Milton Blacksmith Isaac Worster (1772-1838)

By Muriel Bristol | June 26, 2022

Isaac Worster was born in Berwick, ME, April 11, 1772, son of Lemuel and Mary (Woodsum) Worster.

(His known siblings were George Worster (1775-1828), Dorcas Worster (1779-1831), Mary “Polly” Worster, Betsy Worster (1785-1839), John Worster (1787-1862), Lemuel Worster, Jr. (1789-1876), Sally Worster (1793-1863), and Lydia Worster (1795-1863)).

Their original surname of Worcester, as in Worcester, England, was also written as Worster and even Wooster. The Boston, MA, directory of 1873 suggested that for “Worster see Worcester and Wooster.”

Lemuel Worster headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 16-plus years [himself and George Worster], four females [Mary (Woodsum) Worster, Dorcas Worster, Mary “Polly” Worster, and Betsy Worster], and two males aged under-16 years [John Worster and Lemuel Worster, Jr.]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Israel Hodgdon and Lydia Worster.

Isaac Worster married in Berwick, ME, July 19, 1797, Tamsen Frost. She was born circa November 1773.

Elijah Horn was doubtless the first blacksmith [in Milton], but was soon followed by Isaac Worster at the Ponds, and later by Solomon Land and Joseph Rines at Milton Mills (Scales, 1914).

A blacksmith might be described as someone that fabricates tools and other articles from iron, as opposed to a whitesmith, who does so with tin, a goldsmith who does so with gold, and a silversmith, who does so with silver. (Paul Revere was a silversmith). One might go to a blacksmith for horseshoes, fabrication and repair of tools, hardware, such as nails, hinges, hooks, etc., and all those things that are now generally termed “wrought iron,” i.e., things that are “wrought” or created by a smith as opposed to things that are made by pouring or casting molten iron.

An English legal definition explained the smithing process as making things in a “hammery way.” At the simplest level, it would be the blacksmith that does the hammering and shaping, with his hammer and anvil, but this contemporary advertisement suggests more advanced possibilities: using waterpower to drive a triphammer mechanism, as well as driving the blacksmith’s bellows and grindstones, rather than more labor-intensive hand hammering, and foot-treadle grindstone.

ATTENTION BLACKSMITHS! THE subscriber now offers for sale, or to be let, that large and convenient BLACKSMITH-SHOP & FORGE, together with the privilege of water sufficient to carry the Bellows, Triphammers and Grindstones, as the whole has been heretofore improved by Mr. Amasa Bancroft, situated in the Northeastern part of this town, and is one of the most eligible stands for a Blacksmith in the State. SAMUEL RICH. Montpelier, Dec. 13, 1806 (Vermont Precursor (Montpelier, VT), January 5, 1807).

(In the 1830s and beyond, access to waterpower would be the issue driving son James Worster’s fierce opposition to growing monopoly control of water resources).

Daughter Dorcas Worster was born in Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, August 22, 1797. (She was a namesake for her paternal aunt, Dorcas Worster).

Sister Dorcas Worster married in South Berwick, ME, May 24, 1798, Phillip Yeaton, Jr. Rev. John Thompson performed the ceremony. Yeaton was born on Somersworth, NH, June 18, 1772, son of Richard and Experience (Pray) Yeaton.

Sister [Mary] “Polly” Worster married in Rochester, NH, November 25, 1798, John Scates, both of Rochester, NH. He was born in Lebanon, ME, 1774, son of Benjamin and Lydia (Jenness) Scates.

Daughter Mary Worster was born in Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, December 24, 1798. (She was a namesake for her paternal grandmother, Mary (Woodsum) Worster, and her paternal aunt, Mary “Polly” Worster).

Lemuil Worster headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], two females aged 45-plus years [Mary (Woodsum) Worster and another], one male aged 26-44 years, two females aged 26-44 years, one female aged 16-25 years [Betsy Worster], one male aged 10-15 years [Lemuel Worster, Jr.], two females aged under-10 years [Sally Worster and Lydia Worster].

Isaac Worster headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 16-25 years [Tamson (Frost) Worster], two males aged 10-15 years, and two females aged under-10 years [Dorcas Worster and Mary Worster]. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Son Isaac Worster [Jr.] was born in Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, August 8, 1801.

For whatever reason, Isaac Worster did not sign the Rochester division petition of May 28, 1802.

Mother Mary (Woodsum) Worster died, probably in Berwick, ME, sometime before November 28, 1803.

Son James Worster was born in Milton, January 8, 1804.

Father Lemuel Worster married (2nd) in Berwick, ME, July 4, 1805, Lydia (Gowell) Wentworth. She was born in Berwick, ME, in 1747, daughter of John and Mary (Adams) Gowell. (She was the widow of Samuel Wentworth, Jr. (1742-1798)).

Lemuel [Worster] married second at Berwick on 4 July 1805 Lydia (Gowell) Wentworth, widow of Samuel Wentworth (Wentworth, The Wentworth Genealogy, 24; will of Lemuel Worster, Strafford County wills, 29:136) (Anderson, 1990).

Son Mark Worster was born in Milton, June 20, 1806.

Daughter Sophia Worster (I) was born in Milton, September 22, 1808.

The Milton selectmen of 1809-10 were William Palmer, John Remick, Jr., and Isaac Worster.

Isaac Worcester headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Tamson (Frost) Worcester], one male aged 16-26 years, two females aged 10-15 years [Dorcas Worcester and Mary Worcester], three males aged under-10 years [Isaac Worcester, James Worcester, and Mark Worcester], and one female aged under-10 years [Sophia Worster (I)]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joshua Jones and Jonathan Pinkham.

Son George Worster was born in Milton, March 3, 1811.

On 3 April 1812, Lemuel Worster conveyed to Isaac Worster, of Milton, N.H., the homestead in Berwick “which I purchased of my late father John Worster” (id., 93:279). On 26 February 1820, Isaac Worster of Milton recovered judgment against Lemuel Worster of Milton and claimed 12 acres of the Worster lands in Berwick (id., 105:24) (Wentworth, The Wentworth Genealogy, 24; will of Lemuel Worster, Strafford County wills, 29:136) (Anderson, 1990).

Sister Betsy Worster married in Milton, December 1, 1811, Isaac Scates, both of Milton. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony. He was born in Lebanon, ME, July 17, 1785, son of Benjamin and Lydia (Jenness) Scates.

The Milton selectmen of 1814 were Isaac Worster, T.C. Lyman, and [brother-in-law] Isaac Scates.

Son Lewis Worster was born in Milton, April 4, 1815.

Sister Sally Worster married (1st) in Rochester, NH, November 12, 1815, Samuel E. Wallingford. He was born in Rochester, NH, in 1790, son of David and Sarah (Corson) Wallingford.

Daughter Sophia Worcester (I) died in Milton, December 15, 1815, aged seven years, two months. Son Lewis Worster died in Milton, December 18, 1815, aged eight months. (His nephew, Lewis W. Nute (1820-1888), would be named after him). One might suspect they died during an outbreak of some childhood disease, such as whooping cough, measles, etc.

Daughter Dorcas Worster married, September 19, 1816, Ezekiel Nute. He was born in Milton, August 22, 1794, son of Jotham and Sarah (Twombly) Nute.

Daughter Sophia Worster (II) was born in Milton, July 29, 1817.

Father Lemuel Worster of Milton, yeoman, made his last will, August 14, 1820. He devised to his wife, Lydia Worster, one cow and one hog, “now in my possession,” all the furniture formerly belonging to her, all the bedding made in the house during her residence with him, provided she relinquish her dower rights, and $25. He devised $1 to his son, Isaac Worster; one bed and bedding to his daughter, Lydia Worster; and all the rest and residue to be equally divided among his children, excepting the aforementioned son, Isaac Worster. He named [sons-in-law] John Scates and Isaac Scates as his executors. Gilman Jewett, Thos Leighton, and John Fall signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 29:136).

Father Lemuel Worster died in Milton, August 14, 1820. His will was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held in Rochester, NH, November 29, 1920 (Strafford County Probate, 29:136).

Worster, Isaac - November 1820Isaac Worster signed the Milton anti-division remonstrance of June 1820. Isaac Worster and his son, Isaac Worster, Jr, signed the Milton militia division petition of November 1820.

Daughter Adeline E. “Elizabeth” Worster was born in Milton, February 18, 1822.

The NH legislature authorized incorporation of the Milton Social Library by nine Milton men, including Isaac Worster, June 14, 1822.

Daughter Mary Worster married, probably in Milton, in 1823, Mordecai Varney, she of Milton, and he of Farmington, NH. Rev. James Walker performed the ceremony. Varney was born in Dover, NH, September 24, 1796.

Isaac Worster was one of twenty-three Milton inhabitants who petitioned to have Gilman Jewett appointed as a Milton coroner, June 12, 1823. (See Milton Seeks a Coroner – June 1823).

Brother-in-law Samuel E. Wallingford died in Milton, August 11, 1826, leaving a widow, Sally (Worster) Wallingford, and four children.

Son Isaac Worster, Jr., married in the Second (Congregational) Church in Berwick, ME, January 11, 1827, Julia Hilliard, he of Somersworth, NH, and she of Berwick, ME. Rev. Joseph Hilliard performed the ceremony. She was born in Berwick, ME, April 14, 1800, daughter of Rev. Joseph and Sarah (Langton) Hilliard.

Son Mark Worcester married in Somersworth, NH, November 29, 1827, Rachel Donnell. Rev. Aaron D. Gage performed the ceremony. She was born in Brunswick, ME, circa 1809, daughter of Joshua and Hannah Donnell.

Son James Worster married in Berwick, ME, March 1, 1828, Sarah Fernald. She was born in Lebanon, ME, May 21, 1803, daughter of James and Sally F. Fernald.

Ezekl Nute headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female, aged 30-39 years [Dorcas (Worster) Nute], one male aged 15-19 years, one female aged 15-19 years, two males aged 10-14 years [Cyrus W. Nute and Lewis W. Nute], one male aged 5-9 years [Isaac F. Nute], and one male aged under-5 years [Samuel F. Nute]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of [his father] Jotham Nute and John Jenkins.

Isaac Worcester headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Tamson (Frost) Worcester], one male aged 15-19 years [George Worcester], one female aged 10-14 years [Sophia Worcester (II)], and one female aged 5-9 years [Adeline E. Worcester]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John H. Varney and Thomas Cosan [Courson].

Jas Worcester headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Sarah (Fernald) Worcester], and one female aged 5-9 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Isaac Worcester, Jr, and Richd Gerrish.

Sister Mrs. Sally (Worster) Wallingford married (2nd) in Milton, November 24, 1831, Col. Levi Jones, both of Milton. (She was the widow of Samuel E. Wallingford (1790-1826)). Rev. Isaac Willey performed the ceremony (NEHGS, 1908)

Son George Worster married in Somersworth, NH, August 2, 1835, Mary Jane Rowell, both of Somersworth, NH. Rev. Arthur Caverno performed the ceremony. She was born in Pembroke, NH, June 18, 1814, daughter of Charles and Mary “Polly” (Davis) Rowell.

Son James Worster broke down parts of a Great Falls Manufacturing Company dam situated at Milton in April 1837. This occasioned a lengthy lawsuit that continued through various appeals up to July 1844 (NH Superior Court, 1851). Over time, he would become involved, even so much as to be thought a ringleader, in a movement that opposed mill dams obstructing river traffic and flooding abutting lands, as well as opposing water resources being controlled by out-of-state interests.

Isaac Worcester of Milton, blacksmith, made his last will, March 8, 1838. He devised $1 each to his sons, Isaac Worcester, James Worcester, Mark Worcester, and George Worcester, and $1 each to his daughters, Dorcas Nute and Mary Varney. He devised all the rest and residue of his estate to his son, Isaac Worcester, in his capacity as executor, with the proviso that his wife, Tamson Worcester, and daughters, Sophia Worcester and Elizabeth Worcester, retain the use of the real estate until it might be sold. Once sold he should invest the money and pay its interest to Tamson Worcester, for so long as she lived or until she remarried. In either case, he should pay over one-fourth of the interest to each of the two daughters for so long as they should live or until they married (at which point they should receive a one-time payment of $60). The other half of the principal, and the remaining half (one-fourth and one-fourth) when that should become available, should be equally divided among all the children. James Roberts, John H. Varney, and Amos Gerrish witnessed his signature (Strafford County Probate, 53:154).

Isaac Worster died in Milton, March 11, 1838, aged sixty-five years, eleven months. His last will was proved before Judge Daniel C. Atkinson in a Strafford County Probate court held in Rochester, NH, May 19, 1838 (Strafford County Probate, 53:154).

During the pastorate of the Rev. Mr. Willey, – in 1841 – a parish house, which, with subsequent renovations, is the present parsonage was erected on a lot purchased of Isaac Worster. In 1860 the remainder of the Worster lot was purchased, and soon after the present meetinghouse was built. It was dedicated Jan. 9, 1862. In 1886 repairs, the expense of which was $1,000, were made on the meetinghouse and parsonage. In 1895, the interior was remodelled, and renovations, made the whole expense amounting to $1,200. Mr. Lewis Worster Nute whose mother was born where the present church now stands, bequeathed $10,000 to the church making the present funds about $11,000 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). 

Ezekiel Nute headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Dorcas (Worster) Nute], one male aged 15-19 years [Isaac F. Nute], and one male aged 10-14 years [Samuel F. Nute]. Three members of his household were engaged in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of David Nute and John Jenkins.

James Worcester headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Sarah (Fernald) Worcester], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 10-14 years, one male aged 5-9 years, and one female aged under-5 years. Two members of his household was engaged in Manufacture and the Trades. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Francis Looney and George Worster.

Mark Wooster headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Rachel (Donnell) Wooster], one male aged 10-14 years [Lewis Wooster], one female aged 5-9 years [Hannah Wooster], and one male aged under-5 years [Charles H. Wooster]. One member of his household was engaged in Manufacture and the Trades.

George Worster headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Mary J. (Rowell) Worster], one male aged 10-14 years, and two females aged under-5 years [Amanda T. Worster and Mary E. Worster]. One member of his household was engaged in Manufacture and the Trades. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of James Worcester and John H. Varney.

Son Isaac Worster, Jr., became a committed abolitionist from at least 1844, when he offered to contribute towards a new printing press for an abolitionist newspaper. (See Milton and Abolitionism).

[He] .… was a prominent man in Strafford county, N.H., for many years, where he was closely connected with the Abolition party, was firm and outspoken in his views against slavery, and was the personal friend and counselor of many of the noted leaders of the anti-slavery movement at a time when it required strong moral stamina and some personal risk to defend his convictions (Reno, 1901).

Son James Worster broke down part of a Great Falls Manufacturing Company dam situated on the Salmon Falls River between Somersworth, NH, and Berwick, ME, in December 1847.

James Worster had experience breaking down dams. In December 1847, while still living in Dover, New Hampshire, he tore off an abutment, chopped down planking, and removed stone from a dam across the Salmon Falls River in Somersworth, New Hampshire. The dam and factories belonged to the Great Falls Manufacturing Company, a Boston Associates’ venture since the 1830s. Claiming damage to land he leased, Worster sought to abate the nuisance himself – an action that was legal at the time. The Great Falls Company appealed to the New Hampshire Superior Court of Judicature to issue an injunction barring Worster from doing any further damage. In July 1853, the court granted the request (Steinberg, 2014).

James Worster appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1848, as a blacksmith, with his house on Cedat street.

Daughter Sophia Worster (II) married in Milton, April 12, 1848, Daniel W. Dame, both of Rochester, NH. (She was his second wife). Rev. Edward F. Abbott performed the ceremony. Dame was born in Sandwich, NH, February 8, 1820, son of Richard and Abigail (Page) Dame.

Son Mark Worster died February 3, 1849, aged forty-two years.

Adeline E. Worster sued the Winnipiseogee Lake Cotton and Woolen Manufacturing Company for flooding their land in Tuftonborough, NH, in 1849. (This source misidentified her relationship with James Worster as being that of father and daughter, rather than brother and sister).

In 1849, his daughter [sister], Adeline E. Worster, took the company to court for flooding her land in Tuftonborough, on the northeast side of Lake Winnipesaukee. She owned the land jointly with her father [brother] and claimed the Lake Company’s dam at Lake Village had raised the water in the lake and damaged the property. The Lake Company demurred, a move that led to the dismissal of the case in 1852 (Steinberg, 2014).

Ezekiel Nute, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Dorcas Nute, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), Samuel F. Nute, a farmer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and Warren W. Bodge, a farmer, aged twenty years (b. NH). Ezekiel Nute had real estate valued at $4,500. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John C. Wentworth, a laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and Ira Varney, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH).

Isaac Worster, a hoe & foils manufacturer, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Julia [(Hilliard)] Worster, aged fifty years (b. ME), Sarah E. Worster, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Joseph H. Worster, aged twenty years (b. NH), Kenny K.W. Worster, aged nine years (b. NH), Isaac Howard, aged two years (b. NH), Charles Worster, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Tamson Worster, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), and Ezra Varney, aged sixty years (b. NH). Isaac Worster had real estate valued at $6,500. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Francis Looney, a manufacturer, aged forty-eight years (b. England), and George Carlysle, a trader, aged twenty-eight years (b. MA).

James Worster, a blacksmith, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sarah [(Fernald)] Worster, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Susan M. Worster, aged twenty years (b. NH), George O. Worster, a store clerk, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Sarah J. Worster, aged twelve years (b. MA).

Widowed daughter-in-law Rachel [(Donnell)] Worster, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Hannah D. Worster, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Charles Worster, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Arzelia W. Worster, aged eight years (b. NH), and Mark P. Worster, aged four years (b. NH). Her house appeared in the enumeration next above that of Samuel Pray, physician, aged eighty years (b. NH). (He being the Dr. Pray who had attended upon a wounded Norton Scates in 1807 (See Milton Militiaman’s Petition – 1807)).

George Worster, a machinist, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. [(Rowell)] Worster, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Tamson A. Worster, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Mary E. Worster, aged ten years (b. NH), Isaac Worster, aged eight years (b. NH), George A. Worster, aged three years (b. NH), and William Blake, a laborer, aged thirty-five years (b. Ireland). George Worster had real estate valued at $3,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joseph Mathes, a carpenter, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and James Twombly, a farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH).

Richard Dame, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Daniel W. Dame, a farmer, aged thirty years (b. NH), Sophia [(Worster)] Dame, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Julia Dame, aged four years (b. NH), Hannah Dame, aged eighty-six years (b. NH), and Moses S. Dame, aged eleven years (b. NH). Richard Dame had real estate valued at $3,000.

Son Isaac Worster [Jr.] of Milton donated $2 to the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, in or around May 1851. Son George Worster of Milton donated $1, and Stephen Shorey of Milton donated 50¢ (Liberator (Boston, MA), June 13, 1851).

Daughter Adeline E. Worcester married in Millbury, MA, June 21, 1852, Elijah Hanson, she of Milton, NH, and he of Millbury, MA. He was a machinist, aged twenty-seven years, and she was aged thirty years. Rev. J.E. Farewell of Rochester, NH, performed the ceremony. Hanson was born in Ossipee, NH, circa 1824, son of Aaron and Sarah Hanson.

James Worster continued his legal struggle over water privileges with the Lake Company.

Meanwhile, in the period from 1849 to 1853, James Worster made several land transactions: He leased a parcel of meadowland in Sanbornton, a farm bordering Paugus Bay in Gilford, and had a mortgage for a third share of Rattlesnake Island in Lake Winnipesaukee. It is hard to say precisely why he chose these particular tracts of land. Yet one thing is certain: The land seemed destined to bring him into conflict with the Lake Company. On 14 April 1853, Worster threatened to destroy the company’s dam at Lake Village, claiming it injured land he owned and leased in neighboring towns. To protect its property, the Lake Company sought an injunction from the superior court in 1854 (Steinberg, 2014).

Tamson (Frost) Worster died in Milton, May 18, 1855, aged eighty-one years, six months.

J. Worster of Dover, NH, donated $1 to the American Anti-Slavery Society, in July 1855 (Liberator, July 27, 1855).

Son James Worster appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1856, as residing at 5 Green street.

Barred from tampering with the dams at Lake Village and Somersworth, [James] Worster moved to Concord, New Hampshire. For the moment, he kept out of the way of the Lake Company, but he had in no way given up his fight. Between 1856 and 1858, Worster obtained property in Hooksett, New Hampshire – land bordering the Merrimack River. The land, which was probably prone to flooding, lay upstream from the Amoskeag Company’s dam in Manchester. Once again, Worster seemed to be inviting conflict with a Boston Associates’ venture (Steinberg, 2014).

Daniel W. and Sophia (Worster) Dame moved to Illinois, circa 1857. Elijah and Adeline E. (Worster) Dame moved there also, in 1858.

At the age of five years he [Charles S. Dame] came to Illinois with his parents [Daniel W. and Sophia (Worster) Dame], Dixon being the end of their railway journey. They were met by a relative, Mr. Bede, and conveyed by wagon to the Bede home, where they spent the summer while Mr. Dame built the house on the tract of prairie land which he had purchased part from the state and part from the Illinois Central railway. This farm has been known as the old Dame homestead, is now operated by the Joe Pheil family and is in a high state of cultivation. Here Charles Dame spent his boyhood. Their nearest town was Polo and the post office was at the Belding farm on the Telegraph road. In his young manhood he engaged in the live stock business and followed It most of his life (Freeport Journal-Standard (Freeport, IL), July 27, 1929).

At half past six on the morning of 7 March 1859, [James] Worster and another person appeared at the Amoskeag Company’s dam. The watchman on duty spotted them and ordered them to leave. They refused to go and, after having words, the watchman pitched a piece of ice at them. A fight broke out and Worster was knocked down three times before he left the dam, sending for a doctor to dress his injured nose (Steinberg, 2014).

Son-in-law Ezekiel Nute died in Milton, April 14, 1859, aged sixty-four years.

CONSPIRACY TO TEAR DOWN THE DAM OF A MANUFACTURING COMPANY. In the Police Court at Manchester, N.H., on Friday, Joseph Mitchell, Oscar N. Goodale, Edwin K. Goodale, Joseph Mitchell, Jr., James Worster, Jr., John Harvey and John Lury, all of Hooksett, were arraigned on a complaint of conspiracy to tear down the dam across the Merrimac River at Amoskeag Falls, with intent to extort money from the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Several ineffectual attempts were made to have the complaint quashed (Boston Evening Transcript, August 1, 1859).

Water privileges were of the utmost importance to mill owners, but it was not the businessmen of Laconia who held fast to their lingering anger with Lake Company’s control of local waterways. A good number of local residents and farmers possessed a growing amount of resentment towards the company. Their discontent was continually fueled by an activist named James Worster, who reportedly owned riverside properties on the Winnipesaukee River and Merrimack. He had already carried out attacks on several dams in the state after his properties had been flooded; however he continued to focus most of his attention on the Lake Village Dam. On September 28, 1859, he had little trouble rounding up a sizeable group of furious locals, who then proceeded to the dam with the goal of destroying it. The malicious attack became forever known in local annals as the Lake Village Riot. The fruitless assault on the dam paled in comparison to the fight that broke out between the attackers and the officials of the Lake Company. Worster was arrested, charged with attempted murder, and, after a lengthy legal battle, spent time in jail. The Lake Company was the clear winner and never relinquished any of its water rights until water power was no longer necessary to power factories and mills (Anderson, 2014).

Before his role in the attack had been settled, [James] Worster was jailed on another offense. Sometime before the autumn of 1859, Worster physically resisted the Merrimack County sheriff in a dispute over a stolen horse. In 1860, Worster pleaded guilty to the charge and was sentenced to thirty days in jail the following year. When he heard the news, French wrote: “He ought to be in jail or in an Insane Asylum. Perhaps the latter place would be the most humane and proper.” Worster was eventually released but returned to jail two years later after being convicted of contempt for his part in the 1859 attack on the dam. The sentence included three months of incarceration and a five hundred dollar fine. The Lake Company had finally succeeded. James Worster was to cause the company no further trouble (Steinberg, 2014).

Son James Worster appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1860, as residing at 7 Tahanto street. His son, George O. Worster, appeared also, as boarding at J. Worster’s.

Paul Reynolds, aged sixty-one years, headed a Milton (“West Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Salley Reynolds, aged sixty-two years, Ida Herrick, aged five years, Ada Herrick, aged two years, and Dorcas [(Worster)] Nute, aged sixty-two years. Paul Reynolds had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $300. His household was enumerated between those of Ira Varney, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and William Chamberlain, a farmer, aged thirty years (b. NH).

Mordica Varney, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary W. [(Worster)] Varney, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), Sarah E. Varney, a tailoress, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), Beard P. Varney, a farmer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Hannah Varney, aged twenty years (b. NH), Tamson E. Varney, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Peter L. Cook, a shoemaker, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Mordica Varney had real estate valued at $6,000 and personal estate valued at $700.

Charles Jones, a farmer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Betsey [(Varney)] Jones, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Fred P. Jones, aged eight months (b. NH), Salley [((Worster) Wallingford)] Jones, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), Lydia Worster, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), Abba Corliss, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and F.E. [Frank E.] Wallingford, aged eight years (b. NH). Charles Jones had real estate valued at $16,000 and personal estate valued at $6,000. Salley Jones had personal estate valued at $1,000. His household was enumerated between those of E.W. Plummer, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and William Sanborn, aged fifty-six years (b. NH). (Baby Fred P. Jones (1860-1941) would become the father of Robert E. Jones (1887-1954). Lydia Worster (1795-1863) was a sister of Salley ((Worster) Wallingford) Jones. Frank E. Wallingford (c1852-1914) was an orphaned son of Ira and Delania D. (Thompson) Wallingford, his father having died in 1853 and his mother having died only several months before).

James Worcester, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah W. Worcester, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), George O. Worcester, a map peddler, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Sarah J. Worcester, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). James Worcester had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $200.

Rachael R. [(Donnell)] Worster, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included Orange B. Otis, a currier, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Hannah [(Worster)] Otis, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Arzelia Worster, aged eighteen years (b. NH).

George Worster, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed an Allenstown, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. [(Rowell)] Worster, aged forty-six years (b. NH), Isaac Worster, aged nineteen years (b. NH), George A. Worster, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Ida M. Worster, aged seven years, and Charles Rowell, aged seventy-five years. George Worcester had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $200.

D.W. Dame, a farmer, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Rock Creek, IL, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sophia W. [(Worster)] Dame, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Julia A. Dame, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Chas. S. Dame, aged eight years (b. NH), Richard Dame, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), William Horrigan, a farm laborer, aged twenty-six years (b. England), and Frank Canada, aged twenty-two years (b. NY). D.W. Dame had real estate valued at $4,000 and personal estate valued at $2,500.

E. Hanson, a farmer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Wysox (“Elkhorn P.O.”), IL, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included [Adeline] Elizabeth Hanson, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), Ella Hanson, aged four years (b. VT), and Howard Wooster, aged twelve years (b. NH). E. Hanson had real estate valued at $1,600 and personal estate valued at $500.

Another attack was made on the Amoskeag dam at Manchester, N.H., on Tuesday afternoon. A party of four attempted to knock the flashboards off, when one of the party was arrested. The mobocrats stated that they were hired by parties at Hooksett (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), August 18, 1860).

Sister Sally ((Worster) Wallingford) Jones died in Milton, January 12, 1863, aged sixty-nine years, five months, and twenty-one days. Sister Lydia Worster died in Milton, June 6, 1863, aged sixty-seven years, seven months, and fifteen days.

Son James Worster appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1864, as residing on Spring street.

Son-in-law Mordecai Varney died in Farmington, NH, April 12, 1864, aged sixty-seven years.

Son Isaac Worster, Jr., died, probably in Rochester, NH, between 1860 and 1865. Daughter-in-law Julia [(Hilliard)] Worster filed an administratrix’s bond in York County Probate court, September 5, 1865, for the settlement of the York County portion of the estate of her husband, Isaac Worster, late of Rochester, NH. John Worster of Rochester, NH, and Joseph H. White and James Chadbourne, both of Alfred, ME, stood as her sureties (York County Probate, 19:145). She reported having sold two parcels of land in York County to Charles Jones of Milton, for $10 and $40, October 3, 1865. Julia Worster, and her sureties, Joseph F. Hilliard, and Ebenezer Worster, both of Berwick, ME, appeared; and Joseph D. Worcester and Mary D. Knight signed also as witnesses (York County Probate, 19:46).

James Worcester appeared in the Concord, NH, directories of 1867-68, and 1870, as a lumber dealer, with his house on Spring street, near Pleasant street.

Son-in-law Elijah Hanson of Amboy, IL, aged forty-two years, made his last will, April 27, 1867. He devised all his real and personal estate to his beloved wife, Adeline E. Hanson. William B. Andruss and Rufus H. Mellen, both of Amboy, IL, witnessed his signature (Lee County Probate, 7:1389).

Daughter Dorcas (Worster) Nute died in Milton, December 11, 1869, aged seventy-two years.

Joseph H. Worcester, a lawyer, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH (“Gonic P.O.”), household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included [his mother,] Julia [(Hilliard)] Worcester, aged seventy years (b. ME), and [his sister,] Sarah E. Worcester, aged forty-two years (b. NH).

James Worcester, a lumber dealer, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah J. Worcester, aged sixty-four years (b. ME), and Sarah J. Worcester, aged thirty years (b. NH).

Orange Otis, a shoe cutter, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Hannah [(Worcester)] Otis, keeps house, aged thirty years (b. NH), Lottie Otis, attends school, aged ten years (b. MA), Maud Otis, at home, aged ten months (b. MA), Rachel [(Donnell)] Worcester, no occupation, aged sixty years (b. ME), and Lill Worcester, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH).

George Worster, a farmer, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed an Allenstown, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. [(Rowell)] Worster, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), George A. Worster, a jeweler, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Phosia [(Fessenden)] Worster, keeping house, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), Mary Worster, aged three years (b. NH), and Benjamin F. Worster, aged eight months (b. NH, September). George Worster had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $300.

Elijah Hanson, a locomotive machinist, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed an Amboy, IL, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included [Adeline] Elizabeth [(Worster)] Hanson, keeping house, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), Mary Duffey, a domestic servant, aged eighteen years (b. PA), Henry Mcgraw, a R.R. engineer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NY), Jane Mcgraw, a milliner, aged twenty-nine years (b. Ireland), Bernard Truesdell, an attorney at law, aged thirty-seven years (b. NY), Sarah Truesdell, aged thirty-three years (b. NJ), Fanny Patridge, a music teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), and George Wells, a clergyman, aged thirty years (b. NY). Elijah Hanson had real estate valued at $12,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000. Henry Mcgraw had real estate valued at $500; Jane Mcgraw had personal estate valued at $2,000. Bernard Truesdell had real estate valued at $10,000 and personal estate valued at $10,000.

Danl. W. Dame, a farmer, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rock Creek (“Lanark P.O.”], IL, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sophia [(Worster)] Dame, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), Chas. S. Dame, works on farm, aged eighteen years (b. NH), John Kendall, a farm laborer, aged thirty-five years (b. MD), Edwd. Newcomer, a farm laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. NY), Lycinda Pratt, a domestic servant, aged seventeen years (b. IL), and Richard Dame, a farm laborer, aged seventy-six years (b. NH).

Son-in-law Elijah Hanson died in Amboy, IL, November 23, 1871, aged sbout forty-seven years. His last will was proved in Lee County Probate court, November 30, 1871 (Lee County Probate, 7:1390).

Son James Worcester appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1872, as a lumber dealer, with his house on Spring street, near Pleasant street. He appears to have died, probably in Concord, NH, at sometime between 1872 and 1875, when his wife was described as being a widow.

Daughter-in-law Julia [(Hilliard)] Worcester made her last will, June 2, 1873. She devised one of her newest large silver spoons to her son, Henry K. Worcester. She devised a silver teaspoon to her son, Isaac Howard Worcester. She devised all the rest and residue of her estate to her son, Joseph H. Worcester, who was to hold it in trust and pay out its interest for the comfortable support and maintenance of her daughter (his sister), Sarah E. Worcester, during her natural life. He was to have the principal of the trust upon her decease, and was named as executor. (She signed as Julia Worster). Paul A. Hurd, Charles S. Ela, and Guielma M. Varney signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 89:177).

Daughter-in-law Rachel R. (Donnell) Worster died of paralysis in Haverhill, MA, May 19, 1874, aged sixty-five years.

Daughter-in-law Sarah W. (Fernald) Worcester, a widow, died of pneumonia in Chelsea, MA, February 12, 1875, aged seventy-one years.

MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE. To Sarah W. Worster of Chelsea, in the County of Suffolk and to any and all parties interested in the premises hereinafter described: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: THAT By virtue of power of sale contained in a certain mortgage, given by said Sarah W. Worster to William C. Thompson of Lynn, in the County of Essex, dated November 26, 1874, and recorded with Suffolk Deeds, libro 1244, folio 239, and for condition of breach of the said mortgage, by the non-payment of the interest due on said mortgage will be sold at public auction upon the said premises, on FRIDAY, the seventh day of January, A.D., 1876, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, A certain tract or parcel of land, with the buildings thereon, situated in Revere, in the County of Suffolk, and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, bounded and described as follows, to wit: … being the same premises conveyed to said Sarah W. Worster by George O. Worster. WILLIAM C. THOMPSON, Mortgagee (Boston Globe, December 22, 1875).

Daughter Mrs. Mary (Worster) Varney died of “disease unknown” in Farmington, NH, March 26, 1877, aged seventy-seven years.

DIED. VARNEY – In Farmington, N.H., Third mo. [March] 26th 1877. Mary W. Varney, widow of the late Mordecai Varney, aged 77 years, 3 months; an esteemed member of Dover Monthly Meeting. She was of a meek and tender spirit, useful in life, patient and resigned to the divine will, and we believe that through the mercy of Christ her redeemer, she is at rest in glory. Friends’ Review please copy (Christian Worker, Fourth Month [April] 22, 1877).

Daughter-in-law Julia (Hilliard) Worster died, probably in Rochester, NH, between June 1873, when she had made her last will, and when it was proved at a Strafford County Probate court held in Farmington, NH, April 3, 1877 (Strafford County Probate, 89:179).

George Worcester, a farmer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), headed an Allenstown, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary J. [(Rowell)] Worcester, keeping house, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), his servant, Horace Brown, works on farm, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and his boarder, Martha A. Lake, a schoolteacher, aged twenty years (b. NH).

A.E. Hanson, keeping house, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed an Amboy, IL, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census.

D.W. Dame, a retired farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), and Sophia W. [(Worster)] Dame, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), were among the eight boarders residing in the Lanark, IL, household of Louisa Lawson, a boarding house keeper, aged thirty-six years (b. VA), at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census.

Daughter Sophia (Worster) Dame died in IL, June 5, 1886, aged sixty-eight years.

Son George Worster died of heart disease in Allenstown, NH, November 10, 1886, aged seventy-five years. Dr. G.H. Larabee signed the death certificate.

Son-in-law Daniel W. Dame died in Lanark, IL, December 10, 1895. Daughter-in-law Mary Jane (Rowell) Worster died December 6, 1898, aged eighty-four years.

Daughter Adeline E. (Worcester) Hanson died in Amboy, IL, May 1, 1897.

Mrs. Adeline E. Hanson, an aunt of Chas. S. Dame of this city, died at her home in Amboy, on Saturday, May 1st. Mr. and Mrs. Hanson came to this county in 1858 and for a few years resided in Wysox. One daughter was born to them who died in 1864, and the husband and father departed this life in 1871. The family is well remembered by many of our older citizens (Lanark Gazette (Lanark, IL), May 5, 1897).

Daughter-in-law Mary J. (Rowell) Worster died of old age in Allenstown, NH, December 6, 1898, aged eighty-four years, six months.


References:

Anderson, Carol L. (2014). A History of the Belknap Mill: The Pride of Laconia’s Industrial Heritage. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing

Anderson, Joseph C. (1990). Woodsum (Woodsome/Woodsom) Family in America: The Descendants of Joseph Woodsum of Berwick, Maine. Maine: Gateway Press

Find a Grave. (2005, July 6). Sophia C. Worcester Dame. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/11300702/sophia-c-dame

Find a Grave. (2017, November 23). Adeline E. Hanson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/185421387/adeline-e-hanson

Find a Grave. (2017, October 16). Sally Worcester Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184333250/sally-jones

Find a Grave. (2016, September 14). Dorcas Worster Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169916475/dorcas-nute

Find a Grave. (2013, September 11). Mary W. Varney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/116931532/mary-w-varney

Find a Grave. (2013, August 11). John Worcester. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115275060/john-worcester

Find a Grave. (2022, February 3). Lydia Worcester. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236461190/lydia-worcester

Find a Grave. (2009, June 7). George Worster. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/38051181/george-worster

Find a Grave. (2004, December 25). George Worster. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/10173118/george-worster

Find a Grave. (2020, October 22). Isaac Worster. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217582723/isaac-worster

Find a Grave. (2007, November 29). Lemuel Worster [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/23170855/lemuel-worster

Find a Grave. (2016, April 1). Mark Worster. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/160342454/mark-worster

Find a Grave. (2013, February 27). Dorcas Yeaton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/105890169/dorcas-yeaton

NEHGS. (1908). First Congregational Church Records, Rochester, NH. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=8cwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA38

NH Superior Court. (1851). NH Reports: Great Falls Company versus Worster. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=5usaAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA412

NH Superior Court. (1860). Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Judicial Court of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=R9YaAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA429

NH Supreme Court. (1861). NH Reports: Winnipeseogee Lake Company v. Young. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Qpg0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA420

Reno, Conrad, and Jones, Leonard A. (1901). Memoirs of the Judiciary and the Bar of New England for the Nineteenth Century. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=kGswAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA57

Steinberg, Theodore. (2014). Nature Incorporated: Industrialization and the Waters of New England. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press

Worcester, Jonathan F., and Sarah A. (1914). Descendants of Rev. William Worcester. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=O8hfAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA77

Report of the Milton Centennial Committee

By Muriel Bristol | June 19, 2022

At my request, Rep. Bailey visited the NH State Library in Concord on a break and photographed the financial report of Milton’s Centennial celebration as printed in the Milton Town Report of 1903.

The expenditures listed in that report might be compared with the events of the day in a contemporary account of the event.

Rumford Press of Concord, NH, printed invitations, while Joseph H. Avery and Harry L. Avery supplied postage and stamps. Courier Publishing Co. of Littleton, NH, also printed something, perhaps programs. W.H. White provided a register, possibly some sort of event guest register.

Walter McIntyre (1875-1934), John Pass (c1834-1907), H. Rendell [Herman Randall (1868-1923)], and John Woodbury were paid for their labor over one or more days, likely setting up tents and other necessities and, presumably, breaking them down again. H.S. Williams (c1886-1917) was paid for the use of his tent and dishes. Teamsters H.W. Downs (1848-1916) and J.D. Pinkham (1866-1937) were paid for trucking. E.L. Wentworth (1864-1944) was paid for “watching,” perhaps acting as night watchman between the setup and the event.

Charles L. Bodwell was paid for the use of his team for one or more trips to Rochester, and Fred B. Roberts was paid for the use of his horse. Mrs. R.M. [Carrie E. (Willey)] Kimball (1866-1949) boarded invited out-of-town guests.

There was a bonfire on Mt. Tenerife on the night before the Centennial.

The Centennial day itself – Saturday, August 30, 1902 – began at dawn with bell ringing and cannon salutes. J.A. Goodwin was paid for firing thirty-three cannons, then and several other times throughout the day.

Next came field and water sports. The sports committee was reimbursed for prizes given out.

After the amusing sports of the early morning, the street parade was made from the square at the railroad station to the broad campus of the Nute high school. The parade was as follows: Marshal – Maj. Charles J. Berry. Aids – Samuel E. Drew, Fred S. Hart, Clifford Berry, Walter Holtden, Charles Mason; Hanson American band of Rochester, 32 pieces, T.J. Manning, leader; 

Hanson American BandThe Hanson American Band of Rochester, NH, gave a concert in the “upper square.” They were paid for playing at several locations throughout the day.

Teamster William G. “Willie” Hurd (1867-1939) had been paid to sprinkle water on the dirt streets, to keep the dust down. J.P. Kelley provided badges for officers, perhaps auxiliary police officers. Another supplier provided parade badges. C.S. [C.J.] Berry was paid for his services as parade marshal, and Charles Mansur (1878-1946) and his wife [Rosamond (Guptill) Mansur] were paid for their services as aides. Somersworth, NH, hotelier S.F. Greenwood (1855-1931) was paid for the use of his team.

Davis, CA - 1900A New England dinner was served for lunch. It was a ham dinner. Confectioner C.A. Davis (1855-1921), farmer W.A. Pulsifer (1862-1953), butcher L. Rines (1862-194?), butcher G.E. Wentworth (1868-1944), and the Worcester County Creamery provided food and drink (milk). Whitehouse Bros., and Joseph D. Willey provided supplies, likely including food supplies. C.D. Jones provided sundries. Mrs. [Emma (Hall)] Douquette (1872-1958), Mary Leighton, Mrs. Otis S. [Lizzie (Pattee)] Thompson, Addie Tuck (1884-) and her sister, Lilla Tuck (1889-1910), were paid for their labor. One might suppose they decorated the venues or prepared and served the meals.

After lunch commemorative ceremonies and speeches took place. Avery, Jones & Roberts had supplied lumber, perhaps for a daïs and bench seating. Former Nute principal A.T. “Thad” Smith was paid a speaker’s fee.

Leftover bread and ham were sold, as well as a set of cutlery.

REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE

RECEIPTS

Received contributions, $1.75
–for bread sold, 1.19
—-wood sold, 1.00
—-hams sold, 2.00
—-knives and forks sold, 2.00
–of treasurer of Milton, 478.16
$486.10

EXPENDITURES

By paid for knives and forks, $6.00
–for parade badges, 7.80
A.T. Smith, address and expenses, 50.00
–committee on sports, prizes, 12.00
–J.P. Kelley, badges for officers and expenses, 16.50
–H.S. Williams, use of tent and dishes, 20.00
–E.G. Knight, mileage, .36
–G.E. Wentworth, for 255 lbs. ham, 36.98
–L. Rines, milk, .80
–John Woodbury, 2 days labor, 3.00
–J.D. Pinkham, trucking, 3.00
–W.G. Hurd, sprinkling streets, 10.00
–J.A. Goodwin, firing 100 guns, 64.00
–C.A. Davis, bread and express, 12.25
–H. Rendell, labor, 1.00
–Whitehouse Bros., supplies, 6.08
–E.L. Wentworth, watching, 1.50

By paid H.W. Downs, trucking, .50
Avery, Jones & Roberts, lumber, etc., 15.58
–freight and express, 5.65
–W.A. Pulsifer, milk, 3.20
–Mary Leighton, labor, 1.50
–Walter McIntyre, labor, 3.75
J.D. Willey, supplies, 2.77
–Mrs. Douquette, labor, 1.00
–Rumford Press, invitations, 15.00
–W.H. White, register, 4.75
J.H. Avery, stamps, 9.53
–John Pass, labor, 2.00
–Addie and Lilla Tuck, labor, 2.00
H.L. Avery, postage, 1.75
C.D. Jones, sundries, 7.95
–G.I. Jordan, cash expenses, 1.65
–Mrs. O.S. Thompson, labor, 1.00
–Courier Publishing Co., printing, 14.00
–Worcester County Creamery, butter, 7.20
M.A.H. Hart, cash expenses, 2.55
–Hanson American Band, 89.00
F.M. Chamberlain, feeding horses, 6.00
–Reuben Page, soliciting food, 2.75
C.S. Berry, services and expenses as marshal, 8.00
–S.F. Greenwood, use of team and expenses, 12.50
C.L. Bodwell, team to Rochester, 2.00
–Mrs. R.M. Kimball, board of guests, 1.50
–Charles Mansur and wife, labor, 3.50
F.B. Roberts, use of horse and cash, 3.65
$486.30

Respectfully submitted,
CHARLES D. JONES, Treasurer

References:

Historic New England. (2022). Trade card for The Rumford Press, Concord, New Hampshire, undated. Retrieved from www.historicnewengland.org/explore/collections-access/gusn/266291/

Milton Seeks a Coroner – June 1823

By Muriel Bristol | June 12, 2022

Twenty-three Milton inhabitants requested appointment of Gilman Jewett of Milton Mills as Milton coroner, June 12, 1823.

To His Excellency the Governor and the Council of the State of New Hampshire,

We, the undersigned inhabitants of the town of Milton, respectfully represent that it would be proper that some person on the great main road leading from Portsmouth to Lancaster within said town of Milton should be appointed to the office of coroner as there is not any person holding that office from Rochester to Wakefield comprising a distance of twenty miles and the person now holding said office in this town is living at the extreem part of the same. Therefore, thinking that such an appointment would be expedient, we cherefully recommend Mr Gilman Jewett as a Gentleman well qualified to fulfil the said office. Therefore, we humbly solicit that he should be appointed to that trust and we as in duty bound will pray ~

Milton, June 12th 1823

[Column 1:] Nathaniel Pinkham, Ebenezer Ricker, Jr, Samuel B. Hartford, Timothy Roberts, Isaac Worster, Wm Jones, Stephen Henderson, John Wentworth, Jr, John Wentworth, Pelah Hanscom,

[Column 2:] Stephen Drew, Joseph Walker, Thoms Wentworth, James H. Horn, David Wallingford, Jerediah Ricker, James Pinkham, Ebenezer Ricker,

[Column 3:] William Sargent, Saml Jones, Hopley Meserve, Isaac Wentworth, Joshua Jones.

The reverse side bore a title – Milton Pet. for a Coroner, Gilman Jewett, – the third column, and a notation that his appointment was “To be Postponed indefinitely.”


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Gilman Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114597023/gilman-jewett

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Milton Fuller & Trader John Fish (1766-c1819)

By Muriel Bristol | June 5, 2022

John Fish [III] was born in Mendon, MA, February 26, 1766, son of John [Jr.] and Deborah (Sheffield) Fish.

At some point, the Fish family left Mendon, MA, and the Ober family left neighboring Upton, MA, and both removed to Townshend, VT, a distance of about 120 miles.

John Fish married, probably in Townshend, VT, circa 1788, Rebecca Ober. She was born in Upton, MA, July 5, 1766, daughter of Ebenezer and Hannah (Fiske) Ober (given elsewhere as October 12, 1766, perhaps a baptism). (Her mother had died in Upton, MA, December 22, 1780).

Ira Fish, son of John and Rebekah Fish, was born in Townshend, VT, January 4, 1790. (The Ninth (1870) Federal Census gave his birthplace as having been “Townsend, Vt.,”, i.e., Townshend, VT).

John Fish Junr headed a Townshend, VT, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], two females [Rebecca (Ober) Fish and another], and one male aged under-16 years [Ira Fish].

His father, John Fish, headed also a Townshend, VT, household at that same time. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], two females [Deborah (Sheffield) Fish and another], and three males aged under-16 years; while father-in-law, Ebenr Ober, headed yet another Townshend, VT, household. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], two females, and two males aged under-16 years.

Sophia Fish, daughter of John and Rebekah Fish, was born in Townshend, VT, April 6, 1792. (Census records and, at the end of her life, her death certificate gave her birthplace as having been “Vermont State”).

Townshend, VT, delineated its school districts in May 1793. The house of John Fish, Jr., stood within the new Fifth District, while those of his father, John Fish, and his father-in-law, Ebenezer Ober, stood within the adjoining Sixth District.

The Fifth District to include all the families within the following described lines, viz: Beginning at the south-easterly corner of the fourth district, and running on the easterly line of said Townshend, to the southeast corner of said Townshend; thence, turning and running on the southerly line of said Townshend so far as by turning northerly in the most convenient place will include the families of Razey, and Nathan Wood; then, running a straight line from said Wood’s to the house of John Hazeltine, Jr., including said Hazeltine; from thence, by a straight line, to the house of John Fish, Jr., including the said Fish; thence, by a straight line, to the house of Jesse Murdock; to be known by the number of the Fifth District.
The Sixth District to include all the families within the following described lines, viz: Beginning at the house of Ensign Fish, Jr., and running down the road that leads to John Fish’s, including said John Fish’s family; thence, along the road to Ebenezer Ober’s, including the families on said road; thence, west, to the east bank of West River; thence, up said river, to the farm belonging to Dr. Wheeler, including the same; from thence, north, to the line of the second district; thence, easterly, by the lines of the other districts, till it strikes Brookline road, so called; from thence, by the line of the fourth district, to Jesse Murdock’s house; from thence, to the place of beginning; to be known by the number of the Sixth District (Phelps, 1877).

At some point, between 1793 and 1794, the younger John Fish’s family left Townshend, VT, and removed to the Northeast Parish of Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton Three Ponds, a distance of about 130 miles.

Among the first who settled at Three Ponds were Samuel Palmer, Levi Burgen, John Fish, Paul Jewett, Pelatiah Hanscom, Robert McGeoch, and others. Daniel Door and Jonathan Door settled at the head of the Pond quite early. The old tavern house at Three Ponds, burned a few years ago, was built by Robert McGeoch in 1786 or 1787, and was perhaps the first tavern in town (Scales, 1914). 

(The births of all of the children of John and Rebekah [(Ober)] Fish were recorded in Milton vital records, including the first two who had actually been born in Townshend, VT. It would not have been unusual for an existing family record, such as a bible record, to be copied all at once into local town vital records, regardless of geography).

At the time of Milton’s Centennial (in 1902), visitors were shown John Fish’s house at Milton Three Ponds, which was said to have been built in 1794 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

The valuable mill privilege at the Three Ponds naturally made this the trading center, and a considerable village gradually sprang up, its growth being accelerated, at periods, by the prospect of large manufacturing establishments. Among the earliest traders were Joshua Hartford, John Fish, and a Mr. Hovey. In 1810 Simon Chase, who had been a clerk with Joseph Hanson in Rochester, commenced business there being the only trader at that time. There was a fulling mill operated by John Fish, and the houses of Hartford, Gerrish, Fish, Palmer, and perhaps one or two others (McDuffee, 1892).

FULLING, in the manufacture of textiles, process of shrinking or condensing woolen and worsted fabrics to render them firmer and stronger. The primitive method of fulling cloth was to tread it with bare feet in water. It is said that our surnames of Fuller, Walker, and Tucker all came from the fact that those who performed this labor, variously called fulling, walking, and tucking were called by these names.
The present process of fulling is understood more readily by one to whom the condition of woven fabrics as they come from the loom is familiar. Many of the fabrics admired and found serviceable by reason of their close, firm weave appear loose, elastic, and almost flimsy before the fulling process. The shrinking of blankets and woolen garments, whereby they lose elasticity and gain in thickness and hardness, is avoided carefully by the housewife. The fulling process performed in the manufacture of the very fabrics from which these garments are made is, however, a necessity. Not only the beauty, but in many instances the durability and warmth of a material would be lacking were this process omitted.
Fulling is effected by the application of moisture, heat, and pressure. The cleansing and scouring of the fabric is accomplished ordinarily at one operation with the fulling. This scouring rids the cloth of the oil used previous to spinning, and of the sizing used in dressing the warp. The cloth is well saturated with hot water and soap and, in the fulling mill, as the machine is called, is pressed and squeezed between wooden rollers partly immersed in water. Twelve hours in the mill will shrink ordinary cloth two-fifths in breadth and one-third in length. The goods are taken out of the mill frequently, and are stretched, turned, and inspected. Experience and judgment are required by the fuller, as the length of time cloth should be fulled varies. After fulling, the soap is washed from the fabric, and it is tentered, that is, stretched carefully that it may dry evenly (Welles Brothers, 1912).

Here one may find several contemporary descriptions of similar fulling operations (complete with ancillary clothing shops, i.e., trading,) in Hartland, VT, and Pittsfield, MA.

A FARM FOR SALE, IN HARTLAND, ON the great River road four miles north of the Court House in Windsor, containing 5 acres of excellent land, with a convenient Dwelling House, Barn and Store – together with a Clothier’s Shop, and Fulling Mill and tools, new and in good repair, with a good dam and floom, built for other mills; said dam is founded on a rock bottom and sides, and is as good a stand for a Clothier as any in the State – and said farm is as good a stand for a tavern, of trader, or both, as any on the river, as it has answered a valuable purpose for both; and is now licenced the present year for a tavern. The whole will be sold together, or the Clothier’s works with accommodations by itself, or the other premises in the same manner – Some part of the pay down, and the other on undoubted credit. For particulars enquire of BLISS CORLISS, Living on the premises. N.B. Said place will be let if not sold by the 1st of September. Hartland, August 3d, 1797. 32tf (Vermont Journal, September 22, 1797).

Clothier’s Business. The Subscriber takes this method to inform the Public, that he has erected A new Fulling-Mill and Clothier’s Works, at an Old Stand in the west part of Pittsfield, formerly occupied by Elder Volintine Rathbun, and is ready to DRESS CLOTH of all kinds, and all sorts of Colors, in the best and neatest manner, for all those that will favor him with their custom – and all favors received will be gratefully acknowledged, by their humble servant, DAN MUNROW. AUGUST 28, 1801 (Pittsfield Sun, September 1, 1801). 

John Fish, son of John and Rebekah Fish, was born in Rochester, NH, January 15, 1795. He was a namesake for both his father and grandfather.

Hannah Fish, daughter of John and Rebekah Fish, was born in Rochester, NH, September 3, 1797. She was a namesake for her maternal grandmother, Hannah (Fiske) Ober.

Deborah Sheffield Fish, daughter of John and Rebekah Fish, was born in Rochester, NH, April 1, 1799. She was a namesake for her paternal grandmother, Deborah (Sheffield) Fish.

Son John Fish died in Rochester, NH, June 2, 1799, aged four years, four months, and seventeen days.

John Fish headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Rebecca (Ober) Fish], one female aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years [Ira Fish], and three females aged under-10 years [Sophia Fish, Hannah Fish, and Deborah Fish]. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Father John Fish headed still a Townshend, VT, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 45-plus years [Deborah (Sheffield) Fish], and one female aged 26-44 years. (Other Townshend households were headed by his other sons Jacob Fish and Ward Fish). Father-in-law Ebenr Ober headed another Townshend, VT, household at that same time. His household included only one male aged 45-plus years [himself].

For whatever reason, John Fish did not sign the Rochester division petition of May 28, 1802. He would be elected nevertheless as one of the first three Milton selectmen.

The first town meeting in Milton was called by William Palmer, Esq., and held at the dwelling-house of Lieut. Elijah Horn (now the dwelling house of Lewis B. Twombly) on the 30th day of August 1802, at which meeting Beard Plumer was chosen moderator; Gilman Jewett, town clerk; and William Palmer, John FishJohn Remick, Jr., selectmen (Hurd, 1882).

He served also on the meetinghouse building committee in 1804. (See also Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

The first meetinghouse in Milton was erected on the Ridge in accordance with a vote passed at the annual meeting in 1802. John Fish, Beard Plumer and Gilman Jewett, were the executive committee. The lot on which the building was erected was purchased of Thomas and Aaron Downes for $26. The meetinghouse was completed at a cost of about $2,400, by Caleb Wingate, Capt. Daniel Hayes and Gilman Jewett. The net cost of the church, however, was not so large, as the pews were sold for nearly $2,000. The first service was held in 1804 and from that time until after 1830, the meetinghouse was constantly in use. The first preachers to occupy the pulpit were Rev. Gideon Burt and Rev. Christopher Page both of whom were here in 1804 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

John Fish, son of John and Rebekah Fish, was born in Milton, March 9, 1803. He was a namesake both for his father and paternal grandfather, but also for an older sibling that predeceased him.

Milton sent John Fish to the NH state legislature as its NH State Representative in 1804. He was both preceded and succeeded in that office by separate terms of Beard Plumer.

Jacob Fish, son of John and Rebekah Fish, was born in Milton, April 26, 1805. He was a namesake for his paternal uncle, Jacob Fish of Townshend, VT.

Ebenezer Clifford (1746-1821), Esq., of Exeter, NH, invented an improved diving bell, with which he and Capt. Richard Tripe (1756-1817) of Dover, NH, experimented as early as 1803. (Several Milton residents, including John Fish, would become associated with these men and this technology in other salvage ventures in future years).

He [Clifford] was an ingenious mechanic, studied architecture, and made scientific experiments outside of his regular calling. He manufactured a diving bell, with which he brought up from the bottom of the sea valuable property from one or more wrecked vessels (Antiques, August 1960).

THE DIVING-BELL. The diving-bell consists of a heavy vessel in the form of a bell with the mouth downward and generally constructed of cast iron or of wood, the latter loaded with weights to make it sink. It is usually furnished with shelves and seats on the sides for the convenience of those who descend in it; and several strong glass lenses are fitted into the upper part for the admission of light. There is likewise a stop-cock, by opening which the air, rendered impure by respiration, may from time to time be discharged and rise in bubbles to the surface of the water; and provision must be made for the regular supply of fresh air, which may be sent down through pipes from one or more large condensing syringes, worked on the deck of a vessel above or by the person in the bell. The bell must be properly suspended from a crane, or cross-beam, furnished with tackles of pulleys, that it may be lowered raised or otherwise moved according to circumstances (Gale, 1834).

By 1805 Ebenezer Clifford was hard at work retrieving bar iron from a sunken gundalow boat beneath the harbor at Portsmouth, NH.

Diving Bell - 1851In Vol xxii of the American Journal of Science is an interesting account of the experiments made with a diving bell in Portsmouth Harbor, N.H., in 1805. The bell inside was 5 feet in diameter at the bottom, 3 feet at the top, and 5¾ feet high. Two men descended in it at a time; when about 12 feet below the surface, the painful sensation experienced in the ears would pass away with a sudden shock, and this would be repeated at each interval of about 12 feet. It might, they found, be avoided by having the bell raised a foot or two every 8 or 10 feet of the descent. The greatest descent made was about 72 feet. “In a clear day, with an unruffled sea, they had light sufficient for reading a coarse print at the greatest depth, as they moved the pebbles with their gaff at the bottom of the river, fish in abundance came to the place like a flock of chickens and as devoid of fear as if it was a region where they had never been molested by beings from the extra-aquatic world. From the description of the adventurers, no scenery in nature can be more beautiful than that viewed by them in a sunshiny day at the bottom of the deep Piscataqua. It does not appear that the health of either of the men was in the least impaired by their submarine excursions. Their pulsations were quick and their perspiration was very profuse under water; and upon coming out of it they felt themselves in a fit condition for a comfortable sleep.” One of the men, it is further stated, found himself much relieved of rheumatic complaints, from which he had been suffering, which was attributed to the great heat produced in the bell, which was like that of a steam bath (Preble, 1892).

No prismatic colors, no cave of Antiparos, no changes in the Kaleidoscope, no woodlands bending with icy sleet, are equal in beauty to the scenery described by the adventurers, at the bottom of the Piscataqua (Boston Post, August 23, 1832).

Father-in-law Ebenezer Ober died in Townshend, VT, August 17, 1806.

John Fish was Milton’s second town clerk, from 1807 to 1810. He succeeded Gilman Jewett in that office and would be replaced in his turn by Levi Jones.

Father John Fish died in Townshend, VT, in 1808.

Milton sent John Fish to the NH state legislature as its NH State Representative in 1809-10. He was preceded in that office by Beard Plumer and succeeded in it by Theodore C. Lyman.

By the summer of 1809, Ebenezer Clifford of Exeter, NH, and his associate or partner, Samuel Palmer of Milton Three Ponds, were together salvaging cannons from ships scuttled by the Massachusetts Navy in Maine’s Penobscot River during the disastrous Penobscot Expedition of 1779. (Maine was until 1820 a non-contiguous “province” of Massachusetts). Palmer was a son of Maj. Barnabas Palmer and elder brother of William Palmer, Esq.

A Diving Bell, invented for the purpose of raising property from the deep, has been found on experiment in Massachusetts to be very valuable. Two persons can remain in it under water nearly two hours and labor advantageously. From a vessel sunk opposite Frankfort, a brass howitzer worth 200 dollars has been raised by its aid; from a vessel sunk between Hampden and Orrington, 28 pieces of iron ordnance of 6 lbs. calibre have also been raised (Vermont Gazette, October 30, 1809).

DIVING BELL. We understand that Ebenezer Clifford, of Portsmouth, (N.H.) has invented an improved and ingenious Diving Bell, of a new construction; in which labourers can descend with great ease and safety, to almost any depth, and work with convenience. During the last summer he has been industriously employed in weighing the ordinance in Penobscot river, from the wrecks of the vessels lost and destroyed in the unfortunate expedition in the time of the American revolution, against Bagaduce, on that river. He has already weighed thirty-six pieces of artillery and one brass howetzer, together with several tons of cannonball; all of which, it is said, were more than sixty feet below the surface of the water. We hope such ingenuity and enterprize will be suitably rewarded (Sentinel & Democrat (Burlington, VT), February 9, 1810).

Daughter Sophia Fish married in Milton, December 25, 1809, Samuel Twombly. He was born in Milton, March 26, 1780, son of Samuel and Mary (Burrows) Twombly.

John Fish was one of sixty-four Strafford County inhabitants who recommended that Colo James Carr be reappointed as Strafford County sheriff, January 22, 1810. Wm Palmer, John Plumer, Junr, Jonas C. March, and Joseph Plumer signed also.

Fish, John - Signature - 1810Jno Fish headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Rebecca (Ober) Fish], one male aged 16-25 years [Ira Fish], three females aged 10-15 years [Sophia Fish, Hannah Fish, and Deborah Fish], and two males aged under-10 years [John Fish and Jacob Fish]. His household was enumerated between those of Saml Palmer and Simon Chase.

Son-in-law Saml Twombley Jun headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 16-25 years [Sophia (Fish) Twombly].

Massachusetts did reward or pay Ebenezer Clifford and Samuel Palmer in February 1810, for the cannons they had raised from naval wrecks at the bottom of the Penobscot River, in the previous summer.

February 22, 1810; On the petition of Ebenezer Clifford and Samuel Palmer, Resolved That the Quarter-master-general be, and he is hereby directed, to purchase of the said Clifford and Palmer, thirty-six pieces of cannon, and one brass howitzer, and several tons of cannon balls, recovered by them, by the use of their diving bell, from the bed of Penobscot River, if the said several articles of ordnance, or any of them, are wanted for the use of the Commonwealth, and can be had at a reasonable price (MA Secretary of State, 1810).

As we have seen, Samuel Palmer had become an associate of diving bell inventor Ebenezer Clifford. John Fish and Theodore C. Lyman, both of Milton, became also associates of them, or of Palmer only, or succeeded them in similar ventures.

Samuel Palmer and John Fish engaged in several diving bell adventures, endeavoring to raise the cargoes of sunken vessels, one at Portsmouth, and one upon a western lake, but were unsuccessful (McDuffee, 1892).

By January 1811, Milton’s Theodore C. Lyman and John Fish petitioned the U.S. Congress for salvage rights in any public property that might be lying at the bottom of Lakes George and Champlain in New York state. (U.S. Representative William Hale (1765-1848) of Dover, NH, presented their petition).

Mr. Hale presented a petition of Theodore C. Lyman and John Fish, of the State of New Hampshire, stating that they have invented a machine for exploring the bottoms of Lakes Champlain and George; and praying that they may have the exclusive property in all articles which belonged to the public prior to being lost, and which they may recover. Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Committee of Commerce and Manufacture (US Congress, 1826).

That summer, a party led by Samuel Palmer descended in a diving bell on the wreck of the British frigate HMS Huzzah, which had sunk off Hell Gate, a strait separating New York harbor from Long Island Sound, during the Revolutionary War. (One may note with some amusement the gentile substitution of Hurl-Gate for Hell-Gate).

By a gentleman ho came in town yesterday morning, we learn, that Mr. Palmer, who directs the DIVING BELL, on board the gun-boats, now in Hurl-Gate, and who has been for some months past, without avail, endeavoring to obtain a part of the wrecked British frigate Huzza, which sunk there during the revolution – on Saturday last succeeded in getting up her rudder. The quantity of copper which is on it, together with the chains and bolts, will be of considerable value. The greatest difficulty Mr. P, met with, is now surmounted; as the rudder, from the situation in which the ship lays, heretofore prevented them from taking her to pieces, which they now confidently expect to do. The Huzza was a frigate of 28 guns, and was going to Boston with money to pay the British troops then there, when she struck upon a rock a short distance below the country seat of John Graham, Esq., and soon afterwards sunk.
She is described, by those, who went down in the
Bell, to lay on her larboard side, with her keel towards the Morrissina shore, from which she is not distant more than 180 yards. Neither time or the water have made any perceptible impression on the copper of her sides, and her timbers still remain so strong and tight that two men, who went down with axes, wedges, and other tools, could make no impression. One of the divers stated, that he had rubbed his hand over the top of one of the cannon, which, from its peculiar smoothness, he conceived to be brass. The copper bolts which were taken out of the rudder, were so perfect that many would not believe they had ever been used; and the wood (which is of oak) one inch from the surface of the rudder, is as solid as when the ship was built. The aid and assistance which the government has afforded to the company who own the Diving Bell, give us reason to hope that the industry and perseverance of this sub-marine exploring party will be well rewarded, as there is little doubt they will get up the cannon, and a great portion of the imperishable articles that were on board when she foundered (Pittsfield Sun (Pittsfield, MA), July 27, 1811).

Thursday, May 21. Mr. Bartlett presented the petition of Ebenezer Clifford, praying Congress will grant to him all cannon, &c. which he may recover from the bottom of rivers and water courses by means of a diving bell, of which he is the inventor. Referred to a select committee (Washingtonian (Windsor, VT), June 1, 1812).

John Fish received an appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 24, 1814. (He would have been due for a renewal in 1819, but at that later time the record acquired instead the bare notation that he was “dead.” (See Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1820)).

Daughter Hannah Fish married in Rochester, NH, September 22, 1817, Israel Nute. He was born in Milton, May 12, 1792, son of Jotham and Sarah (Twombly) Nute. (See Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1805).

The Norton Scates family took over John Fish’s house at Milton Three Ponds after his death, which would seem to have taken place in or around 1819. Eri N. Scates was born in the “Fish House” in Milton in 1820.

He was a son of Captain Norton Scates and was born in Milton at the “Fish house,” where his father dwelled and kept the post office in the early twenties (Farmington News, July 28, 1899).

The “Fish House” had nothing to do with fish, as such. It was instead the former residence of John Fish, who was said in April 1820 to have “recently been removed by death.” (See Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1820). Several married Fish daughters remained in Milton, but the bulk of their siblings removed first to Wakefield and other places in New Hampshire, prior to settling in Penobscot County, Maine. (Maine became independent of Massachusetts, as of March 1820).

Son Ira Fish married in Milton, March 6, 1820, Abra Hayes. She was born in Milton, June 14, 1795, daughter of James C. and Betsy (Twombly) Hayes.

Son Ira Fish was one of nine Wakefield, NH, residents who joined with a greater number of Middleton and New Durham, NH, residents, May 12, 1820, in recommending appointment of John Hill of Middleton, NH, as a Middleton justice-of-the-peace.

Daughter Deborah Fish died of a fever in Jamaica Plain, MA, November 8, 1821, aged twenty-three years. The local church records identified her as “a stranger from Milton, New Hampshire” (Roxbury, MA, Third Parish Church Records).

Son Ira Fish is said to have moved to Lincoln, ME, and he and his brother, Jacob Fish, to have built its sawmills in 1824-25.

In the fall of 1825 Ira Fish came to Mattanawcook from New Hampshire to build saw-mills on the Mattanawcook Stream. He was the agent of the Wendell brothers, manufacturers and merchants of Portsmouth, N.H. There were three brothers whose names appear in connection with the Mattanawcook enterprise, namely, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob Wendell, sons of John Wendell.
Work was begun on the upper ·mills in September, 1825, seventeen men that Mr. Fish brought with him and some others being employed. Israel Heald, who was employed by Mr. Fish to clear the stream preparatory to the building of the dam, has told the writer’s father that, after removing everything, not a drop of water was found running in the stream. Fish argued strongly that a dam would· not be useful where there was no water. It was realized, however, that the preceding season had been one of unusual conditions, which might not arise again. Fish hesitated, and finally he secured the services of an Indian as guide and went up to the ponds. They were found to be all well filled with water and he decided to proceed with the work. A like condition has never arisen since, though at times the water has not been sufficient to run the mills. The dam and the mill were constructed mostly during the fall and winter, Mr. Reddington of Vassalboro acting as engineer and superintendent. The following spring the work was completed and the sawing of logs began. During the next summer, 1826, a saw-mill was erected at the location always known as the lower mill. This was raised in June and was known as the double mill, having two runs of saws (Fellows, 1929).

[LINCOLN] INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNT. As we have already shown, Ira and Jacob Fish erected the first saw mills in town, in 1824; connected with this was also a grist mill. This mill stood on the site of the old dam near the postoffice, and was the center of activity for some years. It was operated chiefly by Ira Fish, he naming the mills “Mattanawcook,” while the place was for many years known by the residents as “Fish’s Mills.” Wm. R. Ayer succeeded Mr. Fish in operating the mills, continuing for many years to manufacture lumber extensively. Finally the old mills were vacated, and have decayed, but the old stones used to grind the early grist are now used by Mr. Haynes in his new mill (Mitchell, 1905).

Son Jacob Fish married in Tuftonboro, NH, November 12, 1826, Sarah “Sally” Canney, he of Moultonborough, NH, and she of Tuftonboro, NH. She was born in Tuftonboro, ME, May 30, 1806, daughter of Joseph and Anna (Kinnison) Canney.

Son Ira Fish was one of the first selectmen of a newly incorporated Lincoln, ME, in 1829, as his father had been of a newly incorporated Milton, in 1802.

In response to a petition made by six of the leading men of the town, Ira Fish, Esq., issued his warrant, dated March 30, 1829, calling the inhabitants to assemble in town meeting in the school house at “Mattanawcook Mills” on Monday, April 6, following. At this meeting the necessary town officers were chosen, Mr. Fish serving as moderator. After the election of Chesley Hayes for clerk, the meeting was adjourned to Mr. Fish’s barn, probably for room. Ira Fish, Benj. Chesley, and Israel Heald were chosen selectmen and assessors and Chesley Hayes treasurer. Joseph Hammond was made collector and constable, collection to be made at 8 per cent. The selectmen were chosen a committee to district the town for schools and highway districts (Mitchell, 1905).

Son Ira Fish headed a Lincoln, ME, household at the time of the Fourth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [Ira Fish], one female aged 30-39 years [Abra Fish], two males aged 20-29 years, one male aged 15-19 years [Ezra O. Fish], one female aged 15-19 years, and one male aged 5-9 years [Ira D. Fish]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Daniel Forbes and Hiram Wiley.

Ira Fish was an extensive land owner and lumberman in [Lincoln] town, and Fish Hill was named for him. It is sometimes called Lindsay Hill (Bailey, 1950).

Son-in-law Samuel Twombly headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Sophia (Fish) Twombly], two males aged 15-19 years [Thomas B. Twombly and Josiah F. Twombly], one female aged 15-19 years, one male aged 5-9 years [Ira F. Twombly], two females aged under-05 years [Sophia Twombly and Rebecca Twombly], and one male aged 80-89 years [Samuel Twombly Sr.]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Wentworth and Wentworth Dore.

Son-in-law Israel Nute headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Hannah (Fish) Nute], one male aged 15-19 years, one male aged 10-14 years [John F. Nute], one male aged 5-9 years [Frederick E. Nute], one female aged 5-9 years [Deborah Nute], one male aged under-5 years [George Nute], and one female aged 60-69 years [Rebecca (Ober) Fish].

Son Jacob Fish headed a Moultonborough, NH, household at the time of the Fourth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], two females aged 20-29 years [Sarah (Canney) Fish], one male aged 15-19 years, and two females aged under-5 years [Harriet N. Fish]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of N.V. Shannon and Joseph Hoyt.

Mrs. Rebecca [(Ober)] Fish joined the Congregational Church in Lincoln, ME, at some point between its founding in 1831 and her death in 1849 (Fellows, 1929).

Jacob Fish kept a store and, perhaps later, a hotel, in Lincoln, ME. His nephew, John Fish Nute, worked in the store for seven years from circa 1836. (This would have been just after the death of his father, Israel Nute).

At the age of seventeen years our subject entered the store of his uncle, Jacob Fish, at Lincoln, Maine, where he remained seven years and developed an aptitude for the mercantile business, which induced him to start in trade for himself. This he did in the same village and soon had built up a large and paying business. He continued this store for twenty-one years (Lewis, 1900).

Son-in-law Israel Nute died in Lincoln, ME, February 15, 1836, aged sixty-three years, nine months, and one day.

Israel Nute learned the trade of carpenter and followed that business for many years in Great Falls, when failing health obliged him to seek other employment, and he chose agricultural pursuits as being at once healthful and remunerative. He was elected to the office of justice of the peace, a position he held for many years, discharging the duties of the office in a manner which elicited the commendation of all. The maiden name of his wife was Hannah Fish. She was a daughter of John Fish and came from the state of Vermont. Six children were the fruits of this union, three whom are living, namely: J.F., our subject; Frederick E., a resident of Maine, and George H., of Easton, Pennsylvania. The family were reared in conformity to the teachings of the Congregational church, of which Israel Nute was a consistent member; and his death, which occurred in 1836, was sincerely regretted by a large circle of friends (Lewis, 1900).

WANTED. A FEW good Men to work on the Aroostook road, to whom fair wages will be paid. For particulars call on the subscriber at Lincoln or the Land Office, Bangor. IRA FISH. june27. lwd&w (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier, June 29, 1837).

STATE OF MAINE. Land Office, Bangor, April 30, 1S38. } The twelfth section of “an act additional to promote the sale and settlement of the public lands,” passed March 24, A.D. 1835, making it the duty of the Land Agent “to advertise the settling lands in market, once a year, for two months, in one paper in the city of Boston, one in Concord, N.H., and in one paper in each county in the State, describing the quality and situation of said land and the terms of sale,” the Land Agent hereby gives public notice that Township number 4, in the fifth range of Townships west from the cast line of the State, has been lotted for settlers, and is now in the market for sale and settlement under the provisions of the following law passed at the last session of the Legislature. The price will be from fifty to seventy-five cents per acre, according to the quality and situation of the lots. The lots average 160 acres each. The soil in this township is good, being remarkably free from stones, and the land lying in moderate swells. The location of this township is favorable for settlement, as the Aroostook road passes within one mile of the western line of the township. There are between 40 and 50 settlers in the adjoining township No. 4 in the 6th Range, and a good saw mill and grist mill have recently been built there by Ira Fish, Esq., only one mile distant from this township (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), August 15, 1838).

Son Ira Fish headed a Lincoln, ME, household at the time of the Fifth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [Ira Fish], one female aged 50-59 years [Abra Fish], one male aged 20-29 years [Ezra O. Fish], two males aged 15-19 years [Ira D. Fish], one male aged 5-9 years [Charles Fish], and one female aged under-5 years [Louisa Fish]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Daniel Emery and Israel Hall.

Son-in-law Samuel Twombly headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Sophia (Fish) Twombly], one male aged 15-19 years [Ira F. Twombly], two females aged 10-14 years [Sophia Twombly and Rebecca Twombly], one male aged under-5 years [Samuel Twombly], and one male aged 90-99 years [Samuel Twombly Sr.]. Two members of his household were engaged in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joshua Hanson and Dudley Wentworth.

Daughter Hannah [(Fish)] Nute headed a Lincoln, ME, household at the time of the Fifth (1840) Federal Census. Her household included one female aged 40-49 years [herself], two males aged 20-29 years [John F. Nute and Frederick E. Nute], one female aged 15-19 years [Deborah Nute], one male aged 10-14 years [George Nute], one female aged 5-9 years [Hannah A. Nute], and one male aged 5-9 years [Charles W. Nute]. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Chas. H. Dunklee and James Huntress.

Son Jacob Fish headed a Lincoln, ME, household at the time of the Fifth (1840) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 30-39 years [himself and another], one female aged 30-39 years [Sarah (Canney) Fish], three males aged 20-29 years, three females aged 15-19 years, two females aged 10-14 years [Harriet N. Fish], one male aged 5-9 years [John A. Fish], and one female aged under-5 years [Frances R. Fish]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Winthrop Frost and Timothy Fuller.

IN THE HOUSE. Petitions presented and referred – Jacob Fish and 242 als. for a new County to be taken from the north part of Penobscot and to be called Mattanawcook (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier, January 27, 1840).

LOST, ON the 14th instant, at Oldtown, by the subscriber, a calf skin pocket book, containing $21 in bills, one of $10 on the Bank of Bangor, one of $5, on the same, six ones, banks not recollected. Also, a note of hand, against W.H. Smith for $50, dated July, 1839, payable to the subscriber at Oldtown. One note against William Smith for $130, $60 endorsed on same given in July, 1836. Also, one signed by Ira Fish for $7 as Agent of Maine and Massachusetts, and one against I. & J. Wadleigh for $50 $25 being endorsed on same, and some other small notes. Whoever will return the same to the subscriber at Oldtown, shall be handsomely rewarded, and all persons are cautioned not to purchase either of the above notes, as their payment has been stopped. JAMES WALCH. Sept. 17, 1840 (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier, September 18, 1840).

Washington Philbrook, and Isaac C. McColister were arrested at Lincoln and examined on Monday last before Justice Jacob Fish for passing counterfeit bills on the Eastern Bank of this city. They were ordered to recognize in the sum of $1000 each to appear at the Supreme Court to be holden in this city in June next, and for want of security they were yesterday brought to this city and committed to Jail. After arriving here one of them tried the virtue of his legs in an attempt to get away from, the officer but was soon secured (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier, May 4, 1842).

Timothy Fuller and Jacob Fish were advertised as the local Lincoln, ME, agents, i.e., shopkeepers, selling Wright’s Indian Vegetable Pills – 25¢ per box – in September 1842 (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier, October 6, 1842).

Daughter Mrs. Hannah [(Fish)] Nute married (2nd) in Lincoln, ME, April 28, 1844, Dr. Daniel Forbes. He was born in Bangor, ME, August 15, 1802, son of William and Lucy (Griffin) Forbes. (His first wife, Olivia, had died in Lincoln, ME, April 15, 1842, aged thirty-two years).

Mrs. Rebecca (Ober) Fish died of old age in Lincoln, ME, December 21, 1849, aged eighty-three years, two months, and nine days.

Son Ira Fish, a lumberman, aged sixty years (b. VT), headed a Patten, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Abra Fish, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), and Charles Fish, a student, aged seventeen years (b. ME).

Son-in-law Samuel Twombly, a farmer, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sophia [(Fish)] Twombly, aged fifty-eight years (b. VT), and Samuel Twombly, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Samuel Twombly had real estate valued at $3,500. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Mark H. Hart, a farmer, aged forty-three years (b. NH), and Dudley Wentworth, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Son-in-law Daniel Forbes, a physician, aged forty-six years (b. ME), headed a Lincoln, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Hannah [((Fish) Nute)] Forbes, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), George H. Nute, aged twenty years (b. NH), Amanda Nute, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Charles W. Nute, aged fifteen years (b. NH). Daniel Forbes had real estate valued at $400. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of [her son-in-law,] Asa K. Bither, a merchant, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and David S. Plumley, a merchant, aged thirty-six years (b. PA).

Daughter-in-law Sally [(Canney)] Fish, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Lincoln, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Edmund Dorr, a clerk, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), Harriet M. [(Fish)] Dorr (b. NH), aged twenty-one years, John A. Fish, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Frances R. Fish, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Sophia Fish, aged nine years (b. ME), Oscar Fish, aged seven years (b. ME), Mary E. Fish, aged four years (b. ME), E.B. Pike, a physician, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Albert Pearson, aged thirty years (b. ME), Thomas Lewis, a joiner, aged forty-five years (b. NH), Benjamin Gaston, a laborer, aged twenty-eight years (b. England), John Tobin, a laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. Ireland), Stephen Davis, a laborer, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), Charles Giddens, a laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. England), Charles Knowls, a cabinetmaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. England), Reuben Damon, a laborer, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Eliza Coffey, aged fifty years (b. Ireland), Susan Mills, aged eighteen years (b. ME), and A. Hamilton, a carriagemaker, aged forty-five years (b. NY). A marginal notation indicates that her residence was a “Hotel.” Meanwhile, her husband, Jacob Fish, a waiter, aged forty [forty-five] years (b. NH), appeared on the staff of another hotel in Lincoln, ME, one run by Samuel B. Jameson, an innholder, aged twenty-six years (b. ME).

Son Jacob Fish died of erysipelas in Lincoln, ME, March 1, 1850, aged forty-five years. He had been employed as a merchant and in a hotel.

Son Ira Fish, a farmer, aged seventy years (b. VT), headed a Patten, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Abra Fish, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), Maxey Ordway, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), and Geo Voyer, aged sixteen years (b. Canada). Ira Fish had real estate valued at $4,000 and personal estate valued at $300. Maxey Ordway had real estate valued at $300 and personal estate valued at $300.

Son-in-law Samuel Twombly, a farmer, aged eighty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sophia [(Fish)] Twombly, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH [SIC]). Samuel Twombly had real estate valued at $10,000 and personal estate valued at $5,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Henry D. Witham, a farmer, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and Benjamin F. Hayes, a farmer, aged forty-three years (b. NH).

Daughter-in-law Sally A. [(Canney)] Fish, keeps hotel, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Lincoln, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included John A. Fish, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), Frances B. Fish, a teacher of music, aged twenty years (b. ME), Sophia Fish, a common school teacher, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Oscar R. Fish, aged fifteen years (b. ME), and Mary E. Fish, aged fourteen years (b. ME).

Son Ira Fish of Patten, ME, lent his name to a patent medicine for “catarrh” symptoms in February 1862.

The following letter from the Hon. Ira Fish, aged 80 [72], of Penobscot Co., Me., speaks for itself: DR. LIGHTHILL, 8 BOLSTON PLACE, BOSTON. Dear Sir – For several years I have been afflicted with catarrh. I have tried many prescriptions for it without receiving any benefit therefrom. I have taken your medicine about two months, and it has cured me. I would recommend to those afflicted with the disease, that they apply to you. I am confident that if they will strictly follow your directions a cure will be effected, however inveterate the case may be. IRA FISH. Patten, Feb. 24, 1802. lw (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), March 22, 1862).

Daughter-in-law Sarah (Canney) Fish died in Lincoln, ME, June 30, 1865, aged fifty-nine years, one month, and three days.

Son-in-law Daniel Forbes is said to have died in Florida, in September 1865, aged sixty-three years.

He was Assistant Surgeon in the army during the latter part of the Civil War, and died while in charge of a hospital in Florida, in September 1865 (Fellows, 1929).

(A David Forbes died of anthrax in a Florida military hospital, September 29, 1865, but he was listed as a cavalry private, rather than an assistant surgeon, and aged twenty-five years, rather than sixty-three years).

A Hannah Forbes filed for a Civil War widow’s pension, November 7, 1866, for the service of her husband, Daniel Forbes, in Co. E. of the 2nd ME Cavalry Regiment.

Son-in-law Samuel Twombly died of consumption in Milton, November 26, 1868, aged eighty-eight years, eight months.

Son Ira Fish, a farmer, aged eighty years (b. Townshend, VT), headed a Patten, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Abra [(Hayes)] Fish, keeping house, aged seventy-five years (b. Milton, NH), and Sarah Hayes, a domestic, aged fifty years (b. Lincoln, ME). Ira Fish had real estate valued at $900 and personal estate valued at $200. Abra Fish had real estate valued at $1,000.

Benjamin F. Hayes, a farm laborer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sophia [(Twombly)] Hayes, keeping house, aged forty-three years (b. NH). They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of [her mother,] Sophia Twombly, keeping house, aged seventy-eight years (b. VT). Benjamin F. Hayes had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $757. Sophia Twombly had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000.

Son Ira Fish died in Patten, ME, May 24, 1872, aged eighty-two years.

Death of an Aged Citizen. Hon. Ira Fish of Patten died a few days since at the advanced age of 82 years. In 1824 Mr. Fish moved from New Hampshire to Lincoln, where he remained about twenty years, when he moved to Patten, which has since been his home. He was one of the most prominent and influential business men in that section of the county, had been several times elected to both branches of the Legislature, and frequently held other offices of public trust. He was respected by his neighbors, friends and acquaintances for his many excellent traits of character, as was especially testified by the immense throng which gathered to pay the last tribute of respect to their departed friend (Bangor Whig & Courier, May 31, 1872).

Daughter Sophia (Fish) Twombly died of old age in Milton, March 30, 1874, aged eighty-one years, eleven months. (She was said to have been born in Vermont State).

Daughter Hannah [(Fish)] Nute [Forbes] died of stomach paralysis in Ionia, MI, September 26, 1874, aged seventy-eight years.

Daughter-in-law Abra (Hayes) Fish died in Patten, ME, February 1, 1879.


References:

Bailey, Mary M.E. (1950). History of Trans Alpine: The Southernmost Part of the Town of Lincoln, Maine, Beyond the Alps. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin

Fellows, Dana W. (1929). History of the Town of Lincoln, Penobscot County, Maine, 1822-1928. Retrieved from core.ac.uk/download/pdf/230407597.pdf

Find a Grave. (2011, December 29). Ebenezer Clifford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82641972/ebenezer-clifford

Find a Grave. (2012, July 28). Ira Fish. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/94349593/ira-fish

Find a Grave. (2013, January 26). Jacob Fish. Retrieved from https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/104179113/jacob-fish

Find a Grave. (2013, March 1). Rebecca Fish. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/106015877/rebecca-fish

Find a Grave. (2011, May 25). Hannah Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/70350923/hannah-nute

Find a Grave. (2013, November 30). Capt. Richard Tripe. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/120996046/richard-tripe

Find a Grave. (2012, October 7). Sophia Fish Twombly. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98444616/sophia-twombly

Gale, Leonard D. (1834). Elements of Natural Philosophy. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=8yVbAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA92

Garvin, James L. (1975). Ebenezer Clifford, Architect and Inventor. Retrieved from hne-rs.s3.amazonaws.com/filestore/1/2/8/5/1_b674977800b7e29/12851_7bb45b27bc6a913.pdf

Lewis Publishing Co. (1900). Biographical, Genealogical and Descriptive History of the First Congressional District of New Jersey. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=btUwAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA232

McDuffee, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RY0-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA155

Mitchell, H.E. (1905). Lincoln and Enfield Register. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=q7UTAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA12

NH General Court. (1808). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mSZGAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA325

Phelps, James H. (1877). Collections Relating to the History and Inhabitants of the Town of Townsehend, Vermont. Retrieved from www.ancestraltrackers.net/vt/counties/windham/collections-relating-history-and-inhabitants-town-townshend.pdf

Preble, George H. (1892). History of the United States Navy-Yard, Portsmouth, N.H. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=f5E5KhEzfIgC&pg=PA77

Welles Brothers. (1912). Standard Reference Work, for the Home, School and Library. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=LSRMAQAAMAAJ&pg=PP101

Wikipedia. (2022, May 13). Cave of Antiparos. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiparos#The_cave_of_Antiparos

Wikipedia. (2021, September 20). Fulling. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulling

Wikipedia. (2022, April 10). Mendon, Massachusetts. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mendon,_Massachusetts

Wikipedia. (2022, May 19). Penobscot Expedition. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penobscot_Expedition

Wikipedia. (2022, April 21). Townshend, Vermont. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Townshend,_Vermont

Rochester Division Petition – May 1802

By Muriel Bristol | May 29, 2022

The Mitchell-Cony directory of 1907-08 printed the names of the Rochester, NH, division petitioners of May 28, 1802, as well as the text of the June enabling act that followed the granting of their petition.

Rochester encompassed originally 116.6 square miles. Its South Parish had 45.4 square miles, its West or Northwest Parish had 36.9 square miles, and its North or Northeast Parish had 34.3 square miles. A Rochester town meeting of 1774 voted to divide the town along certain agreed lines. Then the Revolution sidetracked the actual divisions for a time.

Rochester had erected a new meeting house in 1780, for which all the parishes were taxed although it was situated such as to serve primarily the South Parish. The North or Northeast Parish petitioners would complain of having to travel 12 or 15 miles to conduct official business or attend church. Inhabitants of the West or Northwest Parish petitioned for their division in 1783, but their prayer was not answered at that time.

The proposed division lines were called into question in 1793 and outside parties were asked to reexamine or verify them. The West Parish petitioned again to be divided along those verified lines in December 1798 and was set off as Farmington, NH, in 1799.

At the time of this 1802 petition, Rochester consisted of a North or Northeast Parish (Milton that-would-be) and a South Parish (Rochester that-would-remain).

Petitions of this period employed generally a certain structure or style. They featured at their head a salutation. Then the petitioners would “humbly shew,” i.e., they “showed” or set forth, a set of facts that they have identified as being or leading to a problem. After those facts have been set forth, the petitioners “pray” or request that a proposed solution be adopted by the authority to whom they have addressed their petition. Finally, the petitioners affix their names.

(The U.S. Declaration of Independence followed this same general format. It does not address an honored authority – for obvious reasons – but is addressed instead to the opinion of “mankind.” It set forth a set of facts – “a long train of abuses” – that constitute a problem. But in place of praying that a particular solution be adopted by an honored authority – prior petitions to that authority having been answered only with further injuries – it instead “declared” its own solution, followed by the well-known signatures (set forth in columns)).

Here is transcribed the full text of the North Parish’s division petition itself (and the same petitioners’ names as transcribed by Mitchell-Cony, although this time in column order).

To the Honorable Senate and house of Representatives of the State of New Hampshire to be convened at Concord in the 1st Wednesday in June next ~

Humbly sheweth

Your Petitioners, Inhabitants of that part of Rochester calld the North Parish, that as early as the year 1774, the Town of Rochester at a Legal Meeting voted that it was expedient to Divide the Town into three Separate Towns or Parishes, and then voted where the Division lines should be, Since that time have erected and compleated a meeting house solely for the accommodation and Convenience of the South Parish ~ that in the Year 1793 some parts of the Town Complained that the Division lines were not equal and right. A meeting was calld, and the town voted to refer the Subject to a respectable Disinterested Committee who reported in favour in favour of the former lines agreed upon and established by the Town ~ that in the Year 1798 application was made by the Inhabitants of the West Parish, to the Honorable Legislature of the State, for an act of incorporation, agreeably to the abovesaid lines, which was Granted, by reason of said Act the town divided into two parts, that only [Converge?] one upon the other about 150 rods ~ that many of your Petitioners have to travel twelve and some fifteen miles to attend meetings for the public worship of god and to transact Town business ~ And many other inconveniencies are experienced by your Petitioners by reason of their being in an unincorporated State ~

Difficult Word - 1802
The difficult word in brackets in the paragraph above as written. Is it Converge, Commence, or something else?

We therefore pray your Honours to incorporate all that part of Rochester that lies between Farmington and the Easterly line of the State into a Separate and Acting Town with Town priviledges, so as to enable the Inhabitants to assess, Collect and appropriate money for Civil and Religious purposes ~ this we apprehend will have a happy tendency to promote good order, unite and harmonize the whole and make us better men and more useful Citizens ~ And will we hope add a respectable town to the State of New Hampshire.

As we in duty bound shall ever pray ~

Rochester May 28th 1802.

[Page One, Column One:] James McGeoch, John Hanson, Richard Miller,

[Page One, Column Two:] Joseph Plumer, Moses Chamberlin,

[Page One, Column Three:] Benjamin Scates, James C. Hayes, Elijah Horn, Thomas Nutter,

[Page Two, Column One:] Shadrach Hard, Nathaniel Gilman, Benja Haggins, Francis Drew, Paul Jewett, John Witham, Humphrey Goodwin, John Remick, Junr., Saml Chapman, Isaac Brackett, Abraham Dearborn, Joseph Dearborn, Nathaniel Dearborn, William Berry, James Berry, Jr., James Berry, Jeremiah Goodwin, Hanry Rollins, Henery Rollings, Wm Corson, Nathl Jewett, Nat Pinkham, William W. Lord, Benjamin Jones, Samuel Twombly, Jotham Ham, Joseph Cook, Samuel {his X mark} Wentworth, Jr., Shubel Roberts, Stephen Jennes.

[Page Two, Column Two:] Francis Berry, Joseph Berry, James Merrow, Obadiah Witham, Gershom Wentworth, Ruben Jones, John Jones, Josiah Witham, Amos Witham, Samuel J. Wentworth, David Wentworth, Timothy Roberts, John Wentworth, Jerediah Ricker, Limuel Ricker, William Hatch, John Downs, Stephen Wentworth, Jr., Samuel Twombly, Jr., Dudley Burnham, John Twombly, Ernest Corson, Otis Pinkham, Francis Nute, Samuel Nute, Jr., William Tuttle, Robert Mathes, Clement Hayes, Wm Palmer, John Palmer,

[Page Three, Column One:] Dudley Palmer, Ephraim Drew, John Scates, Ephraim Twombly, John Remick, David Corson, Fredrick Cate, John Fifield, Robert Heart, [E] William Jones, Joshua Corson, Richard Horn, Jonathan Dore, Gilman Jewett, Lias Ricker, Ebenezer Ricker, Daniel Dore, Josiah Willey, Robert McGeoch, Nicholas Hartford,

[Page Three, Column Two:] Samuel Nute, John Ricker, Wentworth Cook, Gershom Downs, Samuel Palmer, Peltiah Hanscom, Levi Jones, Richard Walker, John Twombly, Ichabod Hayes, Caleb Wingate, Daniel Hayes, Jr, Jotham Nute, Ezekiel Hays, Joseph Walker.

At the foot of the petition’s third page are notes of its progress through the NH House of Representatives, as indicated by then House Speaker John Prentice (1747-1808) of Londonderry, NH, and the Governor’s Deputy Secretary Nathan Parker.

State of New Hampshire } In the House of Representatives, June 8th 1802

Upon Reading and Considering the foregoing petition and the report of a committee thereon Voted that the prayer thereof be granted and that the petitioners have leave to bring in a bill accordingly.

Sent up for Concurrence. John Prentice, Speaker

In Senate the Same Day Read and Concurred. N. Parker, DySy


See also Northeast Parish in the First (1790) Federal Census and Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census.


References:

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA93

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 36: 1797-1800. Concord, NH

Milton Justice William Palmer, Esq. (1757-1815)

By Muriel Bristol | May 15, 2022

William Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, October 19, 1757, son of Barnabas and Elizabeth (Robinson) Palmer. (See Milton in the News – 1816).

(William Palmer’s known siblings were Mary “Molly” Palmer (1748–1810), Margaret Palmer (1749–1839), Col. Jonathan Palmer (1751–1841), Samuel Palmer (1755-), Elizabeth Palmer (1759-), Barnabas Palmer (1761-1762), John Palmer (1763), Barnabas Palmer (1765-1822), Benjamin Palmer (1766-1806), Joseph Palmer (1769-), Mercy Palmer (1770-1770), and Dudley Palmer (1775–1855)).

Sister Margaret Palmer married in Rochester, NH, July 15, 1766, David Copp. He was born in Rochester, NH, February 12, 1739, son of Jonathan and Esther (Dow) Copp. (Jonathan Copp and David Copp would sign the Association Test of 1776 in Wakefield, NH).

Sister Mary Palmer married, circa 1769, Josiah Main. He was born in Rochester, NH, December 27, 1735, son of Amos and Elizabeth (White) Main. (His father was the “Parson” Main whose statue stands on Main Street in Rochester, NH. Josiah Main was Rochester town clerk from 1771 to 1802).

Father Barnabas Palmer was among the one hundred ninety-eight men who signed the revolutionary Association Test in Rochester, NH, June 1, 1776. (Brother-in-law Josiah Main signed also).

WE, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our Lives and Fortunes, with ARMS, oppose the Hostile Proceedings of the British Fleets, and Armies, against the United American COLONIES (Batchellor, 1910). 

Twenty-two Rochester men “refused” to sign. Another twenty-two Rochester Friends, i.e., “Quakers,” did not “choose” to sign, i.e., they were conscientious objectors.

William Palmer, aged nineteen years, enlisted as a private in Capt. Frederick M. Bell’s 4th Company, 2nd NH Regiment, May 22, 1777. He received a £20 enlistment bounty up front, and £16 8s in pay over the remainder of that year.

(Due to British mercantilist policies, there were very few actual British coins circulating in the colonies. The colonies used instead a bewildering variety of coins from all over, but principally the silver Spanish milled dollar (a “piece of eight”). There were also a wide variety of provincial paper notes and bills of credit, passing usually at a depreciated value relative to “hard” coinage. But the British monetary system was used still in keeping accounts and for setting and resetting the fluctuating exchange rates of the many different monies in circulation. Under this British monetary system, 12 pence (d) made up a shilling (s), and 20 shillings made up a pound (£), so there were 240 pence in a pound).

Exchange Rate Chart of 1759 - Notre DameThe Second Regiment marched initially to take up a station at Fort Ticonderoga, NY. A British force occupied a hilltop that overlooked the fort and the Continental forces were obliged to retreat across the Hudson towards Vermont. Col. Hale’s Second Regiment brought up the rear and had with it the army’s wounded and invalids – there was then a measles epidemic among the troops – with him in the rear.

Although great loss had been suffered in this hasty retreat yet the other portion of the army retreating by land from Ticonderoga fared even worse. Col. Hale’s regiment formed a part of the rear guard. By reason of the great number of invalids and stragglers they were unable to keep up with the main body. They fell back six or seven miles and contrary to Gen. St. Clair’s express orders stopped short at Hubbardton. They were overtaken by the enemy on the morning of July sixth and sharply attacked. The regiment fled panic stricken leaving their Colonel, Adjutant, three Captains, and two other officers with from one to two hundred men prisoners to the enemy. George Heard and Ebenezer Chesley with others whose names are not known were missing from Rochester. Three also of our soldiers died this year while prisoners in the hands of the British (McDuffie, 1892).

(Col. Nathan Hale of New Hampshire should not be confused with Captain Nathan Hale of Connecticut, who had been hanged as a spy in the previous year).

Nathan Hale was from Rindge. Upon the retreat from Ticonderoga, in July of this year, Col. Hale’s regiment was ordered to cover the rear of the invalids, and fell some six or seven miles in the rear. The next morning, July 7, he was attacked by an advanced party of the enemy at Hubbardton, and suffered severely, the colonel, three captains, his adjutant, and one hundred men being taken prisoners, and his major, the gallant Benjamin Titcomb, being severely wounded (NH Adjutant General, 1866). 

2nd NH Regimental Flag
2nd NH Regimental Flag. The 2nd NH Regiment marched behind this flag to Fort Ticonderoga. It was captured by the British at Fort Anne during the retreat from Fort Ticonderoga. Their regiment’s commander, Col. Nathan Hale, who had purchased the flag, would be captured at Hubbardton, VT.

Fifer Ebenezer Fletcher (1761-1831) of the Third Company would later recall being wounded when the British overtook the rearguard …

Having just recovered from the measles, and not being able to march with the main body, I fell in the rear. The morning after our retreat, orders came very early for the troops to refresh and be ready for marching. Some were eating, some were cooking, and all in a very unfit posture for battle. Just as the sun rose, there was a cry “The enemy are upon us.” Looking around I saw the enemy in line of battle. Orders came to lay down our packs and be ready for action. The fire instantly began. We were but a few in number compared to the enemy. At the commencement of the battle, many of our party retreated back into the woods. Capt. Carr came up and says, “My lads advance, we shall beat them yet.” A few of us followed him in view of the enemy. Every man was trying to secure himself behind girdled trees, which were standing on the place of action. I made shelter for myself and discharged my piece. Having loaded again and taken aim, my piece misfired. I brought the same a second time to my face, but before I had time to discharge it, I received a musket ball in the small of my back, and fell with my gun cocked… (Fletcher, 1798).

Fletcher was captured but would later escape. The Fourth Company’s regimental commander, Col. Hale, was captured there too. He was released for a time on parole, but when that parole was revoked, he died in captivity in 1780. He would be replaced by Lt. Col. George Reid (1733–1815), who would remain their commander for the rest of the war.

The subsequent Battle(s) of Saratoga was actually two battles separated by several weeks. The first of them was the Battle of Freeman’s Farm (September 19, 1777), followed by the Battle of Bemis Heights (October 7, 1777).

The Fourth Company’s commander, Capt. Frederick M. Bell (1749-1777), was mortally wounded in the Battle of Freeman’s Farm, September 19, 1777.

Frederic M. Bell, of Dover, was wounded in the battle of Stillwater [Freeman’s Farm], was removed to the hospital, but died of his wound (NH Adjutant General, 1866). 

Capt. Bell’s widow, Elezabeth [(Gage)] Bell (1753-1846), would describe his death there in her petition to the NH Legislature of October 1784 …

… untill the 19th of Septemr when at the head of his Coy Company in an Engagement with the Enemies of his Country he received a Wound which has deprived her forever of the Best of husbands …

The Second NH Regiment fought also in Gen. Enoch Poor’s Brigade at the Battle of Bemis Heights, NY, October 7, 1777, after which British Gen. Burgoyne surrendered his army, October 17, 1777. This ended the Saratoga Campaign, which had been a British attempt to split the New England colonies from the other colonies.

William Palmer appeared in a muster roll of Capt. James Carr’s company, in Col. Nathan Hale’s 2nd NH Regiment, February 21, 1778, and in the same company, but Col. Nathan Hale’s 2nd NH Battalion, March 8, 1778. Palmer was listed among those who had enlisted originally for the term of three years. He was carried on both muster rolls as being “sick in camp,” their winter camp being situated at Valley Forge, PA, as were many others encamped with him.

Col. George Reid’s Second NH Regiment fought in Gen. Enoch Poor’s Brigade at the Battle of Monmouth, NJ, June 28, 1778.

William Palmer of the Fourth Company, Second NH Regiment, received one 8s hat, two 30s shirts, one pair of 36s leather breeches, two pairs of 6s stockings, and two pairs of 8s shoes. (Summing to £6 12s). These disbursements appeared in a commissary’s account book, whose final entry was dated July 1778.

William Palmer was promoted to Corporal, June 8, 1779. The Second NH Regiment was sent as a part of General John Sullivan’s controversial 1779 campaign against Loyalists and British-allied Iroquois in Pennsylvania and western New York.

It remains to trace the fortunes of those who were engaged in the regular army. This can be done only by noticing the services of the regiments of which they formed a part. During August and September, 1779, they were in Sullivan’s expedition against the Senecas. The object of this expedition was the capture of Niagara, and the destruction of the villages of the Indians, who had been guilty of great outrages upon the Americans. It was conducted through a region almost entirely unknown, and covered with forests, and the march was beset with unusual dangers and difficulties. Many villages were burned, orchards cut down, and crops destroyed; yet the main object was not accomplished, and the enterprise failed of beneficial results. Several engagements took place, the most severe of which was at Newtown, now Elmira, New York, in which the enemy were led by the celebrated chief, Joseph Brant. The New Hampshire troops, under Poor, sustained the brunt of the battle, and behaved with great coolness and intrepidity (McDuffie, 1892).

2nd NH Accounts - William Palmer (Dr)
The Debtor (Dr) side of the 2nd NH Regiment’s ledger account with William Palmer of its 4th Company, 1777-80. This tallies the amounts (in pounds (£)) of money and goods, including clothing, and “his part of Rum, Sugar, &c” that it paid or issued to Palmer.

Col. George Reid’s Second NH Regiment fought in Gen. Enoch Poor’s Brigade at the Battle of Newtown, NY, August 29, 1779.

2nd NH Accounts - William Palmer (Cr)
The Creditor (Cr) side of the 2nd NH Regiment’s ledger account with William Palmer of its 4th Company, 1777-80. This tallies the value (in pounds (£)) of services provided by Palmer. The two accounts, creditor and debtor, should “balance,” i.e., they should sum to the same final numbers. This credit account also notes the dates of his promotions to Corporal (June 8, 1779) and Sergeant (Jany 7, 1780), as his pay rate would have increased with each promotion.

Forty-two NH officers in Continental regiments petitioned the NH legislature in 1779 asking it to make them, their men, and their families whole again after their having been paid for over a year in depreciating Continental paper dollars. (Retaining at that point only 16.7% of their face value, and still falling). (Lt. Col. Reid and Capt. Carr were among those that signed).

… Our Pay, once liberal, has become of little Value, our Families starving, our Money refused, and publick Supplies denied our Families; when we find Gentleman of Rank in the United States publickly refusing the currency of the Continent, and all Ranks of People who would be thought virtuous, honest and religious, openly fixing a Depreciation and avowing a right of selling Six for one compared with Silver Money, and secretly promoting a further Depreciation – We are alarmed Justly and greatly alarmed …

William Palmer appeared in a pay depreciation list or report of the Fourth Company, of the Second NH Regiment, as being owed an additional $173.69 for his services over 1777-79, as a Private and then Corporal. This monetary amount appeared in a column labeled “amount of depreciation,” i.e., this calculation seems to have been intended to adjust or make up for prior amounts calculated or paid to him with depreciated Continental paper currency. (“Not worth a Continental”). Colonel George Reid commanded the regiment. 

Willm Palmer appeared in a pay roll for the Fourth Company, of the Second NH Regiment, as having been paid $40 for his services in 1780 as a Corporal and then Sergeant. (He had been promoted to Sergeant, January 7, 1780). Colonel George Reid commanded the regiment.

William Palmer received his discharge, likely in one of the middle colonies, April 30, 1780, and came home from there, probably on foot. Former Rochester, NH, selectmen Ebenezer Tebbetts and Barnabas Palmer certified retroactively, in June 1780, that they had paid an enlistment bounty to five Rochester men, including Palmer’s son, Wm Palmer, back in May 1777.

Rochester Bounty Certificate - June 1780Rochester 22nd June 1780.
This Certify all whome it may Concern that the men of the following Names Recd a Town Bounty of us the Subscribers (being Selectmen for the Town afforesaid) in May the 23rd 1777 whose Names are as followeth, D. Wengate, Enoch Wengate, Wm Palmer, D. Watson, Thos Chamberlin.
Ebenr Tebbetts, Barnabas Palmer { Selectmen at that ti time.

William Palmer married (1st), in 1783, Susanna Twombly. She was born in 1764. (Their known children were Elizabeth “Betsy” Palmer (1783-1857), Daniel Palmer (1786-1863), and Nancy Palmer (1788-1876)).

Daughter Elizabeth “Betsy” Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, September 28, 1783.

Palmer, William - 1785
William Palmer’s petition signature of August 30, 1785. The “P” of Palmer seems to be formed with two parts: an initial “L” with a swirl atop it. (This may be compared with his signature of 1813 (see below).

William Palmer was one of three hundred ten Rochester inhabitants that petitioned the NH legislature, August 30, 1785, seeking repeal of an act requiring milled boards to be square-edged and an inch thick (and other lumber in proportion). Those inhabitants described themselves then as being “largely Concerned in Lumber.” They sought also repeal of an act forbidding transport of lumber to the British West Indies, and seeking the issuance of a new paper money (Hammond, 1884).

Son Daniel Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, July 8, 1786.

During the Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress had inflated the Continental paper dollar into nothingness. (“Not worth a Continental”). (The wartime NH paper dollar was not in much better shape and was due to expire in two months).

NH Paper Dollar - 1780Under the Articles of Confederation, Congress could not tax the citizenry directly. It pressed for State-level taxes to pay off its Revolutionary War debts. This came in the midst of a serious post-war recession and a shortage of “hard” money, i.e., real money, with which to pay them.

In August [1786], a convention of committees from about thirty [NH] towns assembled, agreed upon, and preferred to the general court a long petition, setting forth their grievances on account of the scarcity of money, and praying for an emission of paper bills of credit, in which there is no single trace of an idea of redemption, or any one attempt to give the currency a foundation; but the whole seems predicated on a supposition that the general court by a mere act of legislation, by words and signs, could impress an intrinsic value on paper; which is as fully absurd as it would be to suppose, that the legislature had the power of Midas, and could, from a single touch, turn stones and sticks into gold; their great object was, however, to have this paper [be] a tender for all debts and taxes, and no plan is hinted by which the people are to get this money out of the treasury; but it rather seems that they expected the general court to apportion it among the people at large (NH Historical Society, 1832).

On September 20, 1786, over two hundred armed men – including militiamen – assembled where the legislature was meeting in Exeter, NH, and more or less besieged it. They demanded the issuance of a new NH paper money. (For which the three hundred ten Rochester petitioners of the year before had prayed also). This event would be known as the “Exeter Riot” or the “Paper Money Riot.” (It coincided in time and purposes with the lengthier and better-known “Shay’s Rebellion” in neighboring Massachusetts).

Reid, Gen. GeorgeSgt. Palmer’s former regimental commander, Col. George Reid of Londonderry, NH, was by now a Brigadier General in the NH militia. NH President John Sullivan called him out to suppress the Exeter protesters or rioters. (The “President” of NH would now be termed its Governor).

He [Gen. Reid] was brigadier general in the New Hampshire Militia in 1785, and as such, in 1786, led a portion of his command, by order of President [John] Sullivan, against the rebels in arms against the Legislature, in session at Exeter (NH Adjutant General, 1866).

Gen. Reid and his militia dispersed the protesters and the “Paper Money Riot” came to an end, if not the underlying paper money problems that had spawned it. (Several of its leaders were charged with treason but then pardoned).

Daughter Nancy Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, March 9, 1788.

Willm Palmer headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included one male aged-plus years [himself], three females [Susanna (Twombly) Palmer, Elizabeth Palmer, and Nancy Palmer], and one male aged under-16 years [Daniel Palmer]. His household was enumerated between those of Joseph Hait and John Palmer.

Susanna (Twombly) Palmer died in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, January 19, 1790.

William Palmer married (2nd), August 30, 1791, Deborah Ham. She was born in Dover, NH, February 5, 1766, daughter of Dodavah and Lydia (Plummer) Ham. (Their known children were Susanna Palmer (1792-1876), Dodavah Palmer (b. 1794), William Palmer (1796-1877), Lydia Palmer (1799–1897), Rebecca Palmer (1801–1883), Deborah Palmer (1803–1877), Nathaniel Ham Palmer (1805), Achsah Page Palmer (1807–1880), Hannah P. Palmer (1810–1889)).

William Palmer was a Rochester, NH, selectman in the years 1791 to 1795.

Lt. William Palmer was a subscriber of the Rochester Social Library in 1792, as were Levi Jones, Jotham NuteBarnabas Palmer, Beard Plumer, and Joseph Walker (McDuffee, 1892). (Palmer had risen to sergeant during the Revolutionary War. His lieutenancy in this library subscriber list of 1792 would have been his post-war militia rank).

Daughter Susanna Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, May 20, 1792. She would seem to have been a namesake for her father’s first wife, Susanna (Twombly) Palmer. Son Dodavah Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, January 29, 1794. He was a namesake for his maternal grandfather, Dodavah Ham.

Six Rochester, NH, men, including brother-in-law David Copp, petitioned to have John Plummer, Jr., and Lt. William Palmer appointed as Rochester, NH, justices-of-the-peace, February 14, 1794.

To His Excellency the Governor & Honble Council of the State of New Hampshire ~
Whereas it would be good for the State in general & more especially for the Town of Rochester to have Appointed Justices of the Peace in said Town and We beg leave to recommend John Plummer Junr and Lieut William Palmer and pray your Excellency & Honours that they may be appointed to that Office ~ And your Petitioners will Pray & c.
Exeter Feby 14th 1794 ~
James How, David Copp, Charles Hodgdon, John Waldron, Thos Tash, Jr, Isaac Waldron.

William Palmer was one of Rochester’s NH state representatives in the years 1794-1800.

US Specie Tax, 1794-95
Rochester’s account of its “Proportion of the several Towns for raising Fifty Seven Thousand Two Hundred Sixty Eight Dollars (equal to Seventeen Thousand One Hundred Eighty Pounds Eight Shillings) in Interest, Indents, for the use of the United States agreeably to an Act of the General Court passed the Seventh day of February, 1789, to be paid into the Treasury by the first day of July next.”

Wm Palmer, Esqr, received or collected some of Rochester’s share of a Federal “Specie Tax” in December 1794 and December 1795. (“Specie” was “hard” money, i.e., gold and silver coinage, as opposed to paper notes). One may note that he bore now the appellation “Esquire,” i.e., his appointment as a Rochester justice-of-the-peace had been made. As the terms ran for five years; one might expect him to be renewed in 1799, 1804, etc. The Plummer’s Ridge and Milton Three Ponds district school teacher of 1796-1805 would remember him as “Esquire” Palmer. (See Milton Teacher of 1796-1805).

Son William Palmer [Jr.] was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, July 17, 1796. Daughter Lydia Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, February 21, 1799.

Daughter Elizabeth “Betsy” Palmer married in Wakefield, NH, October 31, 1799, Caleb Wingate, both of Rochester, NH. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony. Caleb Wingate was born in Milton, June 18, 1769, son of John and Elizabeth (Cushing) Wingate.

William Palmer was an assessor for Rochester, NH, in 1800.

Wm Palmer, Esqr, headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years, two females aged 26-44 years, one male aged 10-15, one female aged 10-15, two males aged under-10 years, two females aged under-10 years. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Daughter Rebecca Palmer was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, in 1801.

William Palmer, as well as his sons-in-law, Isaac Hayes and Caleb Wingate, signed the Rochester division petition of May 28, 1802. Brothers Samuel Palmer, John Palmer, and Dudley Palmer signed also. (Father Barnabas Palmer did not so sign).

The first town meeting in Milton was called by William Palmer, Esq., and held at the dwelling-house of Lieut. Elijah Horn (now the dwelling house of Lewis B. Twombly) on the 30th day of August 1802, at which meeting Beard Plumer was chosen moderator; Gilman Jewett, town clerk; and William Palmer, John Fish, John Remick, Jr., selectmen (Hurd, 1882).

William Palmer was one of Milton’s first three selectmen, holding that office from 1802 to 1805 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). His son-in-law, Caleb Wingate, served also on the meetinghouse building committee in 1804. (See also Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

The first meetinghouse in Milton was erected on the Ridge in accordance with a vote passed at the annual meeting in 1802. John Fish, Beard Plumer and Gilman Jewett, were the executive committee. The lot on which the building was erected was purchased of Thomas and Aaron Downes for $26. The meetinghouse was completed at a cost of about $2,400, by Caleb Wingate, Capt. Daniel Hayes and Gilman Jewett. The net cost of the church, however, was not so large, as the pews were sold for nearly $2,000. The first service was held in 1804 and from that time until after 1830, the meetinghouse was constantly in use. The first preachers to occupy the pulpit were Rev. Gideon Burt and Rev. Christopher Page both of whom were here in 1804 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). 

Daughter Deborah Palmer was born in Milton in 1803.

Mother Elizabeth (Robinson) Palmer died in 1804. (Some sources have a widowed Barnabas Palmer, living thereafter with their son, William Palmer, on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton for the remainder of his life. However, his own Milton household, consisting of himself alone, was enumerated separately in the Third (1810) Federal Census).

William Palmer received his first appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, December 5, 1804. As he had been termed “Esq.” in Rochester tax accounts of 1794-95, one might infer that he had been already a Rochester justice-of-the-peace since at least that time.

Justices of the Peace and of the Quorum for the County of Strafford
William Palmer, Milton, December 5th 1804, Sepr 19, 1809.

A week after his reappointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, four Strafford County residents nominated him for appointment to the higher office of Strafford County probate judge.

To his Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council of the State of New Hampshire ~
Whereas the office of the Judge of Probate for the county of Strafford by reason of the age of the present Judge, will become vacant in the month of February next, ~ the undersigned take the liberty to name and recommend as the most suitable person in our opinion in said county to fill said vacancy, William Palmer Esqr of Milton.
Concord, Decr 12th 1804. ~
John Fish, Henry Pike, Andw Wentworth, Isaac Lord.

This probate recommendation does not seem to have been fulfilled. Palmer’s supporters’ residences spanned the county (which then included what is now Carroll County). John Fish (c1760-181?) had been elected with Palmer and John Remick, Jr., as an original Milton selectman, would succeed Gilman Jewett as Milton town clerk, and eventually become a Milton justice-of-the-peace. Henry Pike (1758-1825) of Middleton, NH, was a fellow Revolutionary veteran, Maj. Andrew Wentworth (c1765-1813) of Somersworth, NH, was a militia officer and son of a Strafford County probate judge, and Isaac Lord (1772-1838) of Effingham, NH, was a justice-of-the-peace.

Son Nathaniel Ham Palmer was born in Milton in 1805. Daughter Achsah Page Palmer was born in Milton in 1807. (She was a namesake for Beard Plummer’s second wife, Achsah Page).

William Palmer served a second stint as Milton selectman, from 1807 to 1811 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Son Daniel Palmer married in Rochester, NH, September 14, 1809, Abigail Ellis, both of Milton. She was born in Rochester, NH, February 7, 1788.

William Palmer received a renewal of his appointment as Milton justice-of-the-peace, September 19, 1809, at which point he “advanced” to justice “in quorum.”

Wm Palmer headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years, one female aged 26-44 years, one male aged 16-25 years, one female aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, one female aged 10-15 years, one male aged under-10 years, three females aged under-10 years. His household was enumerated between those of Peter Gerrish and Benair Colby.

Barnabas Palmer headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years. His household was enumerated between those of Gilbert Perkin and John Palmer.

Daughter Hannah P. Palmer was born in Milton in 1810.

Sister Mary (Palmer) Main died in Rochester, NH, January 18, 1810, aged sixty-one years.

Deborah (Ham) Palmer died in 1813.

Palmer, Wm - 1813
William Palmer’s petition signature of 1813. The “P” of Palmer seems again to be formed with two parts: an initial “L” with a swirl atop it. (This may be compared with his signature of 1785 (see above).

Milton sent William Palmer to the NH legislature as its state representative in the years 1813-15. Rep. William Palmer recommended John Remick, Jr., for appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace in 1813 (See Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1813).

On 10 Mar. 1814 David [Farnham] sold lot #8, Middleton, NH, consisting of 100 acres, to William Palmer of Milton, NH, for $5 and five annual mortgage payments of $255; in which David Farnham (likely his father) and Daniel Palmer were witnesses (Farnham, 1999).

William Palmer signed the Milton Congregational Society petition of June 1814. His father Barnibas Palmer signed also. (See Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

Son Dodavah Palmer served in Col. Sise’s 3rd NH Regiment in 1814.

William Palmer received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, September 29, 1814. He would serve only nine months of this final five-year term.

Daughter Nancy Palmer married in Wakefield, NH, March 9, 1815, Isaac Hayes, both of Milton. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony. Isaac Hayes was born in Rochester, NH, 1787, son of George S. and Ann (Hawkins) Hayes.

William Palmer made his last will, April 21, 1815. In it he devised property and/or money to the children of his first marriage, Betsy Wingate, Daniel Palmer, Nancy Hayes; and to the children of his second marriage, Susannah Palmer, Dodavah Palmer, William Palmer, Lydia Palmer, Rebecca Palmer, Deborah Palmer, Nathaniel H. Palmer, Achsah Palmer, and Hannah Palmer. He named John Ham of Gilmanton, NH, as guardian of minor children, Nathaniel H. Palmer, Achsah Palmer, and Hannah Palmer. He appointed his sons Dodavah Palmer and William Palmer as joint executors, but added [son-in-law] Caleb Wingate as an additional executor in a codicil. Benjamin Scates, Isaac Hayes, and Levi Jones signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 14:127). (See Last Will of William Palmer, Esq. (1757-1815)).

William Palmer died in Milton, April 23, 1815, aged fifty-seven years, six months, and nine days. His last will was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held at Dover, NH, April 26, 1815 (Strafford County Probate, 14:127).

Daughter Achsah Palmer and father Barnabas Palmer were two of the nine founding members when the newly incorporated Milton Congregational Society organized itself, September 8, 1815. (See Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1815-26).

Son Dodavah Palmer signed the Milton road weight petition of 1816. (See Milton Road Weight Petition – 1816).

Father Barnabas Palmer died in Milton, October 26, 1816, aged ninety-six [?] years.

DEATHS. At Milton, N.H., Mr. Barnabas Palmer, 96 – born in Cork, Ireland. He left his native country when about sixteen years old, and came to this, where he settled and became the father of a numerous family of sons and daughters – he lost an arm (right) in the battle of Louisburg, at that time a major in the British service – he was many years a member of the legislature of New Hampshire before and after the Revolution, a warm and zealous advocate for American Independence, and whilst his voice was heard in our councils with wonder, he inspired and armed his sons for the field, whom he had the satisfaction to see return victorious (Salem Gazette (Salem, MA), November 8, 1816).

On 20 Jan. 1817 David [Farnham] repurchased this [lot #8, Middleton, NH,] land for $200 from Caleb Wingate and Dodavah Palmer, of Milton, administrators [of] the estate of William Palmer, late of Milton, Esq. Witnesses were James Roberts and Levi Jones (Farnham, 1999).

Daughter Susanna Palmer married in Rochester, NH, March 4, 1817, John C. Lord, both of Milton. He was born in Lebanon, ME, in 1787, son of Elisha and Dorcas (Goodwin) Lord.

Brother-in-law Lt. Col. David Copp died in Wakefield, NH, March 13, 1817, aged seventy-eight years.

Son Daniel Palmer signed one of the Milton militia division petitions of 1820 (See Milton Militia Division Petitions – November 1820).

Son William Palmer married in Milton, November 19, 1820, Mary Nutter, both of Milton. Justice Levi Jones performed the ceremony.

Son Dodavah Palmer married in Rochester, NH, September 23, 1821, Abigail H. Hayes, he of Newington, NH, and she of Rochester, NH.

Brother-in-law Josiah Main died in Rochester, November 11, 1823, aged eighty-seven years. (He appeared in a Rochester “Table of Longevity,” a compilation of those who lived to be eighty years of age or older).

Son Dodavah Palmer died October 22, 1824.

Sister Margaret “Peggy” (Palmer) Copp died in Wakefield, NH, August 15, 1839, aged ninety years.

DEATHS. In Wakefield, Mrs. Margaret Copp, relict of the late David Copp, Esq, aged 90 (NH Gazette, August 27, 1839).

Brother Jonathan Palmer died in Wakefield, NH, January 15, 1841, aged eighty-nine years.

DEATHS. In Wakefield, Jan. 15, Col. Jonathan Palmer, in his 90th year. He was a native of Rochester, and moved up to W. [Wakefield] when two or three families constituted the entire population, and when there was scarcely a dwelling between his own and the Canadas (Portsmouth Journal, January 17, 1841).

Daughter Deborah Palmer married in 1846, Ebenezer Buzzell. Son-in-law Caleb Wingate died in Sebec, ME, June 18, 1850.

Son-in-law John C. Lord died in Dover, NH, in 1857.

Daughter Elizabeth “Betsy” (Palmer) Wingate died in Sebec, ME, August 13, 1857, aged seventy-three years, eleven months, and fifteen days.

Son Daniel Palmer died in 1863.

Son-in-law Isaac Hayes died in Milton, March 8, 1863.

Daughter-in-law Abigail (Ellis) Palmer died in Rochester, NH, December 9, 1867.

Daughter Nancy (Palmer) Hayes died in Milton, July 30, 1870.

Daughter Susanna (Palmer) Lord died of cholera morbus in Dover, NH, September 4, 1876, aged eighty-four years.

Son William Palmer, Jr. died in 1877. Daughter Deborah (Palmer) Buzzell died in 1877.

Daughter Achsah P. (Palmer) Hubbard died in 1880.

Daughter Rebecca (Palmer) Berry died of heart disease in Milton, November 22, 1883, aged eighty-two years, seven months.

HERE AND THERE. There was observed in Dover on Friday, the 21st instant, the birthday of Mrs. Lydia Davis who was born on Plumer’s Ridge, Milton, in 1799. On the day named exercises in honor of Washington took place in that one of the public schools which is taught by Mrs. Davis’ grand daughter whose birthday it also was, the combination of circumstances made the occasion thus notable in more ways than one (Farmington News, February 28, 1886).

Daughter Hannah (Palmer) Daniels died of erysipelas (and interstitial nephritis) in Barrington, NH, March 20, 1889, aged seventy-nine years, two months, and five days.

Daughter Lydia (Palmer) Davis died of old age in Dover, NH, October 18, 1897, aged ninety-eight years, seven years, and twenty-seven years.

Of the death of Mrs. Lydia Davis, grandmother of Mrs. F.H. Lathrop, of Swan Lake, and J.E. Jenkins, of this paper, the Dover Republican says: “… She was born in Milton, Feb. 21, 1799, daughter of Wm. Palmer, who served in the revolutionary war, hence was a genuine ‘Daughter of the Revolution.’ She has lived in Dover 74 years and on the same street on which she died. She joined the First Church (Congregational) in Dover 62 years ago last June and has always remained a most exemplary and worthy member of that ancient organization of which she was the senior in membership as well as in age.” The Exeter, N.H., News-Letter says: “A gloriously good Christian woman. If all should become like her in life and character we might forget evils of earth amid the bright beams of the morning sun of the millennium” (Estherville Daily News (Estherville, IA), November 11, 1897).


References:

Batchellor, Albert S. (1910). Miscellaneous Revolutionary Documents of New Hampshire: Including the Association Test, the Pension Rolls, and Other Important Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MIhQAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA127

Farnham, Russell C. (1999). New England Descendants of the Immigrant Ralph Farnum of Rochester, Kent County, England, and Ipswich, Massachusetts. Portsmouth, NH: Peter Randall Publishing

Find a Grave. (2016, July 21). Elizabeth Gage [Bell] Bennett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/167254594/elizabeth-bennett

Find a Grave. (2014, May 2). Rebecca Palmer Berry. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/129045606/rebecca-berry

Find a Grave. (2010, July 2). Deborah Palmer Buzzell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/54383783/deborah-buzzell

Find a Grave. (2011, September 26). [Maj.] James Carr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/77117657/james-carr

Find a Grave. (2012, June 14). Margaret “Peggy” Palmer Copp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/91925387/margaret-copp

Find a Grave. (2016, April 9). Hannah P. Palmer Daniels. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/160796591/hannah-p-daniels

Find a Grave. (2022, February 7). Lydia Palmer Davis. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236557320/lydia-davis

Find a Grave. (2010, December 13. Ebenezer Fletcher. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/62866498/ebenezer-fletcher

Find a Grave. (2012, October 6). Nancy Palmer Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98391660/nancy-hayes

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Milton Mills’ Miller Gilman Jewett (1777-1856)

By Muriel Bristol | May 8, 2022

Gilman Jewett was born in Exeter, NH, January 18, 1777, son of Paul and Elizabeth ((Gilman) Gilman) Jewett. (Paul Jewett had been among the Exeter inhabitants that petitioned the revolutionary Committee of Public Safety, July 9, 1776, complaining about merchants hoarding goods. Later that same year (per a Jewett genealogy): It appears from the records of Exeter that he [Paul Jewett] owned slaves, as “Nov. 26, 1776, two negroes of Paul Jewett married” (Jewett, 1908)).

Gilman Jewett of Exeter, NH, graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy with its Class of 1789. (In so doing, he might have stood out as an educated man, as very few people – and those mostly ministers and physicians – pursued then any studies beyond completing their local district school educations (roughly eighth grade)).

Father Paul Jewett of Exeter, NH has been said to have settled in the Northeast Parish of Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, circa 1785-86.

Paul Jewett, Amos Witham, Reuben Jones and others were the first settlers of the section near the West Branch river. They came probably about 1785 or 1786.
Among the first who settled at Three Ponds were Samuel Palmer, Levi Burgen, John Fish, Paul Jewett, Pelatiah Hanscom, Robert McGooch, and others (Hurd, 1882).

While the Jewetts may have had land or mill interests in Milton as early as the 1780s, his primary residence seems to have remained still in Exeter, NH, during the period 1790-96.

Father Paul Jewett headed an Exeter, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], two females [Elizabeth ((Gilman) Gilman) Jewett and Sally D. Jewett], and two males aged under-16 years [Gilman Jewett and Nathaniel Jewett].

Mother Elizabeth ((Gilman) Gilman) Jewett died in Exeter, NH, in 1796, aged fifty-four years. It would seem that the Jewett family moved finally to the Northeast Parish of Rochester, NH, i.e., Milton, after her death. At some point, either in Exeter, NH, or later, Paul Jewett married (2nd) Mary A. Avery.

… very soon after this a saw-mill was built at Milton Mills by a Mr. Nock. This mill soon went into the hands of Paul Jewett, and was subsequently known as the Jewett mill. This place was known for a long time as Shapleigh Mills (Hurd, 1882).

Father Paul Jewett signed the Salmon Falls sawmill petition of 1797. (See Salmon Falls Sawmill Petition – 1797).

Gilman Jewett married (1st) in Exeter, NH, September 10, 1798, Sally Mead, he of Rochester, NH, and she of Newmarket, NH. She was born in Newmarket, NH, September 16, 1775, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah (Dearborn) Mead. (Their known children would be Sarah D. Jewett (1799-1869), Eliza G. Jewett (1804-1877), Paul Jewett (1814-1861), and Asa Jewett (1815-1883)).

Daughter Sarah Dearborn “Sally” Jewett was born in Rochester, NH, September 23, 1799. She was a namesake for her maternal grandmother, Sarah (Dearborn) Mead.

Sister “Mrs. Polly” Jewett married in Wakefield, NH, in 1800, Noah Robinson, he of Wakefield, NH, and she of Rochester, NH. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony.

Father Paul Jewett headed a Rochester Northeast Parish household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus [himself], one female aged 45-plus [Mary A. (Avery) Jewett], one male aged 16-25 years [Nathaniel Jewett], two females aged 16-25 years [Polly Jewett], one male aged 10-15 years, and one female aged 10-15 years. (See also Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Gilman Jewett headed a Rochester Northeast Parish household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-25 years [himself], two females aged 16-25 years [Sally (Mead) Jewett], and one female aged under-10 years [Sally D. Jewett]. (See also Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Gilman Jewett, as well as his father, Paul Jewett, signed the Rochester division petition of May 28, 1802. (Brother Nathaniel Jewett did not so sign). Paul Jewett received Milton’s first justice-of-the-peace appointment, June 9, 1802, at the time of its founding. (William Palmer, Esq., already held an appointment as a Rochester justice-of-the-peace).

The first town meeting in Milton was called by William Palmer, Esq., and held at the dwelling-house of Lieut. Elijah Horn (now the dwelling house of Lewis B. Twombly) on the 30th day of August 1802, at which meeting Beard Plumer was chosen moderator; Gilman Jewett, town clerk; and William Palmer, John Fish, John Remick, Jr., selectmen (Hurd, 1882).

Gilman Jewett was Milton’s first town clerk, holding that office from 1802 to 1806. He was succeeded by John Fish. Jewett served also on the meetinghouse building committee in 1804. (See also Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

The first meetinghouse in Milton was erected on the Ridge in accordance with a vote passed at the annual meeting in 1802. John Fish, Beard Plumer and Gilman Jewett, were the executive committee. The lot on which the building was erected was purchased of Thomas and Aaron Downes for $26. The meetinghouse was completed at a cost of about $2,400, by Caleb Wingate, Capt. Daniel Hayes and Gilman Jewett. The net cost of the church, however, was not so large, as the pews were sold for nearly $2,000. The first service was held in 1804 and from that time until after 1830, the meetinghouse was constantly in use. The first preachers to occupy the pulpit were Rev. Gideon Burt and Rev. Christopher Page both of whom were here in 1804 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). 

Daughter Eliza G. Jewett was born in Milton, December 3, 1804. (She was a namesake for her paternal grandmother, Elizabeth ((Gilman) Gilman) Jewett. She would have later a younger cousin with the same name).

Father-in-law Benjamin Mead died in Newmarket, NH, in 1805.

Merchant James Rundlett of Portsmouth, NH, sold butter on commission for Gilman Jewett’s brother-in-law, Noah Robinson of Wakefield, NH, in 1809.

His books show forty-three kegs of butter received in 1809 from Noah Robinson of Wakefield, which he sold for $380.33 on a commission of 2½% (May, 1946).

Brother Nathaniel Jewett married in Wakefield, NH, March 18, 1810, Nancy J. Rogers, both of Milton. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony. (Their known children would be Eliza G. Jewett (1811–1882), James Jewett (1813–1815), Mary Rogers Jewett (1817–1850), James J. Jewett (1822–1876), David Jewett (1825–1881), John R. Jewett (1827–1858), and Nathaniel Jewett (1827–1828)).

Father Paul Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself]. one female aged 45-plus years [Mary (Avery) Jewett], and two males aged 16-25 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Obadiah Witham and Jona Young. (And on the same page as Nathl Jewett).

Gilman Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Sally (Mead) Jewett], two females aged under-10 years [Sally D. Jewett and Eliza G. Jewett], and one male aged under-10 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Nicholas Harford and Thos Wentworth.

Brother Nathl Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Nancy (Rogers) Jewett], two males aged 16-25 years, one female aged 16-25 years, and one female aged 10-15 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Josiah Witham and Timo Wentworth. (And on the same page as Paul Jewett).

Son Paul Jewett was born in Milton, in 1814. He was a namesake for his paternal grandfather, Paul Jewett, and was sometimes called Paul Jewett, “Jr.” Son Asa Jewett was born in Milton, in 1815.

Sally (Mead) Jewett died circa 1817.

Daughter Sarah D. Jewett married in Milton, September 19, 1819, James Pinkham, both of Milton. Justice-of-the-peace Levi Jones performed the ceremony. (Their known children would be Lucy D. Pinkham (1819–1860), Nancy B. Pinkham (1821–), Mary E. Pinkham (1822–), James A. Pinkham (1824–1826), James B. Pinkham (1826–1867), Susan A. Pinkham (1828–1917), Sarah Y. Pinkham (1830–), Hannah M. Pinkham (1832–1914), Nathaniel G. Pinkham (1834–1906), John D. Pinkham (1837–1907), and Benjamin W. Pinkham (1837–1839)).

Father Paul Jewett of Milton made his last will, April 20, 1819. He devised a four-acre Milton lot and its buildings to Gilman Jewett, it being where Gilman then lived. He devised to the lawful heirs of Gilman Jewett a fifty-acre lot (purchased of N.A. and John Haven), and the Alpheus Spring lot, both in Shapleigh, ME, excepting that portion set off to Nathaniel Jewett and another portion being improved by Josiah Witham. (Acton, ME, which would border Milton Mills, was yet to be created from the western part of Shapleigh, ME). Witham would pay them for the portion he improved.

Paul Jewett’s will devised all his other Milton land and the forty-acre Wentworth lot in Shapleigh, ME, to his daughter Polly Robinson. She was to receive also his “Saw Mill & privilege & Iron Works, Saws & all the appurtenances thereto belonging, and grist mill & privilege, all I own on both side the river with all the appurtenances belonging thereto.” She was to receive also all his farming utensils.

Paul Jewett’s will reserved forty-five acres of Milton land, as fenced, for Nathaniel Jewett. This included a privilege of the Saw Mill and iron works associated with it. Nathaniel would also receive a twelve-acre portion of the aforementioned Spring Lot, and the one hundred eleven-acre Guppy Lot in Shapleigh, ME, and one-half of his money at interest, money, stock, and sheep. He named Gilman Jewett, Noah Robinson, and Nathaniel Jewett as his executors. John Remick, Junr, Wm S. Nutter, and Josiah Moulton signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 49:345). (The elder Paul Jewett would continue to live and, therefore, his will would not be proved for another sixteen years).

Jewett, Gilman - November 1820Gilman Jewett married (2nd) in Milton, circa 1820, Ann S. Nutter. She was born in Newington, NH, in December 1790, daughter of Hatevil and Susanna (Shackford) Nutter. (Note her father’s male Puritan “virtue” name: “Hate-Evil.” It is of a kind with more familiar female ones, such as Constance, Faith, Hope, Charity, Chastity, Prudence, etc.).

Gilman Jewett signed both of the Milton militia division petitions of November 1820. His father Paul Jewett, brother Nathaniel Jewett and son-in-law James Pinkham joined him in signing one of them. (See Milton Militia Division Petitions – November 1820). Milton’s selectmen sought his appointment as a Milton Three Ponds justice-of-the-peace later that same month (See Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1820).

Daughter Eliza G. Jewett married in Lebanon, ME, July 5, 1821, Thomas Corson. He was born in Lebanon, ME, September 5, 1799, son of John and Tamsen (Hodgdon) Corson. (Their known children would be Charlotte F. Corson (1825–), Caroline Corson (1828–1908), Alonzo Corson (1831–1889), Melinda K. Corson (1833–1906), Henry H. Corson (1837–1841), Tamsen A. Corson (1839-1841), Henry H. Corson (1843–1880), and Amanda E. Corson (1845–1869)).

Gilman Jewett of Milton appeared in an acknowledgement by the publisher of an 1822 NH directory as being one of the “gentlemen, who have contributed materials and afforded other facilities to the improvement of this register” (Claremont Manufacturing, 1822).

Rep. Levi Jones (1771-1847) submitted the petition of Gilman Jewett and others to the NH House of Representatives, June 7, 1822. It sought incorporation of the Milton Social Library.

Mr. Jones of Milton presented the petition of Gilman Jewett and others praying to be incorporated into a Society by the name of the Milton Social Library. Voted That the said petition be referred to the standing committee on incorporations and that they report thereon (NH General Court, 1822).

The proposed society was so incorporated, June 14, 1822. Gilman Jewett was empowered to call its first meeting and preside over it as its moderator pro tem.

Twenty-three Milton inhabitants sought appointment of Gilman Jewett as Milton coroner, June 12, 1823. This appointment does not seem to have taken place as the petition bore on its reverse side a notation that it was “To be Postponed indefinitely.” (See Milton Seeks a Coroner – 1823).

Father Paul Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 80-89 years [Paul Jewett], one male aged 50-59 years [Gilman Jewett], one female aged 50-59 years [Ann S. (Nutter) Jewett], one male aged 20-29 years, two males aged 15-19 years [Paul Jewett and Asa Jewett], and one male aged 10-14 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Steph. Shorey and Amos Witham. (And on the same page as son Nathl Jewett).

Son-in-law Jas Pinkham headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Sarah D. [(Jewett)] Pinkham], one female aged 10-14 years [Lucy D. Pinkham], two females aged 5-9 years [Nancy B. Pinkham and Mary E. Pinkham], one male aged under-5 years [James B. Pinkham], and two females aged under-5 years [Susan A. Pinkham and Sarah Y. Pinkham]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Lucy D. Hartford and Pelatiah Hanscom. (And on the same page as brother-in-law Thomas Coson [Corson]).

Son-in-law Thomas Cosan [Corson] headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Eliza G. (Jewett) Corson], one male aged 5-9 years, one female aged 5-9 years [Charlotte F. Corson], and one female aged under-5 years [Caroline Corson]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Isaac Worcester and Benj. P. Stokes. (And on the same page as brother-in-law Jas Pinkham).

Brother Nathl Jewett headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [Nathaniel Jewett], one female aged 40-49 years [Nancy J. (Rogers) Jewett], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 15-19 years [Eliza G. Jewett], one female aged 10-14 years [Mary Rogers Jewett], one male aged 10-14 years [James J. Jewett], one male aged 5-9 years [David Jewett], and one female aged 5-9 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Nutter and Obadiah Witham. (And on the same page as Paul Jewett).

Father-in-law Hatevil Nutter died in Newington, NH, December 25, 1831, aged eighty-three years.

Son Paul Jewett, Jr., married in Rochester, NH, March 9, 1834, he of Milton and she of Rochester, NH, Drusilla Pickering. Leonard Bennett performed the ceremony. She was born in Rochester, NH, March 2, 1812, daughter of William and Abigail (Calef) Pickering. (Their known children would be Sarah “Sally” Abigail Jewett (1837–), William Gilman Jewett (1842–1894), Benjamin Woodman Jewett (1844–1928), Mary Ann Jewett (1846–), Frank Henry Jewett (1849–1929), and Clara Frances Jewett (1853–)).

Father Paul Jewett died in Milton, in November 1835. His last will of April 1819 was proved before James Bartlett, Strafford County justice-of-the-peace and probate judge, December 14, 1835 (Strafford County Probate, 49:345).

The NH legislature incorporated Gilman Jewett and his associates as the Milton Mills Manufacturing Company in January 1837. They transformed an old woolen mill to a lathe and turning mill in 1837-38. (See Milton Mills Mfg. Co. & the Waumbeck Companies – 1837-98).

Paul Jewett (1744-1835) owned an early sawmill known as the Jewett Mill, which was operated by Asa, his father, Gilman Jewett, and uncle, Nathaniel Jewett. They incorporated the Milton Mills Manufacturing Company in 1837, transforming the mill into a lathe and turning mill where they produced wood products (NHHS, 2022).

The Milton Mills Manufacturing Company was organized in 1837, and in that and the following year built their mill, and after running it a few years transferred the business to Durgin & Co. (Scales, 1914).

Among the industries at Milton Mills in the early days of the town were several saw mills, a crude woolen mill, and a distillery where Stephen Watson manufactured whiskey from potatoes. Gilman Jewett, Nathaniel Jewett, Asa Jewett, and a Mr. Wedgewood transformed the old woolen mill into a lathe and turning mill about sixty-five or seventy years ago [c1837-1842], after which it was operated more or less irregularly up to the year 1847, when it was purchased by John Townsend … (Michell-Cony, 1908).

Son Asa Jewett married in Wakefield, NH, October 31, 1837, Mary Ann Richards, he of Milton and she of Wakefield, NH. Rev. Nathaniel Barker performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, April 20, 1813, daughter of Col. Ichabod and Annie (Hurd) Richards. (Ichabod Richards signed the Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrance of June 1820). (Their kn0wn children were Nancy R. Jewett (1839–1904), Lydia M. Jewett (1842–1922), and Clara Alberta Jewett (1858–1863)).

Son Asa Jewett succeeded his step-uncle, William S. Nutter, as clerk of the Acton & Milton Baptist Church, i.e., the Milton Baptist Church, in 1837. He held that position until he was in turn succeeded by David Farnham in 1850 (Scales, 1914).

Gilman Jewett headed a Milton [Milton Mills] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one male aged 40-49 years, one male aged 30-39 years [Paul Jewett], one female aged 30-39 years [Drusilla (Pickering) Jewett], and one male aged 15-19 years. Three members of his household were engaged in manufacture and the trades, while one member was engaged in agriculture. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles Swasey and John Nutter. (The household of his son Asa Jewett appeared further down the same page).

Son-in-law James Pinkham headed a Milton [Three Ponds] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Sarah D. (Jewett) Corson], two females aged 15-19 years [Lucy D. Pinkham and Nancy B. Pinkham], two females aged 10-14 years [Mary E. Pinkham and Susan A. Pinkham], one male aged 10-14 years [James B. Pinkham], two females aged 5-9 years [Sarah Y. Pinkham and Hannah M. Pinkham], and two males aged under-5 years [John D. Pinkham and Benjamin W. Pinkham]. One member of his household was engaged in manufacture and the trades. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John McMillan and John Scates. (The households of his brothers-in-law Thomas Corson and Paul Jewett appeared a little further down the same page).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson headed a Milton [Three Ponds] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Eliza G. (Jewett) Corson], one male aged 15-19 years, one female aged 15-19 years [Charlotte F. Corson], one female aged 10-14 years [Caroline Corson], one male aged 10-14 years [Alonzo Corson], one female aged 5-9 years [Melinda K. Corson], one male aged 5-9 years [Henry H. Corson], and one female aged under-5 years [Tamsen A. Corson]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Merrill Henderson and his brother-in-law, Paul Jewett. (The households of his brothers-in-law James Pinkham and Paul Jewett appeared on the same page).

Son Paul Jewett headed a Milton [Three Ponds] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Drusilla (Pickering) Jewett], and two females aged under-5 years [Sarah A. Jewett]. One member of his household was engaged in agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of brother-in-law Thomas Corson and Stephen Drew.

Jewett, Asa, House of - c1790
Jug Hill Road in Milton Mills. The Asa Jewett house depicted in the 1856 Milton Mills map as it appears today. A sign above the front door reads “c1790, Asa Jewett” (Google Maps).

Son Asa Jewett headed a Milton [Milton Mills] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years, and one female aged under-5 years [Jewett]. One member of his household was engaged in agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ezekiel Merrow and Thomas Butter. (The household of father Gilman Jewett appeared further up the same page).

Brother Nathaniel Jewett headed a Milton [Milton Mills] household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Nancy J. (Rogers) Jewett], two males aged 15-19 years [James J. Jewett and David Jewett], and one male aged 5-9 years [John R. Jewett]. Three members of his household were engaged in agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Daniel Guptill and Merrill Brackett. (The households of brother Gilman Jewett and nephew Asa Jewett appeared on the previous page).

Fire at Milton Mills, N.H. About one o’clock on the morning of the 19th ult. the shingle and clapboard mill of Mr. Asa H. Jewett, was discovered to be in flames, and before aid could be had, the fire had progressed so far that all effort was useless, and the mill, with its contents, were burned to ashes. The loss is estimated at about $1200, insurance $550, in the Strafford Mutual Fire Insurance Co. Credit is due to the fire company, who with their engine succeeded in saving other buildings and property. – Dover Gazette (North Star (Danville, VT), August 4, 1845).

Not long after the fire the Jewetts sold their Milton Manufacturing Co. to Durgin & Co., who sold to John Townsend (Milton Mills Mfg. Co. & the Waumbeck Companies – 1837-98).

Jewett, Asa - Sturtevant (1848)
Asa Jewett in August 1848. To the extent that a son might resemble his father, or vice versa, Gilman Jewett might have looked like him (MutualArt, 2020).

Son Asa Jewett had his portrait painted by Sturtevant J. Hamblin (1816-1884) in August 1848. Note the “attributes” over Jewett’s left shoulder: woods verging on a body of water, not unlike Milton’s Town Seal. This sitting may have taken place at Hamblin’s studio in East Boston, MA (MutualArt, 2020; National Gallery of Art, 2022; NH Historical Society, 2022).

Mother-in-law Susan (Shackford) Nutter died in Milton, November 13, 1848, aged ninety-one years.

President Zachary Taylor appointed Gilman Jewett as Milton Mills postmaster, April 30, 1849. Such appointments were political sinecures in those days, from which one might infer that Jewett was a Whig, as was Taylor. Gilman Jewett succeeded James Berry in that position. Berry’s tenure coincided with the presidency of Democrat James K. Polk.

Gilman Jewett, a postmaster, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Ann S. [(Nutter)] Jewett, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), Joseph Sharp, a manufacturer, aged forty years (b. England), Hannah Sharp, aged twenty-five years (b. England), Benjamin Sharp, a manufacturer, aged twenty-five years (b. England), Susan A. Hubbard, aged sixteen years (b. ME), [sister-in-law] Susan S. Nutter, aged forty-six years (b. NH), John McDonald, a tailor, aged thirty-five years (b. Scotland), and Joseph Robinson, a manufacturer, aged thirty-six years (b. England). Gilman Jewett had real estate valued at $2,000. Jewett’s household appeared next to that of John Townsend, agent for the Milton Mills Manufacturing Co., aged forty-three years (b. England).

Son-in-law James Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sarah [(Jewett)] Pinkham, aged fifty years (b. NH), Lucy Pinkham, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Hannah Pinkham, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Nathaniel G. Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and John P. Pinkham, aged thirteen years (b. NH). James Pinkham had no real estate valued. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and Thomas Nutter, a shoemaker, aged thirty-five years (b. ME).

Milton - 1856 (Detail) - Corson, Jewett, Pinkham
Milton Three Ponds in 1856 (Detail). The houses of T. Corson and P. Jewett are indicated together by the larger red arrow, while that of N.G. Pinkham, i.e., James Pinkham, is indicated with the smaller red arrow. (Note also John S. Edgerley’s Milton Hotel a bit further south on the railroad side of the road near the bottom of this map detail).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson, a farmer, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eliza G. Corson, aged forty-six years (b. NH), Alonzo Corson, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Melinda Corson, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Henry Corson, aged seven years (b. NH). Thomas Corson had real estate valued at $1,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Aaron Hubbard, a carpenter, aged forty years (b. ME), and Jacob Staples, a shoemaker, aged forty-three years (b. ME).

Son Paul Jewett, a farmer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Druzilla Jewett, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Sarah A. Jewett, aged thirteen years (b. NH), William G. Jewett, aged eight years (b. NH), Mary Jewett, aged four years (b. NH), Frank S. Jewett, aged three years (b. NH), and Laura Jewett, aged four months (b. NH). Asa Jewett had no real estate valued. His household appeared between those of Joseph Nute, a laborer, aged fifty years (b. NH), and Robert Moulton, a laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH).

Son Asa Jewett, a lumber dealer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. HIs household included Mary A. [(Rogers)] Jewett, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Nancy R. Jewett, aged eleven years (b. NH), and Lydia M. Jewett, aged nine years (b. NH). He had real estate valued at $11,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Josiah N. Witham, a farmer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and Charles Swasey, a baker, aged fifty-one years (b. NH). Asa Jewett had real estate valued at $11,000. His household appeared between those of Josiah N. Witham, a farmer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and Charles Swasey, a baker, aged fifty-one years (b. NH).

Postmaster Gilman Jewett received $56.88 in compensation for his work at the Milton Mills post office in 1851, and his post office had net proceeds of $77.66. The Milton postmaster, James M. Twombly, received $112.81 and his post office had net proceeds of $148.10 (US Dept. of the Interior, 1851).

Gilman Jewett appeared in the NH directory of 1854, as postmaster at Milton Mills (Farmer, 1854).

Gilman Jewett died in Milton, May 24, 1856, aged seventy-nine years.

Milton Mills, 1856 (Detail) - Asa Jewett
Milton Mills in 1856 (Detail). The house of “A. Jewett,” i.e., Asa Jewett, is indicated with a red arrow. (See the Google Maps photo above for a picture of this house as it stands today). That of an “N. Robinson” appears across the street. (Note also near the bottom along the river that of “E Brierley,” later to be proprietor of the Brierley Mill).

Ann S. [(Nutter)] Jewett, aged sixty [seventy] years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included [her sisters,] Mary Nutter, aged seventy [seventy-two] years (b. NH), and Susan Nutter, aged fifty [fifty-eight] years (b. NH). Ann S. Jewett had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $1,000. Her household appeared between those of Joseph P. Swasey, a tailor, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Palmuth Came, a laborer, aged seventy years (b. NH).

Son-in-law James Pinkham, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah D. [(Jewett)] Pinkham, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), James B. Pinkham, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), Gilman Pinkham, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Emily Pinkham, aged twenty years (b. NH), Clara Pinkham, aged two years (b. NH), and John D. Pinkham, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). James Pinkham had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $200. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Dearborn Ellis, a shoemaker, aged forty years (b. NH), and Joseph Jenness, a landlord, aged thirty-six years (b. NH).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH [ME]), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza Corson, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), Charlotte Corson, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Henry Corson, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and E.A. Corson, aged fourteen years (b. NH). Thomas Corson had real estate valued at $700 and personal estate valued at $500. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Stephen Drew, a practicing physician, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), and Simon Hart, a shoemaker, aged forty years (b. NH).

Son Paul Jewett, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Farmington P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Drusilla Jewett, aged forty-six years (b. NH), Mary A.  Jewett, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Frank H. Jewett, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Clara F. Jewett, aged seven years (b. NH). Paul Jewett had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $200.

Son Asa Jewett, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, aged forty-five years (b. NH), Nancy R. Jewett, aged twenty years (b. NH), L.M. [Lydia M.] Jewett, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and C.A. Jewett, aged one year (b. NH). Asa Jewett had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $6,000. His household appeared between those of S.S. Hart, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), and Amos Witham, a sawyer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH).

Son-in-law James Pinkham died in Milton, February 4, 1861, aged seventy years.

Son Paul Jewett of Rochester, NH, made his last will, April 9, 1861. He devised all his real and personal estate to his beloved wife, Drusilla Jewett, while she remained his widow. He devised $25 each to his beloved daughters, Mary Ann Jewett and Clara Frances Jewett. Daughter Sarah Amm Jewett and her heirs had aleady received her portion. He bequeathed all the rest and residue, including his wife’s portion after her decease (or remarriage), to his three sons, William G. Jewett, who was also appointed executor, Benjamin W. Jewett, and Frank Henry Jewett. Daniel P. Warren, L.L. Leighton, and C.E. Wiggin signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 70:426).

Son Paul Jewett died in Rochester, NH, September 4, 1861, aged forty-six years. His son and executor William G. Jewett presented his last will for proving in a Strafford County Probate court held in Dover, NH, in October 1861 (Strafford County Probate, 70:426).

Son Asa Jewett brought a lawsuit for debt against his cousin John R. Jewett, a son of Nathaniel Jewett, in the mid-1860s.

When Asa Jewett commenced his suit John R. Jewett, he held certain notes which were covered by the count for money had and received, and a claim for goods sold, covered by count for goods sold, and there was another count upon a claim growing out of the estate of their [grand?] father (NH Supreme Court, 1867).

Asa Jewett of Milton Mills paid $10 in tax for being a retail dealer. (See Milton’s US Excise Tax of May 1864).

The suit would expand to include Mary A. Page (1819-1902) of Milton, daughter of Joseph and Lydia S. (Remick) Page, whose separate suit against Asa Jewett reached the NH Supreme Court in 1866. She claimed that the sequence of events and the accounting methods employed by Asa Jewett had disadvantaged her own claims against John R. Jewett. Her case was dismissed (NH Supreme Court, 1867). (John R. Jewett was her brother-in-law, being the husband of her younger sister, Clara H. (Page) Jewett (b. 1829). In her last will, dated December 1882, Mary A. Page would devise all of her real estate to her nephew, Haven R. Jewett (1856-1924), a son of John R. and Clara H. (Page) Jewett (Strafford County Probate, 118:294).

Asa Jewett of Milton Mills paid $10 in tax for being a retail dealer, and another $10 in tax for his stallion in the US Excise Tax of May 1866.

Son Asa Fox appeared in the Milton directory of 1867, as a Milton justice-of-the-Peace. (His name appeared twice).

MILTON. … Justices – Charles Jones, Luther Hayes, State; Elbridge W. Fox, Joseph Plumer, Ebenezer Wentworth, Ezra H. Twombly, Joseph Mathes, Charles A. Cloutman, Asa Jewett, Elias S. Cook, Joseph Cook, Robert Mathes, Eli Fernald, Asa Jewett, Daniel S. Burley, Ira C. Varney, George Lyman, George W. Peavey (McFarland & Jenks, 1867).

Daughter Sally D. (Jewett) Pinkham died in Milton, July 13, 1869.

Ann S. [(Nutter)] Jewett, keeping house, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included [her sister,] Susan S. Nutter, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and Mary A. Nutter, a housekeeper, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Ann S. Jewett had real estate valued at $600. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Hiram Wentworth, a carpenter, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Frank Bush, Jr., a woolen mill finisher, aged forty-nine years (b. France).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson, a farm laborer, aged seventy years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Eliza [(Jewett)] Corson, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), Charlotte F. Corson, a housekeeper, aged forty-six years (b. ME), Caroline Parlin, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and Lydia J. Parlin, works in shoe factory, aged seventeen years (b. NH). Thomas Corson had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $2,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Robert Brown, works in shoe factory, aged forty years (b. NH), and Simon Hart, a shoemaker, aged forty years (b. NH).

Drusella Jewett, keeping house, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Lowell, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included Mary A. Jewett, works cotton mill, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Clara Jewett, works cotton mill, aged seventeen years (b. NH). (On the same page was the household of Frank E. Jewett, a tinsmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA)).

Son Asa Jewett, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, aged fifty-six years (b. NH). Asa Jewett had real estate valued at $5,000 and personal estate valued at $585. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ira Miller, a hotel keeper, aged forty-three years (b. ME), and Asenath Marsh, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME).

Ann S. (Nutter) Jewett died in Milton, November 28, 1870.

Son Asa Fox appeared in the Milton directory of 1871, as a Milton justice-of-the-Peace.

MILTON – Justices – Charles Jones, Luther Hayes, State; E.W. Fox, Joseph Plumer, Ebenezer Wentworth, E.H. Twombly, Joseph Mather, C.A. Cloutman, Asa Jewett, Joseph Cook, Robert Mathes, I.C. Varney, George Lyman, G.W. Peavey, J.S. Hersey, G.W. Tasker, E.W. Foss, M.V.B. Cook, T.H. Roberts, H.H. Wentworth, J.N. Simes, L.A. Lang (Claremont Manufacturing, 1871).

Son-in-law Thomas Corson died of cancer in Milton, March 13, 1875, aged seventy-five years, six months, and eight days.

Daughter-in-law Drusilla (Pickering) Jewett died of consumption at 113 Columbus Street in Lowell, MA, August 14, 1875, aged sixty-three years, four months, and twenty days.

Daughter Eliza G. (Jewett) Corson died in Milton, November 2, 1877.

Nancy J. (Rogers) Jewett of Milton made her last will, April 9, 1879. She devised all of her real and personal estate to her granddaughter, Mary A. Berry. (Mary A. Berry (1835-1922) was born in Milton, daughter of James and Eliza G. (Jewett) Berry). Ira Miller, Asa Jewett, Nellie C. [(Berry)] Roberts, and Irving Jewett signed as witnesses. It was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held in Somersworth, NH, in February 1881 (Strafford County Probate, 93:271).

Son Asa Jewett, a trader & farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, keeping house, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). His household was enumerated between those of Jeremiah C. Buck, a physician, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), and George Hoyt, works in felt mill, aged forty-two years (b. ME).

Son Asa Jewett appeared in the Milton directory of 1882 as a Milton Mills clothing manufacturer.

MILTON. … Milton Mills … Manufacturers – carriages and wheelwrights, John Brackett, A.O. Prescott; clothing, Asa Jewett; flannels, Waumbeck Manuf’g Co.; felt cloth, piano and table covers, D.H. Buffum & Co.; picture frames, E.A. Hargraves; plows, W.F. Cutts; saddle housings, L.B. Roberts; soap, S.G. Chamberlain; rubber linings, table and piano covers, Townsend & Co., washing powder, E.J. Brierley (Tower, 1882).

Son Asa Jewett died in Dover, NH, April 17, 1883, aged sixty-seven years.

Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, a widowed home-keeper, aged eighty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. She owned her house free-and-clear. She was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett (Asa) appeared in the Milton directories of 1902 and 1905-06, as having her house at 51 Main street in Milton Mills. She appeared also in the Milton directory of 1909, as having her house at 49 Main street in Milton Mills, and as being “96 years of age.”

Thomas Cutts, a farmer (general farm), aged seventy years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lydia [(Jewett)] Cutts, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), his mother-in-law, Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, aged ninety-seven years (b. NH), his son-in-law, William L. Hargraves, a retired barber, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), and his daughter, Alberta [(Cutts)] Hargraves, aged forty-seven years (b. NH). Thomas Cutts owned their farm free-and-clear. Lydia Cutts was the mother of one child of whom one was still living. Mary A. Jewett was the mother of two children of whom one was still living. Alberta Hargraves was the mother of one child of whom one was still living.

Daughter-in-law Mary A. (Richards) Jewett died of nephritis in Milton Mills, August 7, 1910, aged ninety-seven years, three months, and seventeen days. Frank S. Weeks, M.D., signed the death certificate.


References:

Claremont Manufacturing Co. (1822). New Hampshire Register and Farmer’s Almanac. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=KgIXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA141

Claremont Manufacturing Co. (1871). New Hampshire Register, Farmer’s Almanac and Business Directory. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=FpMBAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA79

Farmer, John. (1854). New-Hampshire Annual Register, and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=W0A4AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA136

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Mary A. Berry. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115349918/mary-a-berry

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Eliza G. Jewett Corson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214560554/eliza-g-corson

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Lydia M. Cutts. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114673349/lydia-m-cutts

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Alberta J. Hargraves. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114676772/alberta-j-hargraves

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Asa Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115418840/asa-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Clara Alberta Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115418898/clara-alberta-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). David Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115418930/david-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Gilman Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114597023/gilman-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). James J. Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115418976/james-j-jewett

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Nathaniel Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115419072/nathaniel-jewett

Find a Grave. (2011, December 31). Hatevil Nutter III. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82754846/hatevil-nutter

Find a Grave. (2012, October 16). Mary A. Nutter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/99018846/mary-a-nutter

Find a Grave. (2012, October 16). Mary Nutter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/99018792/mary-nutter

Find a Grave. (2012, October 16). Susan S. Nutter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/99018909/susan-s-nutter

Find a Grave. (2020, September 8). Sarah D. Jewett Pinkham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215360207/sarah-d-pinkham

Find a Grave. (2021, March 3). Nellie C. Berry Roberts. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/223823148/nellie-c-roberts

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Nancy R. Jewett Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612594/nancy-r-simes

Hurd, D. Hamilton. (1882). History of Rockingham and Strafford Counties, New Hampshire. Philadelphia, PA.

Jewett, Frederic C. (1908). History and Genealogy of the Jewetts of America. New York, NY: Grafton Press

McFarland & Jenks. (1867) New Hampshire Register and Political Manual. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=UMYTAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA129

May, Ralph. (1946). Among Old Portsmouth Houses. Boston, MA: Wright & Potter Printing Company.

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). The Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA100

MutualArt. (2020). Portrait of Asa Jewett. Retrieved from www.mutualart.com/Artwork/Portrait-of-Asa-Jewett/CA91E0388921E0A7

National Gallery of Art. (2022). Sturtevant J. Hamblin. Retrieved from www.nga.gov/collection/artist-info.5518.html

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

NH General Court. (1822). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=x-tFAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA16

NH Historical Society. (2022). Portrait of Asa Jewett. Retrieved from www.nhhistory.org/object/1295227/painting

NH Supreme Court. (1867). Page vs. Jewett. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=CJc0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA447

Phillips Exeter Academy. (1838). Catalogue of the Officers and Students of Phillips Exeter Academy. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=2SlDAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA10

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA516

Tower, F.L. (1882). New Hampshire Register, State Year-book and Legislative Manual. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rOsWAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA124

US Department of the Interior. (1851). Official Register of the United States: Containing a List of Officers and Employees in the Civil, Military, and Naval Service. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Vto9AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA26

Wikipedia. (2022, April 21). Whig Party (United States). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States)

Milton Militia Division Petitions – November 1820

By Muriel Bristol | May 1, 2022

A letter of this period was folded in such a way that it formed its own envelope, with the contents within and an address or label without. The label written on the outside was:

Remonstrance of Inhabitants of Milton against the petition of Luther Dearborn & others praying for a new town.

On the reverse or inside side followed a letter to Milton’s NH State Representative Daniel Hayes.

Daniel Hayes, Esquire.

Dear sir, We the subscribers, inhabitants and legal voters in the town of Milton, having lately understood that a second petition would probably be submitted at their next session; signed by a number of the inhabitants of this town, similar to that which was presented last June; praying the Legislature to divide the town; principally on account of the fatigue and hardships to which the Militia are subjected by having to travel a greater distance to travel to get to their usual places for parading than they think is necessary; and in that particular we believe that the burden on the soldiers who do duty in Milton might be made lighter by some alteration and we had not the least doubt, last June, but that the Field officers would have established the division of the company of infantry in the town of Milton, agreeably to a vote of said company which was passed in June with but very few dissenters. But as the Field officers have not established the division, we hope you will endeavor to effect such alterations as you think will best accommodate the Militia in the town of Milton without injury to the state; either by a division of the second Regt or of the 7th Company. As the petition that we suppose will be presented at this Novr session is new, and quite unexpected, it is not convenient to get the names of the people generally who would sign a Remonstrance, and believing it to be unnecessary, as we stated out objections at large last June, we therefore wish for you to make use of the objections which your constituents offered in their Remonstrance last session against the prayer of the petition that was then presented being granted.

Benja Scates, Gilman Jewitt, Wm Jones, Timo Roberts, John Scates, Samuel N. Chamberlin, Isaac Scates, Joseph Plumer, Jr, Charles Ricker, Daniel G. Dore, Aaron Downs, James Pinkham, John Palmer, Ichabod Hayes, Levi Jones, T.C. Lyman, Josiah Withem, Bidfield Hayes, Lewis Hayes.

There was also an accompanying petition to the full NH legislature, for which the above was a sort of cover letter. As in the preceding, there was an address side to the petition that was labeled:

Petitions of Levi Jones & others, James Hayes & others, for a division of the Company of Militia in the Town of Milton.

On the reverse or inside side followed the actual petition:

To the Legislature of the State of New Hampshire.

Humbly shew the undersigned inhabitants of the Town of Milton that said Town at present form but one Company of Militia which renders the meetings for company musters very fatiguing and expensive to those liable to do Military duty therein ~ That there is a sufficient number enrolled in said company to compose two companies ~ That application has been made to the Field officers of the 2nd Regt to divide said company which they have refused to do ~ That the situation of said company is the great cause why so many of the inhabitants have petitioned the Legislature for a division of the Town, believing that to be the only remedy, since the Field officers have refused to divide the company ~ But your petitioners believe that the great evil which must arise to the Town of Milton by forming a new Town may be avoided by a division of the company ~ And since the Field officers have refused to comply with our first request ~ And believing that the Legislature in such a case will not only hear out petition but will answer our prayer ~ Humbly pray that the Company of Militia in the Town of Milton may be so divided as to compose two companies ~ The division line between said Companies to commence near the center of the North West pond so called and run in such a direction [as may] leave the dwelling houses of Matthias Nutter, John Miller and James Moulton on the Easterly side of said of said line, and extending to the Middleton line ~ Milton, November 10th, 1820.

[Column 1:] David Wentworth, John Foss, John Ricker, William W. Lord, Timo Roberts, James Pinkham, Robert [Berry?], Stephen Wentworth, Richard Horn, Wm Foss, Wm Jones, James Roberts, Stephen Drew, James Nutter, Ichabod [Bodge?], David Hayes, Samuell Bragdon, Ebenr Ricker, Saml Jones, Thoms Wentworth, Isaac Worster, Isaac Worster, Jr, John Wentworth, John Wentworth, Jr, John T. Varney,

[Column 2:] Jotham Nute, Hopley Meserve, Moses Nute, Joseph Nute, Jere Cook, Wm W. Cook, William Wentworth, John C. Nute, Samuel Nute, Jr, John Nute, James Y. Pinkham, John Twombly, Dudley Burnham, Wm Downs, Isaac C. Young, Joshua Knight, Wentworth Dore, Moses Downs, Jr, Dudley Wentworth, Jonathan Place, Jacob Wentworth, Samuel Ricker, Samuel Twombley,

[Column 3:] Levi Jones, Joseph Plumer, Jr, Jeremy Nute, Danl Wentworth, Josiah Witham, Phinehas Wentworth, Levi Wentworth, Samuel Wallingford, Aaron Downs, Daniel Palmer, John Palmer, Elijah Horn, James H. Horn, Ichabod C. Horn, James Twombly, Timothy Emery, Daniel Nute, Caleb Wakeham, Isaac Varney, Charles Wakeham, Ebenr Wakeham, James Goodwin, Ambross Tuttle, Jona Hall, John H. Downs, Lemuel Ricker, Pelah Hanscom,

[Column 4:] John Scates, Alvah Scates, Gilman Jewett, William Sargent, Theodore C. Lyman, Israel Nute, Micah Lyman, Richard Walker, John Bragdon, Ezekiel Nute, James Varney, Jr, Icabod Hayes, Enoch Nute.

Another Milton petition took the same view as the first but passed around separately.

To the Honorable Legislature of the State of New Hampshire.

Humbly shew the undersigned Inhabitants of the Town of Milton that said town at present forms but one Company of Militia which renders the meetings for Company musters very fatiguing & expensive to those liable to do military duty thereon ~ that there is a sufficient number enrolled in said Company to compose two companies ~ that application has been made to the Field Officers of the 2d Regt to divide said Company which they have refused to do ~ that the situation of said Company is the great cause why so many of the Inhabitants have petitioned the Legislature for a division of the Town believing that to be the only remedy since the Field Officers have refused to divide the Company ~ but your petitioners believe that the great evil which must arise to the Town of Milton by forming a new town may be avoided by a division of the Company ~ and since the field Officers have refused to comply with our just request ~ and believing that the Legislature will in such a case will not only hear out petition but will answer our prayer ~ Humbly pray that this Company in the Town of Militia may be so divided as to compose two Companies ~ the division line between said Companies to commence near the center of Northwest pond so called and run in such a direction as to leave the dwelling houses of Matthias Nutter, John Miller & James Moulton on the Easterly side of said line & extending to Middleton line ~ Milton, November 10th 1820

[Column 1:] Simeon Applebee, Nathaniel Miller, Mark Miller, Jur, Thomas Merrow, Webster Miller, Thomas Applebee, James Applebee, Hiram Applebee, John Fifeld, Daniel Jennes,

[Column 2:] Nathl Jewett, Joseph S. Frost, Daniel Witham, Amos Witham, Paul Jewett, Samuel Rines, Alpheus S. Goodwin, Ezekiel Worster, Benaiah Dore,

[Column 3:] James Hayes, Jr, Chesley Hayes, Jona Pollard, John D. Remick, John Remick, Otis Wentworth, Josiah Witham, Reuben T. Witham

References:

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrances – June 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 24, 1820

A “number of respectable citizens” of Wakefield, NH, sought to split off the southerly part of Wakefield and the northerly part of Milton, and then join them together as a new town.

… in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this [Wakefield] town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this [Wakefield] town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

The pro-division petitions have not come to hand. But a few of Wakefield’s pro-division advocates can be found in other documents. Luther Dearborn has been mentioned as having been a principal actor.

J. Hall appeared in the title of the following renunciation as having been a pro-division signer, and four other formerly pro-division inhabitants would appear as signers of a November renunciation. (Their names appeared also in the June remonstrance petition).

A Certificate of Persons who signed a Petition of J. Hall and others wishing not to be considered as members

We the undersigned Inhabitants of the Town of Wakefield having signed a petition for the separation of the Towns of Wakefield & Milton to form a new Town without duly Considering the subject and after a more mature Consideration of the subject have signed a remonstrance against said separation and therefore wish the Legislature of the State to consider us as Strenuously opposed to said separation.

John Paul, Joseph Edgerly, Nathl Abbott, Jona Copp

Another twenty-seven Wakefield pro-division petitioners would sign a renunciation in November 1820. (See Wakefield Pro-Division Renunciation – November 1820).

The impetus behind the Wakefield and Milton pro-division petitions had been a desire to thereby split Milton’s militia company, which included southern Wakefield, into two parts for the benefit of those having to travel the greatest distances to militia musters and trainings. (The Wakefield anti-division remonstrance would open by describing the original pro-division signers as respectable citizens, but it would close by characterizing them as selfish and partisan disturbers of the peace).

Ten years earlier, the Third (1810) Federal Census had enumerated a rather generous number of Wakefield householders endowed with military, civil, or religious titles. They included Capt Benjan Cook, Jonan Copp, Esqr, David Copp, Esqr, William Copp, Esqr, Capt Jonathan Copp, Capt Jona Copp, Willm Sawyer, Esqr, Capt Joseph Manson, Capt Richard Dow, Elisha Sanborn, Esqr, Lt James Hutchens, Capt David Spring, Avery Hall, Esqr, Colo John Gillman, Colo John Palmer, Capt Andrew Gillman, Majr Joshua Hall, Dr Thomas Lindsay, Revd Asa Piper, and Luther Dearborn, Esqr. (Rev. Asa Piper and justice-of-the-peace Luther Dearborn, both advocates in 1820 of forming a new town, were in 1810 next-door neighbors).

Although Wakefield did have its own separate northerly militia company in 1810, it might still seem to have been a bit top-heavy in having two colonels, one major, one lieutenant, and seven captains all at the same time. It seems more likely that some at least of these military titles were courtesy ones, a residue of having held that rank at some time in the past. That is to say, some of them at least were likely former militia officers or even former Revolutionary War officers, rather than active ones.

Some rough calculations may give some idea of the relative sizes of Wakefield’s pro- and anti-division contingents. (The 1820 census was then in process only, and ultimately not preserved, except as aggregate totals. The 1810 census figures are used here as being those cited in the anti-division remonstrance). Wakefield had 1,166 inhabitants in 1810, of which 605 were male. Roughly 375 of these were below voting (and petitioning) age. That left roughly 230 potential petitioners. (N.B., 61 of those potential petitioners were above militia age). So, the 197 anti-division remonstrance petitioners represented roughly 85.7% of Wakefield’s 1810 electorate. (Leaving as many as 14.3% in the pro-division category).

(There was a companion remonstrance from the Milton voters that also opposed the division (representing roughly 65.3% of its 1810 electorate)).

As previously mentioned, Wakefield’s entries for the Fourth (1820) Federal Census are missing (as are those of Milton). The following anti-division remonstrance – signed by those 197 men opposing the proposed town division – supplies the names of at least a large portion of Wakefield’s householders (and those living with them). (There was a companion remonstrance from those Milton voters that opposed the division).

Such petitions employed a certain structure and style. Their overall tone is respectful. The authorities to whom they are directed are characterized as “honorable” and they are frequently asked – “we pray” – to consider some measure by virtue of “their wisdom.”

They begin with a salutation. The petitioners might identify themselves and their situation. There is usually then a recitation of facts, each one prefaced with “That.” Finally, the petitioners would “pray” that some proposed solution be adopted. (This term of phrase, although frequently employed in this type of writing, sounds somewhat archaic nowadays. The only higher authority to whom modern speakers might address a “prayer” is the ultimate one: God).

(Wakefield’s NH state representative for the 1820-21 biennium was William Sawyer (1774-1860)).

A Remonstrance of the Inhabitants of Wakefield praying that the southerly part of Wakefield and the northerly part of Milton May not be Incorporated into a separate Town.

To the Honorable Legislature of the State of New Hampshire convened at Concord June Session A.D. 1820.

Your memorialists, Inhabitants of Wakefield in the County of Strafford in said state; having lately learnt, that a number of respectable Citizens living at the Southerly part of Wakefield were about to present a Petition to the Honorable Legislature praying that the Southerly part of Wakefield and the Northerly part of Milton may be incorporated into a separate Town. Never having seen said Petition, nor heard of it untill since the last annual Town Meeting, we are wholly ignorant of the reasons they offer for the groundwork of their prayer. But we feel it a duty that we owe to ourselves and to Posterity to remonstrate against the prayer of said petition being granted. We do not deny, but cheerfully admit, that there may be cases, in which it is necessary, that the Legislature should incorporate new Towns, taken off from one or more old Towns. But we think and hope to be able to convince the Legislature, that this is not one of those cases.

The Town of Wakefield is small in Territory and its Inhabitants few in numbers compared with many other Towns in the State. It does not exceed six miles square, when brought into such form, and a large proportion of said surface is covered with Ponds, Heaths, and Stagnant waters, more than two thousand acres of the Northerly part of the Town is composed of poor gravelly Pitch pine plains of the worst quality on which neither Man nor Beast can make a living. The Town, according to the last enumeration, contains only Eleven hundred and sixty-six Inhabitants scarcely able to maintain their corporation. Increase of taxes is the natural consequence of the division of Towns. Public buildings are now erected fit and convenient for the Town, one of which called the old meeting-house is situated at the northerly extremity of the new contemplated Town and more than one mile South of the center of Population of the whole Town of Wakefield, in which the Town have always held their Town Meetings untill the last annual Meeting. The other, called the new Meetinghouse, is situated at the center of Population of the Town, in a handsome flourishing Village, to which all the roads in Town lead and center. If the Legislature should grant the prayer of the Petitioners, Wakefield will be deprived of nearly one-half of its cultivated soil, comprehending the ancient and best Settlements in the Town. It will subject the Inhabitants of the old Town, as well as the new, to many disadvantages and inconveniences, and to an expense more than they are able to bear. New Public Buildings must be erected or the old ones removed, new roads leading to new centers must be laid out, made and kept in repair. School Districts will be split & divided, school houses thrown off from their centers, farms divided partly into the new and partly into the old Towns.

There are other considerations which we beg leave to suggest. Property of almost every description has a local value; and in perhaps no instance more so than in those little Villages in the center of Country Towns. In the Village in the center of Wakefield, Traders, Mechanics, and others have purchased house lots and garden spots, some at the rate of more than a thousand dollars per acre, and erected Houses, Stores, and work shops thereon with the reasonable and well grounded expectation that the center of Town, public business and Buildings would there continue. But if the Town should be divided, this village will be situated at the Southern extremity of the Town and thereby its value and local situation destroyed. But what advantages and privileges do the Petitioners derive by a division; or in other words, what inconveniences and hardships do they now suffer? We apprehend none. The Public Buildings in which the Town assemble, either for Religious worship or Town Meetings are both from one to two miles nearer the Southerly part than the Northerly Yet the inhabitants of this quarter are very well [all] located and make no complaints.

We are aware that Petitioners for the new Town will point out by Carrigain’s Map, or some other Survey, what a handsomebeautiful five-mile square Town may be made out of Wakefield and Milton, and then attempt to show and make it believed, that the remaining part of those two Towns will be equally as good as the whole and in a better form.

But we apprehend that the wisdom of the Legislature will not warrant the practice or establish the principle of cutting up and destroying old corporate Towns for the sake of making handsome new-formed Towns, and thereby destroy the harmony and happiness of its inhabitants.

During nearly fifty years the inhabitants of Wakefield have lived in peace and harmony and conducted their public affairs with an unanimity not surpassed if equaled by any Town in the State. We now appeal to the Wisdom of the Legislature, as the Guardians of our rights, liberties & privileges, to keep us together in our corporate capacity and not permit the party feelings and selfish motives of the few to disturb the peace, interest and happiness of the many.

Jonathan Copp, Henry L. Wiggin, Elias Wentworth } Select Men

Reuben & Benjamin Something - 1820
Two signature surnames that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. They appeared in Column 1 of Page 3, both above and below those of Mason Dorr. Any ideas?

[Page Three]

[Column 1:]

William Sawyer, John M’Crillis, Spencer Wentworth, John Hill, John Roberts, James Young 2, James Dame, John S. Wentworth, Silvanus Wentworth, John Wentworth, Saml Sevrans, Saml Sevrans, Shadrach Folsom, Robert Quimby, Nathl M. Meserve, Reuben [Currier?], Mason Dorr, Benjamin [Dorr?], Benjamin Bickford, James Shepard, John Brooks, Ephraim G. Smith, John Nocks, Nicholas Nocks, Zachariah Nocks, Daniel M.D. Smith, Joshua Nock, Joseph Burbank, Isaiah Varney, Abner Nutter, John Dore, James Thompson, John Thompson, Daniel Smith, Eliphalet Clough, Samuel [Ames?], Israel Wiggin, Joseph Corson, Simeon Philbrick, Jeremiah Wiggin, Walter Cate,

Samuel Something - June 1820
A signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 1 of Page 3, between those of Eliphalet Clough and Israel Wiggin. Any ideas?

[Column 2:]

Moses Young, Mark Young, Mark Wentworth, Phineas Wentworth, Paul D. Young, John Campnell, Ephraim Wentworth, Thomas Cook, Daniel Young, Edmund Wentworth, Thomas Bickford, William Dame, Joseph Young, John Cook 2th [?], Stephen [Burbank?], James Young, Richard K. Young, Jesse Cook, James Cook, Peter Cook, John Blake, Thos Wiggin, Henry Wiggin, Benjamin Cook, John Blake, Jr, Joseph Bennet, Jonathan Quimby, Eliphalet Quimby, Amasa Quimby, Daniel Quimby, Jacob Clark, John Cook, Nathaniel Cook, Samuel C. Dame, Levi Dearborn, Simeon Dearborn, Thomas P. Clark,

Stephen Something - June 1820
A signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 2 of Page 3, between those of John Cook and James Young. Any ideas?

[Column 3:]

John Dame, David Allen, John Clark, Jr., Ambrose Swasey, John Wingate, Dodavah Copp, Isaac B. Chesley, Stephen Fellows, Jeremiah Dearborn, David Dearborn, Jona Dearborn, Levi Neal, Asa Dow, Jonathan Brown, Jonathan Copp, Richard Dow, Josiah Dow, Joseph [M’Coon?], John Campernell, Jr., Nathan Dearborn, Stephen Horn, Nathan Dearborn, Samuel his X mark Dearborn, James Perkins, John Sanborn, Jr., Samuel Chamberlin, Richard Cook, Ebenr Hill, Jonathan Burley, James Hill, William Burley, Benja Brown, William Brown, Noah Horne, Daniel Horne,

Joseph Something - June 1820
A signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 3 of Page 3, between those of Josiah Dow and John Campernell, Jr. Any ideas?

[Page 4]

[Column 1:]

Jacob Lock, John Lang, Richard Land, Caleb Weeks, John Weeks, Josiah Allen, Mark Allen, John Watson, Nathan Watson, Joshua Vickery, Samuel Vickery, John Clark, Phineas Weeks, Nathaniel Lock, Nicholas Tuttle, Joseph Pike, Joseph H. Pike, Moses Gage, Jonathan Gage, John Gage, Benjamin [—–], James [—–], Joseph Maleham, Nathan Mordough, Benjamin Dame, Josiah Warren, Peter K. Wiggin, Elisha Rollins, Jacob A. Chesley, Thomas Nudd, Jr, Daniel T. Carter, Alvah H. Sawyer, Ichabod Richards, Joseph Wiggin, Henry M. Lindsay, George Hill,

Benjamin & James Something - June 1820
Two signature surnames that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. They appeared in Column 1 of Page 4, between those of John Gage and Joseph Maleham. Any ideas?

[Column 2:]

Joseph Hill, Tobias Hanson, John Fellow, Nelson Nutter, Thomas Nudd, Nathaniel Evans, Stephen D. Hutchins, William Clark Frost, James Martin, Isaiah Hodgdon, Joseph Hodgdon, Otis V. Geodey, Joseph W. Sanborn, Eliphalet Philbrook, Joshua Edgerly, James Edgerly, William Parsons, James Garvin, John Paul, Miles Davis, Wentworth Davis, Wm French, Moses French, John Hanson, Wentworth Garvin, John Sanborn, Daniel H. Sanborn, Samuel R. Hutchins, Ezra M. Hutchins, Charles Carter, Nathl Cook, Jr, Timothy Watson,

[Column 3:]

William Perkins, Joseph Palmer, Shadrach Allen, John Copp, Noah Kimball, Noah Kimball, Saml Burbank, John Horne, Joseph Edgerly, George Lindsay, Nathl Abbot, Ebenr Garvin, Richard Russell, William Bennet, Daniel Hall, Elisha Sanborne, Joseph Hutchins, Nathan Weeks.


See also Milton Militia Dispute – 1820 and Milton Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820


References:

Find a Grave. (2007, October 15). Jonathan Copp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/22229979/jonathan-copp

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Luther Dearborn. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92171689/luther-dearborn

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Rev. Asa Piper. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92206616/asa-piper

Find a Grave. (2012, June 23). William Sawyer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92415030/william-sawyer

Find a Grave. (2012, June 24). Henry L. Wiggin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92466261/henry-l-wiggin

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Milton Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820

By Muriel Bristol | April 17, 2022

A “number of respectable citizens” of Milton circulated a petition for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature, seeking to split off the northerly part of Milton and the southerly part of Wakefield, and then join them together as a new town. Their petition has not come to hand. (It might have been withdrawn).

... in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this [Wakefield] town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this [Wakefield] town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

Other documents, including this subsequent remonstrance petition, suggest that the impetus behind the original petition had been the simpler desire to split Milton’s militia company into two parts for the greater convenience of those having to travel the greatest distance to militia musters and trainings. (See Milton Militia Dispute – 1820).

Some rough calculations may give some idea of the relative sizes of Milton’s pro- and anti-division contingents. (The 1820 census was then in process only, and ultimately not preserved, except as aggregate totals. The 1810 census figures are used here as being those cited in the Wakefield anti-division remonstrance). Milton had 1,005 inhabitants in 1810, of which 476 were male. Roughly 276 of these 476 Milton males were below voting (and petitioning) age. That left roughly 200 potential petitioners. (N.B., 76 of those potential petitioners were above militia age). So, the 127 anti-division remonstrance petitioners represented roughly 63.5% of Milton’s 1810 electorate. (Leaving as many as 36.5% in the pro-division category).

(There was a companion remonstrance from the Wakefield voters that also opposed the division (representing roughly 85.7% of its 1810 electorate)).

As previously mentioned, Milton’s entries for the Fourth (1820) Federal Census are missing. The following remonstrance – by those 127 men opposing the proposed division – supplies the names at least of about two-thirds of Milton’s 1820 householders (and those living with them).

(Column 1 signer Daniel Hayes [Jr.] (1781-1856) was Milton’s NH state representative for the 1820-21 biennium).

Remonstrance of sundry Inhabitants of Milton agt. the prayer of certain petitions for a new town to be taken from Milton & Wakefield.

To the Honourable Legislature of the State of New Hampshire convened at Concord June session A.D. 1820 ~

Your memorialists, inhabitants and legal voters in the town of Milton in said state, having lately understood that a petition would be presented by a number of respectable citizens residing on the Northerly part of said Milton, praying that the Northerly part of Milton and the southerly part of Wakefield may be incorporated into a town, beg leave to remonstrate against the prayer of said petition being granted. A division of the town would subject the inhabitants of the old town as well as the new to many hardships and inconveniencies.

The town, though somewhat large in territory, contains but few inhabitants compared with other towns in this state ~

A large proportion of said town is composed of hills and Mountains or covered with ponds of water. Teneriff mountain and the three ponds, and almost all of the wast[e] land in said Milton lie in that part of the town not included in said petition. Should the town be divided according to the prayer of the petitioners, we are of opinion that much the best part of the town will be taken off, and Milton left without form or comeliness, within a few years the town has built a large handsome Meeting-house which is completely finished, in the center of the town, in which the inhabitants can conveniently assemble in town-meeting as well as for public Worship.

If the town should be divided this Meetinghouse will be situated on the North-Easterly section of the town, and of course must be almost (if not altogether) useless to those who have been at a large expense to complete it with the pleasing expectation that the same place would continue to be the center of said town ~

Should the prayer of the petitioners be granted it will be necessary to erect a Meetinghouse in the center of the territory that will be left, New roads leading to said center made and kept in repair; and a large increase in taxes must be the inevitable consequence ~

It is not to be expected that every individual in any town can possess and enjoy equal privileges. If towns are divided, split and subdivided there will be centers and extremities. But those living in the center purchase their privileges by giving more for their land on account of its local situation than those who live on the extremities give for land of the same quality ~

And we apprehend that it must be an extreme case in which the Legislature will take away those purchased rights by dividing the town and thereby transferring them to others ~

The public funds for the support of the Gospel and Schools, like the town are too small to be divided ~ Your memorialists, fully believing in the wisdom of that precept given us by the father of our country “United we stand; divided we fall” beg the Honourable Legislature to keep us together ~

[Column 1:]

Joseph Plumer, Levi Jones, Joseph Plumer, Jr, Benja Scates, Benjamin Scates, Jnr, Isaac Scates, Elijah Horn, James Twombly, James H. Horn, Daniel Emery, Timothy Emery, John Loud, John Palmer, Aaron Downs, John Scates, Nal Pinkham, Norton Scates, Pelah Hanscom, William Hatch, Gilman Jewett, Saml Jones, Ichabod Bodge, Isaac Worster, Wm Jones, Joshua Jones, Moses Nute, Ebenr Wakeham, James Goodwin, James Pinkham, Jedediah Ricker, Saml Ricker, Stephen Wentworth, Lemuel Ricker, Jonathan Dore, Dodovah Dore, James Hayes, Jr, Chesley Hayes, Micah Lyman, Daniel Hayes, Jr, Edward Tebbets, Stephen Drew, Wm Palmer, Theodore C. Lyman,

[Column 2:]

Richard Walker, Israel E. Nute, Jacob Nute, Benja Jenkins, Jeremy Nute, Joseph Walker, Samuel Bragdon, Isaac Wentworth, James Varney 3, John T. Varney, James C. Varney, J.C. Varney, Jr, John Jenkins, Ivory Bragdon, Lemuel Varney, Stephen Jenkins, Jr, Ezekiel Nute, Samuel Nute, Jotham Nute, Bidfield Hayes, Hayes Nute, John Twombly 3rd, James Y. Pinkham, William Wentworth, William [Hays?], Timothy Ricker, John Ricker, Richard Horn, Jonathan Ricker, Samuel Twombly, Jr, Robert Knight, Samuel Twombly, John Downs, Stephen Henderson, Daniel Wentworth, Phinehas Wentworth, Daniel Dore, Samuel Nute, Jr, Thomas Y. Wentworth, John C. Nute, William Downs, Samuel N. Chamberlin, Matthias Nutter, Hopley Varney, Joshua Knight,

William Something - 1820
The signature surname that I found difficult, if not impossible, to decipher with full confidence. It appeared in Column 2, between those of William Wentworth and Timothy Ricker. The initial letter might be a rather squiggly “H.” The next letter that looks like an “n” is also very like the rather similar open “a” of the “William.” The final two figure-eights could be the “y” and “s” of “Hays,” i.e., Hayes. Any other ideas?

[Column 3:]

James Varney, John C. Varney, Ezekiel Hayes, Stephen Hayes, Lewis Hayes, James Hayes, Ichabod Hayes, James Varney, Jr, Ephraim Plumer, John Meserve, Ephm Wentworth, Ichabod Wentworth, L.H. Wentworth, Isaac Varney, Wm Tuttle, Ambrose Tuttle, Jonathan Howe, Dudley Farnham, Jere: Cook, Isaac C. Young, William Sargent, Daniel G. Dore, James Bragdon, William Foss, John Foss, Ebenr Ricker, Charles Ricker, Wentworth Dore, Matthew Farnham, John Wentworth, John Wentworth, Jr, William W. Loud, Timo Roberts, Nathl Jewett, Merk Miller, John Blaisdell, George Dore, Nathan Jones, Joseph Corson.


See also Milton Militia Dispute – 1820 and Wakefield Anti-Division Remonstrance – June 1820


References:

Find a Grave. (2016, September 20). Daniel Hayes, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170258230/daniel-hayes

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 47: 1819-1820

Thompson, Rev. Albert H. (1886). Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Organization of the First Church, and Ordination of the First Settled Town Minister of Wakefield, N.H. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EKm15quwMhsC&pg=PA42

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