Milton Millwright Charles C. Hayes (1822-1893)

By Muriel Bristol | August 21, 2022

Charles Chesley Hayes was born in Milton, September 1, 1822, son of James Jr. and Apphia “Effie” (Card) Hayes.

(His parents had been married in Milton, January 28, 1817, by Levi Jones, justice-of-the-peace. NH Gov. William Plumer commissioned his father, James Hayes, Jr., as a lieutenant of the Seventh Company, Second Regiment of NH Militia, July 17, 1818. He was promoted to captain of the Sixth Company, Thirty-Ninth Regiment of NH Militia, September 4, 1822).

James Hayes headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [James Hayes], one female aged 50-59 years [Apphia (Card) Hayes], one male aged 15-19 years [Charles C. Hayes], one female aged 15-19 years [Sarah C. Hayes], and one male aged 10-14 years [Cyrus A. Hayes]. Three members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

Father James Hayes died in Milton, February 18, 1845, aged fifty-four years.

The Milton selectmen of 1849 were Jos. Mathes, C.C. Hayes, and Jos. Cook. Those of 1850 were Jos. Mathes, C.C. Hayes, and Asa M. Durrell.

Sister Mary J. Hayes died in Milton, April 6, 1850, aged seventeen years, eight months. Brother Cyrus A. Hayes died in Milton, April 24, 1850, aged twenty-one years, seven months.

Apphia Hayes, aged sixty-four years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Charles Hayes, a farmer, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and Sally Hayes, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Charles Hayes had real estate valued at $900. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Comfort Laskey, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), and David M. Corson, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH).

Charles C. Hayes and John E. Goodwin received five-year appointments as Milton justice-of-the-peace, July 5, 1850.

Sister-in-law Mary E. Spinney died in Milton, September 8, 1850, aged twenty-one years, eleven months, and fifteen days.

Charles C. Hayes married in Somersworth, NH, November 26, 1851, Abigail Paul “Abby” Spinney, he of Milton and she of Somersworth, NH. Richard Russell, a Somersworth justice-of-the-peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, November 3, 1826, daughter of Parker F. and Mary E. (Dearborn) Spinney.

Son Eugene Augustine Hayes was born in Milton, November 24, 1854.

Charles C. Hayes was the Milton town moderator for fourteen years from about 1855. He was preceded in that office by Charles A. Varney (1834-1893), and succeeded by Charles Jones (Scales, 1914).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 26, 1855.

Son Eugene A. Hayes died in Milton, January 17, 1856, aged thirteen months, twenty-three days.

Our treasure is in heaven. – Eugene A. Hayes epitaph

Mother-in-law Mary E. (Dearborn) Spinney died in Milton, February 10, 1856, aged fifty years.

C.C. Hayes of Milton filed a report with the NH Board of Education, March 29, 1856. He was a member of Milton’s superintending school committee, who made forty-eight visits to local schools during the 1855-56 academic year, and had been paid $28.50 (NH Board of Education).

MILTON. The Committee are of opinion that we have far too many districts in town for the best interest of our schools. We believe that if the number of districts was reduced one third or one half even, that the benefit derived from our money would be increased in the same proportion. Many object to this reduction of districts because the children having farther to walk, will be unable to attend the schools regularly. We believe this to be no argument, from the fact that we find the per cent of absentees in our villages much larger than it is in the more sparsely settled districts; and that those scholars who live remote from the school-house are much the most punctual in their attendance at school. In many of our schools the past year, there has been a manifest want of good wholesome discipline; very many teachers who are well qualified in other respects are wholly incompetent to govern a school in a proper manner. Those teachers only should be employed who are thorough disciplinarians. We would call your attention to the importance of parents manifesting a greater interest in our schools. It is a duty devolving upon every parent to see that his children attend school regularly, that they are there in season, and that they conform to the reasonable regulations of the school. It is the duty of every parent to show both teacher and scholars by his frequent presence in the school-room, that he is deeply interested in the welfare of the school. Every parent should visit each term of the school at least twice. This would encourage the scholars in their efforts for improvement and stimulate the teacher to greater exertions in their behalf. – Charles C. Hayes, Committee (NH Board of Education, 1856).

Dr. Charles F. Elliott (1804-1876) of Somersworth, NH, who was Strafford County Commissioner of [Common] Schools, made his own report on Milton’s district or common schools.

MILTON – The schools in this town are improving. A new school-house for two schools has been erected at the Ponds within the last year, which does credit to the citizens of that village. At the Mills – the Branch – are houses and schools worthy [of] notice. If the school districts suffer no further division they will be fortunate (NH Board of Education, 1856).

C.C. Hayes of Milton filed a report with the NH Board of Education, March 25, 1857. He was a member of Milton’s superintending school committee, who made thirty-nine visits to local schools during the 1856-57 academic year, and had been paid $32.97 (NH Board of Education).

The Milton selectmen of 1857 were D. Wallingford, Jr., C.C. Hayes, and S.S. Wakeham.

Daughter Abbie Louisa Hayes was born in Milton, September 5, 1857.

The Milton selectmen of 1859 were C.C. Hayes, J.F. Hart, and C.H. Goodwin.

Daughter Mary Elizabeth Hayes was born in Milton, May 5, 1859.

Charles C. Hayes received a reappointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 19, 1860.

Chas. C. Hayes, a farmer, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Abba P. Hayes, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Abba L. Hayes, aged three years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, aged one year (b. NH). Chas. C. Hayes had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $300. His household immediately preceded in the enumeration that of [his mother,] Aphie Hayes, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Her household included Sarah C. Hayes, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). Aphie Hayes had personal estate valued at $300.

Milton - 1871 (Detail) - Hayes, CC
Milton in 1871 (Detail). The “C.C. Hayes” farm off what is now Applebee Road, near its junction with Plummer’s Ridge Road (NH Route 125).

Charles C. Hayes, a millwright, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Abbie P. Hayes, keeping house, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Abbie L. Hayes, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH). Chas. C. Hayes had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $250. He shared a two-family residence with the household of Apphia Hayes, keeping house, aged eighty-two years (b. NH). Their households appeared in the enumeration between those of Parker Spinney, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), and John P. Nute, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. NH).

Milton sent Charles C. Hayes to Concord, NH, as its NH State Representative for the 1874-75 biennium. (Milton’s state representatives of 1874-75 were Charles Hayes (1822-1893) and George E. Simes (1832-1914)).

Father-in-law Parker F. Spinney died in Milton, August 1, 1874, aged seventy years, eleven months, and fifteen days.

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year appointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, July 2, 1875.

Mother [Apphia] “Effie”(Card) Hayes died of a brain hemorrhage in Milton, October 4, 1878, aged ninety-two years, twenty-three days.

The Milton selectmen of 1878-79 were Chas. C. Hayes, Asa A. Fox, and M.V.B. Cook. (They appeared belatedly as such in the Milton business directory of 1880).

C.C. Hayes appeared in the Milton business directories of 1880, 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, and 1889, as a justice-of-the-peace).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, June 24, 1880.

Charles C. Hayes, a farmer & sets water wheels, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Abbie T. Hayes, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), Abbie L. Hayes, at home, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, at home, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Jonas S. Laskey, a farmer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and Geo. W. Fellows, connected with the press, aged forty years (b. NH).

(A young Ira W. Jones (1854-1946) appeared in this same 1880 census as being engaged in setting water wheels. Might they have been working together? (See Milton’s Hydraulic Engineer: I.W. Jones)).

Charles C. Hayes compiled a Milton historical sketch, including lists of its public officials, which was included in D. Hamilton Hurd’s History of Rockingham and Strafford Counties, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, as published in 1882. (Much of his information was reprinted in John Scales’ History of Strafford County, New Hampshire, and Representative Citizens, when it was published in 1914). (See for example Milton’s NH State Representatives – 1803-1902).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, May 26, 1885.

The Milton selectmen of 1888 were J.H. Avery, Chas. Hayes, and C.C. Hayes. (They appeared belatedly as such in the Milton business directory of 1889).

The Milton selectmen of 1889 were C.C. Hayes, Chas. Hayes, and C.A. Jones.

Milton sent Charles C. Hayes as a its delegate to the NH Constitutional Convention of January 1889. His mileage was calculated to be 176 miles. He was assigned to the Committee on the Bill of Rights and Executive Department.

The delegates of the Constitutional Convention assembled in the hall of the House of Representatives on Wednesday, January 2, 1889, at 11 o’clock A.M., and were called to order by John W. Morse of Bradford (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889). 

On Tuesday, January 8, 1889, delegate Hayes presented a petition from the Union Law and Order League of Wakefield, Brookfield, Milton, and Middleton. (Daniel S. Burley of the Burley & Usher Shoe Company was the leader of this league. New Hampshire was then operating under what was called “semi-prohibition” (see Milton Under “Semi-Prohibition” – 1855-02)).

Mr. Hayes of Milton presented a memorial of the Union Law and Order League, of Wakefield, Brookfield, Milton, and Middleton, praying for the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution prohibiting the manufacture or sale of all malt or distilled liquors. The memorial was laid on the table pending the appointment of the special committee to consider petitions on the same subject (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889).

On Wednesday, January 9, 1889, delegate Hayes reported his committee’s majority opinion that it would be inexpedient to pass an amendment limiting the terms of police court justices. The convention agreed with his committee.

Mr. Hayes, from the Committee on Bill of Rights and Executive Department, to which was referred the proposed amendment limiting the term of office of justices of police courts to a period of five years, reported the following resolution: Resolved, That it is inexpedient to adopt such amendment. The report was accepted and the resolution adopted (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889).

On Thursday, January 10, 1889, delegate Hayes proposed that a select committee be appointed to consider the question of female suffrage. (There was no female suffrage at this time, nor would there be for another thirty-one years).

Mr. Hayes of Milton offered the following resolution: Resolved, That a select committee of ten, one from each county, be appointed by the chair to take into consideration the subject of the suffrage of women. The resolution was adopted, and the president announced the following gentlemen as said committee: Messrs. [Charles C.] Hayes of Milton, [George F.] Merriam of Greenville, [Aaron L.] Mellows of Newmarket, [Oran E.] Randall of Chesterfield, [Frank M.] Beckford of Laconia, [Granville J.] Marshall of Unity, [Charles W.] Gray of Jackson, [Hazen D.] Smith of Plymouth, [Charles] Danforth of Concord, [Daniel E.] Cummings of Colebrook.

On Friday, January 11, 1889, Delegate Hayes’ proposed amendment regarding religious freedom was one of three similar proposals considered by the convention.

Mr. [Samuel D.] Felker of Rochester: I introduced the resolution to strike out the word “Protestant” from article 6 of our Bill of Rights. I did it, in the first instance, because I believed that the word “Protestant” is distasteful to a certain class of our citizens. They are entitled to as much consideration as we are. Suppose the word “Catholic” instead of “Protestant” was there, would it not be just as distasteful to us? I do not care which form the resolution takes; the one proposed by the gentleman from Hanover (Mr. [Edward R.] Ruggles) or the one proposed by the gentleman from Milton (Mr. Hayes). I am for religious freedom, even if it is a matter of sentiment, for sentiments are sometimes very dear to us. I have as much veneration for the works of the fathers as the gentleman from Dover (Mr. [James] Thurston). If he will look in the old Bill of Rights of Massachusetts, he will see somewhat similar language, which was thoroughly revised in 1833; but it would do no harm, if it were satisfactory to our Methodist brethren, to retain the old form stripped of its objectionable features. Ours is the last State in the Union that retains any such article in its Bill of Rights, and it seems to me that it should be changed so as to give everybody equality in matters of religion (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889).

After some debate an amendment proposed by the delegate from Hanover (Mr. Ruggles) was adopted and that amended alteration to the NH Bill of Rights was passed by the convention.

(NH constitutional conventions was the mechanism for constitutional change for many years. In more recent years, constitutional amendments have originated in the NH legislature rather than in a convention of delegates).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, May 21, 1890. He would not live to complete this final term.

C.C. Hayes appeared in the Milton business directory of 1892, as a justice-of-the-peace).

Charles C. Hayes died of Bright’s disease (and a carbuncle) in Milton, February 10, 1893, aged seventy years, five months, and ten days. Charles W. Gross, M.D., of Milton Mills signed the death certificate.

MILTON. The death of Mr. Charles Hayes which occurred last Friday removes from our midst one who will long be missed in public life as well as by many warm personal friends. He was an active, earnest and efficient member of the school board, a skilled surveyor, one of the trustees of the Nute High school and much respected by every one. He was connected with the Masonic fraternity and stood high in their circles. The funeral took place Tuesday, the school closing in memory of his labors with and for its interests, and teachers and pupils attended. Rev. Frank Haley officiated (Farmington News, February 17, 1893).

UNION. The late Charles C. Hayes, whose death was mentioned by your Milton correspondent last week, was a charter member of the above lodge and in the years 1875 and 1876 filled the master chair in the most acceptable manner. The lodge was instituted in June 1857, and of the thirteen persons who have been elected to the office of Worthy Master, Brother Hayes was the first to be “called from labor to reward.”
Farewell, dear brother, farewell; Thou has gone with Christ to dwell. Though we shall greet thee here no more, Yet we shall meet on the other shore (Farmington News, February 24, 1893).

Sister Sarah C. Hayes, a housekeeper in Haverhill, MA, died of a strangulated hernia in Milton, September 6, 1896, aged sixty-six years, two months, and nine days.

Brother-in-law Nathaniel D. Spinney died in Milton, April 7, 1900, aged sixty-five years.

Abby P. Hayes, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included Abby L. Hayes, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, aged forty-one years (b. NH). She owned their farm, free-and-clear. She was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living.

Brother Benjamin F. Hayes died of a strangulated hernia in Milton, October 8, 1902, aged eighty-five years, six months, and fifteen days. James J. Buckley, M.D., of Milton, signed the death certificate.

Daughter Mary E. Hayes died of a bowel obstruction, appendicitis, and ovaritis in Milton, March 3, 1904, aged forty-four years, nine months, and twenty-eight days. Charles W. Gross, M.D., of Milton Mills, signed the death certificate.

Abbie P. Hayes, a farmer, aged eighty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Abbie L. Hayes, aged fifty-two years (b. NH). Abbie P. Hayes owned their farm, free-and-clear. She was the mother of four children, of whom one was still living.

Abigail P. (Spinney) Hayes died of acute indigestion (followed by heart disease) in Milton, NH, April 10, 1913, aged eighty-six years, five months, and seven days. H.E. Anderson, M.D., of Milton Mills, signed the death certificate.

Abbie L. Hayes, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Abbie L. Hayes owned her farm, free-and-clear.

Daughter Abbie L. Hayes died of Addison’s disease on Branch Road in Milton, June 17, 1927, aged sixty-nine years, nine months, and twelve days. H.E. Anderson, M.D., of Milton Mills, signed the death certificate.


References:

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Abbie Louisa Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130390001/abbie-louisa-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Abigail Paul “Abbie” Spinney Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130388134/abigail-paul-hayes

Find a Grave. (2012, October 7). Benjamin F. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98444912/benjamin-f-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Charles Chesley Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130387666/charles-chesley-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Cyrus Augustus Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130383936/cyrus-augustus-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Eugene Augustine Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130389206/eugene-augustine-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Cpt. James Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336842/james-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Mary A. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237337115/mary-adaline-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Mary D. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336998/mary-d-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130389688/mary-elizabeth-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Mary Jane Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130383602/mary-jane-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Sarah Card Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130384568/sarah-card-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Mary E. Dearborn Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130405538/mary-e-spinney

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Mary E. Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336379/mary-e-spinney

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Nathaniel D. Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130382579/nathaniel-d-spinney

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Parker Foster Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130406637/parker-foster-spinney

NH Board of Education. (1856). Annual Report Upon the Common Schools of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qYQ-AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA3-PR60

NH Constitutional Convention. (1889). Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the State of New Hampshire, January, 1889. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Vw0MAAAAMAAJ

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA508

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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