S. Syze, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and his children, Carl I. Syze, aged sixteen years (b. NY), and Clyde A. Syze, aged eleven years (b. NY [SIC]). Albert Syze owned their farm on the Berlin Road.

Albert Syze, an R.F.D. rural delivery mail carrier, aged sixty-two years (b. NY), headed a Bolton, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Laura S. Syze, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), and his son, Clyde A. Syze, aged twenty-one years (b. MA). Albert Syze owned their farm on the Berlin Road, with a mortgage. They had a radio set.

Albert Syze, no occupation given, aged seventy-two years (b. NY), headed a Bolton, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Laura Syze, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Albert Syze owned their house, which was valued at $2,800.

Laura S. (Huckins) Syze died in Rochester, NH, February 7, 1947. Rev. Albert Syze died in Rochester, NH, November 11, 1954.

Fannie Isabel Hayes – 1901-02

Fannie Isabel Hayes was born in Milton, August 22, 1881, daughter of Charles and Nellie M. (Parmenter) Hayes.

Nellie M. Hayes, a widow, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Fannie I. Hayes, a school teacher, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Florence A. Hayes, at school, aged seventeen years (b. NH), George W. Hayes, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Charles T. Hayes, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), and Nellie W. Hayes, at school, aged seven years (b. NH). Nellie M. Hayes owned their farm, free-and-clear; she was the mother of six children, of whom six were still living.

WEST MILTON. Miss Fannie Hayes, having finished a successful term of school at Nute Ridge, has gone to Farmington to teach the Depot school (Farmington News, February 7, 1902).

Fannie I. Hayes married (1st) in Milton, June 29, 1909, Harry W. Pinkham. He was born in 1872, son of William H.H. and Sarah A. Pinkham. He died in Milton, June 8, 1917.

W.H.H. Pinkham, a farmer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-six years), Sarah Pinkham, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), his son, Harry W. Pimkham, a [farm] laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and his daughter-in-law (of one year), Laura Pinkham, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH). W.H.H. Pinkham owned their farm, free-and-clear. Sarah Pinkham was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Fannie I. Pinkham, a farmer, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Winston H. Pinkham, aged nine years (b. NH), Shirley Pinkham, aged eight years (b. NH), and Winona Pinkham, aged six years (b. NH). Fannie D. Pinkham owned their farm on the Hare road, free-and-clear.

Fannie I. (Hayes) Pinkham married (2nd) in Milton, March 18, 1926, George Albert Downing. He was born in Farmington, NH, May 31, 1872, son of Rev. George T. and Anna R. (Aikens) Downing.

George A. Downing, a B&M R.R. section foreman, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fannie I. Downing, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), his daughter, Alice J. Downing, a shoe factory sorter, aged thirty-two years (b. RI), and his step-children, Winston Pinkham, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Shirley Pinkham, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Winona Pinkham, aged sixteen years (b. NH). George A. Downing owned their hours at rear 9 High street, which was valued at $2,000. They did not have a radio set.

George A. Downing died in the Farrington hospital in Portland, ME, October 16, 1940, aged sixty-nine years. (He had been a patient there for six weeks). Fannie I. ((Hayes) Pinkham) Downing died in Farmington, NH, April 24, 1942.

IN MEMORIAM. Mrs. Fannie Isabel Downing. Many people in Farmington and vicinity regret to learn of the death of Mrs. Fannie I. Downing, aged 60, who died in her home on Maple court, last Friday evening following a long illness. Mrs. Downing, who was a native of Milton, was the daughter of Charles T. and Nellie (Parmenter) Hayes. For over twelve years she taught school in Milton and was a member of Advent Christian church. She was also a member of Fraternal Order, O.E.S., Henry Wilson Grange, Eastern New Hampshire Pomona Grange, and the New Hampshire Grange. She had been a resident of Farmington for many years and had acquired many friends and acquaintances. Mrs. Downing is survived by one son, Winston Pinkham of this town, two daughters, Mrs. Clyde Horne and Mrs. Ralph Parent, also of Farmington, two step-daughters, Mrs. Marion L. Roberts of Cumberland Center, Me., and Miss A. Josephine Downing of Providence, R.I., two sisters, Mrs. Elvah Kelley of West Milton and Mrs. Clyde Hannant of Winchendon, Mass., and two brothers, Charles T. Hayes of West Milton and George W. Hayes of Farmington. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Advent Christian church, with Rev. E.E. Pender officiating, and burial was in Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, May 1, 1942).

Hattie May Campnell – 1902-03, 1905-07

Hattie M. Campnell was born in Sanford, ME, May 1, 1870, an apparent daughter of Susan S. Campnell (and definitely a granddaughter of Daniel and Hannah (Burbank) Campnell). (The family name was rendered variously as Campernell, Campnell, and Campbell).

Daniel Campnell, a farmer, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Hannah Campnell, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), Susie Campnell, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Hattie May Campnell, aged two months (b. NH (March)). Daniel Campnell had real estate valued at $300 and personal estate valued at $2,093.

Susie S. Campnell married in Wakefield, NH, October 1, 1870, Leander G Abbott, she of Wakefield and he of Boston, MA. She died in 1872; her daughter (and Hattie’s apparent half-sister), Susie H. Abbott, was born in 1872 and died in 1873; and her mother Hannah (Burbank) Campnell died in 1873.

Daniel Campernell, a farmer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his granddaughter, Hattie M. Campernell, at school, aged ten years (b. ME), and his servant, Lizzie Simons, a housekeeper, aged sixty-four years (b. NH).

WEST MILTON. Schools began Monday. Miss Hattie Campnell has her same school at Nute Ridge. Miss Jessie Butler of Berwick teaches on the Hare road and Miss Daisy Davis of Rochester the West Milton school (Farmington News, September 12, 1902).

WEST MILTON. Robert Jones, a former teacher at Nute’s Ridge, is teaching at Milton Ridge, Miss Campbell is taking the Nute Ridge school (Farmington News, December 8, 1905).

WEST MILTON. Miss Campnell closed the winter term of school at Nute Ridge last Friday (Farmington News, March 16, 1906).

WEST MILTON. G.H. Hurd is conveying the scholars of the Hare road to Nute Ridge school (Farmington News, May 4, 1906).

WEST MILTON. Miss Hattie Campnell and Miss Maude Boroughs recently visited the latter’s aunt, Mrs. Abbie Hayes, at the Branch (Farmington News, November 16, 1906).

WEST MILTON. Nute Ridge school is closed for one week (Farmington News, December 28, 1906).

WEST MILTON. School began at Nute Ridge last week with the same teacher, Miss Campbell (Farmington News, April 12, 1907).

Hattie M. Campbell died of cerebrospinal meningitis (and cancer) on Branch Road, Milton Mills, August 31, 1907, aged thirty-four [thirty-seven] years, three months, and thirty days.

The last will of Hattie M. Campbell, of Wakefield, NH, dated July 17, 1907, and proved in Carroll County Probate court, November 5, 1907, devised $75 to her friend, Mary S. Wentworth of Melrose, MA, a gold watch to Master Gordon Brown, 6/11 of the remaining estate to Rebecca Skillings of Saco, ME, and the remainder to Abbie L. Hayes of Milton, who was also named as executrix. N.M. Lord, N.L. Littlefield, and J. Frank Farnham signed as witnesses.

Master Gordon N. Brown was the ten-year-old grandson of George E. and Abbie M. (Russell) Nute (see him in their household with Oscar G. Morehouse (below)).

Emily Christina Davis – 1904-05

Emily Christina Davis was born in NH, September 13, 1883, daughter of Charles A. and Ida E. (Junkins) Davis.

Charles A. Davis, a candy manufacturer, aged forty-four years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Ida E. Davis, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), his children, Emily C. Davis, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Gladys R. Davis, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), Wayne E. Davis, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), Roger H. Davis, at school, aged eight years, and Horace J. Davis, at school, aged seven years (b. NH), his father-in-law, Henry Junkins, a day laborer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), his mother-in-law, Emily M. Junkins, a canvasser, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), and his servant, Mary Hartigan, a servant, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Charles A. Davis owned their house at 9 Myrtle Street, with a mortgage. Ida E. Davis was the mother of five children, of whom five were still living; her mother, Emily M. Junkins, was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

WEST MILTON. Schools began Monday morning. Miss Alice Patterson of Brookline, Mass., teaches the Hare road school, Miss Davis of Rochester at Nute Ridge, West Milton has the same teacher, Miss Daisy Davis (Farmington News, December 2, 1904).

Press Comment. The names of three New Hampshire girls appear in the list of Bates college graduates this year. They are Ethel J. Davis of this city, Emily C. Davis of Rochester and Fannie G. de Rochemont of Newington. When Dartmouth opens her doors to women and Durham gets a dormitory for their accommodation, our girls will not be compelled to go out of state to receive a college education. The latter arrangement is understood to be on the way. – Portsmouth Times (Farmington News, July 5, 1907).

E. Christina Davis appeared in the Rochester directory of 1909, as a teacher, with her home at 9 Myrtle street. (Her father, Charles A. Baker, kept a wholesale and retail confectionary, bakery, and ice cream parlor at 37 North Main street in Rochester, and had his house at 9 Myrtle street).

C. Charles A. Davis, an ice cream and confectionary manufacturer, aged sixty-two years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ida E. Davis, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), his children, E. Christine Davis, a high school teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), Gladys A. Davis, a bookkeeper, aged thirty years (b. NH), Morris J. Davis, a Dupont chemist, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Dorothea Davis, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Bernice E. Frye, a grade school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). C. Charles A. Davis owned their house at 9 Myrtle Street, free-and-clear.

Teachers Appointed. Christine Davis was appointed instructor in history at the B.M.C. Durfee high school. vice F. Winifred Given, resigned, and she was placed upon the academic schedule, fifth year. Miss Davis is a graduate of Bates College, class of 1907, and has attended summer schools at Boston University and Harvard University. She taught in various high schools, including Natick, Mass., from 1913 to 1918, Rochester, N.H, from 1918-21, and last year was in the Forest Park junior high school in Springfield. Her home is in Rochester, N.H. (Fall River Daily Evening News [Fall River, MA), September 6, 1922).

Christine Davis, a public school teacher, aged forty-six years (b. NH), was a roomer in the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census of Fall River, MA, She resided at 88 Prospect street.

Obituary. Mrs. Ida E. Davis. Ocean Park, Me., Aug. 22. (AP) – Mrs. Ida E. Davis, 74, of Rochester, New Hampshire, active in the Rochester WCTU, died yesterday in the summer home of her daughter, Miss Christine Davis (Hartford Courant (Hartford, CT), August 23, 1937).

Minnie Glendon, a widow, aged seventy years (b. Irish Free State), headed a Fall River, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her partner, Catherine Cooney, aged seventy-one years (b. MA), and their lodgers, Laura Wood, aged sixty-seven years (b. MA), Christine E. Davis, a public school teacher, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and Helena Withrow, a public school teacher, aged forty-nine years (b. Canada (Eng.)). Minnie Glendon owned their house at 89 Prospect street, which was valued at $5,000.

Emily C. Davis died in MA, December 15, 1967.

Miss Hayes – 1907-08

The Miss Hayes of Nute Ridge’s 1907-08 academic year was probably the same Fannie I. Hayes from above. However, her older sister, Miss Elvah M. Hayes, was also a schoolteacher, although usually in Wakefield, MA. Both of them lived – when not boarding near their respective schools – with their mother, Mrs. Nellie M. (Parmenter) Hayes, on the nearby Hare road.

WEST MILTON. School began at Nute Ridge last Monday with Miss Hayes of Milton as teacher. School was one week late on account of the sudden death of Miss Hattie Campbell, who was a most successful teacher there for a number of years (Farmington News, September 12, 1907).

Elvah M. Hayes was born in Farmington, NH, December 22, 1878, daughter of Charles and Nellie M. (Parmenter) Hayes.

WEST MILTON. Miss Elvah Hayes, the popular young teacher, has a vacation this week. Reviews and Thanksgiving recitations were given last week, and parents and friends invited. An essay by May Harriman was well written (Farmington News, December 4, 1896).

HERE AND THERE. Miss Agnes L. Berry, Miss Isa Wood, and Miss Elvah Hayes are the bright young women from this neighborhood who are teachers in Wakefield, Mass., under the superintendency of Mr. Charles E. Hussey, formerly of Farmington and Rochester (Farmington News, April 15, 1898).

WEST MILTON. Miss Elvah Hayes is to return to Massachusetts this week, where she is to teach (Farmington News, September 8, 1898).

Elvah M. Hayes appeared in the Milton directories of 1902, 1905, and 1909, as a teacher, with her house at Mrs. Nellie M. Hayes, on the Hare road. (Sisters Fannie I Hayes and Florence A. Hayes resided there too). However, it was not unusual for teachers to claim or maintain a permanent residence somewhere, while boarding during the school year in the town where they taught. In this case, Miss Elvah Hayes, teacher, appeared also in the Wakefield, MA, directories of 1902, 1905, 1907, and 1909.

Delia A. Day, a widowed housekeeper, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Wakefield, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her son-in-law, Elmore C. Temple, a tank and pump salesman, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), her daughter, Edith E. Temple, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), and her boarder, Elvah M. Wentworth, a public school teacher, aged thirty-one years (b. NH). Delia A. Day owned their house at 12 Richardson Avenue, with a mortgage. She was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Her daughter had been married for eight years; she was the mother of one child, of whom none were still living.

Elvah Wentworth married in Wakefield, MA, May 27, 1916, Edward H. Kelley. He was born in Plymouth, CT, January 10, 1858, son of Henry R. and Sarah J. (Bloss) Kelley. (His previous wife, Harriet (Bristol) Kelley, had died in March 1915).

Edward H. Kelley, a brass foundry foreman, aged sixty-one years (b. CT), headed a Lynn, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elvah Kelley, aged forty years (b. NH). Edward H. Kelley owned their house at 115 Euclid Avenue, free-and-clear.

Edward H. Kelley, a farmer, aged seventy-two years (b. CT), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elvah Kelley, aged fifty-one years (b. NH). Edward H. Kelley owned their house on the Hare Road (at its intersection with Kings Highway), free-and-clear. They had a radio set.

Edward H. Kelley died in Milton, October 27, 1934. Elvah M. (Wentworth) Kelley died in Farmington, NH, February 5, 1948.

IN MEMORIAM. Elvah H. Kelley. Many people in this vicinity were deeply saddened by the death of Mrs. Elvah H. Kelley, aged 69, which occurred last Thursday morning, February 5, at a Farmington convalescent home, following a long period of failing health. She was born in Farmington in 1878, the daughter of Charles and Nellie (Parmenter) Hayes, and was the eldest of six children. She attended the Farmington schools and was graduated from the Farmington high school with the class of 1896, following which she attended Simmonds college in Boston. After receiving her schooling, she taught school for a number of years in New Hampshire, Massachusetts and New York state. In 1916 she was united in marriage with the late Edward H. Kelley, and for some time they resided in Lynn, Mass., before returning to this section about 25 years ago, where they made their home on Nute Ridge in West Milton. Her husband passed away a number of years ago and during her later years the deceased lived with her brother, Charles T. Hayes. Mrs. Kelley was a member of the Farmington Congregational church and a regular attendant as long as her health permitted. She was wholeheartedly interested in church work and was leader and organizer in the Ladies’ Aid Society. She was also a member of Nute Ridge Grange. Survivors include one sister, Mrs. Nellie Hannent of Winchendon Springs, Mass., two brothers, George W. Hayes of Barnstead and Charles T. Hayes of West Milton, also three nieces and one nephew. Funeral services were held in the Congregational church, Sunday, February 8, with Rev. Myles D. Blanchard officiating. Remains were taken to Lynn, Mass., for inter[ment] (Farmington News, February 13, 1948).

Josie Mabel Calkins – 1908-09

Josie Mabel Calkins was born in Milton, February 20, 1891, daughter of Henry G. and Emma M. (Lancaster) Calkins.

Josie M. Calkins appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as being the Nute Ridge school teacher (as of October 1, 1908).

She married in Milton, November 23, 1909, Joseph S. Garland, she of Lebanon, ME, and he of Wakefield, NH. He was a surveyor, aged twenty-six years; she was a teacher, aged eighteen years. Joseph N. Walker performed the ceremony. Garland was born in Wakefield, NH, August 20, 1883, son of Alvah S. and Priscilla L. (Lothrop) Garland.

Joseph Spinney Garland of Milton, NH, registered for the WW I military draft in Waterville, ME, in June 1917. He was a contractor’s superintendent, employed by the Sanders Engineering Co. of 112 Exchange Street, Portland, ME, aged thirty-five years (b. August 20, 1883). His nearest relative was his wife, Mrs. Josie M. Garland, 50 Pleasant street, Waterville, ME. He was of tall height, with a slender build, hazel eyes, and brown hair.

Joseph S. ([with wife] Josie M.) Garland appeared in the Portland, ME, directory of 1920, as a superintendent, with his house at Elsmere avenue, S.P. [South Portland].

Joseph S. Garland, a construction superintendent, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a South Portland, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Josie M. Garland, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and his daughter, Jessie P. Garland, aged nine years (b. NH). Joseph S. Garland owned their house at 68 Elsmere Avenue, with a mortgage.

Joseph ([with wife] Josie) Garland appeared in the Amsterdam, NY, directory of 1921, as a foreman, boarding at 239 Market street.

Joseph S. Garland, a construction superintendent, aged forty-one years (b. US), headed an Amsterdam, NY, household at the time of the NY State Census of 1925. His household included his wife, Josie Garland, a houseworker, aged thirty-three years (b. US), his daughter, Priscilla Garland, at school, aged fourteen years (b. US), and his cousin, Waide Lishe, at school, aged sixteen years (b. US).

Joseph S. Garland, a construction superintendent, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Schenectady, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Josie Garland, a clothing dept. saleslady, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and his daughter, Priscilla Garland, an office work stenographer, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Joseph S. Garland rented their house at 110 Barrett Street. They did not have a radio set.

Joseph S. Garland, a civil engineer, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Josie M. Garland, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Joseph S. Garland rented their house in the Willey district, for $5 per month. Joseph S. Garland had attended eight years of school, while Josie M. Garland had attended also four years of high school. They had both lived in Schenectady, NY, in 1935.

Joseph Spinney Garland of Sanbornville, Wakefield, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Center Ossipee, NH, May 4, 1942. He was self employed, aged fifty-eight years (b. Wakefield, NH, August 20, 1883). His nearest relative was his wife, Mrs. Josie M. Garland, Sanbornville, NH, R.F.D.. He stood 6’4″ in height, weighed 185 lbs., with hazel eyes, gray hair, and a sallow complexion.

Joseph S. Garland died March 19, 1961. Josie M. (Calkins) Garland died in Pinellas County, FL, October, 5, 1980.

Georgia Anne (Gerrish) Wentworth – 1911-12, 1919-20

Georgia Anne Gerrish was born in Lebanon, ME, September 7, 1865, daughter of Elisha P. and Elizabeth M. (Hersom) Gerrish.

Wentworth, Georgia A. - Detail - c1893
Georgia A. (Gerrish) Wentworth, c1893

She married in Rochester, NH, November 20, 1886, Martin G. Wentworth. He was born in Milton, in June 1863, son of John A. and Hannah E. (Grey) Wentworth.

Martin G. Wentworth, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Georgia Wentworth, aged forty-five years (b. ME), and his children, G. Myron Wentworth, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Herbert A. Wentworth, aged thirteen [twenty-three] years (b. NH), and Russell G. Wentworth, aged eleven years (b. NH). Martin G. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear.

WEST MILTON. The West Milton and Nute Ridge schools were reopened Monday after the annual spring vacation. The West Milton school government held its election of officers for the third term on the opening day, and during the last week of the recess and up to the hour when the ballot box was set out there was some campaigning that would have done credit (in its straightforward respect at least) to older politicians. The various officers were all closely contested, and especially those of postmaster, chief of police and selectmen. The meeting was called to order during the noon recess by moderator, Lula V. Grace, who, after reading the minutes of the last meeting, and outlining the duties incumbent on each office, declared the ballot open for first selectman. Until the adjournment the voting was very close and showed the following results for choice: Board of selectmen, Carrie Grace, Raymond Horne, Marguerite Swinerton; postmaster, Jacob Swinerton; town clerk, Luis Grace; town treasurer, Clara Hurd; tax collector, Ulfrida Ray; chief of police, Clyde Horne; police officer, Reginald Swinerton. The slip ballot system was used and perhaps it is well to say that the above choice was nominated and elected on a citizens’ ticket. The Nute Ridge school has also adopted this form of a pupils’ government and held its initial election on the same day with no less enthusiasm manifested than at the former school. Hazel Perkins was appointed moderator and presided at the ballot box. The result of the voting was as follows: Board of selectmen, Emma Barber, Clementine Barber, Eva McGregor; town clerk, Vivian McGregor; town treasurer, Hazel Perkins; postmaster, Bernice Varney; chief of police, Wilbur McGregor; police officer, Irving Gray; tax collector, Annie Perkins (Farmington News, April 4, 1912).

WEST MILTON. O.G. Moorehouse has recently been elected to fill the teachership at Nute Ridge school, made vacant by the resignation of Mrs. Georgia Wentworth, School will begin Monday, September 9 (Farmington News, September 6, 1912).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Georgia Wentworth and Fern McGregor were in Dover Saturday (Farmington News, February 19, 1915).

WEST MILTON. Nute Ridge school has reopened with Mrs. Martin Wentworth as teacher, and Miss Ferne McGregor has the South Milton school (Farmington News, September 19, 1919).

Martin Wentworth, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Georgie G. Wentworth, a grammar school teacher, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), and his children, Herbert A. Wentworth, a leatherboard laborer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), George M. Wentworth, a United Shoe Co. machine inspector, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Russell G. Wentworth, a groceries wagon driver, aged twenty years (b. NH). Martin G. Wentworth owned their farm on Nute Ridge road (at its intersection with Hare Road), free-and-clear. They appeared in the enumeration between the households of John P. Hayes, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), and Edwin E. Nute, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. NH). (Close to that of Fred McGregor below).

Georgia A. (Gerrish) Wentworth died in Milton, March 4, 1940. Martin G. Wentworth died in Milton, January 17, 1947.

IN MEMORIAM. Mrs. Georgia G. Wentworth. Relatives and friends in Farmington, Milton and Rochester and neighbors of the West Milton section were grieved to learn of the sudden death of Mrs. Georgia G. Wentworth, wife of Martin L. Wentworth, which occurred at her home at Nute Ridge late Monday evening. Mrs. Wentworth became ill while abut her household duties the previous Friday. She was 77 years of age, a native of Lebanon, Me., and one of two daughters born to Mr. and Mrs. Elisha P. Gerrish. Before and subsequent to her marriage to Mr. Wentworth she lived in Farmington, the family having moved to Nute Ridge nearly fifty years ago. In church, community and Grange affairs Mrs. Wentworth was an active figure. For many years she sang in the Nute Ridge chapel choir, was a charter member and organist of the Nute Ridge Grange and to the end of her life contributed helpfully of her talents to all of these sources. She was devoted wife, a loving and indulgent mother, a friend and neighbor who spared neither herself or resources in extending charity and sympathetic help in every worthy quarter. She is survived by her husband, three sons, Herbert A. Wentworth and Russell G. Wentworth, of the home circle, and Russell G. [error for Myron B.] Wentworth of Beverly, Mass., one grandchild, a sister of St. Louis, Mo., and a niece of South Bend, Ind. Funeral services were held from Nute chapel this Thursday afternoon, with the pastor, Rev. E. Lincoln Bigelow, officiating. The remains were taken to Farmington (Farmington News, March 8, 1940).

Oscar Guymont Morehouse – 1912-13

Hiram Oscar Morehouse was born in Highgate, VT, May 11, 1887, son of Herbert E. and Mary E. “Nellie” (Guymont) Morehouse. He apparently did not care much for the name Hiram, which he dropped, and used instead his mother’s maiden name as a middle name: Oscar Guymont Morehouse.

Geo. E. Nute, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Abby M. Nute, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), his daughter, Edith M. Brown, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), [married eight years to] his son-in-law, Fred L. Brown, a farm laborer, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), his grandson, Gordon N. Brown, aged two years (b. NH), and his boarder, H. Oscar Morehouse, at school, aged thirteen years (b. MA [SIC]). Geo. E. Nute owned their farm, but with a mortgage. Each of the women were mothers of one child, each of whom was still living.

Oscar G. Morehouse graduated from Nute High school with its class of 1906.

WEST MILTON. Oscar Moorehouse, of Boston, returned home this week after spending two weeks at George Canney’s (Farmington News, August 30, 1907).

Oscar G. Morehouse appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1908, as a clerk at 208 Newbury street [New England Telephone & Telegraph], who boarded at 53 Temple street. He resided at 706 Huntington avenue in 1909 and 1910.

Oscar G. Morehouse appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1912, as a clerk at 208 Newbury street [New England Telephone & Telegraph], who boarded at 706 Huntington Avenue, Roxbury.

WEST MILTON. O.G. Moorehouse has recently been elected to fill the teachership at Nute Ridge school, made vacant by the resignation of Mrs. Georgia Wentworth, School will begin Monday, September 9 (Farmington News, September 6, 1912).

WEST MILTON. The Nute Ridge school commenced last Monday morning with O.G. Morehouse as teacher and thirteen pupils enrolled. This is an unusually large number for this district (Farmington News, September 13, 1912).

WEST MILTON. O.G. Moorehouse and Mrs. C.B. Canney, teachers of the Nute Ridge and West Milton schools, gave a Hallowe’en party to their students at the home of Mrs. Annie Cook. The little guests were summoned to appear at 8 o’clock, and with hardly an exception were all present on time, each carrying a jack o’ lantern. The yard was shimmering in the light of several Hallowe’en illuminations, and as each little group arrived it added a little more to the grotesqueness of the scene of dancing shadows. The children were admitted to the hall, where a huge jack o’ lantern beamed on them, and thence to the living room where an old-fashioned fire-place presented a typical Hallowe’en appearance from behind its fenders and andirons trimmed in the season’s colors, where burned the king of jack o’ lanterns. The room was very artistically embellished with tasty decorations. Here all sorts of mystic games were in progress throughout the evening. To add to the spooky surroundings, weird music was furnished by Mr. Moorehouse, who is an accomplished artist on the piano. At 9.30 the pupils were formed in line and marched through the hall into the dining room, where Hallowe’en plate favors were laid on the plate each child was to occupy according to a name rotation which had been previously arranged. The table was very tastefully laid with dainty napkins and dishes, and was decorated with festoons and streamers of yellow and black which hung from the ceiling. The ice cream, assorted cakes and confections were served by the host and hostess, after which all repaired to the living room again where new games and contests were indulged in until a late hour. Before departing each child did not forget to thank their teachers and Mrs. Cook, to whom much credit is due, for their delightful entertainment (Farmington News, [Friday,] November 8, 1912).

West Milton. The West Milton and Nute Ridge schools held union memorial exercises at the latter schoolhouse last Thursday afternoon. Forty visitors were present, including representatives from Eli Wentworth Post, G.A.R., Milton, and the Sons of Veterans. An excellent program of exercises was rendered by the pupils, under the direction of O.G. Morehouse, teacher of the Nute Ridge school (Farmington News, June 6, 1913).

Oscar Morehouse appeared in the Brookline, MA, directories of 1912, 1913, and 1914, as a telephone operator in Boston, MA, boarding at 20 Roberts street in Brookline, MA. (This would seem to suggest a certain amount of back and forth between greater Boston and Milton).

Moorehouse, OG - FN140227
Oscar G. Morehouse’s advertisement (Farmington News, February 27, 1914).

WEST MILTON. Oscar Morehouse has been ill recently with an attack of acute appendicitis. He has now recovered sufficiently to resume work (Farmington News, December 18, 1914).

WEST MILTON. The many friends of Oscar Morehouse will be glad to hear of his return from the Dover hospital, where he underwent an operation for appendicitis. He is doing well (Farmington News, February 19, 1915).

West Milton. Oscar Morehouse has so far recovered from his recent operation as to be out (Farmington News, March 19, 1916).

Oscar G. Morehouse appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as an shoe opr. [operative], boarding with Mrs. Annie Cook, on Middleton road.

Oscar Guymont Morehouse registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, June 5, 1917. He was a shoe operative, employed by J.F. Cloutman & Co. of Farmington, NH, aged thirty years (b. Highgate, VT, May 11, 1887). His mailing address was Farmington R.F.D. #1, i.e., he lived in West Milton. He was of medium height, with a slender build, brown eyes, and dark brown hair.

The last will of Oscar G. Morehouse of Milton, dated Farmington, NH, March 30, 1918, and proved in Strafford County Court, April 15, 1919, skipped over his brother, Herbert E. [“Eugene”] Morehouse (and any other heirs), and devised his estate to Herbert B. Swinerton of Milton, who was also named as executor.

U.S. Army private Oscar G. Morehouse of Union, NH, died of pneumonia in France, February 7, 1919. (He might be considered to be yet another Milton victim of the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918-19).

WW I - 302 Reg (76 Div)IN MEMORIAM. Private Oscar G. Morehouse, Co. G, 302 Inf., A.E.F. Out of the lifting cloud of conflict that has enveloped two continents, there emerge the daily emissaries of unbounded joy and poignant grief. Among the latter there came to this community last Friday an official telegram from the war department at Washington announcing the death of Private Oscar G. Morehouse, which occurred while on active duty with the American expeditionary forces in France, as the result of pneumonia, February 5. As is customary, no other details accompanied the official dispatch and leaves the mind to conjure up a pathetic picture of this soldier passing to his reward thousands of miles from the caress of loved hands at home. Relentless are the fortunes of war and accustomed as we are to reading the grim details of casualty lists, we cannot but feel particularly depressed on hearing this news, as we have but to recur to almost any one of the letters that have come to local friends from the deceased to apprehend the deep yearning that he entertained for the sights of familiar faces and the clasp of the friendly hands that awaited his coming in vain. Private Morehouse was one of the national army draftees inducted into the service May 18, 1918, and subsequently stationed at Camp Devens, a member of the 302d infantry until September 4, when his unit was shipped enroute to France. He was stationed with the reserve troops just back of the front until the hostilities ceased with the signing of the armistice. Since that time it is learned that he was transferred to the 302d and that his division was gradually being withdrawn to the coast in preparation for transportation home. Private Morehouse was 31 years of age and a native of Vermont, the son of Herbert and Nellie (Guymont) Morehouse, both deceased. He came to Milton with his father and an older brother when a small boy and most of his life had been passed in that town. He received his elementary education in the public schools and graduated from Nute High school in the class of 1906, after which he was employed in Boston with the New England Telephone Co. for a number of years, returning to this locality in 1912 and remained, teaching school and working as an operative in the J.P. Cloutman factory until he was inducted into the service of his country. He was a bright, honest and upright young man and made a host of long and lasting friends who are deeply afflicted at the sad news that has shadowed the community. The deceased was a member of the Nute High School Alumni association and a past officer of the Nute Ridge Grange. Memorial services will be held at Nute chapel, West Milton, sometime in the near future. A brother, Eugene Morehouse, whose location is unknown, is the only surviving relative (Farmington News, February 28, 1919).

Milton’s American Legion post was named for Oscar G. Morehouse and its members turned out for his funeral in November 1920. (His name is now attached to American Legion Post 61 in Dover, NH).

PRIVATE OSCAR G. MOREHOUSE SERVICES. Funeral services of a most touching nature were held at Nute chapel last Sunday at 12:00 over the remains of Private Oscar G. Morehouse who died in France, February 5, 1919. His body was among those of the 2,800 overseas soldiers returned to New York a week ago last Thursday and it was not until Saturday noon that it arrived in town, under military guard. The flag-draped oak casket, enclosing a metallic shell which safe-guarded the heroic remains during the long sea voyage, was taken in charge at once by relatives and friends and the guard released. Well before the hour appointed for the service the church was well filled with devoted friends, officers and members of Oscar G. Morehouse Post, American Legion of Milton, officers and members of Nute Ridge Grange, of which the deceased was a member, and a few of the Legion boys from Farmington. Promptly at the hour announced, the Legion delegations filed into the church in military order and surrounded the casket that was almost hidden under the massive flag and a profusion of beautiful offerings. After a brief form of tribute they retired to a reserved section in the front of the house and Rev. D.A. Gammon, a former pastor and personal friend of the deceased, took the pulpit. Inasmuch as a previous service had been performed in the memory of Private Morehouse, his remarks were of a simple order, including touching quotations from Tennyson’s poems. Yet, in their very simplicity, they reached down into the heart to sound responsive chords of awakened and tender memories. The Three Links quartet sang two beautiful selections and with the prayer and benediction, the service was concluded. Tender hands of former comrades of former comrades in arms bore the casket to the hearse and faithful feet followed it to its resting place, a beautiful spot in the Lewis Nute cemetery. As the body was lowered into the grave the quartet sang a last selection and a firing squad from the Legion fired a salute over the open grave. In the echo flung back from the nearby woods and distant hills there sounded the valor of America and may it keep an eternal vigil over the resting places of our nation’s dead (Farmington News, [Friday,] November 12, 1920).

Jennie E. Jewett and Annie E. Cook published a “Card of Thanks” in the same issue of the Farmington News.  Annie E. (Davis) Cook had been his landlady during his time on Nute Ridge and Mrs. Jennie E. Cook of Boston was his sister.

But the body buried in the Lewis Nute cemetery was not actually that of Oscar G. Morehouse. The War Department discovered its error two years later and made a substitution.

EXCHANGE OF BODY OF AN UNNAMED SOLDIER FOR THAT OF PRIVATE MOREHOUSE. The arrival of a soldier’s body in his flag-draped coffin on the noon train Saturday caused the usual inquiries to follow such an incident. At the time, although the body was convoyed by military guard, a lieutenant in civilian costume, and was ordered placed in the tomb, little or nothing could be learned. Later in the day the body was taken to the Hayes cemetery at West Milton and, acting under a permit obtained from the authorities at Milton, the grave containing the remains of Private Oscar G. Morehouse was opened, the box and casket exhumed and replaced by the later arrival. Although the ceremony, which was marked with reverence, was significant to those that observed it, information at that time was vouchsafed by the custodian of the body to the extent that the exchange was necessitated owing to the discovery of a mistake and that the identity of the body of Private Morehouse had been established beyond any question, also that it had been buried under orders from the war department at Washington and that the lieutenant that accompanied it was an attaché of that department. The name of the soldier buried in the Morehouse grave since November 7, 1920, was not revealed. It was brought to this village and shipped to New York, accompanied by the guard, on the morning train Sunday. Inasmuch as this was one out only four similar instances in handling 35,000 bodies, and the government went to enormous expense and pains, showing the finest spirt of respect and good attitude to relatives and all concerned, when it could, so far as anyone would have ever known, have compounded the error by forwarding the remains of Private Morehouse, which landed at Hoboken on Tuesday of last week, to the perhaps waiting relatives of the other soldier, the United States government is to be highly commended rather than censured in this and other few instances of fallibility. Private Morehouse died in France, February 5, 1919. His supposed remains were forwarded here November 6, 1920, and the following day were interred with funeral services at Nute chapel and full military honors by Oscar G. Morehouse Post, American Legion, of Milton, and Clarence L. Perkins Post of this town (Farmington News, December 29, 1922).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Jennie Jewett of Boston visited at the home of Mrs. Annie Cook over the weekend. She is the sister of the late Oscar Morehouse. She returned to her home Monday. She was conveyed to Rochester by Mr. and Mrs. John Dorr and made a few hours’ visit at their home (Farmington News, October 17, 1924).

PERSONAL. Mrs. Jennie Jewett of Boston, sister of the late Oscar G. Morehouse, was called here last Saturday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Annie Cook (Farmington News, May 20, 1927).

Miss Ferne C. [Gilmartin] McGregor – 1913-15, 1916-17, 1924-47

Ferne C. Gilmartin was born, probably in Lowell, MA, January 24, 1894, daughter of William J. and Roseltha S. (Chesley) Gilmartin. Her mother married (2nd), in Boston, MA, February 28, 1901, Fred McGregor, a B&M railroad engineer. Ferne took his surname.

Fred McGregor, a steam railroad engineer, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Roseltha S. McGregor, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and his step-daughter, Ferne M. McGregor, aged sixteen years (b. MA).

For a number of years the McGregor family spent their summers at Nute Ridge, and in 1918 moved from Charlestown, Mass., to their present [Nute Ridge] home (Farmington News, March 27, 1942).

Miss Ferne McGregor had charge of the Nute Ridge schoolhouse in the spring term of the 1913-14 academic year, and the whole of the 1914-15 academic year.

West Milton. Nute Ridge school will reopen for the spring term on next Monday, March 30, with Miss Elizabeth Jones of Plummer’s Ridge as teacher (Farmington News, March 27, 1914).

West Milton. The Nute Ridge school began last Monday with Miss Ferne McGregor as teacher. It was announced in last weeks’ News that Miss Elizabeth Jones of Plummer’s Ridge would continue the school, but owing to later arrangements Miss Jones was given a school nearer her home (Farmington News, April 3, 1914).

West Milton. The winter term of the Nute Ridge school has closed and the teacher, Miss Ferne McGregor, is absent on vacation (March 19, 1915).

West Milton. The closing exercises of the Nute Ridge school were attended by relatives and friends of the pupils and teacher and were a credit to all participating (Farmington News, June 23, 1916).

Miss Ferne McGregor had charge of the Nute Ridge schoolhouse in the 1916-17 academic year.

West Milton. The Nute Ridge school opened Tuesday (Farmington News, [Friday,] September 8, 1916).

West Milton. The Christmas tree and exercises given at the chapel Monday evening were well attended. A fine literary and musical program was furnished by pupils of Nute Ridge school under direction of the teacher, Miss Ferne McGregor. Presents were distributed among the children of the Sunday school (Farmington News, [Friday,] December 29, 1916).

Ferne C. McGregor appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as teacher of the Nute’s Ridge school.

Miss Ferne McGregor had charge of the South Milton schoolhouse in the 1918-19 academic year (Farmington News, September 19, 1919).

WEST MILTON. The Memorial was fittingly observed with appropriate exercises by the teacher and pupils of the Hare road school on Thursday afternoon of last week. The schoolroom was tastefully decorated with wreaths of evergreen, flags, and crepe paper in the national colors, while bouquets added their beauty and fragrance. It was evident that time and labor and thoughtful interest had been combined in preparing for this day of commemoration. The teacher and pupils of Nute Ridge were in attendance, together with parents and neighbors, and the hour was pleasantly and profitably spent in giving attention to the program of songs and recitations which was very creditably given. At the close of the exercises, refreshments of assorted cake and fruit punch were served, and the pleasant little affair was concluded with the taking of a group picture of the school by Miss McGregor (Farmington News, June 6, 1919).

Fred McGregor, a Boston & Maine R.R. steam engineer, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Rose S. McGregor, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), his daughter, Fern McGregor, a grammar teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and his mother-in-law, Mary E.W. Place, a widow, aged seventy-six years (b. MA). Fred McGregor owned their house on Nute Ridge road (near its intersection with Hare Road), free-and-clear. They appeared in the enumeration between the households of Edwin E. Nute, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and Henry B. Hayes, a farmer, aged sixty-six years (b. NH). (Close to that of Martin G. Wentworth above).

WEST MILTON. A meeting was called by the school board of Milton last week to discuss the matter of consolidation of the several schools in this corner of the town. Nothing was done except to discuss the pros and cons. A goodly number was in attendance, but matters were left as they stood before, with two schools, one at Nute Ridge and the other on the Hare road. The outside scholars will be conveyed as heretofore. All expressed their views and a vote was taken which soon decided the matter in favor of the two schools (Farmington News, August 3, 1923).

WEST MILTON. Miss Fern McGregor started to school last Monday morning in her auto, but owing to the depth of the snow was obliged to leave her car at the home of John Hayes and make the rest of the trip on foot (Farmington News, December 5, 1924).

WEST MILTON. Herbert Wentworth is transporting the school children by auto to the Nute Ridge schoolhouse. The two schools have been consolidated which makes a little larger school with Miss Ferne McGregor as teacher (Farmington News, August 28, 1925).

Ferne C. McGregor had twenty-one students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1926-27. She received an annual salary of $825.00. She received also an additional $72.00 for providing her own janitorial services. Her stepfather, Fred McGregor, received $60.25 for providing fuel, likely firewood for the school (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1928).

(The South Milton school, which was the only other one-room school remaining in operation, had nine enrolled Milton students (under Cora McD Hayes), but that school and its expenses were shared with Rochester, whose students were not included in its head count).

WEST MILTON. Miss Fern McGregor. teacher of the Nute Ridge school, was hostess of a delightful box party given at Nute chapel on Tuesday evening, in aid of a fund which will be used to pay for a new organ that recently has been installed in the school. The community was well represented and the sale of boxes netted a tidy sum. The children of the school deserve much credit for a very fine program of exercises (Farmington News, June 10, 1927).

Ferne C. McGregor had nineteen students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1927-28. She received an annual salary of $850.00. She received also an additional $72.00 for providing her own janitorial services (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1929).

Ferne C. McGregor had twenty students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1928-29. She received an annual salary of $900.00. She received also an additional $72.00 for providing her own janitorial services (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1930).

Ferne C. McGregor appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as a teacher, with a mailing address of Farmington R.D. (rural delivery).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Martin Wentworth and Mrs. Agnes Goodwin motored to Massachusetts with Miss Ferne McGregor this week in the latter’s car. Mrs. Goodwin will make an extended visit in Boston, while Mrs. Wentworth and Miss McGregor will return this week, bringing with them Miss McGregor’s grandmother, Mrs. Mary Place, who at present is staying with relatives in Milton, Mass. (Farmington News, May 2, 1930).

Fred McGregor, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Roseltha McGregor, aged sixty-five years (b. MA), and his daughter, Ferne McGregor, a public school teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. MA). Fred McGregor owned their house on Nute’s Ridge. They had a radio set. They appeared in the enumeration between the households of Douglas Blanchard, a farmer, aged thirty-six years (b. NY), which household included the Henry B. Hayes of 1920, and Martin Wentworth, a farmer, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH). (Just beyond the Wentworth house was that of Nute Chapel’s Rev. E. Lincoln Bigelow).

NUTE RIDGE. Miss Edith Ball Sampson was a recent guest of Miss Ferne McGregor (Farmington News, August 1, 1930).

WEST MILTON. Miss Ferne McGregor spent the week-end with her parents and has returned to Keene for the last week of summer school (Farmington News, August 14, 1931).

Ferne C. McGregor had twenty-four students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1931-32. She received an annual salary of $900.00. She ceased providing her own janitorial services (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1933).

WEST MILTON. Miss Ferne McGregor and Mrs. Martin Wentworth were in Laconia to attend the teachers’ convention last Friday (Farmington News, October 23, 1931).

Ferne C. McGregor had twenty-four students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1932-33. She received an annual salary of $900.00 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1934).

Ferne C. McGregor had twenty-three students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1933-34. She received an annual salary of $810.00 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1935).

Ferne C. McGregor had an average of 23.25 students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1934-35. She received an annual salary of $810.00 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1936).

WEST MILTON. Ferne McGregor attended a convention of rural teachers held at Chocorua, Tuesday, and found herself booked for a talk on “Public activities in a rural school.” She was accompanied by Mrs. Lizzie Fall of the Milton school board and Miss Alice Dennison of Boston (Farmington News, November 2, 1934).

Ferne C. McGregor had twenty-three students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1935-36. She received an annual salary of $810.00 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1937).

Ferne C. McGregor had twenty-nine students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1936-37 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1938).

Ferne C. McGregor had fourteen students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1937-38 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1939).

Ferne C. McGregor had eleven students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1938-39. She received an annual salary of $900.00 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1940).

Ferne C. McGregor had ten students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1939-40. She received an annual salary of $945.00 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1941).

WEST MILTON. As guests of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Schmeltz of Wayland, Mass., Russel Wentworth and Ferne McGregor spent several days motoring in Quebec (Farmington News, September 8, 1939).

Fred McGregor, a farm laborer, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Roseltha McGregor, aged sixty-five years (b. MA), and his daughter, Ferne McGregor, a public school teacher, aged forty-four years (b. MA). Fred McGregor rented their house on Nute’s Ridge. They appeared in the enumeration between the households of Guy R. Smith, a farm laborer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Horatio Butters, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. ME). Fred McGregor and Ferne McGregor had completed four years of high school, while Roseltha McGregor had completed eight years of grammar school.

Ferne C. McGregor had twelve students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1940-41. She received an annual salary of $945.00. Her stepfather, Fred McGregor, received $74 for janitorial services (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1942).

Roseltha S. ((Chesley) Gilmartin) McGregor died in Milton, March 25, 1942, aged seventy-five years, ten months, and three days.

Ferne C. McGregor had seventeen students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1942-43. She received an annual salary of $978.16. Her stepfather, Fred McGregor, received $74 for janitorial services (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1944).

PERSONAL. Local friends of Fred McGregor of Nute’s Ridge regret to learn that he is confined to his bed by illness (Farmington News, June 20, 1947).

Ferne C. McGregor had seventeen students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1943-44. She received an annual salary of $1,025 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending December 31, 1944).

Ferne C. M’Gregor had fifteen students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1944-45. She received an annual salary of $1,175 (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending December 31, 1945).

Ferne C. McGregor had eighteen students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1945-46. She received an annual salary of $1,250. She was reimbursed $5.00 for minor repairs and expenses (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending December 31, 1946).

FOR SALE. 1935, two-ton international dump truck. Can be seen Monday through Friday after 4 o’clock, and Saturday and Sunday, or see Ralph Colomy. Fred McGregor, Nute Ridge (Farmington News, May 9, 1947).

Fred McGregor died in Milton, June 10, 1947, aged seventy-four years, five months, and twenty-one days.

Ferne C. McGregor had fourteen students enrolled at the Nute Ridge school for the academic year 1946-47. Her school covered grades 1-7. (Grade 8 students went to the Milton Grammar school) (Milton Town Report, for the Year Ending December 31, 1947).

The Nute Ridge School, with a total enrollment of fourteen children in grades 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7, has seven children in the seventh grade. As these seven children are transported to the village school next year for the eighth grade, it would seem that the other seven Nute Ridge children might more effectively be transported to the grammar school than to continue to educate them at the one-room Nute Ridge School (Milton Town Report, For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1947).

The 1946-47 academic year seems to have been the last for the Nute Ridge school. Miss McGregor taught thereafter at the Milton Grammar school, i.e., what is now called the Milton Elementary school, until her retirement after the 1960-61 academic year.

Another Party for Miss McGregor Retiring After 45 Years of Teaching. Milton. – Miss Ferne McGregor will be honored will be honored in a testimonial party in the Nute gym Friday evening sponsored by the P.T.A. Executive Board and the School Board. People of all ages will be welcome. Former pupils who cannot be present are urged to send greetings. Miss McGregor has been teacher of the 4th and 5th grade pupils at Milton Grammar school for the past 13 years. She had taught the Nute Ridge school before it was closed, at So. Milton and at Hare Road. She retires this month after 45 years of teaching here. Miss McGregor received a silver keyring inscribed from the Union 44 Teachers Association. Her second recognition and surprise came from her colleagues Friday evening, when the Milton Teachers Guild gave a surprise party in her honor in the Home Economics Room following the Night of Singing program. President Nelson Dionne of the Guild presented Miss McGregor with a watch. Several Milton teachers also attended the Nute Ridge Grange meeting when her fellow Grangers honored her (Farmington News, [Thursday,] June 8, 1961).

MILTON. Miss McGregor Feted. Milton. – Miss Ferne McGregor was honored on Friday evening at a public testimonial party at Nute High. The affair was sponsored jointly by the Milton P.T.A. and the Milton School Board. Rev. Bradley T. Lines, P.T.A. president, spoke for the P.T.A., expressing the gratitude of the parents for Miss McGregor’s dedicated life of teaching. He read a letter from former Supt. of Schools, Jonathan Osgood, now Professor of Education at Plymouth Teachers College. John B. Folsom, principal here, paid tribute to Miss McGregor, and in his capacity as a member of the Executive Board of the New Hampshire Education Association, presented her with a certificate from the association and a life membership in the New Hampshire Retired Teachers Association. Sup. Ramon Martineau of Union 44 spoke of Miss McGregor’s faithful devoted service over a period of 45 years. Llewellyn Scott, Milton School Board Chairman, spoke briefly then read a poem appropriate to the occasion. All former pupils were asked to stand and about a third of the audience rose. The only two generation family represented was Mrs. Milford Galerneau and son Peter. Principal Folsom presented a money tree which held 45 silver dollars and an envelope with nearly double that sum. Miss McGregor expressed her appreciation. Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Amadon of Montpelier, Vt., and their two children, David and Muriel, came the greatest distance to honor Miss McGregor. Mr. Amadon was her former principal and Mrs. Amadon a former teaching colleague. Mrs. Leslie O. Chase presented the guest book. Refreshments of ice cream and cookies were served by Mrs. Ernest Pierce, Mrs. Nelson Dionne, Mrs. John Folsom, Mrs. Cecil Brakeville and Miss Judah Brakeville (Farmington News, June 15, 1961).

Ferne C. Gilmartin McGregor died at Frisbee Hospital in Rochester, NH, June 23, 1970.

Miss Ferne C. McGregor. MILTON. – Miss Ferne C. McGregor, 76, died yesterday morning in the Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester after a long illness. She was born in Milton [SIC], Jan. 24, 1894, daughter of Fred [SIC] and Roselda (Chesley) McGregor. She taught in the Milton school system for 44 years. She was a charter member of the Nute Ridge Grange of West Milton, the Rebecca Lodge of Farmington, the Eastern Star of Farmington, and the Milton Women’s Club. Also the Mary Torr Chapter, DAR, of Rochester. There were no immediate survivors. Funeral services will be held at the Davenport Funeral Home Friday afternoon at 1 p.m. with the Rev. Greta Dow, pastor of the Center Effingham Church, officiating. Burial will be in the Fore-Father’s Cemetery, Chelmsford, Mass. (Farmington News, [Thursday,] June 25, 1970).

References:

Find a Grave. (2010, June 6). Elvah Hayes Kelley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/53324509

Find a Grave. (2015, August 25). Fannie Isabel Hayes Downing. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/151180169/fannie-isabel-downing

Find a Grave. (2016). Ferne C. McGregor. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/18168860

Find a Grave. (2016, February 7). Georgia Anna Gerrish Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/157906069/georgia-anna-wentworth

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Hattie M. Campnell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130390375

Find a Grave. (2015, October 27). Josie Caulkins Garland. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154316946

Find a Grave. (2014, July 11). Laura Susan Huckins Syze. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/132676686

Find a Grave. (2016, September 19). Oscar G. Morehouse. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170190819

Funk, I.J., and Gregory, D.S. (1903, December). Homiletic Review. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=UgbRAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA478

NH Board of Education. (1920). Report of the State Board of Education. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=5Xw-AQAAMAAJ

Wikipedia. (2020, March 31). One-Room School. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-room_school

Milton Automobiles in 1909-10

By Muriel Bristol | March 29, 2020

Milton 3-Ponds’ automobile owners and drivers of 1910 were: George E. Jordan, a shoe factory cutter; Wilbur C. Knight, a machine man [a machine repairman] for United Shoe Machinery; and James J. Buckley, a general practice physician. The single motorcyclist was George N. Corson, a drug store clerk. (His Indian-brand motorcycle would have been more like a motorized bicycle than a modern motorcycle).

REO Record - PH090223
REO Advertisement (Portsmouth Herald, February 23, 1909)

Milton Mills’ automobile owners and drivers of 1910 were: Arthur M. Flye, a dry goods and grocery merchant; Asa A. Fox, an undertaker; Forrest L. Marsh, a general practice attorney; R. Seth Pike, a butcher; John C. Townsend, a farmer; and John E. Townsend, a woolen blanket manufacturer. Frank D. Stevens was a general farm laborer and, apparently, a chauffeur (without automobile), perhaps for the elderly John E. Townsend.

Marmon 32 - IS090207
Nordyke & Marmon’s Marmon Model 32 (Indianapolis Star, February 7, 1909)

Automobiles were relatively expensive items at this time. Most of those listed above had some business use for an automobile, such as deliveries or travel, or were wealthy men, or both. For example, one may imagine Milton Mills manufacturer John E. Townsend sending an automobile to pick up business associates or clients at the Union railroad station. (See also Milton Businesses in 1909).

Elmore 36-B - BG110528
Elmore Model 36-B Touring Car (Boston Globe, May 28, 1911).

The automobile registration numbers below would have appeared with the prefix “N.H.” on license plates.

Automobile Registrations, September 1, to December 31, 1909

  1.  Forrest L. Marsh, Milton

New Hampshire Automobile Registrations, January 1, 1910, to September 1, 1910

  1. 1235, A.M. Flye, Milton, 22 hp. Buick
  2. 1464, A.A. Fox, Milton Mills, 30 hp. Elmore
  3. 2141, R.S. Pike, Milton Mills, 18 hp. Buick
  4. 3100, J.E. Townsend, Milton Mills, 45 hp. Nordyke & Marmon
  5. 3526, G.E. Jordan, Milton, 20 hp. Reo
  6. 4027, J.C. Townsend, Milton, 30 hp. Peerless
  7. 4152, W.C. Knight, Milton, 40 hp. Overland
  8. 4268, F.L. Marsh, Milton, 22 hp. Buick
  9. 4532, J.J. Buckley, Milton, 25 hp. Overland
  10. 4600, J.E. Townsend, Milton Mills, 40 hp. Overland

Motorcycles

  1. C306, George N. Corson, Milton, Indian

Professional Chauffeurs

  1. Milton – Frank D. Stevens

Asa A. Fox of Milton Mills took his friends for a drive whose route passed through Farmington.

PERSONAL. On Wednesday, Mr. A.A. Fox of Milton Mills was in [Farmington] town with a party of friends, in his automobile (Farmington News, August 24, 1906).

Some tourists stopped over at Milton Mills’ Central House on their automobile trip to Bretton Woods.

PERSONAL. A distinguished party from Brookline, Mass., were guests at the Central House Tuesday night. They included Mrs. J.M. Longyear, her two daughters and one son, Miss Margaret Glum of Columbus, Ohio, and Countess Hedda Levenhaupt of Stockholm, Sweden, and their chauffeur. They were enjoying a trip to Bretton Woods in their touring car (Farmington News, September 20, 1907).

There were no driving tests or automobile inspections at this time. Licenses and registrations were a by-mail process. Apparently, one could even learn to be a chauffeur through taking a correspondence course.

WANTED – Young men to learn automobile business by mail and prepare for positions as chauffeurs and repair men. We make you expert in ten weeks; assist you to secure position. Pay big; work pleasant; demand for men great; reasonable; write for particulars and sample lesson. Empire Automobile Institute, Rochester, N.Y. – ch-hm28-29 (Portsmouth Herald, May 29, 1909).

Wind chill was a factor when driving an open car. One would want to have a driving coat (with a turn-up collar), a cap and gloves. Goggles and a scarf would be useful too.

Automobile Toggery. We can fit you out in anything you may wish for in this line. We have a large variety and all the latest things in Coats, Caps and Gloves. Lothrops-Farnham Co., 21-23 No. Main Street, Rochester, N.H. Tel 123-3 (Farmington News, June 18, 1909).

Coastal motorists jammed Portsmouth roadways on weekends even as early as 1909.

CITY BRIEFS. It is estimated that three hundred automobiles passed through here [Portsmouth] on Sunday (Portsmouth Herald, August 2, 1909).

LOCAL DASHES. The Overland touring cars are handsome, reliable, quiet running and the equal of any $2000 car on the market. No extra charge for “fore door” bodies (Portsmouth Herald, February 13, 1911).

Here we find some Wakefield ladies out for a weekend drive through Milton Mills and Milton.

UNION. Mrs. Ernest Walker and Miss Mary Horne were given an auto ride through Milton Mills and Milton Saturday, kindness of Mrs. E.F. Hamlin (Farmington News, July 28, 1911).

Just after the 1910 registration period mentioned here, the number of New Hampshire’s automobile registrations rose from 2,100 in 1911 to 3,000 in 1912.

Interesting Items. New Hampshire registration of automobiles has reached nearly 3,000, which is about 900 over last year’s figures at the same time, and most of the auto dealers report larger sales of new cars than ever before (Farmington News, May 10, 1912).

For a rather brief description of the main route through Milton in this period (1917-18), see also Milton, Straight Thru (North), in 1918.


Previous in sequence: Milton Automobiles in 1906-07.


References:

Wikipedia. (2020, March 13). Buick. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buick

Wikipedia. (2020, January 28). Elmore Manufacturing Company. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elmore_Manufacturing_Company

Wikipedia. (2020, March 5). Indian Motorcycle Manufacturing Company. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Motocycle_Manufacturing_Company

Wikipedia. (2018, February 21). Nordyke, Marmon & Company. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nordyke_Marmon_%26_Company

Wikipedia. (2019, August 7). Overland Automobile. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overland_Automobile

Wikipedia. (2020, February 22). Peerless Motor Company. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peerless_Motor_Company

Wikipedia. (2020, March 10). REO Motor Car Company. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/REO_Motor_Car_Company

Milton Businesses in 1875

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | March 22, 2018

Extracted below are the Milton entries from the New Hampshire Register, Farmer’s Almanac and Business Directory, for 1875.


MILTON, STRAFFORD. Роp. 1598. N.E. from C., 40. R.R.S. [Railroad Stations], Мilton, and South Milton on Ports., Gt. Falls & Conway R.R.

OFFICERSClerk, Joseph Mathes; Treas., E.W. Fox; Selectmen, George Lyman, G.H. Plumer, John U. Simes; Supts., G.W. Olney, M.V.B. Cook, J.F. Joy

Postmasters. – C.H. Looney; South, H.H. Wentworth; West, T.F. Canney.

Justices [of the Peace]. – Luther Hayes, C.H. Looney, E.W. Fox, State; Joseph Plummer, Joseph Mathes, Joseph Cook, George Lyman, G.W. Peavey, J.S. Hersey, J.N. Sims, B.B. Plummer, B.P. Roberts.

Churches. – Chris., D.B. Goodwin; Cong., ___ ___; F. Bap., ___ ___. 

Exp. & Tel. Agent – Daniel Cerkery.

Hotel – Franklin House, Joseph Jenness. 

Livery Stables – Jas. R. Horne.

Literary InstitutionMilton Classical Institute, ___ ___, prin.

Manufacturers– boots and shoes, South, H.H. Wentworth; lumber, Luther Hayes, Scates & Lyman; Lewis Plumer, p.о. ad. ,Union. 

Mechanicsblacksmiths, H. Duntley & Son; carpenters Joseph Mathes, E.H. Hersom; painter, G.F. Hodgdon; wheelwrights, Joseph Matthes, Daniel Jenness. 

Merchants – Looney & Avery, G.A. Gilmore, J. Hart, Daniel Plummer, Jas. R. Horne; — fancy goods, Mrs. Ira L. Knox, Mrs. J.F. Hart; millinery, Mrs. C.M. Roberts. 

Physicians – G.W. Peavey.

Mills. – Postmaster & Exp. Agent – E.W. Fox. 

Churches – Cong., D.B. Scott, C.F. Page; F. Bap., A.S. MacLean; Meth., James Crowley.

Hotel & Livery Stable – Central House, Ira Miller.

Manufacturers – carriages & wheelwright, John Brackett; flannels, Waumbeck Manuf’g. Co.; flannels, felt cloth, piano and table covers, Edward Brierly & Son; table and piano covers, H.H. Townsend, John Meikle. 

Mechanics – blacksmiths, Ebenezer Osgood, Nathaniel Rines, S.F. Rines; carpenters, J.F. Titcomb, E.S. Simes; harness makers, A. Sanborn & Son; mason, J.G. Rines; painter, G.W. Came. 

Merchants – F.H. Chesley, Asa Fox & Son, A.A. Fox & Co., J.U. Simes, J.B. Merrill & Son; — boots and shoes. S. Grant; fancy goods, Mrs. W.P. Farnham; provisions, C.S. Lowd. 

Physicians – J.C. Buck, C.W. Gross, M.K. Cowell.


The Boston Globe reported a Milton Mills factory suspension in this year:

MILL SUSPENDED. GREAT FALLS, N.H., Aug. 10 – Brierley’s felt mills, at Milton, N.H., have suspended, throwing forty hands out of employment. Cause assigned, no sale for the goods already on hand (Boston Globe, August 11, 1875).


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1874; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1876


References:

Claremont Manufacturing Company. (1875). New Hampshire Register, Farmer’s Almanac and Business Directory, for 1875. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=gvAWAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA161

 

Milton Classical Institute – Redux

By Muriel Bristol | Match 20, 2020

Institute Bldg (3) -Detail
Institute Building, 1888

This is not a new article in itself, but serves merely to advise our readers that new information has come to hand that allowed for a significant expansion of our earlier study of the Milton Classical Institute (1867-c1889).

Prior to the Milton Classical Institute, Milton students who wanted to continue past the district or “common” school level might avail themselves of the resources at the subscription Milton Social Library – 1822.

Briefly, the Milton Classical Institute was a private secondary school that operated in the former Union church at Milton Three Ponds between 1867 and circa 1889. As such it was a precursor to the Nute High School that would establish itself corporately on February 15, 1889.

The Milton Classical Institute building was sold at auction on Saturday, August 29, 1891. Its new owner, merchant Joseph D. Willey, intended to convert it for residential use. Nute High School opened its doors (under Principal William K. Norton) on Tuesday, September 8, 1891.

 

 

Milton Businesses in 1868

By Muriel Bristol | March 15, 2020

A NH-wide business directory for 1868 (or 1868-69) has come to hand, from which the Milton entries have been extracted below. (Some revisions or additions to pre-existing articles are now possible).


POPULATION OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, According to the Census of 1860. STRAFFORD COUNTY. 31,493. Milton, 1,862.

POST-OFFICES AND POST-MASTERS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. Milton, Ezra H. Twombley; South Milton, Hiram V. Wentworth; West Milton, Edward L. Goodwin; Milton Mills, Elbridge W. Fox.

LEGISLATURE. SENATE. Dist. No. 5 – Alonzo Nute, Farmington. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. Strafford County. Milton. – John W. Simes, H.V. Wentworth.

COUNTY OFFICERS. Strafford County. Sheriff. Luther Hayes, Milton (South). JUSTICES. [Justices of the Peace] Milton. – Charles Jones, Luther Hayes, Elbridge W. Fox, Joseph Plumer, Ebenezer Wentworth, Ezra H. Twombly, Joseph Mathes, Charles A. Cloutman, Asa Jewett, Elias S. Cook, Joseph Cook, Robert Mathes, Eli Fernald, Asa Jewett, Daniel S. Burley, Ira C. Varney, George Lyman, George W. Peavey.


Milton Entries

Academies. Milton Classical Institute, W.D. Ewer, prin., Milton.

Blacksmiths. Duntley, Hazen, Milton; Osgood, Ebenezer, Rines, Nathaniel, Rines, Samuel F., Runnells, Alvah, Milton Mills; Goodwin, J & D.B., West Milton.

Boot & Shoe Manufacturers. Bennett, James, [of] Dover, Milton; Varney John H., Milton.

Box Manufacturers (See also Paper Box Manufacturers). Tuttle, William P., (sugar), South Milton.

Carpenters and Builders. Lucas, John; Mathes, Joseph; Simes, George E.; Swasey, George A.; Milton.

Carpet Manufacturers. Pine Valley Co., Milton.

Clergymen. Doldt, James (C.T.), Milton; Lothrop, Nathan C. (F.B.), Milton; Page, —- (C.T.), Milton Mills; Lang; Larkin A. (F.B.), West Milton.

Country Stores. Where is kept a general assortment of dry goods, groceries, agricultural implements, etc. Those who deal in but one kind of goods will be found under their appropriate headings. Hart, Mark H., Milton; Sayward, Joseph, Milton; Twombly, John E., Milton; Fox, Asa & Son, Milton Mills; Hubbard, Benjamin F., Milton Mills; Simes, Bray U., Milton Falls; Simes, John U., Milton Falls; Goodwin, Edward L., West Milton.

Grist Mills. Tuttle, Wm. P., South Milton; Horne, David, Milton Mills; Jack, Alexander, Milton Mills.

Hotels. Milton House, Wm. H. Huntress, Milton; Central Hotel, Ira Miller, Milton Mills.

Lumber Dealers. Hayes, Luther, South Milton.

Manufacturing Companies. (with kinds of goods manufactured). Milton Mills (blankets, etc.), Milton Mills.

Painters. (House, Sign, Carriage and Ornamental). Mathes, Robert, Milton; Hatch, Elijah, West Milton.

Physicians. Drew, Stephen, Milton; Peavey, George W., Milton; Swazey, Charles E., Milton Mills.

Saw Mills. Plumer, Lewis, Milton; Wentworth, Geo. W., Milton; Tuttle, Wm. P., South Milton.

Shingle Mills. (See also Saw Mills). Tuttle, Wm. P,., South Milton.

Shook Manufacturers. (See also Coopers). Hayes, L. & Co. (hogsheads), Milton.

Stables. Huntress, William M., Milton; Miller, Ira, Milton Mills; Buffum, —-, Milton.

Woolen Goods Manufacturers. (See also Hosiery). Briley, Edward (flannels), Milton; Milton Mills (flannels and blankets), Milton Mills.


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1867-68; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1869-70


References:

Briggs & Co. (1868). The New Hampshire Business Directory, for the Year Commencing April 1, 1868. Boston, MA: Briggs & Company, Publishers, 25 Kilby Street

Milton Mills’ Ira Miller (1826-1902)

By Muriel Bristol | March 8, 2020

Ira Miller was born in Acton, ME, December 13, 1826, son of Caleb and Mary (Kennerson) Miller.

He was left motherless when a babe of six weeks and was twelve years old when his father died. He was reared by his uncle, Woodman Miller. When sixteen years of age he started out to take care of himself and assisted farmers during the haying season, feeling sufficiently well paid when he received twenty-five cents for a day’s work. He then went to Lebanon, Me., where he worked for Millett Wentworth for seven months, thereby earning the sum of seven dollars, after which during the summers he again assisted farmers and attended school in the winters in Acton, Me., where he afterward was employed by Simon Tuttle at a wage of ten dollars a month, which in his second season was increased to thirteen dollars (Scales, 1914).

Woodman Miller headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years, one female aged 30-39 years, two males aged 5-9 years, one female aged 5-9 years, one male aged under 5 years, and two females aged under 5 years.

He married, May 29, 1849, Frances W. “Fanny” Merrill. She was born in Acton, ME, December 7, 1825, daughter of Asa and Fannie (Wood) Merrill.

Ira Miller, a shoemaker, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Frances Miller, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Winfield S. Miller, aged six months (b. ME), Ezra Farnham, a shoemaker, aged seventeen years (b. ME), and Ezriah Brackett, a shoemaker, aged fifteen years (b. ME). Ira Miller had real estate valued at $500. (He was a neighbor of Ralph Farnham).

He then learned the shoemaking trade at Milton Mills and then opened a shop and soon had a trade that made necessary the employment of six or eight men. In 1855 he erected the first shoe factory ever built at Acton, Me., and embarked in shoe manufacturing on a large scale, having a shoe store in connection, later selling his factory and buying the Roberts’ grist mill. This he remodeled and made it the best plant of its kind in the county, operating it from 1859 until 1866 (Scales, 1914).

Ira Miller, a miller, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Fanny Miller, a lady, aged thirty-three years (b. ME), Windfield L. Miller, aged ten years (b. ME), and Fanny L. Miller, aged eleven months (b. ME). Ira Miller had real-estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $200.

Ira Miller registered for the Class II military draft in Acton, ME, July 1, 1863. He was a miller, aged thirty-six years (b. ME). Ira Miller enlisted in the Third State Militia, Cavalry (2d Organization) in 1863.

The Miller’s youngest child, Fannie L. Miller, died October 3, 1863. One might suppose that her death date was actually October 3, 1862, as their next child, Fannie L. Miller, who was born in Acton, ME, August 15, 1863, received her name.

Ira Miller was Town Clerk of Acton, ME, in 1863 through 1865.

He then sold out and went into the hotel business, becoming proprietor of the Central House at Milton Mills which he conducted until 1877 (Scales, 1814). 

Ira Miller appeared in the Milton directories of 1868, 1869-70, 1871, as proprietor of the Central House hotel at Milton Mills.

Ira Miller, a hotel keeper, aged forty-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Fannie W. Miller, a landlady, aged forty-four years (b. ME), Winfield L. Miller, a clerk in hotel, aged twenty years (b. ME), Fannie L. Miller, aged six years (b. ME), Samuel Kershaw, a laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Hattie Young, a domestic servant, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Ira Miller had real estate valued at $5,500 and personal estate valued at $2,500.

Ira Miller appeared in the Milton directories of 1873, 1874, 1876, 1877, as proprietor of the Central House hotel and Livery Stable, at Milton Mills.

He then opened the largest general store at Milton Mills, putting in a heavy stock, including groceries, boots, shoes, oil, drugs, hardware and farm implements, and this proved a very prosperous enterprise. He had acquired 400 acres of valuable land together with his town property (Scales, 1914).

Ira Miller was one of the Milton Mills merchants and manufacturers that had business with some rival soap salesman in or around 1878.

Ira Miller, a storekeeper, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fannie W. Miller, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), and his child, Fannie L. Miller, at school, aged sixteen years (b. ME).

Ira Miller appeared in the Milton directories of 1880, 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, 1889, 1892, 1894, and 1898, as a Milton Mills merchant. He appeared also as Town Treasurer and a Justice of the Peace in 1880, 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, 1889, 1894, and 1898. He was Town Treasurer in 1901.

MILTON. Town meeting passed with but very little excitement. Ira Miller. Officers elected are as follows: MODERATOR, Abram Sanborn; TOWN CLERK, Charles H. Looney; SELECTMEN, Henry B. Scates, David Wallinford, Elbridge W. Fox; TREASURER, Ira Miller. Voted to purchase a safe for the benefit of the town Voted to build a road to the new mill, which will be done as soon as the weather will permit. OLD HUNDRED (Farmington News, March 25, 1881).

WAKEFIELD [MILTON]. The following are the town officers for the ensuing year: Moderator, Luther Hayes; Town Clerk, Chas. H. Looney; Selectmen, Geo. Lyman, W.H.H. Pinkham, John L. Sims; Treasurer, Ira Miller (Farmington News, March 17, 1882).

MILTON. The following officers were chosen at the recent town meeting: Moderator, Chas. C. Hayes; Town Clerk, Chas. H. Looney; Selectmen, Geo. Lyman, Henry H. Pinkham, John L. Sims; Town Treasurer, Ira Miller; Auditors, Luther Hayes, Elbridge Fox (Farmington News, March 16, 1883).

LOCALS. Ira Miller, of Milton Mills, recently slaughtered four hogs whose aggregate weight was 2667 pounds (Farmington News, January 30, 1885).

The following substantial real estate transaction might have been the purchase of the 400-acre farm mentioned in the Scales history.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. E.D. Farnham to Ira Miller, land in Milton, $4,350 (Farmington News, August 12, 1887).

ROBBERY AT MILTON MILLS. About $200 in Goods and Money Taken. On Opening the store of Ira Miller, at Milton Mills, Tuesday morning, it was found that burglars had been at work during the night. Hardly a thing was in its proper place. The safe door was lying upon the floor, and the contents of the safe, with the exception of the money it contained, were also upon the floor.  About $100 worth of goods, mostly cigars, tobacco and cutlery were taken, and about $80 in money. Mr. Miller received, Monday, for safe keeping, $2,000, and it is supposed that this was what the thieves were after, but the money was where they could not find it (Farmington News, September 23, 1887).

York. Ira Miller’s safe at Acton, was burglarized a short time ago, and about thousand dollars in cash and three thousand in securities stolen, reports the Biddeford Journal (Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, ME), October 10, 1887).

Fannie W. (Merrill) Miller died January 30, 1897. Her daughter Fannie L. (Miller) Lowd died in the Maine General Hospital in Portland, ME,, May 25, 1898, aged twenty-four years.

Ira Miller, a widowed merchant (retired), aged seventy-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his son-in-law, Freeman H. Lowd, a widowed storekeeper, aged forty-six years (b. ME), his grandchildren, Grace M. Lowd, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Alice M. Lowd, at school, aged thirteen years (b. MA), and his servant, Susie B. Clarke, a housekeeper, aged twenty years (b. NH). Ira Miller owned their farm, free-and-clear.

I. Miller appeared in the Milton directory of 1901, as a Milton Mills merchant of shingles and clapboards.

Ira Miller died in Milton Mills, December 12, 1902, aged seventy-five years, eleven months, and thirty days.

References:

Find a Grave. (2013, August 15). Ira Miller. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115515930

Find a Grave. (2013, November 7). Woodman Miller. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/119949526

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire, and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA861