Milton Mills’ Dr. Moses K. Cowell (1823-1905)

By Muriel Bristol | February 28, 2021

Moses K. Cowell was born in Lebanon, ME, February 22, 1823, son of Ichabod and Rebecca (Clark) Cowell. (Date arrived at by computation from death record).

Ichabod Cowell, a farmer, aged sixty-one years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Rebecca Cowell, aged fifty-six years (b. ME), Moses Cowell, a farmer, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), and Sewell Cowell, aged twenty-two years (b. ME). Ichabod Cowell had real estate valued at $1,500, Moses Cowell had real estate valued at $500, and Sewall Cowell, had real estate valued at $500.

Ichabod Cowell, a farmer, aged seventy-three years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon (“Lebanon Centre P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Rebecca Cowell, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), and Moses Cowell, a shoemaker, aged thirty-four years (b. ME). Ichabod Cowell had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $200, while Moses Cowell had personal estate valued at $100.

Moses Cowell, of Lebanon, ME, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), registered for the Class II military draft in 1863.

Ichabod Cowell, a farmer, aged eighty-three years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Rebecca Cowell, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), and Moses Cowell, a farm laborer, aged forty-four years (b. ME). Ichabod Cowell had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $225, and Moses Cowell had personal estate valued at $1,000.

Young Acton, ME, diarist Ida Isadore Reynolds (1860-1946) mentioned Moses Cowell as being a customer of her seamstress mother, who made him a pair of pants in May 1873 (Heirlooms Reunited, 2019).

Saturday, May 3, 1873: Snowed. Mother made Moses Cowell’s pants. Mr. Hilton here. Edward did not go away.

She encountered him again in his capacity as physician, in February 1874, when he treated her for catarrh.

Tuesday, February 24, 1874:  Fair and Cold. I had a very bad pain in my side. I knit some. Father not very well. Mother got a bad head ache. She spun Five skeins of yarn.  Moses Cowell here. He left me some medicine to Purify my blood and some for my throat and some powder to blow down my throat. This is all for Catarrh. Clara Prescott and Enoch Sherman here.

M.K. Cowell appeared in the Milton business directories of 1875, 1876, and 1880, as a Milton Mills physician.

Moses K. Cowell, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Moses K. Cowell owned his house, free-and-clear. His household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Gilbert H. Welch, a farm laborer, aged twenty-nine years (b. ME), and Margarette Ploude, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. Canada).

M.K. Cowell appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, and 1889, as a Milton Mills physician.

Moses K. Cowell, M.D., reported to the NH State Board of Health on his contagious disease cases in Milton Mills in 1888.

Milton Mills. MOSES K. COWELL, M.D. Typhoid Fever – Four cases, one fatal; two, with the one fatal, in town; one in Lebanon, Maine; one in Acton, Maine. Polluted water in all cases, to which I attribute the disease. Diphtheria – Three cases, none fatal; two in town, one in Acton, Me. Bad sanitary conditions in all cases. Think polluted water the most common source of the disease (Clarke, 1888).

Moses K. Cowell, a physician, aged seventy-six years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Moses K. Cowell owned his house, free-and-clear. His household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Francis Coffrin, a farm laborer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), and Edward J. Brierley, a grocer, aged fifty-one years (b. MA).

Moses K. Cowell appeared in the Milton directories of 1902, and 1905, as having his house at the Acton bridge, in Milton Mills.

Moses K. Cowell died of senile gangrene in Acton, ME, July 8, 1905, aged eighty-two years, four months, and six days. (Dr. W.E. Pillsbury signed his death certificate).


References:

Clarke, Arthur E. (1888). Report of the State Board of Health of the State of New Hampshire, 1888. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=DZ4_GY2UvBcC&pg=PA44

Find a Grave. (2016, June 9). Moses K. Cowell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/164165614/moses-k-cowell

Heirlooms Reunited. (2019, January 29). May Entries in the 1873 Diary of Ida Isadore Reynolds (1860-1946) of Acton, Maine; Future Wife of John Jotham Shapleigh (1856-1923). Retrieved from www.heirloomsreunited.com/2019/01/may-entries-in-1873-diary-of-ida.html

Wikipedia. (2020, December 26). Catarrh. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catarrh

Ray’s Marina Fires of 1972-73

By Muriel Bristol | February 24, 2021

Ray's Marina - LogoThe following two news articles emerged while researching Milton’s Railroad Station Agents. They fall a bit beyond the time frame with which we have concerned ourselves so far, but they do throw some light on  the ultimate fate of Milton’s Railroad Station or Depot building of 1873.

And our readers seem also to retain a considerable interest in and affection for Ray’s Marina. (The marina would rise from the ashes to close finally forty years later).

Ray’s Marina Fire of Monday, December 11, 1972

Fire Destroys Milton Marina. Damage Estimated at $200,000. MILTON – An exploding snowmobile has been listed as the cause of the major blaze which destroyed all by the offices of Ray’s Marina in Milton Monday afternoon. According to Ray Lamoureux, owner of the marina, an employee was working on a snowmobile in one of the bays when a spark set off the fire.

Milton Fire Chief Herb Downs said the fire spread rapidly from the working bay to the upper floor of the structure and then the most of the other building. Firemen from Milton, Farmington and Rochester worked for nearly three hours to put out the blaze, which according to Mr. Lamoureux caused an estimated $200,000 worth of damage.

On Tuesday Mr. Lamoureux surveyed the damage and indicated that he intended to start rebuilding immediately. For the time being the marina will continue operating out of the American Service Station next door with offices in a cottage on the other side of the structure. Mr. Lamoureux noted that although the telephone lines were destroyed in the fire and new homes [phones?] were installed on Tuesday, the numbers will remain the same, they are 332-1511 and 652-4523.

Prior to the location of Ray’s Marina at the site, the area served for nearly 100 years as the Milton Railroad Depot. Several years ago the facilities were moved to Rochester and the building lay abandoned for some time until Ray’s took over in 1963. During his ownership Mr. Lamoureux built onto the original structure and added a showroom and office space. The railroad depot was kept and converted into a repair shop. It was the railroad depot section of the building which was destroyed (Farmington News, [Thursday,] December 14, 1972).

The article was illustrated with four photos, which will not copy well. Their captions appear below.

Ray's Marina - PH721006
Ray’s Marina Advertisement of October 1972 (Portsmouth Herald, October 6, 1972)

[Photo Caption:] AS THE BURNT OUT, caved in shell of Ray’s Marina in Milton was being cleaned out on Tuesday, the day after one of Milton’s worst fires, Ray Lamoureux, owner of the Marina, was already making plans for rebuilding. For the time being, the Marina will be operating out of a cottage on one side of the building with their repair shop located in an American Service Station on the other side of the structure. (Photo by AEW).

[Photo Caption:] EVEN THOUGH the flames spread fast through Ray’s Marina in Milton all employees managed to get out of the building safely. According to Mr. Lamoureux, the owner of the business, no employees will be out of work because of the fire. He said, “It will be business as usual” (Photo by AEW).

[Photo Caption:] THE MONDAY AFTERNOON fire, which destroyed Ray’s Marina in Milton, was started when a snowmobile (pictured above) exploded and spread flames racing through the structure that once served as the Milton Railroad Depot (Photo by AEW).

[Photo Caption:] AS THINGS CALMED DOWN on Tuesday, the written location remained on the chalk board at the Milton Firehouse to tell where the fire had done $200,000 worth of damage the day before. (Photo by AEW).

Ray’s Marina Fire of Tuesday, October 30, 1973

Ten months later a Ray’s Marina boat storage building in Lebanon, ME, burned also.

Marina Blaze. WEST LEBANON, Maine (AP) – A fire here Tuesday leveled a storage building and destroyed its contents, about 65 motor boats and a fork lift truck, fire officials said. The cause of the blaze is undetermined and is under investigation. No injuries were reported. Fire fighters from several surrounding Maine and New Hampshire communities responded to the alarm. The storage building, the property of Ray’s Marina of Milton, NH, is on the Maine side of Milton Three Ponds. The marina itself is on the New Hampshire side (Portsmouth Herald, [Wednesday,] October 31, 1973).


See also Milton’s Railroad Line, Milton Railroad Station Agents, and Grand Opening of Ray’s Marina


References:

Foster’s Daily Democrat. (2016, May 12). Rheaume J. (Ray) Lamoureux. Retrieved from www.legacy.com/obituaries/fosters/obituary.aspx?n=rheaume-j-lamoureux-ray&pid=179960532&fhid=4824

Milton Mills’ Dr. Hugh D. Grant (1870-1958)

By Muriel Bristol | February 21, 2021

Hugh Duncan Grant was born in Canada, December 31, 1870, son of Duncan and Eliza (Graham) Grant.

James McKay, a physician, aged forty-one years (b. Canada), headed a Potsdam, NY, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eleven years), Mary McKay, aged thirty-four years (b. NY), his servant, Marc[e]lina LaPoint, a housekeeper, aged twenty years (b. NY), and his boarder, Hugh Grant, a physician, aged twenty-eight years (b. Canada). James McKay owned their house at 89 Market Street, free-and-clear. McKay was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1885, while Hugh Grant was still an alien, having immigrated in 1893. Mary McKay was the mother of two children, of whom none were still living.

CUTTINGSVILLE. Dr. Fiske is entertaining a former classmate, Dr. H.D. Grant of Malone, N.Y. (Southern Vermont Mirror (Danby, VT), June 10, 1904).

NORTHERN NEW YORK. Dr. H.D. Grant has gone down to Dundee, P.Q., to spend two weeks (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), July 2, 1904).

BARTON LANDING. Dr. H.D. Grant of West Derby will take charge of Dr. Parlin’s patients, while the latter is away for the winter (Orleans County Monitor (Barton, VT), October 24, 1904).

BARTON LANDING. Dr. H.D. Grant, formerly of this place, has opened an office at Derby Line (Orleans County Monitor (Barton, VT), April 10, 1905).

Hugh Duncan Grant married (1st) in Newbury, VT, October 12, 1905, Martha Katherine “Mattie” Hamm. He was a physician, aged twenty-five years, and she was aged nineteen years. Congregational Rev. J. Alphonso Belanger performed the ceremony. She was born in Haverhill, MA, July 2, 1886, daughter of Charles W. and Susan L. (Marston) Hamm. (She died in East Hartford, CT, August 18, 1971).

DERBY LINE. Dr. H.D. Grant has closed his office in the studio building and intends locating in the West (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), October 19, 1905).

Dr. Hugh D. Grant, like Dr. Weeks an alumnus of Baltimore Medical College, began practice at this [Milton Mills, NH] place during the latter part of the summer of 1907, and has resided here since that time (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Hugh D. Grant appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as having his house at 12 Springvale Road, Acton Side, Milton Mills.

James Russell Grant was born in Acton, ME, January 2, 1909, son of Hugh D. and Martha (Hamm) Grant, as reported by physician H.D. Grant of Milton Mills, NH.

GROWING GIRLS NEED RED BLOOD. Pallor and Lack of Blood Should Be Corrected to Secure Proper Development. The pallor and lack of blood so often noted in the case of school girls, as well as young girls employed in stores and factories, if not corrected by proper tonic treatment, may reasonably be counted upon as a source of suffering and annoyance until the age of forty is reached. It indicates a lack of blood and with the blood deficient the growing girl cannot properly develop. It is a time when good red blood is urgently needed and the fact cannot be too strongly impressed upon parents. The disease is easily recognized by the yellow-green pallor, breathlessness and palpitation of the heart upon the least exertion, and sometimes, but not always, a tendency to faintness. The one remedy perfectly adapted for the cure of this condition is Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills. Mrs. H.D. Grant of Milton Mills, N.H., whose husband is a physician, says: “When about twelve years of age I began to decline in health and at last became so weak that I could not walk across the room without taking hold of something to steady myself. I don’t know what was the cause of my sickness unless I played too hard and grew too fast. I was very large for my age but extremely pale. I had headaches almost constantly and the only way I could sleep was by taking some sedative. I could not walk upstairs without my knees trembling. My appetite was poor and capricious. My heart seemed to be in my throat. I was thin and fainted frequently. During this time I suffered from weakness common to my sex. “I was treated by three physicians for anæmia but was given up by them and as a last resort tried Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills. I didn’t have any faith in them at first but I took them regularly and soon realized that they were doing me good. I gained in strength and weight, my appetite returned and I am now in good health.” Dr. Grant added: “My wife is a well woman today. She has a good appetite, sleeps well and does her work without any assistance.” Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills are sold by all druggists, or sent postpaid, on receipt of price, 50 cents per box, six boxes for $2.50, by the Dr. Williams Medicine Co., Schenectady, N.Y. (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), January 21, 1910).

H.D. Grant, an M.D. doctor, aged forty years (b. Canada), headed a Bowdoinham, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Mattie K. Grant, aged twenty-three years (b. MA), and his children, Herley G. Grant, aged three years (b. NH), and James R. Grant, aged sixteen months (b. ME). H.D. Grant rented their house on Brooklyn Street. He was an alien, who had immigrated in 1887.

NORTHERN NEW YORK. Dr. H.D. Grant of Bowdoinville [Bowdoinham], Me., is the guest of his brother. Dr. J.A. Grant (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, ME), July 24, 1911).

DESCRIBE VISIT OF MASKED MEN. Dr. and Mrs. Grant in Bath, Me, Court. Frank P. Brown, Bowdoinham, Held tor Supreme Court. Contents of Threatening Letter Divulged. BATH, Me, Feb 27 – Alleging that a party of 15 or 20 masked men called at his home last Tuesday night about 9 o’clock to hand him a threatening letter and that one of the party struck him, Dr. H.D. Grant of Bowdoinham appeared in the Municipal Court today against Frank P. Brown, also of Bowdoinham, whom he charged with assault and battery. Judge Keegan found probable cause and young Brown was bound over to the May term of the Supreme Court in sureties of $500, which were furnished by his father, George W. Brown of Somerset Junction, and by James H. Millay of Bowdoinham. Dr. Grant was the principal witness. He said that last Tuesday night he was notified by telephone that a delegation was then on its way to give him a letter warning him that he and Mrs. Grant had better drop an action which Mrs. Grant is planning to bring against another woman in Bowdoinham, A group of masked men soon called and one handed him a letter. The doctor attempted to pull the man’s mask from his face, he said, and the man shot out his fist, striking him under his eye. He had succeeded in so removing the mask that he recognized the wearer as Brown, he said. In the scuffle others jumped at him, Dr. Grant testified, and he fell into a ditch. Dr. Grant’s testimony was corroborated by Mrs. Grant, who said she followed her husband out of the house in an attempt to remove the masks from as many others as possible but she only succeeded positively in identifying three members of the party. She said they are prominent citizens of Bowdoinham. She handed a revolver to her husband, who fired it in the air, causing the party to flee. Dr. and Mrs. Grant testified that one of the party was Charles Berry, their next-door neighbor. Young Berry denied that he took any part in the affair. He said he was playing the piano at his home when he heard a woman’s scream. Rushing out in the direction of the sound, he saw two figures in the ditch and from their voices believed them to be Dr. and Mrs. Grant. He saw a group of men, then more than 200 feet away, running down the street. A moment later a shot was fired and he became so frightened he ran back to his home. The letter handed Dr. Grant and read before the court read, “Since your arrival in this town our citizens have been subjected to many odorous episodes because of your presence. From time to time our peace-loving citizens have conferred together as to the advisability of purging our town of your presence. “But their good old New England blood coursed slowly through their veins and no one could take the lead in a plan to eliminate you. At frequent intervals since you came here you have succeeded in bringing your own and your wife’s misdeeds into the limelight and allowed their poisonous influences to be disseminated among our young people. “Recent events disclose the fact that you are preparing again to bring an obnoxious matter before the public, and for that purpose have instituted a civil suit against one of our old and respected citizens. Patience has ceased to be a virtue, and we therefore take this occasion to advise you to withdraw same on or before March 10, 1915, reminding you that you have too much to lose and nothing to be gained by your failure to do so. “We as citizens respect your rights as a citizen, and believe you should seriously consider the situation and respect our rights, upon which we assure you we shall insist. “Twenty Citizens of Bowdoinham.” (Boston Globe, February 28, 1915).

St. Johnsbury Locals. Dr. and Mrs. H.D. Grant of Bath Maine, and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Heath of Bowdoinham, Maine, were the recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. A.F. Houghton on their way to Montreal on an automobile trip (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), May 23, 1917).

Hugh D. Grant received a commission as a 1st Lieutenant in the Medical Section of the N.G.R. [National Guard Reserve], February 8, 1918. He was attached to the Third Maine Regiment.

Hugh D. (Martha K.) Grant appeared in the Bath, ME, directory of 1919, as a physician, with his office and house at 82 Pine street.

Hugh D. Grant, a general practice physician, aged forty-nine years (b. Canada), headed a Bath, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Martha K. Grant, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), and his children, Hurley G. Grant, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and James R. Grant, aged eleven years (b. ME). Hugh D. Grant owned their house at 82 Pine Street, free-and-clear. It was a two-family residence, which they shared with a tenant household, that of Mary E. Wright, a housekeeper, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME).

Dr. Hugh D. Grant of Bath, Me., is suffering from a burn on his left arm sustained in a peculiar manner. He was driving his car on Sewall’s hill, Washington street, when he noticed steam coming from the radiator, which he believed had gone dry. Removing the cylinder cap his movement was a trifle awkward because of his heavy fur coat and before he could withdraw the cap, from the opening, the hot steam quickly went up his sleeve, scalding the arm from the hand to the elbow (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), December 8, 1921).

Hugh D. (Mattie) Grant appeared in the Bath, ME, directories of 1922, and 1924, as a physician, with his office and house at 82 Pine street. They would seem to have divorced between 1924 and 1925.

Hugh D. Grant appeared in the Bath, ME, directories of 1926, 1928, and 1931, as a physician, with his office and house at 141 Front street. (His son, Hurley G. Grant, a student in NYC, had his home residence at 141 Front street in 1931).

Hugh D. Grant married (2nd) in Portsmouth, NH, June 7, 1934, Hazel [Abbie] ((Jaquith) Holland) Gwynn, both of Bath, ME. He was a physician, aged fifty-eight years, and she was a bookkeeper, aged thirty-eight years. They were both divorced; it was his second marriage and her third marriage. Peter J. Hickey, justice of the peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Durham, ME, March 19, 1896, daughter of Horace G. and Abbie E. (Littlefield) Jaquith.

Dr. and Mrs. Hugh D. Grant will leave Wednesday morning for a two weeks’ trip to Montreal and Ottawa (Bath Independent, October 11, 1934).

NEWLY WEDS TAKE UP RESIDENCE IN BATH. Mr. and Mrs. Fred P. Wilson, whose wedding took place Nov. 3 in Topsham, where Rev. Harry W. Chamberlin officiated at the single ring service, are making their home at 805 Washington street. Attending the couple were Dr. and Mrs. H.D. Grant. The bride, formerly Mrs. Ruby H. Avery, wore brown matelassé crepe and carried bronze chrysanthemums. Mrs. Grant wore a purple gown and carried pink chrysanthemums. The bride’s gift to her attendant was a double compact and the groom’s gift to the best man was a leather bill fold. A wedding supper followed the ceremony. Mrs. Wilson is employed at the Commercial Trading Company and Mr. Wilson is employed by the A. and K. Street Railway (Bath Independent, November 14, 1935).

H.D. Grant was elected Vice President of the Sagadahoc Medical Society at its meeting in the Hotel Sedgwick in Bath, ME, November 16, 1937.

Cyrus Russell Grant, beloved husband of Annie Margaret Gage, died at his home in Dundee Center, Québec, age 78 years. He was born in Russell, ON, on December 14, 1861, and came to Dundee at the age of 21. He is survived by his widow, one son Hugh at home, one brother, Dr. Hugh D. Grant of Bath, ME, three sisters, Mrs. Johnna Kirschner of Ottawa, and Misses Matilda and Ellen Grant of Montreal. Three grandchildren and four nephews, Harley and Russell Grant of Bath, ME, and Kenneth and Howard Grant of New York. He has lived here ever since [—-]. On February 8, 1888, he was united in marriage to Miss Annie Margaret Gage of Dundee who survives him, one son Hugh was born to this marriage. Funeral was held from his late residence to Zion United Church, in Dundee, service conducted by the Rev. J.B. McLean, D.D. of Huntingdon, assisted by the Rev. J.H. Woodside of Kensington. Interred in the Zion Church Cemetery ([Southwest Quebec] Gleaner, December 20, 1939).

Hugh D. Grant, a doctor, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Bath, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hazel Grant, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), his stepson, Norman Grant, aged fifteen years (b. ME), and his lodger, Arthur Eller, a restaurant owner, aged forty-five years (b. Greece). Hugh D. Grant rented their house at 141 Front Street, for $25 per month. He had attended seven years of college, Hazel Grant had attended four years of high school. The family had resided in the same house in 1935, while their lodger had resided elsewhere in the same place, i.e., Bath, ME. (Arthur Eller appeared in the Bath, ME, directory of 1936, as proprietor of Arthur’s Lunch, at 136 Front street, with his house at 133 Front street).

Hugh D. Grant appeared in the Bath, ME, directory of 1949, as a physician, with his office and house at 141 Front street.

Hugh D. (Hazel A.) Grant appeared in the Bath, ME, directories of 1951, 1953, 1955, and 1957, as a physician, with his office and house at 3 Linden street. (Mrs. Ruth Grant, appeared as a registered nurse (Brunswick), with her house at 26 Liberty street, in 1951. His ex-wife, Mrs. Martha K. Grant, also a registered nurse, boarded with her, in 1951, and had her house at 14 Liberty street in 1953).

Dr. Hugh D. Grant is in Augusta where he is attending the training school of the officers of the Third Maine regiment of the Maine National Guard (Bath Independent, August 21, 1958).

Hugh D. Grant died in Bath, ME, September 29, 1958, aged eighty-eight years. Hazel A. ((Jaquith) (Holland) Gwynn) Grant died in Volusia County, FL, April 29, 1980.

References:

Find a Grave. (2012, April 20). Martha Kate “Mattie” Ham Miller. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/88806158/martha-kate-miller

Milton’s Railroad Station Agents

By Muriel Bristol | February 17, 2021

Milton’s original railroad station stood on the other side of the Salmon Falls River. It was within Milton still, but on that side of the river that was called the “Lebanon side.” The Portsmouth, Great Falls & Conway Railroad (PGF&C) corporation ran things initially from that original station that stood on the Lebanon side. (See Milton’s Railroad Line).

The railroad station depicted in the picture postcards, i.e., Milton’s second railroad station, was built on the Milton side over twenty years later in 1873.

B&M RR Station - 1905 - AJ Cate (Detail)
Milton’s B&M Railroad Station, circa 1905 (Per A.J. Cate). Note the floral “Milton” letters to the left, as remembered from childhood by poet laureate Louise Bogan, and the weathervane atop the station

There seems to have been a career progression, at least in later years, from telegrapher to freight agent and, finally, to station agent. At least some of those working “on the ground,” as opposed in the train crews, seem to have been managed by the station agent. These might include baggage handlers, flagmen, freight agent, telegrapher, and, possibly, section hands.

The Milton railroad station agents (or depot masters) of this period or, at least, those that have been identified so far were: Charles A. Sawyer, Daniel Corkery, John E. Fox, and Hugh A. Beaton. (Whoever replaced Hugh A. Beaton, after his 1940 death and until the station closed, has not yet been identified).

Charles A. Sawyer – 185?-1874

Charles Augustine Sawyer was born in Wakefield, NH, March 1, 1825, son of William and Mehitable “Hettie” (Richards) Sawyer.

Charles A. Sawyer married in Farmington, NH, May 1, 1853, Amanda M.F. Horne, he of Wakefield, NH, and she of Farmington. Rev. D.D. Tappan performed the ceremony. She was born in Dover, NH, July 24, 1834, daughter of John and Tryphena (Perkins) Horne.

Son George E. Sawyer was born in Milton, in March 1858.

Charles A. Sawyer, a R.R. agent, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included A.M. [Amanda M.] Sawyer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), E.A. [Ella A.] Sawyer, aged five years (b. NH), and George E. Sawyer, aged two years (b. NH). Charles A. Sawyer had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $500. His household was enumerated between those of Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), and Stephen W. Dearborn, a box maker, aged forty-five years (b. NH).

Charles A. Sawyer of Milton registered for the Class II military draft, June 30, 1863. He was a depot master, aged forty-one years.

Daughter Ella A. Sawyer died in Milton, April 30, 1866, aged eleven years. (She is buried in Portland, ME).

PGF&C Lantern - 1869
PGF&C Railroad Whale Oil Lantern, 1869 (Willis Henry Auctions)

Charles A. Sawyer, a R.R. station agent, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Amanda M. Sawyer, keeping house, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Anna M. Sawyer, at school, aged twelve years (b. MA), and George E. Sawyer, at school, aged ten years (b. NH). Charles A. Sawyer had real estate valued at $800 and personal estate valued at $650. His household was enumerated between those of William H. Jones, a shoe factory worker, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and Robert Miller, a shoe factory worker, aged thirty-six years (b. MA).

Son John G. Sawyer was born in Milton, August 19, 1870, the third child of Charles A. and Amanda Sawyer. Charles A. Sawyer was a station agent.

Charles A. and Amanda M. (Horne) Sawyer, and family, left Milton for Portland, ME, circa 1874.

Chas. A. Sawyer, a confectioner, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), headed a Portland, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Amanda M. Sawyer, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. NH), his children, George E. Sawyer, a confectioner, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Anna M. Sawyer, at home, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), and John G. Sawyer, aged nine years (b. NH), his servant, Costella Ashlund, a servant, aged nineteen years (b. ME), and his boarders, Fred Sawyer, a confectioner, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Elmer Spinney, an apprentice, aged nineteen years (b. ME). They resided at 321 Congress Street.

Sawyer, GE, ConfectionerCharles A. Sawyer appeared in the Portland, ME, directory of 1883, as a confectioner at 419 Congress street, with his house at 321 Congress street. George E. Sawyer appeared as running a wholesale and retail confectionary at 309 and 315 Congress street, and 419 Congress street, with his house at 311 Congress street.

Charles A. Sawyer appeared in the Portland, ME, directory of 1886, as a confectioner at 419 Congress street, with his house at 11 Fessenden street, D. [Deering]. George E. Sawyer appeared as running a wholesale and retail confectionary at 309 and 315 Congress street, and 419 Congress street, with his house at 15 Fessenden street.

Charles A. Sawyer died of chronic nephritis in Deering, ME, February 11, 1893, aged sixty-seven years, eleven months, and eleven days.

Amanda M. Sawyer appeared in the Portland, ME, directory of 1897, as the widow of Charles A.,, with her house at 11 Fessenden street, Oakdale. George E. Sawyer appeared as a wholesale and retail confectioner, at 309 to 323 Congress street, and 465 Congress street, with his house at 14 Wilmot street. John G. Sawyer appeared as a salesman, at 315 Congress street, with his house at 11 Fessenden street, O [Oakdale].

Amanda M. (Horne) Sawyer died of chronic nephritis at 33 Fessenden Street in Portland, ME, March 14, 1916.

Daniel Corkery – 1874-189?

Daniel Corkery was born in St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, December 1842, son of Daniel and Mary (Blake) Corkery. (His parents were natives of Ireland).

Daniel Corkery came to the Milton area from California, in or around 1865. He married Martha E. “Lizzie” Felch. She was born in Reading, MA, circa 1848.

Daniel Corkery, a sawmill laborer, aged twenty-eight years (b. New Brunswick), headed a Wakefield (“Union P.O”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lizzie Corkery, at home, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and his child, Annie I. Corkery, at home, aged four years (b. NH).

RAILROAD NOTES. The extension of the Portsmouth, Great Falls & Conway Railroad to connect with the Portland & Ogdensburg road, has been completed, and the cars are now run to Upper Bartlett. More than a thousand men are at work on the mountain near the Willey House (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), January 16, 1875).

Daniel Corkery, depot master, aged thirty-nine years (b. New Brunswick), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lizzie A. Corkery, keeping house, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), Annie J. Corkery, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Daisy A. Corkery, aged four months (b. NH (January)), and his helper, William T. Wallace, assistant station agent, aged nineteen years (b. NH). His household was enumerated between those of George Blake, a day laborer, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and Huon L. French, a shoe worker, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH).

Daughter Annie J. Corkery died in Milton, December 29, 1883, aged seventeen years, ten months, and twenty-three days. (She is buried in the Prospect Hill Cemetery, in Lebanon, ME).

Some Railroad Literature. CONCORD. N.H., June 9. – The secretary of state has received for record in the office, a copy of the proceedings of the meeting of stockholders of the Boston & Maine railroad relating to the purchase of the roads, franchises and properties of the Eastern, and of the Portsmouth, Great Falls & Conway railroad, together with certificates of sale (Boston Globe, June 10, 1890).

Daniel Corkery appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a shoe beater out, with his house on Main street, near the Post Office. (A shoe “beater out” was one that tended a shoe leveling machine. It shaped and smoothed leather insoles and outsoles, especially imperfections arising out of other assembly operations). Daughter Daisy G. Corkery appeared also as a milliner on Main street, near the Post Office, boarding at the same location.

MILTON. Daniel Corkery who has been on a trip to Roxbury, Mass., has returned home (Farmington News, April 6, 1900).

Daniel Corkery, a shoe shop hand, aged fifty-seven years (Canada (Eng.)), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Martha Corkery, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), and his children, Daisy G. Corkery, a milliner, aged twenty years (b. NH), and Katy D. Corkery, aged seventeen years (b. NH). Daniel Corkery owned their house, free-and-clear.

MILTON. Miss Daisy Corkery is remodelling her house. The upper rooms will be used for millinery. A large bay window is to be added to the lower part for the display of goods (Farmington News, September 27, 1901).

Daniel Corkery died of pyaemia in Milton, September 15, 1902, aged fifty-nine years, eight months, and sixteen days. He was then a flagman (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate).

John E. Fox – 1891-1904

John E. Fox was born in Tuftonborough, NH, May 30, 1845, son of George and Drusilla E. (Hersey) Fox.

John E. Fox married in Brooklyn, NY, December 25, 1872, Abbie Frances “Frances” Woodman, he of Tuftonborough, NH, and she of Brooklyn. The ceremony took place “at her Father’s house.” John L. Page and N. Hubbard Woodman, Jr., appeared as witnesses. She was born in Tamworth, NH, circa 1847.

George Fox, a farmer, aged seventy-three years, headed a Tuftonborough, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Drusilla E. Fox, keeping house, aged sixty-nine years, his son, John E. Fox, works on farm, aged thirty-five years, his daughter-in-law, Abbie F. Fox, works in house, aged twenty-six years, and his grandchildren, Alice E. Fox, aged three years, George N. Fox, aged two years, and Sadie M. Fox, aged three months.

John E. Fox was a Tuftonborough, NH, Selectman in the years 1880-85.

MILTON. Station Agent John E. Fox is proving a very popular man in that capacity (Farmington New, September 4, 1891).

Daughter Lillian E. Fox was born in Milton, July 13, 1893, fourth child of John E. Fox (station agent, aged forty-three years (b. Tuftonborough, NH) and Abby F. Woodman (aged forty-one years, b. Tamworth, NH).

NEWS AND NOTES. Mr. John E. Fox, station agent at Milton, who had his leg broken two or three months ago, has had to have it amputated (Farmington News, September 14, 1894).

John E. Fox, a R.R. station agent, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Frances A. Fox, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Alice E. Fox, a teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Sadie N. Fox, a milliner, aged twenty years (b. NH), and Lillian E. Fox, aged six years (b. NH), and his brother, Henry L. Fox, a paper mill laborer, aged sixty-four years (b. NH). John E. Fox owned their house, but with a mortgage. Frances A. Fox was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

MILTON. The New England Telephone Company is to place long distance telephones at the store of Avery, Jones & Roberts, and the meat market of G.E. Wentworth, and the residences of H.B. Amey, Hazen Plummer, D.A. Whitehouse, H.F. Whitehouse, Station Agent J.E. Fox, and D.W. Beede the miller. This will make an appreciable addition to the Milton exchange (Farmington News, October 25, 1901). (See also Milton Gets the Telephone).

MILTON. John E. Fox has returned to his duties as station agent, after a vacation of two months (Farmington News, March 4, 1904).

MILTON. John E. Fox sold his house to Mrs. Belle Penney, and is to move to Derry (Farmington News, May 6, 1904).

John E. Fox was a Wolfeboro Selectman in the years 1906-08.

John E. Fox, a home farm farmer, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Frances A. Fox, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Alice E. Fox, a day school teacher, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Sadie M. Fox, a bedding company bookkeeper, aged thirty years (b. NH), Lillian J.E. Fox, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Julia C. Dore, aged seventy-one years (b. NH). John E. Fox owned their house on North Main Street. Frances A. Fox was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living. Julia C. Dore was the mother of five children, of whom three were still living.

Abbie F. (Woodman) Fox died June 15, 1915, aged sixty-two years.

John E. Fox, a widower, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), headed an East Kingston, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. He rented his house on Depot Road.

John E. Fox died October 3, 1923, aged seventy-eight years.

Hugh A. Beaton – 1904-40

Hugh Arthur Beaton was born in Jefferson, OH, October 8, 1873, son of Charles and Eliza A. (Hill) Beaton.

Hugh A. Beaton married in Lancaster, NH, August 19, 1894, Myrtle F. Hartshorn, both of Whitefield, NH. Rev. R.T. Wolcott performed the ceremony. Beaton was a laborer, aged twenty-one years, and she was a domestic, aged nineteen years. She was born in Lunenburg, VT, circa 1875, daughter of Vernon E. and Edith (Tyler) Hartshorn.

Daughter Ione Edith Beaton was born in Lunenburg, VT, December 30, 1894, daughter of Hugh Arthur Beaton, a telegraph operator, aged twenty-one years, and Florence Myrtle Hartshorn, aged nineteen years. (The record was amended in 1952 to correct the mother’s name from “Abbie” Beaton to Florence Myrtle Hartshorn).

Hugh A. Beaton, a telegrapher, aged twenty-six years (b. OH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Myrtle Beaton, aged twenty-five years (b. VT), and his children, Ione Beaton, at school, aged five years (b. VT), and Hazel L. Beaton, aged three months (b. NH). Hugh A. Beaton rented their house in Milton Village. Myrtle Beaton was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Daughter Hazel Leola Beaton was born in Milton, February 4, 1900. She died of cholera infantum in Milton, September 21, 1900, aged seven months, and seventeen days. (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate).

FITZDALE. Mrs. Hugh Beaton of Milton, N.H., is visiting her mother, Mrs. V.E. Hartshorn (St. Johnsbury Republican, February 25, 1903).

Daughter [Gladys Marjorie] Beaton was born in Milton, June 17, 1903, daughter of Hugh A. Beaton (telegraph operator, aged twenty-nine years, born Jefferson, OH) and Myrtle Hartshorne (aged twenty-seven years, born Lunenburg, VT).

MILTON. Mrs. Hugh Beaton started Monday for a visit to her old home in Vermont (Farmington News, April 8, 1904).

H.A. Beaton appeared in the Milton business directories of 1905-06, and 1909, as agent for the American Express Company.

RAILROAD NOTES. An extra eastbound freight passed through here [Portsmouth, NH] on Tuesday with fifty empty cars for the Conway branch, to be used for ice shipments (Portsmouth Herald, May 23, 1906).

B&M RR Station from Maine Side - 1909Hugh Beaton, a B&M Railroad station agent, aged thirty-six years (b. OH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Mirtle F. Beaton, aged thirty-six years (b. VT), his children, Iona Beaton, aged fourteen years (b. VT), and Gladis Beaton, aged five [six] years (b. NH), and his boarder, James Hayes, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Hugh Beaton owned their house, free-and-clear. Mirtle F. Beaton was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joseph Avery, postmaster, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), and Charles Houston, a B&M freight agent, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH). (Next beyond Houston was The Sampson hotel).

CONCORD. Ione Beaton of Milton, N.H., is visiting Miss Grace Smith (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), July 27, 1910).

Rochester Div., No. 65. Bro. H.A. Beaton, agent at Milton, has just recovered from a severe attack of blood poisoning. He was relieved by Bro. C.L. Beaton, while incapacitated for duty (Order, 1910).

Union brother C.L. Beaton was Hugh A. Beaton’s actual brother, Charles L. Beaton of Portsmouth, NH.

The case of Myrtle G. Bodwell vs. the Boston and Maine railroad, which was tried at the February term and resulted in an $1800 verdict for the plaintiff, then opened for retrial, the verdict having been set aside because of newly, discovered evidence. The plaintiff seeks $5000 damages for injuries alleged to have been sustained from being thrown from a platform at the Milton station through the sudden starting of a crowded train, Aug. 12, 1910 (Portsmouth Herald, October 3, 1911).

H.A. Beaton appeared in the Milton business directories of 1912, and 1917, as agent for the B&M Railroad and the American Express Company.

Rochester Div., No. 65. Bro. H.A. Beaton, Milton, has a new Ford runabout. Wish we all might “of-ford” an auto this year (Order, 1912).

Hugh A. Beaton of Milton had a 22½ horsepower Ford automobile registered (as #2182) between January and August 1912.

WRECKERS BUSY ON RAILROAD. Mixup in Local Yard and Another in Milton on Conway Branch. After working for four hours or more to replace a 125-ton locomotive on the rails near the Green street crossing on Thursday Afternoon, the wrecking crew of the Boston & Maine railroad were ordered to Milton on the Conway branch where they worked all night to clear the tracks of two ice cars, one of which tipped over after leaving the rails. They arrived back at 8.30 this morning (Portsmouth Herald, December 12, 1913).

LOCAL. A fine time was enjoyed at the Thanksgiving ball given under the auspices of Charity Temple No. 44, Pythian Sisters, at A.O.U.W. hall, Milton, Tuesday evening of last week. About 75 couples were in attendance. The grand march was led by Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Hodgdon, the next in order being Mr. and Mrs. E.A. [H.A.] Beaton. Music was furnished by Peerless orchestra of Rochester. A fine supper was served and all in all a good time was enjoyed by everybody. About $64 was cleared, which fund is to be used for the new shoe firm which is to locate in Milton. Ralph Whitehouse was the successful contestant in the silver service contest. The committee of arrangements consisted of Mrs. E.A. Hodgdon, Mrs. H.A. Beaton and Mrs. S.G. Blaisdell (Farmington News, December 4, 1914).

B&M RR Station and Tri-Echo LakeDaughter Ione E. Beaton married in South Berwick, ME, March 18, 1915, Edward A. Connell, she of Milton and he of Littleton, MA. He was an iceman, aged twenty-three years, and she was a house worker, aged twenty years.

Hugh Arthur Beaton of Milton registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was a B&M R.R. station agent & operator, aged forty-four years of age (b. October 8, 1875). (For some reason, he clipped two years off of his age). His nearest relative was Myrtle F. Beaton of Milton. He was of a medium height, with a stout build, blue eyes, and brown hair.

EAST CONCORD. Mr. and Mrs. Vern Hartshorn have returned home from an extended visit with their daughter, Mrs. Hugh Beaton at Milton, N.H. They were accompanied home by Ed. Cornell (Caledonian Record (St. Johnsbury, VT), September 3, 1919).

B&M Station Agent Cap
B&M Station Agent Cap, circa 1915 (Per B&M Railroad Historical Society)

Hugh A. Beaton, a Boston & Maine R.R. station agent, aged forty-six years (b. OH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Myrtle F. Beaton, aged forty-four years (b. VT), and his child, Gladys M. Beaton, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Hugh A. Beaton owned their house on Lower Main Street (at its intersection with Silver Street), free-and-clear.

RUNAWAY HORSE STOPS TRAIN.  Becoming frightened when his heels hit the sleigh behind him, a horse belonging to Edward Hammond of Rochester ran away down the Boston & Maine railway tracks in that city toward Milton yesterday afternoon. At the Milton station a north-bound passenger train was about to start, and word was sent to the engineer to look for the horse and sleigh. The animal had become entangled in a culvert cover however, and had a broken leg, before the train approached it, the engineer stopped the train and the horse was shot (Portsmouth Herald, January 24, 1923).

WEST MILTON. … one hundred dollars was appropriated to beautify the grounds near the railroad station at Milton, the work to be done under the direction of the Womans’ club (Farmington News, March 23, 1923).

PERSONAL. Mrs. H.H. [H.A.] Beaton and family party were in [Farmington] town from Milton Tuesday (Farmington News, August 24, 1923).

WRECKING CREW SENT TO MILTON. The local wrecking crew of the Boston & Maine Railroad were sent to Milton, on the Conway branch, today, to replace a buggy and one freight that became derailed on a siding (Portsmouth Herald, October 4, 1923).

BRING IN TWO B&M WRECKED ENGINES. The two locomotives No. 919 and 1376 which were wrecked in a collision between a snow plow train and a passenger train on the Conway branch near Milton last Wednesday were hauled to Portsmouth by the Portsmouth wrecking train and are now on a side track in the roundhouse yard. They will be held here until orders are received from the motive power department to send them to shop at Billerica, Concord or Somerville. The front end of both engines is badly damaged (Portsmouth Herald, February 24, 1924).

Daughter Gladys M. Beaton appeared in the Portsmouth, NH, directory of 1928, as a teacher at the West Junior High School in Portsmouth, with her residence at Milton. Her paternal uncle, Charles L. (Annie H.) Beaton, appeared as a ticket agent for the B&M R.R., with his house at 50 Orchard street. (In 1930, she resided with her uncle and aunt at 50 Orchard street (See Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26 for a fuller account of Charles L. and Annie J. (Horne) Beaton).

Hugh A. Beaton, a railroad station agent, aged fifty-six years (b. OH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Myrtle F. Beaton, aged fifty-four years (b. VT). Hugh A. Beaton owned their house on South Main Street, which was valued at $1,300. They had a radio set.

Daughter Gladys Marjorie Beaton married in Chocorua [Tamworth], NH, June 27, 1931, Edgar Brown Bruce, she of Milton and he of Lebanon, ME. He was a teacher, aged twenty-four years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-eight years.

Hugh A. Beaton was assessed for Milton property in 1932, which was valued at $1,100, and for which he was taxed $27.52 (Milton Town Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1933). (A mil rate of $25.02 per thousand).

Batch of Smiles - BG330410BATCH OF SMILES. “Aunt Sarah Shapleigh,” a jolly old soul, once well known to Milton people and who resided for some years in the house now owned and occupied by station agent Hugh Beaton, once told this little anecdote: A young girl who was deficient in her orthography was one day studying her spelling lesson and called to her mother in an adjoining room saying, “Marm, what does t-h-e spell?” Her mother impatiently answered, “Dod zounds, Suzette, ain’t I told you a thousand times and more that t-h-e spells feledelfy’?” – Rochester Courier (Boston Globe, April 10, 1933).

The former occupant of Beaton’s residence, “Aunt” Sarah (Bragdon) Shapleigh, widow of Richard Shapleigh, died in Milton, December 26, 1893, aged eighty-seven years, one month, and twenty-six days.

MILTON. Mrs. H.A. Beaton is in Springfield, Mass., visiting her daughter [Ione E. (Beaton) Connell] (Farmington News, November 30, 1934).

Station Agent James A. Reed of Wakefield, NH, received a visit from Station Agent Hugh A. Beaton of Milton.

UNION. Hugh Beaton, station agent at Milton, called on James Reed, Sunday (Farmington News, September 25, 1936).

Hugh A. Beaton, station agent at Milton, NH, appeared in the B&M Railroad employee’s magazine of December 1937, as being on the sick list.

ALTON AND ALTON BAY. Mrs. and Mrs. Charles [Hugh A.] Beaton of Milton are guests this week of their daughter and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Bruce (Farmington News, February 24, 1939).

Hugh A. Beaton died suddenly at the B&M railroad station in Milton, at 3:30 PM, February 12, 1940, aged sixty-six years, four months, and four days.

Strafford County medical examiner Forrest L. Keay, M.D., viewed the body and determined that Beaton had died from “Some form of heart disease. He had walked up the R.R. track about 50 yards from the station and dropped to track and died there.”

Was Brother Of Local Man. Hugh A. Beaton, 67, station agent at Milton for many years, and brother of Charles L. Beaton, agent at the Boston & Maine station in this city, dropped dead Monday while at his work (Portsmouth Herald, [Tuesday,] February 13, 1940).

IN MEMORIUM. Hugh A. Beaton. Announcement of the sudden death of Station Agent Hugh A. Grant at Milton on February 12 brings sorrow to many friends and acquaintances in this locality. Mr. Beaton dropped dead while about his duties in the B&M railroad yard at Milton, Monday afternoon. The deceased was 67 years of age, and had been in the employ of B&M for about 45 years. For nearly 40 years he had held the position of station agent, freight agent and telegraph operator at Milton, and was widely known among his townsmen and to the traveling public. He is survived by his wife, two daughters, a brother Charles Beaton, also a railroad man of Portsmouth, and one sister, for all of whom much sympathy is expressed. Funeral was held Wednesday morning at the Baptist church in Milton, with services in charge of Fraternal Chapter, No. 71, A.F. & A.M., of which he was a member (Farmington, February 16, 1940).

Edward Connell, a paper company beater engineer, aged forty-nine years (b. MA), headed a West Springfield, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ione Connell, aged forty-five years (b. VT), his children, Maynard Connell, a mail clerk for a magazine paper company, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Shirley Connell, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and his lodger [and mother-in-law], Myrtle Beaton, a widow, aged sixty-four years (b. VT). Edward Connell rented their house at 23 Church Street.

Myrtle Florence (Hartshorn) Beaton died in 1955.


See also Milton’s Railroad Line


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, July 25). Hazel L. Beaton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114383725/hazel-l-beaton

Find a Grave. (2013, July 25). Hugh A. Beaton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114383726/hugh-a-beaton

Find a Grave. (2014, April 18). Marjorie G. Bruce. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/128165539/marjorie-g.-bruce

Find a Grave. (2011, July 7). Jane E. [Ione E.] Connell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/72972420/jane-e.-connell

Find a Grave. (2015, January 9). John E. Fox. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/141122102/john-e-fox

Find a Grave. (2013,October 20). Charles Augustine Sawyer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/119019275/charles-augustine-sawyer

Find a Grave. (2011, February 26). Sarah Bragdon Shapleigh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/66176250/sarah-shapleigh

Order of Railroad Telegraphers. (1910). The Railroad Telegrapher. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=6VmjAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA69

Order of Railroad Telegraphers. (1912). The Railroad Telegrapher. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=L44tAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA897

Wikipedia. (2020, November 20). Portsmouth, Great Falls and Conway Railroad. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portsmouth,_Great_Falls_and_Conway_Railroad

Willis Henry Auctions. (2018, December 2). Lot 124A: Historic and Rare Railroad Lantern. Retrieved from www.willishenryauctions.com/catalogs/antiques-estates-auction-sunday-december-2-2018/lot-124a-historic-and-rare-railroad-lantern/

Milton Mills’ Dr. Harry E. Anderson (1887-1936)

By Muriel Bristol | February 14, 2021

Harry Edward Anderson was born in Limington, ME, April 1, 1887, son of Edward A. and Nettie S. (Purinton) Anderson.

He was born April 1, 1887, at Limington, Me., and is the only child born to Edward A. and Nettie S. (Purinton) Anderson. The mother of Dr. Anderson died at Limington, Me., in 1896. She was a daughter of Stephen Purinton, who formerly was a county commissioner of York county, Me. (Scales, 1914).

Nettie B. (Purinton) Anderson died in Limington, ME, April 21, 1896. Edward A. Anderson married (2nd) in Alfred, ME, May 6, 1899, Julia T. Walker, both of Alfred. He was a widowed jailer, aged thirty-four years, and she was a music teacher, aged twenty-six years. She was born in Kennebunkport, ME, October 18, 1872, daughter of Melville H. and Abigail (Tripp) Walker.

Edward A. Anderson, a jailer, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), headed an Alfred, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His “household” was the York County Jail and included thirty-nine prisoners (one of them female). The jail was a rented farm.

Edward A. Anderson’s own household was next door. The census record bore an explanatory marginal notation:

This family live in a house separated from the jail by a wall and Mr. Anderson is the only officer connected with the jail.

It included his wife (of one year), Julia T. Anderson, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), his son Harry E. Anderson, at school, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and his servant, Ema J. Roberts, a servant, aged forty-nine years (b. ME). Julia T. Roberts was the mother of one child, of whom none was still living.

The father of Dr. Anderson was sheriff of York county for six years. He died at Alfred, Me., in March 1911 [1912]. H.E. Anderson was eleven years old when his parents moved from Limington to Alfred, Me., where he continued his schooling. Later he attended the Lewiston High school for two years, after which he returned to Limington and completed his academic studies there (Scales, 1914).

Edward A. Anderson, a farmer, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Limington, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his [2nd] wife (of eleven years), Julia T. Anderson, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, Harry E. Anderson, a medical school student, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), Justin S. Anderson, aged eight years (b. ME), Clara A. Anderson, aged four years (b. ME), and Helen A. Anderson, aged one year (b. ME). Edward A. Anderson owned their farm, free-and-clear. Julia T. Anderson was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

Subsequently he had medical college advantages at Boston, Brunswick and Portland, and after receiving his degree [1910] he located at Acton (Milton Mills) and has remained here, becoming a leading citizen and physician in whom great confidence is placed. He is town physician of Acton, chairman of the board of health, superintendent of schools and town clerk of the west end of the southern part of the town of Acton (Scales, 1914). 

Harry E. Anderson married in Limington, ME, August 21, 1912, Abbie Eliot Small. She was born in Limington, ME, June 4, 1889, daughter of W. Scott and Catherine (Mitchell) Small.

Dr. Anderson married Miss Abbie Small, who is a daughter of W.S. and Kate Small of Limington, Me. Mrs. Anderson is a highly educated and talented lady and devotes much time to music, having pupils at Acton and Milton Mills. She belongs to the Sisters of Rebecca and also to the Eastern Star. Dr. Anderson and wife take a prominent part in the social activities of Acton (Scales, 1914).

Anderson, HE - 1912Harry E. Anderson appeared in the Milton business directory of 1912, as a Milton Mills physician, on Main street, at its corner with Church street.

H.E. ANDERSON, M.D., physician and surgeon with office and residence at Acton, Me., and Milton Mills, N.H., inclusive, enjoys a substantial practice that covers a wide extent of country (Scales, 1914).

His area of practice covers Union, Middleton, Acton (Milton Mills), Lebanon and Shapleigh and, as may be judged, his time is very fully occupied. He is affiliated with the Republican party and belongs to the leading fraternal organizations, being a member of Springvale Lodge, No. 192, A.F. & A.M.; Miltonia Lodge No. 52, I.O.O.F.; Rebecca Lodge No. 79, and is identified also with the Milton Grange (Scales, 1914).

Dr. Harry E. Anderson, Bowdoin Medical, 1910, of Acton, Me., and Milton Mills, N.H., was elected to membership in the Maine Medical Society, in 1916 (ME Medical Society, 1916).

As an Odd Fellows District Deputy Grand Master (D.D.G.M.), Harry E. Anderson of Milton Mills installed officers at the Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., in Farmington, NH, in 1916, with his suite of Milton Mills officers.

LOCAL. Installation of officers from Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., took place at the close of the regular meeting last Thursday evening. The installing officer was D.D.G.M. Harry E. Anderson of Milton Mills, assisted by his suite. The work was performed in a competent and impressive manner, the officers to receive promotion being as follows: John P. Hurd, N.G.; Warren B. Russell, V.G.; Ira W. Glidden, secretary; Vivian A. Libbey, F.S.; Arthur R. Jones, treasurer; George F. Davis, warden; Herbert D. Browne, conductor; Chester Russell, chaplain; James B. Hayes, R.S.N.G.; Ralph C. Trask, L.S.N.G.; Frank I. Gilman, R.S.S.; Chester Bodwell, L.S.S.; Fred W. Browne, R.S.V.G.; Alonzo I. Davis, L.S.V.G.; James Smith, I.G.; Harry Hanscom, O.G. At the conclusion of work, remarks were heard from visiting grand officers and members. A delegation of 17 members from Rochester was present. An oyster supper was served at the conclusion (Farmington News, January 21, 1916).

Farmington IOOF Hall
I.O.O.F. Hall, Upstairs on Main Street in Farmington, NH

LOCAL. The officers elect of the Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., were installed at the regular meeting last Thursday evening, the work being performed in a very capable manner by D.D.G.M. Harry E. Anderson and suite of Milton Mills. The presence of grand officers and a delegation of visitors from Rochester lent auspiciousness to the occasion. Officers to receive promotion were as follows: N.G., Warren B. Russell; V.G., Chester C. Russell; R.S., Ira W. Glidden; F.S., Vivian A. Libbey; treasurer, Arthur R. Jones; warden, Ralph Card; conductor, Herbert Browne; R.S.N.G., James Hayes; L.S.N.G., Ralph Trask; R.S.V.G., Fred Browne; L.S.V.G., Henry Davis; R.S., Frank Oilman; L.S.S., Wilbur Jones; I.G., Frank Davis; O.G., Harry Hanscom; chaplain, Edwin Tripp. At the close of ceremonies interesting remarks were made by grand officers and visitors. Refreshments of ice cream and cake were served in the banquet hall (Farmington News, July 16, 1916).

Harry E. Anderson appeared in the Milton business directory of 1917, as a Milton Mills physician, on the Springvale road. Mrs. H.E. Anderson appeared also as a Milton Mills music teacher.

Harry Edward Anderson of Acton, ME, aged thirty years, registered for the WW I military draft in Acton, ME, June 5, 1917. He had been born in Limington, ME, April 1, 1887. He was married. He was employed as a physician and a York County deputy sheriff. He claimed an exemption for his position as a deputy sheriff. He was tall, with a stout build, grey eyes, and brown hair.

Many New Englanders Commissioned, War Department Announces. Special Dispatch to the Globe. WASHINGTON, July 31 – The following appointments were announced today by the War Department: First Lieutenant, Ordnance Reserve Spurgeon W. Howatt, 762 Broadway, Everett. First Lieutenant. Medical Reserve Harry E. Anderson, Milton Mills, N.H.; Frank G. Wheatley, 174 Adams st. North Abington. [Remainder of lengthy list omitted] (August 1, 1918).

Harry E. Anderson reported to Fort Oglethorpe, GA, August 22, 1918, where he was a 1st Lieutenant in the Medical Department. He was discharged December 21, 1918, “for the conv. [convenience?] of Government.”

SANBORNVILLE. The Sanbornville baseball team defeated the Wolfeboro team at Brookfield recently by a score of 6 to 4. Batteries were Brackett and French H. Horne, Haines and Dr. Anderson (Farmington News, September 17, 1926).

Dr. H.E. Anderson appeared in the Milton directory of 1927, as a Milton Mills physician. Harry E. Anderson, M.D., appeared in the Maine Register of 1929, as being Health Officer at Milton Mills, NH.

Harry E. Anderson, a medical doctor, aged forty-three years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Abbie S. Anderson, aged forty years (b. ME). Harry E. Anderson rented their house at 105 High Street, for $50 per month. They had a radio set.

SOMERSWORTH NAMES FOUR OF CITY OFFICIALS. Four of the city officials have been elected by the Somersworth city council and the other offices will be filled on April 18. The officers named are: Tax collector, Michael O’Malley, City treasurer, Haven Doe, City solicitor, Thomas J. McGreal, City physician, Dr. Harry E. Anderson (Portsmouth Herald, April 14, 1933).

Mrs. H.E. Anderson performed the song “Sometime We’ll Understand” at the Somersworth, NH, funeral of Warren E. Leighton, May 2, 1933. Leighton had been a member of the Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., of Farmington (Farmington News, May 19, 1933).

MILTON MILLS. Many in our town were sorry to learn of the passing of Mrs. Janet Pillsbury last Wednesday at the home of her sister, Mrs. Harry Anderson in Somersworth. Mrs. Pillsbury was well known here, as she made her home with Dr. and Mrs. Anderson while he was practicing in town. When she left to work elsewhere, she often came here to see friends. She was a bright, sunny woman and will be missed by many friends. Many from this town attended the funeral services (Farmington News, 1934).

MILTON MILLS. Dr. and Mrs. Harry E. Anderson of Somersworth were visitors in town last Thursday (Farmington News, May 17, 1935).

Harry E. Anderson died in 1936, aged forty-nine years.

Abbie S. Anderson appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1962, as the widow of Harry E., with her house at 173 N. Main street.

Abbie E. (Small) Anderson died in Limington, ME, March 17, 1967, aged seventy-seven years.


References:

Find a Grave. (2015, November 13). Edward Alden Anderson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154958666/edward-alden-anderson

Find a Grave. (2016, April 28). Dr. Harry Edward Anderson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/161764838/harry-edward-anderson

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire, and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA732

Wikipedia. (2020, December 28). Battery (Baseball). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battery_(baseball)

Youtube. (2020, March 31). Sometime We’ll Understand. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9Qwecstmwk

Milton’s Dr. James J. Buckley (1877-1930)

By Muriel Bristol | February 7, 2021

James Joseph Buckley was born in Dover, NH, February 19, 1877, son of Daniel and Catherine (McCarthy) Buckley. (His parents were Irish immigrants).

He attended the public schools of his native city while taking his preparatory and pre-medical courses (Cutter, 1932).

James Joseph Buckley, of Milton, graduated from Dartmouth College’s Medical School with its Class of 1900 (Dartmouth College, 1906).

He finished his academic training at Dartmouth College, taking his medical studies at Dartmouth Medical School, from which he was graduated with his degree in the class of 1900, commencing practice in Milton, New Hampshire, the year he left medical school (Cutter, 1932).

Daniel Buckley, a cotton mill spinner, aged fifty-six years (b. Ireland), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Katharine Buckley, aged fifty-four years (b. Ireland), and his children, Daniel J. Buckley, a druggist, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), James J. Buckley, a physician, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and Annie G. Buckley, at school, aged seventeen years (b. NH). Daniel Buckley owned their house at 664 Central Ave., free-and-clear. Katherine Buckley was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

J.J. Buckley appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, and 1904, as a Milton physician. He was a physician at 16 So. Main street in 1905-06, and 1909.

James Joseph Buckley married in Manchester, NH, August 12, 1903, Minnie Eula “Eula” Hussey, both of Milton. He was a physician, aged twenty-six years, and she was aged twenty-five years. Bishop Dennis M. Bradley performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, May 23, 1878, daughter of Benjamin and Charlotte E. (Huff) Hussey. (Her father was a musician).

MILTON. Mrs. J.J. Buckley and Mrs. R.K. Webber are attending the W.R.C. convention at Concord, as delegates (Farmington News, April 8, 1904).

The Women’s Relief Corp (or W.R.C) had its origin as the women’s auxiliary of the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.), which was a Civil War veterans’ organization.

MILTON. Mrs. J.J. Buckley has been quite ill during the past week (Farmington News, April 22, 1904).

James J. Buckley, a general practice physician, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Minnie E. Buckley, aged thirty-one years (b. ME). James J. Buckley rented their house.

J.J. Buckley of Milton did not have an automobile in 1906-07, but had acquired a 40-horsepower Overland automobile by 1910. He had a 22½-horsepower Overland automobile in 1912.

1910 Overland-11At their organizational meeting in Dover, NH, April 1, 1911, the Strafford County Commissioners elected Dr. J.J. Buckley as County Physician for Milton (Farmington News, April 7, 1911).

J.J. Buckley appeared in the Milton business directories of 1912, as a physician at 16 So. Main street. He was a physician at 18 So. Main street in 1917.

SOUTH WEYMOUTH AUTO PARTY IN N.H. WRECK. MILTON, N.H., Oct. 20 – An automobile owned and driven by J.T. Price, also containing Mrs. Price and Mr. and Mrs. Barraud, all of South Weymouth, Mass., skidded and turned over late this afternoon at South Milton, pinning Mr. Price under the machine. He was badly injured and Mrs. Price’s right wrist was broken. Mr. and Mrs. Barraud escaped with a severe shaking. The machine was wrecked. The automobilists were then taken to the office of Dr. J.J. Buckley for treatment. They will return home tomorrow (Boston Globe, October 21, 1917).

“He was thus engaged there [in Milton] with the exception of one year which he spent at Roxbury, Massachusetts, during which time he was on the staff of the Emergency Hospital until he entered service for the World War” (Cutter, 1932).

ROCHESTER. Dr. J.J. Buckley of Milton has passed the required examination and received the appointment of lieutenant in the medical reserves (Portsmouth Herald, July 29, 1918).

He was most enthusiastic about his service to his country during the war, and for the greater part of the period he was stationed as a lieutenant in the medical corps at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia. His work there was of a highly meritorious character and it won for him the commendation of his superior officers. Returning to Milton where he had practiced for thirty [twenty] years, Dr. Buckley, in 1919, closed his practice there and located in Dover, and with the exception of the period of his protracted illness he had since practiced in that city (Cutter, 1932).

John J. Buckley, a surgeon physician, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Dover household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eula H. Buckley, a music and elocution teacher, aged forty years (b. ME). John J. Buckley owned their house at 7 Hamilton Street.

James J. Buckley appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1921, as a physician, with his office on Third street, and his house at 7 Hamilton street.

[His] memories and associations of his term of enlistment were perpetuated through his membership in Dover Post No. 8, American Legion. He was a member of the American Medical Association and had the respect of his medical colleagues. In his fraternal life he was associated with Dover Lodge, No. 184, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (Cutter, 1932).

At their organizational meeting in Dover, NH, April 1, 1925, the Strafford County Commissioners elected Dr. James J. Buckley as County Physician for Dover (Farmington News, April 7, 1911).

Dover. Doctor Regains Health. Dr. James J. Buckley, a local physician, who recently underwent a surgical operation at a hospital in Jamaica Plain, Mass., has improved so steadily that it was reported yesterday that he is expected to return home in about a week (Portsmouth Herald, January 31, 1928).

James J. (Eula H.) Buckley appeared in the Dover, NH, directories of 1928, and 1929, as a physician, with his office in the Merchants Bank building, at 1 Third Street, (3-4), and his house at 7 Hamilton street.

His wife is a well-known and active participant in affairs for the advancement of women in New Hampshire (Cutter, 1932).

Dr. J.J. Buckley of Dover, NH, responded, as did several doctors, when a lineman for the Twin City Gas & Electric Company was killed while repairing an electric line in Berwick, ME, July 5, 1929 (Boston Globe, July 6, 1929).

James J Buckley, a general practice physician, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Dover household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Eula H. Buckley, a music and elocution teacher, aged fifty-one years (b. ME). James J. Buckley owned their house at 7 Middle [Hamilton] Street, which was valued at $8,000.

James J. Buckley, M.D., appeared in the 1930 Town Report of Dover, NH, as an obstetrician – since 1921 – on the staff at Wentworth Hospital. He was also the examiner of obstetrical nursing there.

DRAMATICS. On the evening of March 21 [1930], before a large and appreciative audience in the City Opera House, the senior class gave its annual play. The members of the cast did excellent work in their respective parts, “reflecting much credit on the young people, who worked hard and long, and Mrs. Eula Buckley, the capable coach, whose name connected with an amateur play assures a finished production.” The high school orchestra, under the direction of the instructor, gave an excellent musical program. The proceeds of the entertainment were used, in part, to defray the expenses of a trip to Washington, D.C. (City of Dover, 1931).

James J. Buckley died of bladder cancer at 7 Hamilton street in Dover, NH, November 4, 1930, aged fifty-three years, eight months, and sixteen days.

In Memoriam. On the fourth day of November, 1930, following a painful illness, Dr. James J. Buckley, a member of the hospital staff, was called to his eternal home. Dr. Buckley was a native of Dover, a graduate of Dartmouth Medical school, and a physician of wide repute; he was a deep student, devoted to his profession, and dedicated to the alleviation of human suffering. Dr. Buckley was elected obstetrician by the board of trustees of the Wentworth Hospital, July 11th, 1921, and held that position at the time of his death. Always kind, courteous and considerate, his presence in the sick chamber imparted a sense of security and hopefulness which helped dispel the dark mantle of incertitude within which the weak and suffering are so often enshrouded. The sympathy of the board of trustees is extended to the widow, and to all sorrowing relatives and friends. On December 8th, 1930, only a few short weeks following the demise of Dr. Buckley, his friend and colleague, Dr. John C. Lawlor, also passed to that unknown land whence no traveller returns. During the decade of his professional life in this city, Dr. Lawlor won a warm abiding place in the hearts of our people, and was rapidly coursing down the path of fame, both as a medical and surgical practitioner, when the summons came. Elected to the surgical staff on the same date that Dr. Buckley was chosen to the hospital force, he ministered to an ever growing clientele for intensive surgical treatment, his patients coming from afar to receive the benefit of his skill. In his death the Wentworth Hospital suffers the loss of a valued official, and the board of trustees, as well as the community at large, deeply mourns his passing. To the bereaved family the sympathy of our people goes forth in generous measure (City of Dover, 1931).

Mrs. Eula H. Buckley purchased graves 1 and 2, in lot 59, on Catalpa Ave., group 11, in Pine Hill Cemetery in Dover, NH, for $20.00, in 1930 (City of Dover, 1931).

Eula H. Buckley appeared in the Dover, NH, directories of 1931, 1933, and 1939, as the widow of James J., with her house at 7 Hamilton street.

Eula H. Buckley lost her November 1936 election to be the NH State Representative from Ward Four of Dover, NH, and then won in a recount, and then lost again in a second recount.

19 WOMEN IN N.H. HOUSE. DOVER, N.H., Nov. 23. (AP) A recount of votes today in ward four here gave Mrs. Eula H. Buckley (R) a seat in the New Hampshire House of Representatives and brought the number of women in the House to 19. Mrs. Buckley’s Democratic opponent was Harold Blaisdell (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), November 24, 1936).

BLAISDELL ELECTED IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. Mrs. Eula Buckley Loses by Only Two Votes. CONCORD, N.H., Dec. 31 (AP) Republicans lost one member of the 1937 House of Representatives and Democrats gained one today when the State Ballot Law Commission, on an appeal from a recount, declared Harold F. Blaisdell, Democrat of Dover, elected. Blaisdell was shown elected on original returns. A recount by Secretary of State Enoch D. Fuller gave Mrs. Eula Buckley, Republican, the seat. Now the commission has given Blaisdell the seat by two votes. The change decreased to 18 the number of women in the next House and changed party distribution of members to 229 Republican, 188 Democrats and one Independent (Boston Globe, January 1, 1937).

DOVER WOMAN IS FIGHTING FOR SEAT OF BLAISDELL. The legislative committee on elections asked for more time yesterday in the case of Mrs. Eula H. Buckley, Republican, of Dover who has asked for a seat in the House now held by Harry F. Blaisdell, Democrat. The fight seems to be on party lines. Chairman Hoyt of the committee explained to the House that one of the members of his group had asked to have photostatic copies made of some of the ballots and he moved that the bill be recommitted (Portsmouth Herald, January 27, 1937).

Myrtle F. Grant, a widow, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), headed a Durham, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her sister, Eva Brown, aged sixty years, and her lodger, Eula Buckley, aged fifty-six [sixty-one] years. Myrtle F. Grant owned their house, which was valued at $6,000.

Mrs. Eula Buckley appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1953, as having her house at 60 Central av. She appeared in the Dover, NH, directories of 1956, 1958, and 1960, as having her house at 177 Central av.

M. Eula (Hussey) Buckley died in Dover, NH, March 31, 1961.

References:

Cutter, William R. (1932). American Biography: A New Cyclopedia, Volume 50. New York: American Historical Society Press

Dartmouth College. (1906). Dartmouth Alumni Directory. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=79p5uQ4xgZ4C&pg=PA112

Find a Grave. (2017, October 27). James J. Buckley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184669765/james-j-buckley

Milton Mills’ Fruitier Nicholas L. Mucci (1869-1966)

By Muriel Bristol | February 5, 2021

Nicholas L. Mucci was born in Italy, August 22, 1869. (If, as would seem to be the case, Angelo P. Mucci of Sanford, ME, was his brother, then both were sons of Iacopo Mucci).

Nicholas L. Mucci married in Florence, Tuscany, Italy, circa October 1892, Teresa Laurezi (also given as Lorenzi). She was born in Italy, in August 1871.

Nicholas Mucci, a country man, aged twenty-eight years, and his wife, Teresa Mucci, aged twenty-six years, both of Firenze, i.e., Florence, Italy, sailed from Genoa, Italy, April 14, 1898, on the S.S. Kaiser Wilhelm II (1889), arriving in New York, NY, April 28, 1898. They would be joining his brother (her brother-in-law), presumably at their stated “final” destination of Boston, MA.

Nicholas Mucci appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as running a fruit and confectionary store at 48 Main street in Milton Mills, with his house at Sanford, ME.

Mucci’s fellow countryman, Raffaele A. “Ralph” Ferretti (1864-1931), had opened a very similar establishment in neighboring Farmington, NH, in 1894. Descriptions of his business activities may give us some sense of the “flavor” of Mucci’s Milton Mills store.

LOCALS. Ralph Ferretti has a new cart of attractive appearance which he will keep on the road with fruit and ice cream this summer. He also has recently purchased a gas engine to operate his ice cream freezer (Farmington News, May 17, 1895).

LOCALS. That Ferretti makes caramels of the finest flavor to be found, is the decision of all good judges (Farmington News, November 13, 1896).

In 1899, Ferretti advertised Ice Cream, “Made from the Very Best Cream, with the Highest Quality of Flavoring Extracts. Special Prices by the Gallon;” Ice Cold Soda (i.e., “tonics”), “Flavored with the Best Fruit Syrups;” and Fruit, “of all kinds at the lowest living prices” (Farmington News, May 12, 1899). Five pounds of chocolate might be obtained for $1.

Nicolas Mucci, a storekeeper, aged thirty years (b. Italy), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Teresa Mucci, aged twenty-eight years (b. Italy), his daughter, Eliza Mucci, aged three months (b. NH), and his boarder, Angelo Lenzi, a storekeeper, aged twenty-one years (b. Italy). Nicholas Mucci rented their house. Teresa Mucci was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. They had immigrated into the U.S. in 1897. (Their boarder had immigrated into the U.S. in 1895). Their household was enumerated between those of Elisha S. Gerrish, a farm laborer, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), and Elphonzo Pinkham, a barber, aged forty-four years (b. ME).

Mucci, N - 1902 Nicholas Mucci appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as running a fruit and confectionary store at 44 Main street (corner of Church street) in Milton Mills, with his house at the same address. F.S. Weeks, M.D., a physician and surgeon, was at 42 Main street (corner of Church street), and W.S. Miller, a furniture dealer, was at 46 Main street.

N. Mucci appeared in the Milton business directories of 1904, and 1905-06, as proprietor of a Milton Mills fruit, confectionary, and fancy grocery store at 44 Main street, with his house at the same address. Winfield S. Miller, a furniture dealer, was at 46 Main street.

N. Mucci appeared in the Milton business directory of 1909, as proprietor of a Milton Mills fruit, confectionary, and fancy grocery store at 46 Main street, with his house at the same address.

Nichla Muci, a general store proprietor, aged forty years (b. Italy), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Teresa Muci, aged thirty-eight years (b. Italy), and his children, Allice Muci, aged twelve years (b. NH), Susan Muci, aged nine years (b. NH), Charles Muci, aged five years, Elenah Muci, aged three years (b. NH), and Fred Muci, aged two months (b. NH). Nichla Mucci rented their house. Teresa Mucci was the mother of eight children, of whom six were still living. They had immigrated into the U.S. in 1898; Teresa Mucci spoke Italian, i.e., she spoke mostly Italian. Their household was enumerated between those of John Howland, Jr., a hotel clerk, aged fifty years (b. Canada), and William Pinfold, a woolen mills napper, aged forty-six years (b. England). (See Milton in the News – 1902 regarding Pinfold’s wife, Annie E. (Lewis) Pinfold, who was a writer of short stories and song lyrics).

N. Mucci appeared in the Milton business directories of 1912, and 1917, as proprietor of a Milton Mills fruit, confectionary, and fancy grocery store at 46 Main street (corner of Church street).

Mucci, N - 1917Nicholas Mucci, a woolen mill washer, aged fifty years (b. Italy), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Th[e]resa Mucci, aged forty-eight years (b. Italy), and his children, Alicia M. Mucci, drawing warp in a plush mill, aged twenty years (b. NH), Susie S. Mucci, drawing warp in a plush mill, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Charles A. Mucci, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Eleanor Mucci, aged twelve years (b. NH), Orlando N. Mucci, aged nine years (b. NH), and Arline L. Mucci, aged six years (b. NH). Nicholas Mucci owned their farm on Church Street, with a mortgage. Nicholas and Theresa Mucci had immigrated into the U.S. in 1898, and had become naturalized citizens in 1908. Their household was enumerated between those of James C. Hawksworth, a woolen mill washer, aged sixty years (b. Nova Scotia), and Elisha S. Gerrish, a teamster laborer, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME).

Nickolas Mucci, a woolen mills finisher, aged sixty years (b. Italy), headed a Sanford, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Theresa Mucci, aged fifty-eight years (b. Italy), and his children, Alice Mucci, a variety store saleslady, aged thirty years (b. NH), Susie Mucci, a plush mill twister, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Charles Mucci, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Eleanor Mucci, a plush mill twister, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Orlando Mucci, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Arline Mucci, aged seventeen years (b. NH). Nickolas Mucci owned their house at 17 Sherburne Street, which was valued at $2,600. They had a radio set. Nickolas and Theresa Mucci had immigrated into the U.S. in 1898, and were naturalized citizens.

Nicholas Mucci, a worsted mills dryer, aged seventy years (b. Italy), headed a Sanford, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Theresa Mucci, aged sixty-eight years (b. Italy), his children, Alice Mucci, a retail furniture saleswoman, aged forty-one years (b. NH), Orlando Mucci, a mohair mills bookkeeper, aged thirty years (b. NH), Aileen Mucci, a retail furniture saleswoman, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and Eleanor Downing, a mohair mills mender, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and his grandson, Roger Downing, aged four years (b. ME). Nicholas Mucci owned their house at 17 Sherburne Street, which was valued at $1,200. They had all resided in the same place in 1935.

Sanford Couple Feted On 57th Anniversary. Sanford, Oct. 19 – Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Mucci, of 17 Sherburne Street, observed their 57th wedding anniversary with a family dinner party Sunday at their home. Mr. and Mrs. Mucci, who were married in Florence, Italy, came to this country 51 years ago. They resided for a short time in Sanford and then moved to New Hampshire, returning to Sanford 30 years ago. Mr. Mucci is a retired employee of Goodall-Sanford, Inc. Their entire family, with exception of one grandchild, who is a student at the University of New Hampshire, were with them on this occasion, together with their husbands and wives. The children are James Mucci, Scarborough, Orlando Mucci, Mrs. Susie Burke, Mrs. Arline Emery, Mrs. Eleanor Downing and Miss Alice Mucci. There are five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren (Portland Press Herald (Portland, ME), October 20, 1949).

Nicholas Mucci appeared in the Sanford, ME, directory of 1951, as being retired, with his house at 17 Sherburne street. (Angelo P. Mucci (1873-1962), and his wife, Julia, resided at 31 Sherburne street. He was born in Marliana, Tuscany, Italy, May 23, 1873, son of Iacopo Mucci, immigrated to the U.S. in 1891, and was perhaps the U.S.-resident brother mentioned by Nicholas Mucci at the time of his own 1898 arrival).

Teresa (Laurezi) Mucci died in Sanford, ME, December 2, 1955, aged eight-three years. Nicolas L. Mucci died in Sanford, ME, August 1, 1966, aged ninety-six years.

References:

Find a Grave. (2014, October 4). Nicholas Mucci. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/136811275/nicholas-mucci

Metropolitan Museum. (2021). Goodall-Sanford Suit. Retrieved from www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/159532

Wikipedia. (2021, January 14). Italian Diaspora. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_diaspora

Farmington’s Dr. William H. Nute (1858-1938)

By Muriel Bristol | January 29, 2021

William Herbert Nute was born in Farmington, NH, May 8, 1858, son of Charles W. and Mary L. (Richardson) Nute. His mother died of typhoid fever in the Union army camp at Alexandria, VA, August 10, 1863.

Mrs. Nute, a most estimable lady, came to camp in winter of 1863, bringing the little Captain Herbert. How pleasantly we remember both. We recall with sorrow the death of Mrs. Nute by typhoid fever at camp. Her gracious, kindly presence lives with us (Shaw, 1903).

His father, Major Charles W. Nute, placed his son, “little Captain [William] Herbert,” in the care of a brother-in-law, George W. Colomy (1825-1881), of Farmington. Major Nute died of disease in the Union army camp in Alexandria, VA, March 9, 1865.

LOCAL AND OTHER ITEMS. A letter received last evening from the First Me. Heavy Artillery, dated March 10th, says that Major Nute, of Lincoln, died very suddenly on the 9th inst., in camp, of congestion of the lungs. He was out a dress parade on the 6th inst. The writer, an officer of the regiment, says, “We have lost a good officer and a pleasant man one that was a favorite with all” (Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, ME), March 16, 1865).

George Colomey, a farmer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included  Harriett Colomey, keeping house, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Arthur W. Colomey, at home, aged sixteen years (b. NH), George A. Colomey, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Hattie Colomey, aged twelve years (b. NH), William H. Colomey [i.e., Nute], aged twelve years (b. NH), Daniel Colomey, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH), and Rebecca Colomey, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH). George Colomey had real estate valued at $4,000 and personal estate valued at $1,200.

He was graduated from the high school of his native [Farmington, NH] town and pursued his studies at the New Hampton institution, going for his professional training to Bellevue, New York city, and the Bowdoin Medical school, Brunswick, Me., where he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1881. He immediately entered upon the practice of his profession in his native town (Willey, 1903).

Willis Herbertus Nute, i.e., William Herbert Nute in Latin, appeared in a list of Bowdoin College’s Medical School Class of 1881.

The Mitchell-Cony Directory of 1908 portrayed Dr. Nute as having filled a gap in the roster of Milton physicians occasioned by the departure of Dr. G.W. Peavey, circa 1877-78.

Dr. Nute succeeded Dr. Peavey, but stayed only a short time. For several years there was no resident physician at the village until Dr. H.F. Pitcher came in 1879 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

In fact, this Dr. Nute practiced in his native Farmington, NH, and possibly neighboring Milton too, but some years later, from the time of his 1881 graduation until his relocation to Exeter, NH, in 1890-91.

William H. Nute married (1st) in Farmington, NH, November 27, 1885, Christina Ferre “Cressie” Cotton, he of Farmington, and she of Providence, RI. He was a physician, aged twenty-seven years, and she was a housekeeper, aged nineteen years. Rev. W.E. Darling performed the ceremony. She was born in Brownfield, ME, circa 1866, daughter of Daniel M. and Levina (Meader) Cotton.

LOCALS. Saturday, while strapping a razor, James McGibbon, the tonsorial artist at the Wilson House, cut an ugly gash in the ball of the thumb of his left hand. Dr. Nute dressed the wound, taking two stitches to bring the severed parts together (Farmington News, January 22, 1886).

LOCALS. While John Dustin was at work on the foundation of a cellar near J.T. Pride’s stone yard, Wednesday, a large rock fell upon him, breaking both bones of the right leg below the knee. He was conveyed to his residence on the Jessie Elliot place and Dr. Nute called, who set the broken bones. It was a most unfortunate occurrence coming as it does just at the beginning of summer’s work (Farmington News, April 16, 1886).

LOCALS. The firm of Nute & Blake has dissolved partnership, Dr. Blake buying out Dr. Nute and continuing the business. See elsewhere adv. of dissolution. Dr. Nute’s office will still continue to be in the store as formerly (Farmington News, August 6, 1886).

CHIP’S CONTRIBUTION. John Pike, who works in Cloutman’s factory, cut a bad gash in his hand Tuesday. Dr. Nute dressed the wound (Farmington News, June 21, 1889).

SERIOUS ACCIDENT. Charles Hayes, son of Elihu Hayes, of New Durham, met with a serious and painful accident Monday while tending a planing machine at Downing’s Mills. While in the act of stooping for something he lost his balance and in trying to regain himself thrust his right hand directly under the knives of the planer. The hand was chopped in such a manner as to necessitate the amputation of all of the fingers back of the third joint or into the palm of the hand, the thumb only being saved and even this was injured somewhat. What rendered the circumstances more difficult and painful was the fact that while the accident occurred at 10 a.m., the necessary surgical treatment was not obtained until afternoon, from the reason that all the doctors here were away or so engaged that they could not attend. Dr. Hanson was first in attendance, but having no instruments could do little beyond checking the flow of blood. At about 5 p.m. Dr. Wallace of Rochester was found, who assisted by Dr. Nute of this place, performed the necessary amputation. Mr. Hayes is now comfortable and it is hoped will soon recover (Farmington News, August 23, 1889).

MEDICAL GRADUATES. CLASS OF 1881. William Herbert Nute. b. 8 May, 1858, Farmington, N.H. Physician, Farmington, N.H. (Bowdoin College, 1889).

Christina F. Nute divorced her husband in Strafford County, in February 1889. She alleged adultery. (She married (2nd) in Boston, MA, December 24, 1902, Raymond E. Valiquet, she of Providence, RI, and he of Boston. She died in Boston, MA, in December 1922).

[Dr. Nute] remained there [Farmington, NH,] until 1891, when despite the marked success which had followed him in Farmington he determined to make the hazard of new fortunes and removed to Exeter. In his new location Dr. Nute was equally prosperous and successful, and he almost immediately entered upon a practice which has now grown to be one of the largest in central Rockingham county (Willey, 1903).

William H. Nute married (2nd) in Exeter, NH, December 22, 1892, Lucy Ellen Reed, both of Exeter. He was a physician, aged thirty-four years, and she was aged twenty-four years. Rev. A.C. Nickerson performed the ceremony. She was born in Dorchester, MA, August 19, 1868, daughter of Henry E. and Lavinia Reed.

The Exeter Cottage Hospital was incorporated in November 1891, and opened June 9, 1897.

Dr. Nute was one of the first to recognize Exeter’s need of hospital accommodations, and largely through his efforts the Exeter cottage hospital was established to which he gives a large measure of his time (Willey, 1903).

William H. Nute, a physician, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed an Exeter, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Lucy E. Nute, aged thirty-one years (b. NH [SIC]), his child, Norwood Nute, aged six [three] years (b. NH), and his servant, Hannah Fitzgerald, a servant, aged thirty-five years (b. Ireland). William H. Nute rented their house at 27 Front Street. Lucy E. Nute was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Nute, William H, MDDr. Nute keeps thoroughly abreast with all the progress of his profession, and annually spends a large amount of time in the hospitals of Boston, perfecting himself in all the latest discoveries of modern medical science. In addition to the exacting cares of a large general practice, Dr. Nute is a medical examiner for the Ancient Order of United Workmen, as well as for all the leading insurance companies which do business in his section. He is president of the Strafford district medical society, Fellow of the American Medical association, member of the New Hampshire Surgical club, and of the New Hampshire Medical society. He has been prominent also in various secret fraternities and is a 33d degree Mason, having served as master of his lodge and past district deputy grand master. He has also passed the chairs in the Odd Fellow and is a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is Past Sachem of the Improved Order of Red Men, being the highest office in the gift of the order in state. He is also a member of the Foresters of America. … He is a Republican in politics, a member of the Board of Health of Exeter, and attends the Unitarian church (Willey, 1903).

William H. Nute, a physician, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed an Exeter, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Lucy E. Nute, aged “X” [forty-one] years (b. MA), his child, Norwood Nute, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his servant, Hannah Fitzgerald, a housekeeper, aged forty-five years (b. Ireland). William H. Nute owned their house at 27 Front Street. Lucy E. Nute was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

William H. Nute, a physician, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed an Exeter, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Lucy E. Nute, aged forty-seven [fifty-one] years (b. NH [SIC]), and his servant, Hannah Fitzgerald, a cook, aged forty-five years [fifty-five] years (b. Ireland). William H. Nute owned their house at 27 Front Street, free-and-clear.

William H. Nute, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed an Exeter, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucy Nute, aged sixty years (b. NH [SIC]), his son, Norwood Nute, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Marjorie W. Nute, aged twenty-eight years (b. Scotland), and his servant, Hannah E. Fitzgerald, aged sixty-four years (b. Ireland). William H. Nute owned their house at 25 Front Street, which was valued at $10,000. They had a radio set.  Marjorie W. Nute had immigrated into the U.S. in 1907, and Hannah E. Fitzgerald had done so in 1870. Both were naturalized citizens.

William H. Nute died in Exeter, NH, August 18, 1938, aged eighty years.

DR. WM. NUTE OF EXETER DIES AT 80. Dr. William H. Nute, for 48 years an Exeter physician and prominent citizen, died at the Exeter Hospital yesterday afternoon after a long illness, aged 80 years. Owing to failing health he gave up practicing a few years ago and his condition had gradually declined. Born in Farmington, May 8, 1858, a son of Charles W. and Mary L. (Richardson) Nute, he lived in his early years with an uncle and guardian, George W. Colomy, after his parents died when he was seven years of age. He was educated in the Farmington public schools and the New Hampton Literary Institute, now New Hampton School, and attended Bowdoin College, being graduated from the Bowdoin Medical School in 1881. He afterwards studied at Bellevue Hospital in New York. Dr. Nute practiced his profession for a year in Farmington and came to Exeter in 1890. He had an extensive practice both in Exeter and the surrounding towns. Before the acquisition of a school physician at Phillips Exeter Academy Dr. Nute attended the students and thus became well known among many from various parts of the country. Dr. Nute was also prominent fraternally, being a 32nd degree Mason, Blue Lodge, and was a past district deputy grand warden in the I.O.O.F., besides being a past sachem of the Wehannonowit Tribe of Red Men. In military circles, Dr. Nute was also prominent, being captain of Company L, N.H.N.G., which was the Exeter unit in the organization, and during World War after it was called into service he was major of the Sanitary Corps for home duty. He was a member of the New Hampshire Medical Society and the Rockingham County Medical Association. Dr. Nute married Lucy Reed, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Henry Reed of Exeter, who survives him, and also a son, Norwood Nute of Exeter (Portsmouth Herald, August 19, 1938).

Lucy E. (Reed) Nute died in Exeter, NH, June 15, 1941.

References:

Find a Grave. (2014, September 4). Maj. Charles Wilby Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/135415511/charles-wilby-nute

Find a Grave. (2017, July 2). Dr. William H. Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/180926024/william-herbert-nute

Find a Grave. (2011, January 5). Christine Valiquet. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/63791604/christine-valiquet

Shaw, Horace H. (1903). The First Maine Heavy Artillery, 1861-1865. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=G50dAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA219

Willey, George F. (1903). State Builders: An Illustrated Historical and Biographical Record of the State of New Hampshire at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=7MpYAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA350

Milton’s Dr. John H. Twombly (1848-1927)

By Muriel Bristol | January 27, 2021

John Herbert Twombly was born in Dover, NH, October 17, 1848, son of John and Charlotte (Drew) Twombly.

JOHN HERBERT TWOMBLY. The son of John and Charlotte (Drew) Twombly, was born in Dover, N.H., October 17, 1848. He prepared for college at Gilmanton Academy. After graduation he studied medicine at Dover, N.H., and attended lectures at Harvard Medical School until February, 1872, at which time he received his degree. The next seven months he was assistant to Dr. Jasper H. York of Dover, N.H.; was in private practice in Brooklyn, N.Y., from October, 1872, to January, 1874, when he received an appointment at King’s County Lunatic Asylum, Flatbush, N.Y., for six months. In October, 1874, he was appointed assistant physician at Michigan Asylum for the Insane, Kalamazoo, Mich. (Dartmouth College, 1913).

No changes have occurred in the staff of resident officers. So much of the time and attention of the medical officers was occupied in conducting the largely increased correspondence of the Institution, in receiving the friends of patients, and in transcribing the clinical notes and daily records, that it became necessary to secure the services of a special assistant. Dr. John H. Twombly, previously connected with an eastern hospital, was accordingly appointed in the spring of 1875, and has rendered very acceptable service in the Male Department In April, 1876, Dr. Edward A. Adams was selected to act as assistant physician in the Female Department during the temporary absence of Dr. Emerson, and discharged his duties with great credit to himself and to our entire satisfaction. The corps of employés is complete, and many have acquired a valuable experience by a long term of service. We feel assured the attendants and assistants as a body are efficient, and are entitled to our commendation (Michigan Asylum, 1877).

Dr. John H. Twombly, who had served acceptably as assistant physician [at the Michigan Asylum] for three years, was compelled to leave the institution in July [1878] on account of ill health (Michigan State Legislature, 1879).

John H. Twombly married in Milton, July 11, 1878, Frances W. ‘Fanny” Plummer. He was aged twenty-nine years, and she was aged twenty-seven years. She was born in Milton, February 28, 1851, daughter of Enoch W. and Orinda (Ayer) Plummer.

He entered the drug business in Newmarket, N.H., in October, 1879, and continued until October, 1887 (Dartmouth College, 1913). 

John H. Twombly, a druggist, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Newmarket, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Francis W. Twombly, keeping house, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH).

Alvah H. Place of Strafford, NH, “came to Newmarket in 1882 to learn the drug business with Dr. J.H. Twombly” (Portsmouth Herald, June 18, 1931). (Place would become later a local Judge).

Pulmonary weakness kept him on a farm [from October, 1887,] until the fall of 1890, when he purchased an interest in the same store (sold in 1887) and continued until April, 1895, when he returned to Milton, N.H., and remained on a farm for health reasons until December of that year (Dartmouth College, 1913).

HERE AND THERE. … Dr. Twombly, the Grand Marshal, is well known to people in this vicinity, having married Miss Fannie Plumer of Milton, and spent much time hereabout. He is an accomplished gentlemen whom one cannot see too often, and is high in Masonic, as in social and professional circles (Farmington News, April 15, 1892).

MILTON. Dr. Twombly, a druggist at Newmarket, spent Sunday with his wife at Plumer’s ridge (Farmington News, August 3, 1894).

At that time [December 1895] he went to East Concord, N.H., to care for a brother-in-law [Joseph E. Plummer] who was ill with pulmonary tuberculosis and who died in 1899. The same year the death of another brother-in-law [Samuel W. Wallingford] brought him to Milton, where he has assisted his sister [sister-in-law] in managing her farm (Dartmouth College, 1913).

New Hampshire passed a medical licensing law, March 1, 1897, which required medical practitioners to be tested, licensed and registered as of September 1, 1897. (Charles William Gross, William Emerson Pillsbury, and Frank Sherman Weeks, of Milton Mills, and Malcolm A.H. Hart, Charles Dana Jones, and John Herbert Twombly, of Milton, were all rated “A”- they were already in practice prior to the passage of the law – i.e., they were “grandfathered in” and did not have to pass the new examination) (NH State Board of Education, 1906).

Mary B. [(Plummer)] Wallingford, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her brother-in-law, John H. Twombly, a physician (retired), aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and her sister (his wife of twenty years), Frances W. [(Plummer)] Twombly, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Mary B. Wallingford owned their farm, free-and-clear.

John H. Twombly, of Milton, published a medical case study, in January 1909, concerning the tuberculous enlargement of the cervical glands of his patient, who he identified as “F.W.T.,” i.e., the patient was his wife, Frances W. Twombly. He described the patient as being 5′ 6″ tall, and weighing 117 pounds. She had been married thirty years (Materia Medica, 1909).

Mary B. [(Plummer)] Wallingford, a farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her brother-in-law, John H. Twombly, a home farm helper, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), her sister (his wife of twenty years), Frances W. [(Plummer)] Twombly, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), and her sister-in-law, Susan [(Pecker)] Plummer, a widow, aged seventy years (b. NH). Mary B. Wallingford owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Dr. John H. Twombly appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as retired, with his house on Plummer’s Ridge, near the schoolhouse. (Mary B. Wallingford, widow of Samuel W., kept a summer boarding house on Plummer’s Ridge, near the schoolhouse).

His physical health is better now than for years. He has held no public positions, although several times offered. In fraternal societies, he is a Mason. He is now living an economical, quiet life, believing he still has a bright future, and still believes in Dartmouth and the class of ’68 (Dartmouth College, 1913). 

Mary B. [(Plummer)] Wallingford, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her brother-in-law, John H. Twombly, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), her sister, Frances W. [(Plummer)] Twombly, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and her sister-in-law, Susan E. [(Pecker)] Plummer, a widow, aged eighty years (b. NH). Mary B. Wallingford owned their farm on the Plummer’s Ridge Road, free-and-clear.

Susan E. (Pecker) Plummer died on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, February 29, 1920, aged eight years, six months. She had lived there for twenty years, i.e., since the death of her husband, Joseph E. Plummer.

John H. Twombly, M.D., died in the Masonic Home, at 813 Beach Street, in Manchester, NH, March 2, 1927, aged seventy-eight years, four months, and thirteen days. (He had resided there for one year (The headline of the obituary that follows, although not its content, was in error regarding the place of his death)).

DR. JOHN H. TWOMBLY DIES AT DOVER, N.H. DOVER, N.H., March 3 –  Dr. John H. Twombly, who died at the Masonic Home in Manchester last evening, was a native of Dover, born Oct 17, 1848, the son of John and Charlotte (Drew) Twombly. He was a descendant of Ralph Twombly, who came from England and settled at Dover Neck about 1650. On the maternal side he was descendent from Lieut. John Drew of Dover, an officer of the Indian Wars. Dr. Twombly graduated from Dartmouth in 1868 and from the Harvard Medical School in 1872. He first practiced in Brooklyn and later was on the staff of the insane asylum at Kalamazoo, Mich., after which he followed his profession in New Market. He owned a drug store there. He was affiliated with New Market and Dover Masonic bodies, and was the oldest living eminent commander of St. Paul Commandery, K.T., of this city. The body will be brought here tomorrow and will later be interred in Pine Hill Cemetery with Knight Templar Rites (Boston Globe, March 4, 1927).

Mrs. Frances Twombly appeared in the Manchester, NH, directories of 1928, 1929, 1930, 1932, and 1933, as resident at 813 Beech street. (The Masonic Home appeared on Beech street, between Sagamore and Salmon streets. Her sister, Mary B. Wallingford, joined her there in or around 1932).

Frances Twombly, a widow, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), boarded in the Masonic Home in Manchester, NH, at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. She was one of twenty-five boarders there, fourteen of whom were males and eleven were females. (Their average age was 79.5 years). The home had a resident head, Mary M. Ormiston, superintendent, aged sixty years (b. Scotland), and five servants, including a cook, assistant cook, waitress, maid, and laundress.

Frances W. (Plummer) Twombly died of heart disease in the Masonic Home, at 813 Beach Street, in Manchester, NH, March 22, 1933, aged eighty-two years, one month, and thirteen days. (She had resided there for six years). (Mary B. (Plummer) Wallingford died also in the Masonic Home in Manchester, NH, September 22, 1939).

References:

Dartmouth College. (1913). Biographical Sketches of the Class of 1868, Dartmouth College: With Historical Notes of the College, 1864-1913. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=aBQTAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA107

Find a Grave. (2012, September 30). John Herbert Twombly. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98010468/john-herbert-twombly

Materia Medica. (1909). Clinical Excerpts. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=DtdXAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA88

Michigan Asylum for the Insane. (1877). Report of the Trustees. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=S3DhAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA97

Michigan State Legislature. (1879). Joint Documents of the State of Michigan. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=owEoAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA123

Milton’s Dr. Herbert F. Pitcher (1853-1924)

By Muriel Bristol | January 24, 2021

Herbert Frank Pitcher was born in Stoddard, NH, September 10, 1853, son of Frederick and Clarissa “Clara” (Towne) Pitcher.

Dr. Pitcher was born in Stoddard, N.H., September 10, 1853, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Pitcher. He was educated in the public schools of Marlow and at Marlow Academy, from which he graduated (American Journal, 1924).

Herbert F. Pitcher of Marlow, NH, was a student at the Marlow Academy in its 1872-73 academic year.

After leaving the Academy, he entered the University of Vermont at Burlington, from which institution he graduated with the degree M.D. in 1879 (American Journal, 1924).

Herbert Frank Pitcher received a medical degree from the University of Vermont, with its Class of 1879 (University of Vermont, 1901). Its commencement took place at the Howard Opera House in Burlington, VT, June 26, 1879 (Burlington Free Press, June 27, 1879).

Henry F. Pitcher would appear to have “hung out his shingle” in Milton shortly after graduation and to have been active there for several years (as late as 1883 or 1884). H.F. Pitcher appeared in the Milton business directories of 1880, 1881, and 1882, as a Milton physician.

Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his son, Ira W. Duntley, a blacksmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Sarah A. Duntley, keeping house, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), his grandchildren, Addie C. Duntley, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), Nettie M. Duntley, at home, aged ten years (b. NH), and the “boarder at Mr. Duntley’s,” Herbert F. Pitcher, a physician, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH).

Herbert F. Pitcher married in Stoddard, NH, November 25, 1880, Nettie M. Sheldon, he of Milton, and she of Stoddard. He was a physician, aged twenty-seven years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-one years. She was born in Londonderry, VT, in October 1858, daughter of David P. and Mary Sheldon.

Dr. Pitcher married on November 25, 1880, Miss Nettie M. Sheldon, daughter of David P. and Mary Sheldon, and a native of Londonderry, Vt., who survived him (American Journal, 1924).

LOCALS. Dr. Pitcher of Milton has moved into the Chas. Dame tenement, lately vacated by Walter Carleton (Farmington News, April 6, 1883).

Westport. Dr. Herbert F. Pitcher of Milton, N.H., paid a short visit to his friends in this vicinity. Mr. Pitcher was formerly employed in Westport, after which be studied medicine with Dr. Smith of Russell’s Mills, and subsequently settled in New Hampshire, where he is having good success (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), April 11, 1883).

LOCALS. Stephen Nutter has sold that stylish-looking gray horse of his to Dr. Pitcher of Haverhill, Mass., late of Milton, N.H. (Farmington News, December 21, 1883).

The Massachusetts Medical Society admitted Herbert F. Pitcher of Haverhill, MA, to its ranks, in 1885 (MA Medical Society, 1899). Herbert F. Pitcher appeared in the Haverhill, MA, directory of 1885, as a physician, with his house on Beacon street, corner of Central street.

Dr. and Mrs. Pitcher of Haverhill, MA, took a transcontinental railroad trip on the Raymond & Whitcomb “vestibule train” in 1888. This was said to be a sort of innovative Pullman train whose cars were connected, at both their roofs and floors, such that a child could proceed between cars from one end of the train to the other without danger. A correspondent of the Farmington News described the trip, the train, and his encounter with Dr. Pitcher, by then of Haverhill, MA:

… Starting as we did without a single intimate acquaintance on board, the atmosphere looked at first a trifle blue, but hardly had the wheels begun to revolve before, down upon us came Dr. Pitcher and Mr. Chick of Haverhill, Mass., with an urgent invitation to come up unto them and their party. Dr. Pitcher is well known to many of our readers as he was for some time located in Milton, but latterly has been in Haverhill where, so extensive has been his practice, he became completely worn out and, accompanied by his amiable wife, was on a trip to the land of eternal sunshine (Farmington News, January 20, 1888).

Dr. Pitcher was registered (No. 3118) as a physician in California, in June 1891.

He was a charter member of the Haverhill Medical Club, a charter member of the Essex North Medical Society, New Hampshire Medical Society, and California Medical Society. He was prominent in Masonic circles and was a member of Saggahew Lodge, Pentucket Chapter, and Royal Arch Masons (American Journal, 1924). 

Herbert F. Pitcher, a physician, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nineteen years), Nettie M. Pitcher, aged forty-one years (b. VT), his son, Karl H. Pitcher, at school, aged fourteen years (b. MA), and his servant, Belle McLeod, a servant, aged thirty-five years (b. Prince Edward Island). Herbert F. Pitcher owned their house at 97 Arlington Street. Nettie M. Pitcher was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

He took a post-graduate course in 1902 in the New York School of Therapeutics (American Journal, 1924)).

Herbert Frank Pitcher appeared in a Massachusetts list of registered physicians, as of December 31, 1902. He was classified as an “A,”, i.e., “graduates of legally chartered medical colleges or universities having power to confer degrees in medicine, who applied for registration before the law went into full effect on Jan. 1, 1895, graduation and residence in the Commonwealth at the time of the passage of the law being the only requirements for registration” (MA Board of Registration, 1904).

Dr. Pitcher became an active student investigator in the field of Electrotherapeutics in the early part of the present century and co-worker on the Editorial Staff of the JOURNAL in 1908. His contributions and comments on current medical literature, to which he was constant and self-sacrificing contributor, enlightened the sphere of investigation by his earnest endeavors to set the profession right in a field which called for constant effort against the doubts and skepticism of professional conservatism. As a member of the editorial staff, he was a ready and constant contributor whose comments have done much to clarify developments of the science to which he devoted his best years of labor. In the issue of the JOURNAL, September 1906, was published his contribution on Phototherapy in General Practice, in which he made public his discovery of the efficiency of reflected incandescent light in the treatment of otitis media and mastoiditis – a discovery, which despite its frequent mention, has been ignored by the otologists. When it is finally recognized, there will be rare occasion for intervention, and the service his discovery rendered should perpetuate his name and service to the profession (American Journal, 1924).

Pitcher, H.F - Per L. Williams
Dr. Herbert F. Pitcher (per L. Williams)

Herbert F. Pitcher, a general practice physician, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-nine years), Nettie M. Pitcher, aged fifty-one years (b. VT), his son, Karl H. Pitcher, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), and his servant, Catherine Jordan, private family housework, aged forty-three years (b. Canada (Eng.)). Herbert F. Pitcher owned their house at 97 Arlington Street, free-and-clear. Nettie M. Pitcher was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

COLLEGE GIRL ELOPES WITH MEDICAL STUDENT. Haverhill, Mass., Jan. 5 – Karl H. Pitcher, a medical student at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, and Marjorie W. Fox, a Simmons College girl, eloped yesterday to Nashua, NH., where they were married. They were accompanied by Miss Pauline Winkler of Springfield, a classmate of the bride, and Paul Albert of Chicago, assistant treasurer of Dartmouth University, classmate of the groom. Young Pitcher is the son of Dr. Herbert F. Pitcher, a wealthy physician, while his bride is the only daughter of the millionaire shoe manufacturer, Charles K. Fox (Post Standard (Syracuse, NY), January 6, 1911).

Karl H. Pitcher dropped his medical studies and went to work for his shoe manufacturer father-in-law. He enlisted in the U.S. Army, April 9, 1917, after war was declared. He took ill – likely the Spanish Flu – and died at Mesvres, France, September 29, 1918.

New England Boys on Casualty List. DIED OF DISEASE. Sgt. Karl H. Pitcher, 125 Arlington st., HAVERHILL, A Batt., 102d F.A. (Boston Post, October 27, 1918).

Herbert F. Pitcher, a general practice physician, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nettie M. Pitcher, aged sixty-one years (b. VT). Herbert F. Pitcher owned their house at 97 Arlington Street, free-and-clear.

Herbert F. Pitcher died in Haverhill, MA, October 28, 1924. (American Journal, 1924).

His impaired physical strength in recent years has been unequal to the strain of professional demands upon his heart and vitality. They set a task which could not be performed without the recuperation which his very zeal denied it. But the beauty of his life, its completeness, its rounded richness and character of the man are things known by all in contact with him. In his life he received many honors. In his death he will be remembered as a citizen of high character and great ability his people well (American Journal, 1924).

Nettie M. (Sheldon) Pitcher died in Haverhill, MA, in 1942.

References:

American Journal of Electrotherapeutics and Radiology. (1924). American Journal of Electrotherapeutics and Radiology. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=5CmgAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA433

Find a Grave. (2015, October 21). Dr. Frank Herbert Pitcher. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154043719/herbert-frank-pitcher

MA Board of Registration. (1904). Annual Report of the Board of Registration in Medicine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vwM1AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA58

MA Medical Society. (1899). A Catalog of Its Officers and Fellows, Honorary, Active and Retired, Borne Upon the Rolls. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=v0WOYs2U2r8C&pg=PA61

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