Celestial Seasonings – June 2021

By Heather Durham | May 31, 2021

Hello there everyone!  Welcome to the month of June during which time we celebrate the summer solstice.  There’s plenty of excitement this month including two meteor showers along with a phenomenon commonly referred to as retrograde and the full strawberry moon.  This Moon is the most colorful one of the year.

Below is a meteor shower graphic along with three YouTube videos that pertain to the astronomical events this month along with a bit of last month’s activity.  I hope to add more references and graphics, photos and videos in future issues.  There’s also a link to a graphic description of the eclipse that will give you an idea of how it will appear.

So come along as we begin our adventure into the night skies of June 2021!


June 1. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to one another.

June 2. The Moon will be at its last quarter.

June 10. The Moon will pass the sun providing a 74% eclipse visible from Dover, NH The link below will give you a visual view of what this should look like. The Daytime Arietid meteor shower will peak today with the best viewing be after 2:40 am, but before sunrise.  This is one of the brightest daytime meteor showers there is.

Daytime Arietids - Per F.C. Cain
Daytime Arietids (Per F.C. Cain).

June 17. The Moon will be at first quarter.

June 20. Jupiter may be seen moving west to east.  This is called Retrograde. Today is the summer solstice and the longest day of the year. It may be referred to as midsummer.

June 24. The full Strawberry Moon will be full.

June 27. The Moon and Saturn will rise closely to one another. The June Bootid meteor shower will be at its peak today with the best viewing at twilight. The meteors are slow and are known to be unpredictable.

June 28. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to one another.


References:

Anonymous, A.A. (2020, April 20). June Bootids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_Bootids

Anonymous, A.A. (2020, December 29). Daytime Arietids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arietids

Cain, F.C. (n.d.). Daytime Arietids [Graphic]. Retrieved from www.universetoday.com/102715/june-arietids-the-invisible-meteor-shower-you-just-

Ford, D.F. (2021, January 5). June 2021. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/newscal.php?month=6&year=2021&maxdiff=1#datesel

Late Night Astronomy. (2021, April 1). What’s Up In The Night Sky – May & June 2021. Retrieved from youtu.be/tuyNLOrQi5E

NBC News. (2019, June 19). Why June’s Strawberry Moon is the most colorful of the Year. Retrieved from youtu.be/7kbMuUeqoMw

Now Next. (2021, April 24). June 2021 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/Oi4BYiq3ero

J. Spaulding & Sons Co., 1894-24

By Muriel Bristol | May 30, 2021

Jonas Spaulding, Jr. (1833-1900), and his younger brother, Isaac W. “Waldo” Spaulding (1845-1927), formed a leather-board company under the name Spaulding Brothers, in Townsend (Townsend Harbor or East Townsend), MA, in 1873. (Prior to that they had been coopers and barrel manufacturers).

Spaulding-Frost CooperageJonas Spaulding, Jr., a manufacturer of leather board & coopering, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Townsend, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma [(Cummings)] Spaulding, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. NH), his children, Leon C. Spaulding, at school, aged twelve years (b. MA), Huntley N. Spaulding, at school, aged ten years (b. MA), Rolland H. Spaulding, at school, aged seven years (b. MA), and Marian Spaulding, aged one year (b. MA), and his servant, Jennie Fitch, a servant, aged twenty-two years (b. MA).

On the next page appeared his brother and business partner: Waldo Spaulding, a manufacturer of leather board, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), headed a Townsend, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta B. [(Haynes)] Spaulding, keeping house, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), and his nephew, Charles Spaulding, at school, aged thirteen years (b. MA).

TOWNSEND HARBOR. The leather board mills here and at West Townsend have been run for some time by Jonas and Waldo Spaulding, but Jonas Spaulding has now purchased Waldo Spaulding’s interest in the mills. Huntley S., son of Jonas Spaulding, will have a general oversight of both mills, buying and selling stock and goods, and proposes to enlarge the business. They have made extensive repairs of the mill here, this summer, and now the carpenters are repairing the mill at West Townsend. Leon, another son of Jonas, has taken a contract to do all the work at the Harbor mill by the job. They employ about 20 hands and it is expected that the brothers will make a success of their business (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), November 14, 1890).

Jonas Spaulding, Jr., purchased a mill property at South Milton from Luther Hayes in December 1893. He constructed a second leather-board mill in Milton in 1894 – under the separate corporate name of J. Spaulding & Sons – with his three sons, Leon C. Spaulding (1868-1924), Huntley N. Spaulding (1869-1955), and Rolland H. Spaulding (1873-1942). (Daughter Marion L. Spaulding (1878-1957) does not seem to have been involved).

ANOTHER BOOM FOR MILTON. Luther Hayes has sold his mill property at South Milton, known as the Tuttle mills, to James [i.e., Jonas,] Spaulding of Andover, Mass., who will build a leatherboard factory 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, 4 stories high. He has bought eight acres of George Lyman for flowage and other purposes and will build a stone dam four feet higher than the present one, giving twenty feet head and fall. It will be one of the finest privileges on the whole stream. He will build storehouses and tenements, for his workers to live in, giving work for a large number of workmen in building and manning the factory. The factory is to be one of the finest buildings on the whole stream. He is to commence early in the spring to build. – Ex. (Farmington News, December 29, 1893).

Spaulding Mill in Milton (Previously Tuttle Shingle Mill)
J. Spaulding & Sons Co. Mill at Milton, NH

TOWNSEND. Jonas Spaulding is building a new leather board factory at Milton, N.H., to be completed ready for use during next Fall.  It will be about two and one-half times the capacity of the factory at the [Townsend] Harbor. His water privilege is estimated to be about 275-horse power (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), May 24, 1894).

(See also Milton Water Power in 1901).

TOWNSEND HARBOR. Mrs. Jonas Spaulding and daughter are spending a few days here. Rolland has also returned from Andover and is again cautiously at work in the leatherboard mill (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), January 3, 1896).

The Spaulding homestead in Townsend Harbor flooded in early March 1896.

Jonas Spaulding appeared in the Milton directory of 1898, as a Milton leatherboard mill manufacturer.

TOWNSEND HARBOR. Business at the leatherboard mill is flourishing, and its proprietors believe in territorial expansion. They have recently shipped lunch boxes to England and Australia (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), November 18, 1898).

TOWNSEND HARBOR. Arthur Patch has gone to Milton, N.H., to work in Jonas Spaulding’s mill there. That cannon, manufactured in the machine shop of the leatherboard mill, did its duty well on the Fourth furnishing the necessary noise. The day passed without accident, winning with the usual fireworks in the evening (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), July 7, 1899).

J. Spaulding & Sons constructed their third leather-board mill in North Rochester, NH, in 1899. Milton’s well-known hydraulic engineer, Ira W. Jones, placed his name, and the date 1899-1900, on a bronze plaque set in the mill wheel masonry at this plant. This location would become the company headquarters.

Jones, IW - 1899-00FOR A NEW PLANT. Contracts to Be Let Friday at North Rochester, N.H. NORTH ROCHESTER, N.H., Aug 10 – The contracts for the construction of a big leatherboard manufacturing plant for the firm of J. Spaulding & Sons, now doing business at Milton, N.H., and Townsend, Mass., are to be let Friday. The contracts call for the construction of a mammoth dam, a canal 5oo feet in length, a three-story factory 250 feet long and 50 feet wide, to contain 50,000 feet of floor space, a boiler house to contain two boilers, and a bleachery 150 feet long and 40 feet wide. Also a raceway from the proposed factory 200 feet in length. The total expense of the under taking has been estimated at $75,000, and the city of Rochester has given favorable consideration to the proposition to exempt the concern from taxation for a period of 10 years. The plant will employ 300 hands when running at its fullest capacity. Dwellings for the accommodation of the operatives are to be erected, and it is expected that before the 1st of February, 1900, a thriving village will be established where now there is nothing but a broad expanse of field and forest. The preliminary surveys have been made and the plans drafted (Boston Globe, August 10, 1899).

Spaulding & Sons at North Rochester say that their mill at the above place will be completed about the last of this month. The great wheel is ready for operation, and the water could now be turned on. When business is good they expect to employ 200 hands (Farmington News, May 25, 1900).

Agnes Going, a housekeeper, aged forty-five years (b. Canada), headed a Townsend, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Vera A. Going, aged seventeen years (b. MA), Charles W. Going, at school, aged sixteen years (b. MA), and William B. Going, at school, aged thirteen years (b. MA), and her boarders, Jonas Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged sixty-seven years (b. MA), Leon C. Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), Huntley N. Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Rowland H. Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA). Huntley N. Spaulding rented their house. Agnes Going was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Meanwhile, Huntley Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Rolland Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), were enumerated also among the seven boarders in the Rochester, NH, household of Simon Wentworth, a farmer, aged seventy-six years (b. NH). Seth A. Moulton, a draughtsman [for Milton’s Ira W. Jones], aged twenty-four years (b. MA) was another of the seven boarders.

LOCALS. Huntley Spaulding has purchased the old homestead of the late Charles F. Hayes at North Rochester and will improve the place at an outlay of several thousand dollars, and occupy the house as a family residence The late owner of the place was the father of James B. Hayes of this village (Farmington News, May 25, 1900).

Spaulding, J and Sons - 1900William A. Dickson (1874-1952), his father, and brother were operatives in the leatherboard factory in 1900. (His wife and daughter lived still in Groton, MA). By 1910, Dickson had become the Spauldings’ Milton mill superintendent. (See also Milton in the News – 1915, and 1916).

MILTON. Spaulding Bros. Co. are putting in the foundation for a stockhouse, 120 feet long by 50 feet wide (Farmington News, July 20, 1900).

Spaulding, Jonas, JrJonas Spaulding, Jr., was said to have been saddened when the last piece of countermaking machinery was moved from the original Townsend Harbor, MA, plant to the Milton plant in or around July 1900. Leatherboard counters were a component of shoemaking. The Spauldings diversified to fabricate also a leatherboard “fiber” material, with which they made storage boxes, suitcases, lunchboxes, record players (and their “horns”), etc.

Huntley N. Spaulding married in St. Paul, MN, August 11, 1900, Harriet G. Mason. She was born in Boston, MA, November 13, 1876, daughter of James D. and Lillie F. (Manley) Mason.

VITAL STATISTICS. MARRIAGE LICENSES. Huntley M. Spaulding, Harriet G. Mason (St. Paul Globe (St. Paul, MN), August 11, 1900).

Notes and Personal Mention. Cards were received in Topeka Wednesday afternoon announcing the marriage of Miss Harriet Mason of St. Paul, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Duncan Mason, formerly of Topeka, to Mr. Huntley Nowel Spaulding, which took place Saturday. August 11. This marriage will be a great surprise to Miss Mason’s friends in Topeka (Topeka State Journal (Topeka, KS), August 16, 1900).

GOSSIP OF SOCIETY FOLKS. Mr. and Mrs. James Duncan Mason have sent out announcements of the marriage of their daughter, Harriet Gardiner, to Mr. Huntley Nowel Spaulding on Saturday, August 11, at St. Paul. The bride is a former Topeka girl, who lived here most of her life. The Mason home was on Sixth and Tyler streets. She was graduated two years ago with high honors, from the Boston conservatory (Topeka Daily Capitol (Topeka, KS), August 16, 1900).

News of the State. Huntley Nome [Nowell] Spaulding, of the firm of Spaulding Bros. Co., of the mills in North Rochester, was united in marriage August 11, with Miss Helen Gardner Mason, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Duncan Mason, of St. Paul, Minn. Mr. and Mrs. Spaulding sailed August 15, for Europe, where they will remain until the first of October (Farmington News, September 7, 1900).

Jonas Spaulding, Jr., a pulp manufacturer – the “J. Spaulding” of J. Spaulding & Sons Co. – died of mitral & aortic regurgitation in Andover, MA, November 10, 1900, aged sixty-seven years, nine months, and four days.

DEATHS. SPAULDING – In Andover, Nov. 10, Jonas Spaulding, 67 yrs. 9 mo. Funeral from the church at Townsend Harbor, Mass., Tuesday, Nov. 13, at 2 p.m. (Boston Globe, November 11, 1900).

Spaulding & Sons Co. appeared in the Milton directories of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as Milton leatherboard mill manufacturers.

Townsend [MA] (Feb.) [1902]. Spaulding Bros. Co., leather board, sold to J. Spaulding & Sons, Co., of Milton, N.H., and moved thereto (MA Bureau of Statistics of Labor, 1902).

MILTON. Spaulding Bros. are laying the foundation for another stockhouse at their lower mill (Farmington News, January 15, 1904).

MILTON. Spaulding Bros. have commenced on a new store house at the lower mill (Farmington News, February 12, 1904).

MILTON. Spaulding Bros. are to erect six dwelling houses at North Rochester in the spring (Farmington News, March 4, 1904).

MILTON. M.K. Breckenridge, of the Atlantic Works of Boston, was at Spaulding Bros. mill last week to make some special repairs. He has been engaged to repair the engine in the steamer Mt. Washington (Farmington News, March 25, 1904).

Notes and Personal Mention. Mrs. Huntley N. Spaulding of Boston, formerly Miss Harriet Mason, is visiting Miss Kate D. Putnam (Topeka State Journal (Topeka, KS), November 4, 1904).

NEWS OF THE STATE. The J. Spaulding and Sons Co., of North Rochester, well known manufacturers of leather board and shoe findings, are about to remove their Kennebunk, Me., branch to Rochester, where it will occupy the upper mill of the Norway Plains Woollen plant, owned by C.E. Clark (Farmington News, March 24, 1905).

J. Spaulding & Sons (Huntley, Rollins and Leon) appeared in the Townsend, MA directory of 1907, as leatherboard (heeling) manufacturers, on Main street in Townsend Harbor. Huntley Spaulding appeared as general manager and president, with his house at Marblehead, MA.

Milton hydraulic engineer Ira W. Jones had a partnership for a time with the Spaulding Brothers, under the name Spaulding-Jones Company, which company sought in 1907 to build a “huge” hydroelectric dam on the Merrimac River.

Special from Concord. … There was a hearing on the famous “Spaulding-Jones” bill, which it is claimed will grant enormous water privileges on the Merrimack below Manchester. It is thought that the Spaulding-Jones company will turn the charter over to a wealthy syndicate who will exercise a great monopoly in the state; but this is denied by one of the Spauldings (Farmington News, February 15, 1907).

The wounded victim of Milton’s murderous lover of June 1907 crawled to Spaulding’s Milton mill, where workers brought her inside and summoned medical assistance.

MEANS A NEW MILL. Clash is Averted Between Two Big Companies. Great Falls and Spauldings Settle Water Privileges. MILTON. N.H., Aug. 9 – The threatened legal clash between the Great Falls manufacturing company of Somersworth and the J. Spaulding & Sons Co. of North Rochester, over the water privilege at the old flume, just below where the mill of the Salmon river paper company was burned last May, has been averted by the leasing of the water privilege by the Spauldings from their upper mill to the site of the burned mill. As a result the Great Falls company this morning called off its crew that was set at work last month to build a dam for a proposed electric power station. On this site the Spauldings will erect a leather board, mill that will employ 500 hands. They are also negotiating for the water privileges held by the United boxboard and paper company under a lease from the Great Falls manufacturing company that runs until 1923. These rights include the site of the burned paper mill. As the paper company has no further use for the privilege it is understood that it will shortly sublet it to the Spaulding company. This will mean another mill for Milton. The Great Falls company owns the entire water privileges of the river from its mills at Somersworth to the Milton ponds (Boston Globe, August 10, 1909).

J. Spaulding & Sons Co. built an updated replacement for their Milton mill in 1910. (See Milton in the News – 1910).

Roland H. Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his housekeepers, Bessie T. Dore, a housekeeper, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Agnes Going, a housekeeper, aged fifty-four years (b. Canada), and his boarder, Vera A. Going, a leatherboard mill stenographer, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA). Roland H. Spaulding owned their farm, free-and-clear. Agnes Going was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. (See also Milton and the Immigrants – 1910).

J. Spaulding & Sons constructed their fourth leather-board mill in Tonawanda, NY, in 1911. Besides being overall company president, Leon C. Spaulding was general manager of the Tonawanda mill.

MALE HELP WANTED. COUNTER MOULDERS wanted – Good moulders can earn from $2.50 to $3 per day. Apply to J. SPAULDING & SONS CO., Postoffice, North Rochester, N.H.; railroad station, Hayes, N.H. dSutf au21 (Boston Globe, August 21, 1911).

Spaulding & Sons Co. appeared in the Milton directories of 1912, and 1917, as Milton leatherboard mill manufacturers.

Leon C. Spaulding appeared in the Buffalo, NY, directory of 1912, as residing at 15 Manchester place.

Leon C. Spaulding married, June 21, 1912, Dorothy Hummel. She was born in Turner’s Falls, MA, April 14, 1884, daughter of Oscar and Bertha (Koerbel) Hummel.

J. Spaulding & Sons (Huntley, Rollins and Leon) appeared in the Townsend, MA directory of 1913, as leatherboard (heeling) manufacturers, on Main street in Townsend. Huntley Spaulding appeared as general manager and president, with his house at Boston, MA. Rollins Spaulding appeared as treasurer, with his house at North Rochester, NH, and Leon Spaulding appeared as having his house at North Rochester.

J. Spaulding & Sons constructed their fifth mill (which was their second one in Milton) in 1913.

Interesting Items. The firm of J. Spaulding & Sons Co. is erecting a new mill at South Milton near the old plant and it is to be 200 feet long, 100 feet wide and four stories, of concrete and fireproof. It will be used for the manufacture of fibre specialties and will furnish employment to about 50 hands. It is expected that it will be in running order by the first of January (Farmington News, June 27, 1913).

HELP WANTED. WANTED – Millwrights and pipers. J. Spaulding & Sons Co., Milton, N.H. William A. Dixon, Supt. (Portsmouth Herald, December 9, 1913).

Rolland H. Spaulding ran for and won the office of Governor of New Hampshire for the 1915-17 biennium.

Groton Locals. Rolland H. Spaulding of Rochester, N.H., a native of Townsend and well-known here, has announced his candidacy for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in his adopted state. Mr. Spaulding’s brothers, Huntley N. and Leon C. Spaulding of Townsend, were both students at Lawrence academy, although Mr. Spaulding never attended the local school (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), May 15, 1914).

Industrial Information. New Enterprises and Changes in the Trade. MILTON, N.H. The construction of the new concrete mill for SPAULDING BROS. has been completed and a part of the mill put in operation in the manufacture of one grade of leatherboard. The whole plant will soon be in operation (American Shoemaking, June 20, 1914).

Leon C. Spaulding appeared in the Rochester, NY, directory of 1915, as boarding at the Hotel Rochester. (The Hotel Rochester was situated at 95 Main street West (corner of Plymouth Ave.).

Emma (Cummings) Spaulding, widow of Jonas, Jr., and mother of Leon C. Spaulding, Huntley N. Spaulding, Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, and Marion L. Spaulding died in Boston, MA, October 19, 1915, aged seventy-nine years.

DEATHS. SPAULDING – In this city, Oct. 19, Emma C., wife of the late Jonas Spaulding, in her 80th year. Funeral services private. Interment at Townsend, Mass. (Boston Globe, October 19, 1915).

The citizens of New Hampshire, the press, and all those in official circles lament with Governor Spaulding the death of his mother, Mrs. Emma (Cummings) Spaulding, who passed away at Hotel Brunswick, Boston, Tuesday (Farmington News, October 22, 1915).

WANTED. Twenty-five men and ten girls. Steady work. Apply in person at office of J. Spaulding & Sons Co., North Rochester, N.H. tf (Farmington News, May 5, 1916).

GIFT OF GOV SPAULDING. His Employes in Rochester Mill Given 5 Percent of Their Yearly Earnings. ROCHESTER, N.H., Dec. 21 – More than 400 employes in the leather board mills of J. Spaulding & Sons in this city, owned by Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, were surprised this afternoon on receiving 5 percent of their years earnings, in addition to their regular pay, as a Christmas present from the Governor. The total amount of the gift was more than $5000. In some of the departments of the mill at Milton, those on piece work were given a raise in addition to the gift (Boston Globe, December 22, 1916).

After the 1914 death of his first wife, Spaulding’s Milton mill superintendent William A. Dickson married (2nd) in East Rochester, NH, May 21, 1918, Grace E. Harwood, a teacher at the Milton Grammar school. (One of his daughters, Marion I. Dickson (1895-1969), taught in the Hare Road school, as well as in the Milton Grammar school).

Huntley N. Spaulding appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1917, as the NH Food Administrator, with his house at Rochester, NH.

Hayes Station
Hayes Railroad Station

Huntley N. Spaulding, Leon C. Spaulding, and Rolland H. Spaulding all appeared in the Rochester directory of 1917, as employed by J.S. & Sons, with their house at Main Street, near Hayes [Hayes R.R. Station], in North Rochester. Huntley N. Spaulding had also a house at Brookline, MA, and Leon C. Spaulding has also a house at Buffalo, NY.

Spaulding, J and Sons - 1917J. Spaulding & Sons Co. appeared in the same 1917 directory as manufacturers of leatherboard, hard fibre, tube, chair seats, boxes and cans, dress suitcases, heeling, etc., with factories at Hayes, No. Rochester, and Milton, NH, at 100 No. Main, Rochester; at Tonawanda, NY, and Townsend Harbor, MA. Their Main office was at North Rochester, Hayes Depot, and their Boston office was at 203 Albany bldg., 89 Beach Street.

In the February 10th issue of the “Paper Mill and Wood Pulp News,” one of the most widely read publications in connection with the textile industry, there appears an article complimentary to the retiring governor of New Hampshire, Rolland H. Spaulding, who, now returned to private life, is devoting his well known business ability to the interests of J. Spaulding & Sons at North Rochester. The article identifies Mr. Spaulding as one of the prominent figures in the textile world and recognizes his administrative capacity in business affairs. It also mentions him as the possible choice of New Hampshire for the United States senate in 1918 (Farmington News, February 23, 1917).

Rolland H. Spaulding married in Brookline, MA, December 18, 1918, Vera A. Going. She was born in Townsend, MA, September 5, 1882, daughter of Charles W. and Agnes (Gilcrest) Going.

ARE MARRIED IN BROOKLINE, MASS. Ex-Gov. Spaulding and Miss Vera Adelaid Going Wedded. Rochester, Dec. 20. – Announcement of the marriage of ex-Governor Rolland H. Spaulding and Miss Vera Adelaid Going at Brookline, Mass., on Wednesday, has been received in this city. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Agnes Going, housekeeper of the Spaulding residence, North Rochester. The officiating clergyman was Rev. J.R. Dinsmore, pastor of the North and East M.E. church. Mr. and Mrs. Spaulding will reside at North Rochester (Portsmouth Herald, December 20, 1918).

Rolland H. Spaulding, aged forty-six years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Vira G. Spaulding, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), and his housekeeper, Susan C. Rodger, a private family housekeeper, aged twenty years (b. Scotland). Rolland H. Spaulding owned their farm in the North Rochester District.

J. Spaulding & Sons Co., Inc., appeared in the Milton directories of 1922, and 1927, as North Rochester, NH, leatherboard mill manufacturers. Kennebunk Manufacturing Co. appeared also in the Milton directory of 1922, as a Milton manufacturer of Fiber Goods.

Milton – Strafford Co. Pop. 1,128. On B&M R.R. M.O. and Tel. office; nearest bank, Rochester, 8 miles. SPAULDING, J., & SONS, CO., INC. New York Office, 484 Broome Street; Chicago Office, 659-661 West Lake Street; Boston Office, 203 Albany Bldg.; Philadelphia Office, 141 North 4th Street. (L.C. Spaulding, Pres.; R.H. Spaulding, Vice Pres.; H.N. Spaulding, Treas. A.W. Gray, Supt.) Address, North Rochester, N.H. Four Mills, North Rochester and Milton, N.H., and Townsend Harbor, Mass. Fibre Boards. (For equipment, see Townsend Harbor, Mass.) (Lockwood, 1922).

Sister Marion L. Spaulding’s fiancé crashed her new Lincoln touring car in North Adams, MA, in June 1922.

Ford and Lincoln In Head On Meeting. Two automobiles were damaged about 5 o’clock yesterday afternoon in a collision on West Main street at the easterly end of the bridge over little tunnel, where the narrowness of the roadway has resulted in agitation for widening it to lessen the danger of accidents. The cars figuring in the collision were a new Lincoln touring car, owned by Marran [Marion] L. Spaulding of 435 Beacon street, Boston, and operated by Walter A. Potter of 284 Dartmouth street Boston, and a Ford runabout, owned by F.A. Pulsifer of 80 Hathaway street and operated by Howard E. Richmond of 65 Hathaway street. The Boston car was proceeding towards Williamstown and the local car was approaching from the opposite direction when they came together. The damage to the Boston car consisted of a broken hub cap, a broken mudguard and a broken running board. The front end of the Ford car was stoved in (North Adams Transcript (North Adams, MA), June 5, 1922).

Marion L. Spaulding married in Providence, RI, September 26, 1922, Walter A. Potter, both of Boston, MA. He was born in Cranston, RI, April 8, 1865, son of Pardon K. and Ann E. (Davis) Potter.

BOSTON PAIR GET LICENSE TO WED IN PROVIDENCE. PROVIDENCE, Aug. 23 – Walter Armington Potter, furniture manufacturer, and Marion Lucy Spaulding. both of Boston, took out a marriage license here today (Boston Globe, August 24, 1922).

J. Spaulding & Sons Co., Inc., changed their name to Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., in 1923.

Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc. A new name for your convenience. IN changing our name from J. Spaulding & Sons Company, Inc., to Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., we accomplished a dual objective at one stroke: we have united the name Spaulding with the word fibre to more clearly indicate the character of our business. And, through that natural union we have made our name more easily remembered. Strangely enough, the public has for a long time past displayed peculiar insistence upon addressing us as the Spaulding Fibre Company thus, we have adopted a name entirely in accord with that inclination. The same organization – the same policies – the same service. One thing we wish particularly to express is that there is to be no change in personnel or policies. The same experienced organization and the same untiring service which have always been identified with J. Spaulding & Sons Co., Inc., remain unaltered. Let us register the name once more – Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc.: it stands for prompt, unstinted service to you in your fibre needs. And, if you are experimenting in the use of hard fibre in your products, we will gladly give you the benefit of our experience of you will write us. SPAULDING FIBRE Co., Inc. 316 Wheeler Street, Tonawanda, N.Y. BRANCH OFFICES AND WAREHOUSES. 484 Broome St., New York City. 659-661 West Lake St., Chicago. 15 Elkins St., Boston, 37, Mass.; 141 N. 4th Street, Philadelphia. Clapp & Lamoree. San Francisco. Los Angeles. Spaulding HARD FIBRE (Automotive Industries, June 7, 1923).

Spaulding president Leon C. Spaulding died at his summer home in Sebago, ME, September 11, 1924. (He would be succeeded as president by his younger brother, Huntley N. Spaulding).

Spaulding, Leon CL.C. SPAULDING DEAD. Tonawanda, Sept 12. Word was received yesterday of the death of Leon C. Spaulding, president of the Spaulding Fiber company of Tonawanda, at his summer home in East Sebago, Me., that morning. Mr. Spaulding. had been in failing health for the past five months. Besides being president of the Spaulding company, which has several branch factories in different sections of the country. Mr. Spaulding was general manager of the Tonawanda factory, the company’s principal mill. During the many years that the company has been operating here Mr. Spaulding had made his home at the Statler hotel in Buffalo during the winter, and living at East Sebago during the summer Buffalo Enquirer (Buffalo, NY), September 12, 1924).

L.C. SPAULDING DIES AT SEBAGO. Portland, Sept. 12 – Leon C. Spaulding, 56, died yesterday at his cottage at East Sebago. He was a shoe manufacturer with shops in Rochester, N.H. Mr. Spaulding’s cottage was one the first built at East Sebago, where is now a large colony.
Rochester, Sept. 12 – Leon C. Spaulding was born at Townsend Harbor and was the son of Jonas and Emma (Cummings) Spaulding. He received his education in the public schools of his native place, at Lawrence Academy at Groton, Mass., and at Phillips Andover Academy. For 35 years he has been a member of the leather-board firm of E. [J.] Spaulding Sons company, the first 10 of which he was located at North Rochester.. When the firm opened a new plant at Tonawanda, N.Y., for the manufacture of vulcanized fibre he was placed in charge as president the Spaulding Fibre company. Mr. Spaulding is survived by a wife and two brothers, ex-Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding and Huntley N. Spaulding, both of this city. He also leaves a sister, Mrs. Marion Potter, of New York (Portsmouth Herald, September 12, 1924).


Continued in Spaulding Fibre Company, 1925-57


References:

American Textile Reporter. (1920, May 6). American Textile Reporter. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=BvBYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA6-PA43

Bassett, Lynne Z. (2009). Massachusetts Quilts: Our Common Wealth [Spaulding Family Quilt]. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=quNEcnPiM1cC&pg=PA21

Facebook. (2020). Spaulding Fibre – 310 Wheeler Street – Tonawanda. Retrieved from www.facebook.com/Spaulding-Fibre-310-Wheeler-Street-Tonawanda-153561917990611/

Find a Grave. (2018, August 23). Marion Lucy Spaulding Potter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192498207/marion-lucy-potter

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Huntley Nowell Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42230637/huntley-nowell-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2009, November 3). Jonas Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/43897371/jonas-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2013, October 17). Leon Cumming Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/118847337/leon-cumming-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Rolland Harty Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42231184/rolland-harty-spaulding

MA Bureau of Statistics of Labor (1902). Public Documents of Massachusetts: Being the Annual Reports of Various Public Officers and Institutions. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=9mRBAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA3-PA19

U.S. Geological Survey. (1937). The Floods of March 1936: Part 1. New England Rivers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=YDiShfgiuP8C&pg=PA390

Wikipedia. (2020, June 13). Huntley N. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntley_N._Spaulding

Wikipedia. (2021, April 23). North Rochester, New Hampshire. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Rochester,_New_Hampshire

Wikipedia. (2021, March 3). Rolland H. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolland_H._Spaulding

H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1928-34

By Joyce Wentworth Cunningham | May 23, 2021

Continued from H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27

Wentworth, Harry E. - Per Joyce W. Cunningham
Harry E. Wentworth (Per Joyce W. Cunningham).

The story of Miltonia Mills continues: A couple things are now clearer. First, the reason for all the negotiations being carried on at the end of 1927 was a financial crisis. Second, Henry A. Townsend is in charge, but much of the day to day operation is Grandpa’s [Harry E. Wentworth’s] responsibility.

Here is the chronology for 1928-34. You can draw your own conclusions about what it all means.


1928

January 11: Norman took Ella & me down to Rochester in P.M. I had to go on some business for Henry.

[Norman L. Wentworth (1903-1991), son of the diarist Harry E. Wentworth (1869-1955), took his father and his step-mother, Ella C. (Buck) Wentworth (1870-1947), down to Rochester, NH, on business for mill proprietor Henry A. Townsend (1898-1932)].

January 13: Mr. Griswold & Mr.  Buckley, two accountants, came this P.M. to get some figures from our books for Mr. Grant of N.Y.

[Dana H. Grant [(1894-1973)] was the head of D.H. Grant & Co. Dana H. Grant, an importer, aged thirty-six years (b. ME), headed a Pelham, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Dorothy R. [(Gross)] Grant, aged thirty-six years (b. IL), his children, Dorothy H. Grant, aged four years (b. NY), and Dana W. Grant, aged two years (b. NY), and his mother-in-law [mother], Mary H. Grant, aged seventy years (b. MA). Dana H. Grant owned their house at 218 Cliff Avenue, which was valued ay $35,000. (Nor was his the most valuable house in the neighborhood). They had a radio set].

January 21: Mr. Buckley got through at the office to-night and went home.

January 30: Henry came home from Texas. He got in Boston Friday. He will go back to Boston to-morrow, where he & Ing will stay for a few weeks. 

You will recall that he left for Texas (and elsewhere) on December 24, 1927.

February 8: Henry came home to-night.

February 13: Henry went back to Boston this morning.

February 24: Mr. Emerson was in the office this A.M. to talk about the mill.

[This visitor might have been John N. Emerson [(1875-1946)], president of the Emerson Shoe Company of Rochester, NH. His vice-president and treasurer was Seth F. Dawson of the Milton Leatherboard Company. John N. Emerson, a shoe manufacturer, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nellie [(Briody)] Emerson, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), and his son, Lloyd E. Emerson, a shoe factory helper, aged twenty-one years (b. MA). John N. Emerson rented their house at 87 Wakefield Street, for $36 per month. They had a radio set].

February 25: Henry came back this P.M. and Mr. Emerson came up again to see him.

February 27: Norman took me down to Milton after dinner to see Mr. Dawson about the mill.

[This would have been Seth F. Dawson, Jr. (1879-1955), proprietor of the Milton Leatherboard Company. After the 1933 death of Dawson’s second wife, he would marry as his third wife Ing’s sister, Mrs. Ruth H. ((Svenson) Anderson) Iovine]. 

March 17: Ralph & I finished work for Henry in the office. I have a little more to do, but no more pay. 

[Ralph Pike [(1893-1938)], a fibre mill commercial traveler, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Marian H. Pike, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), and his children, Franklin Pike, aged six years (b. NH), Roland Pike, aged five years (b. NH), and Roger L. Pike, aged three years (b. NH). Ralph Pike owned their house on Highland Street (near its intersection with Western Avenue), which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set].

March 20: Mr. Grant, Mr. Astatt & Mr.____? From N.Y. were in the office in the P.M.

March 28: When down to No. Rochester to see Mr. Spaulding in the A.M. and he came up here to see the mill in P.M.

[This might have been either Rolland H. Spaulding (1873-1942) or his elder brother, Huntley N. Spaulding (1869-1955), at this time president and vice-president respectively of the Spaulding Fibre Company of North Rochester. Both served as governors of New Hampshire, but Huntley N. Spaulding was actually governor at the time of this diary entry, which suggests on several levels that Harry E. Wentworth went down to North Rochester to see former governor Rolland H. Spaulding].

[Roland H. Spaulding, a leather-board factory president, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Vera G. Spaulding, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), his children, Virginia P. Spaulding, aged nine years (b. MA), Betty L. Spaulding, aged seven years (b. MA), his cook, Mary Wakefield, a private family cook, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), and his servant, Rachael Houle, a private family maid, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Roland H. Spaulding owned their house at 76 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $200,000 [!]. They had a radio set].

April 13: Was at the office all day. Mr. Grant was here from N.Y. and we expected to get the finances all fixed up but Mr. Dawson disappointed us and so we are no better off than we were a month ago.

April 14: Henry, Mr. Grant, and I went down to see Mr. Hall in A.M. & talked business in the office in P.M. We are going to start the mill and make some samples and see if we can’t keep it going. Henry is to put in part of the capital.

Miltonia Mills Trademark - 1921
Registration of Miltonia Mills’ Trademark “Miltonia” (U.S. Patent Office)

I wonder if these sample blankets were the white hospital blankets for which the mill became known.  I grew up covered by those blankets – seconds, samples stitched together to make a twin or full bed size – and even heated pieces used to cover my Vicks-Rubbed chest when I had a cold.  I spent a lot of time looking at those Miltonia Mills labels!

April 30: Was over in the office a little while in P.M. Fred started getting the warps in the looms for sample blankets.

[Fred H. Simes [(1868-1953)], a woolen mill superintendent, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-two years), Mary A. [(Smith)] Simes, aged sixty-one years (b. NH). Fred H. Simes rented their house on Main Street, for $8 per month. They did not have a radio set].

May 16: Was in the office in P.M. and paid off. 

I assume this means that there were at least some workers making the sample blankets. Grandpa had continued to go to the office occasionally since the March 17 shut down without pay. After this date, he was in the office fairly regularly, but no indication of whether or not he was being paid.

May 18: In the office in P.M.  New sample blankets coming along slowly.

June 1: I was in the office most of P.M. Sample blankets about all done.

June 6:  Sent a case of the new blankets to Mr. Grant.

June 27:  Mr. Harvey L. Lord from Auburn & Kennebunk was here to look over the mill proposition. He may put some money in with us.

[This might have been Harvey J. Lord [(1881-1960)]. Harvey J. Lord, a lumber mill sawyer, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. He owned his house, which was valued at $100. He did not have a radio set].

June 30: Mr. and Mrs. Grant of N.Y. were here in P.M. They are stopping at York Village for a few days.

July 2: Mr. Lord and Mr. Grant were at the office most of the day trying to reach some conclusion about the mill.

November 16: Went over to the office for Henry to give figures for the Income Tax inspector about 11:30 and was over in P.M.

Grandpa had continued to work in the office, at least half days, on a fairly regular basis over the last six months of the year, but did not record anything more about the mill’s financial situation. Was he being paid or was he still working gratis? Did they get the financing they needed?  Were the sample blankets satisfactory? Had they re-employed some/many of their laid-off workers? Perhaps his 1929 diary will continue to help demystify the situation.

1929

The year began on this less than hopeful note. On January 7, Grandpa wrote: Mill is all closed up – has been for a week. I am finishing the work on the books.  Other developments during the year are detailed below:

January 11: In the office all day. Henry went to Boston. Will go to N.Y. Sunday night to see Mr. Jenkins.

[Thomas A. Jenkins [(1867-)], a commercial blanket salesman, aged sixty-three years years (b. NY), headed a Mount Vernon, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Sarah B. Jenkins, aged sixty years (b. NY), and his son, James H. Jenkins, a bond salesman, aged twenty-six years (b. NY). Thomas A. Jenkins rented their house at 120 Grand Street, for $128 per month. They had a radio set].

February 9: Henry has closed the mill, drawn off all the water and let the fire go out.

April 2: Had some work to do for Henry in P.M. Mr. Carmichael was here and called to talk a little about the mill.

[Mrs. Helen G. (Fox) Carmichael (1881-1971) was a daughter of Milton Mills merchant Everett F. Fox (1856-1927). Her husband, George E. Carmichael (1875-1965) was headmaster at the Brunswick School, in Greenwich, CT. George E. Carmichael, a private school teacher, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Greenwich, CT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Helen F. Carmichael, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), and his children, Margaret Carmichael, aged sixteen years (b. CT), and Douglas Carmichael, aged six years (b. CT). George E. Carmichael owned their house, which was valued at $50,000. They had a radio set.

CARMICHAELS AT FARM. George E. Carmichael, headmaster of the Brunswick School, and Mrs. Carmichael are spending the week at their farm at Milton Mills, N.H. (Daily Item (Port Chester, NY), May 7, 1932)].

July 17: Went to work in the office again. Shall work half time or so.

July 25: Did not go to the office at all. Am going to work Mon, Wed & Fri for a while.

August 19: Began working in the office all the time.

September 5: Ernest Libby began working in the office during the blanket sale.

[Everett H. Goodwin, a plush mill weaver, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Florence Goodwin, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), his son, Everett H. Goodwin, aged one month (b. ME), his mother, Nellie Goodwin, aged sixty-three years (b. MA), his brother-in-law, Ernest Libbey, a plush mill weaver, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), his sister, Stella Libbey, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), and his nephews, Robert Libbey, aged five years (b. ME), and Richard Libbey, aged five months (b. ME). Everett H. Goodwin owned their house. They did not have a radio set].

Obviously the mill was operating and blankets were being made, but no explanation of how or why or how successfully. What kind of sale? Did buyers actually come to the mill to look and buy? Or had an advertised sale resulted in an abundance of orders? As usual, more questions than answers!

[Wall  Street News and Comment. Special Dispatch t0 the Globe. NEW YORK, Oct 24 – For years, ever since the Federal, Reserve System began to operate shortly after the outbreak of the World War, Wall Street has been saying with increasing confidence that there would never again be a panic. There was a panic today in the Stock Market (Boston Globe, October 25, 1929). This crash was the first of several, culminating in the Great Depression].

November 12: Went over to Sanford with Henry to see a lawyer about incorporating his business in A.M.

December 5: Everything closed up now at the mill except the office.

December 11: Let the fire go out in the boiler at the mill so I can’t work any after to-day unless we get other heat in the office.

December 12: Went over to the office and got the books and worked on them here at home about 4 hr.

He continued to work on the books at home for another five days. Thus ended another year of uncertainty.

1930

Realizing that we are now into the Great Depression years, things must have looked rather bleak for Miltonia Mills as the new year started.

January 6: Went down to Rochester & Gonic with John Horne, Mose Chamberlain & Charlie Langley in P.M. to see if we could to anything about the mill.

[John E. Horne and Charles A. Langley each appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as Milton Mills general store keepers. John E. Horne was at this time Milton Mills postmaster, i.e., the Milton Mills post office was in his store. Moses G. Chamberlain appeared as a Milton Mills lumberman].

These were all local merchants who had a vested interest in keeping the mill going and local men employed.

January 9: Worked on Income Tax for Henry most of day. 

January 10: Henry was over in P.M. and we worked on Income Tax.

January 11: Worked for Henry most of P.M.

February 5: Henry went to Boston to stay for a while. Eda [Townsend’s mother and Wentworth’s sister-in-law] is quite poorly. Henry will be up once a week probably.

Grandpa records only one visit from Henry over the next couple of weeks, but …

February 19: Worked over at the office part of P.M. putting up some blankets to ship.

And again …

February 21: Worked over in the office most of the day putting up some blankets.  Were these blankets they had in stock or was the mill back in production?

Either way, it looks as if Grandpa is not only the accountant, but also the shipping department!

February 25: Went over to the mill to show the place to a man from the Chamber of Commerce of Rochester in P.M.

[ROCHESTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, pres. Conrad E. Snow; v-pres. J. Leslie Meader; sec. William J. Warren; treas. John M. Stevens, City Hall. See p. 492 (Rochester Directory, 1930-31)].

More mystery: Why were they interested? Nothing more about working in the office or for Henry until …

April 4: Henry telephoned from Boston. He has gotten home from the South where he has been since the middle of February.

[Harry E. Wentworth, a woolen mill accountant, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census (April 22, 1930). His household included his [second] wife (of eighteen years), Ella B. Wentworth, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their house, which was valued at $5,000. They had a radio set. (His son, Norman L. Wentworth, a B&M Railway file clerk, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), lived nearby with his wife (of one year), Helen M. Wentworth, aged twenty-five years (b. ME))].

June 11: Helped Henry over at the office 2½ hours in P.M.

The next entry about the mill is surprising!

September 17: So many people in the sales room to-day we had to stay there all day – went without our dinner. Henry was away.  

Who are “we”? Who was there? What were they shopping for? Blankets? Mill machinery? Office furniture? Is the mill running? Is it getting ready to go out of business?

Grandpa customarily recorded “worked in the office” hours or A.M. or P.M, or all day.  If he had been working, it seems odd that he would not have at least mentioned it occasionally, and yet his next entry sounds as if it was the normal thing for him to be doing.

November 6: Worked in office in A.M.

November 10: Worked in the office all day.

November 11 Armistice Day, a holiday: Mill closed for the day. I worked in the office in  A.M. & part of P.M.

November 12: In the office all day as usual. 

Perhaps both the mill and he have been working all year and he just hasn’t been mentioning it.

November 26: Mill closed to-night for the rest of the week. [Thanksgiving weekend]

 December 23: Henry was sick at home all day.

December 27: Worked in office in A.M. and part of P.M.

At this point, I have come to believe that the mill was, indeed, in full operation.

1931

January 1: Henry kept the mill running to-day so I was in the office. Happy New Year!

February 17: The mill is closing down for a few weeks. The card room finished up last night and the spinning room to-night.

February 21: Finished up in the office this noon for a few weeks at least. They have the orders all filled and everything closed up to-night. Hope to get going again in a month or two.

March 13: Did a little work for Henry in P.M. 

He also did a little work for Henry on 14th and the 2oth.

May 4: I had to go over to the office and help Henry about 2½ hours in P.M. He is getting ready to start the mill.

May 8: I was over in the office a little while. Henry is getting started up

May 11: Was in the office all day. Shall probably have to work all of the time for a while.

June 12: The mill closed this noon until after the 4th.

Grandpa went back to work on June 29. I assume the mill reopened after the 4th as planned and continued in operation the rest of the year since Grandpa makes no mention of any more shut-downs. He was obviously still working on December 1 when the horn of one of his calves (he operated two farms as well as working for Henry) hit him in the eye. He went to the office, but was in too much pain to work very long. The next day Henry took him to Dover to an eye doctor. The eye felt a little better and he worked all day on the 3rd.  It eventually healed completely.

1932

January 1: Worked in office all day.

The mill was still operating, but not for long.

January 11: The last day we work in the office for the present. Henry is letting the fire go out and disconnecting the pipes.

January 21: Worked for Henry in P.M.

He also did a little work for Henry on January 27th.

February 10: Henry has put a heater in the office and I was over there 3 hrs. this P.M.

February 12: Went down to Dover with Henry in A.M. to fix up his income tax.

Grandpa continued to work in the office steadily throughout February and March. Sad news arrived in April.

April 2: Telegram came from New Orleans to-day saying Henry died of intestinal flu there to-day. They will be home with the body Monday night. He was in his early 30s.

April 4: They came home to-night with Henry’s body.

[SANBORNVILLE. This village was shocked at news of the death of J. Henry Townsend of Milton Mills, which occurred while on a return trip from Texas. His death was at New Orleans from a sudden attack of the “flu” last week. Mr. Townsend was a member of the Men’s club of this village, and was well known and liked here, both as a business man and a social friend. UNION. This community was shocked to learn of the sudden death of Henry Townsend of Milton Mills. Sympathy is extended to the bereaved family (Farmington News, April 8, 1932)].

April 6: Henry’s funeral occurred this P.M. at the house. Lots of people there from all around – some 30 or 40 Masons. Mr. Snell preached and they had the Shubert Quartette from Boston for the singing.

[Rev. Frank H. Snell was ordained at the Milton Mills Baptist Church in June 1931 and was the settled minister there until he accepted another pastorate in Melrose, MA, in 1937. At a Baptist funeral of some years earlier in Brookline, MA, “… the Schubert Quartette of Boston rendered ‘Abide With Me,’ ‘Nearer My God to Thee,’ ‘In the Garden’ and ‘Rock of Ages’.”).

April 7: Went up to Henry’s to see Ing [Henry’s widow] a few minutes in A.M. and spent ½ hour or more in the office in P.M. looking over mail and getting out Life Insurance policies.

April 8: Spent about 1½ hrs. up at Henry’s house with Edgar Varney (Insurance Agt.) and at the office.

[Edgar G. Varney [(1893-1971)], an insurance agent, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Ardys [(Shaw)] Varney, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his children, Edgar S. Varney, aged seven years (b. NH), and Sheldon Varney, aged one year (b. NH). Edgar G. Varney rented their house at 23 Charles Street, for an unspecified amount, from its owner [his mother], Edith [(Gerrish)] Varney, a widow, aged sixty years (b. NH). They had a radio set].

April 11: Went over to the mill in P.M. with Mr. Burleigh & Mr. Blaisdel of South Berwick.

[John H. Burleigh [(1883-1966)], a woolen mill accountant, aged forty-six years (b. ME), headed a South Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Helen H. [(Huntingdon)] Burleigh, aged forty years (b. VT), his children, Jean H. Burleigh, aged ten years (b. VT), Lucy D. Burleigh, aged seven years (b. VT), and John H. Burleigh, Jr., aged two years (b. VT), and his servant, Julia Moynihan, a private family servant, aged fifty-two years (b. MA). John H. Burleigh owned their house at 77 Portland Street, which was valued at $5,000. They had a radio set.

Clarence L. Blaisdell [(1897-1975)], a woolen mill paymaster, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a South Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edna R. [(Richards)] Blaisdell, aged thirty-four years, his children, Chyrma F Blaisdell, aged five years, and Clarence L Blaisdell, Jr., aged one year, and his mother-in-law, Henrietta B. Richards, aged sixty-seven years. Clarence L. Blaisdell rented their house at 15 German Street, for $2o per month. They had a radio set].

April 12: Ing called here a few minutes in A.M. on mill business and I spent about 2 hrs. at the office with Agnes & Halton in P.M. 

Agnes (“Aunt” Agnes to me) was Henry’s younger sister and Halton (“Uncle” Hal’) was her husband.

[Halton R. Hayes, a biscuits sales agent, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Agnes T. Hayes, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his son, Paul T. Hayes, aged five years (b. MA). Halton R. Hayes owned their house on 35 Fernwood Avenue, which was valued at $10,000. They had a radio set].

April 13: Was over in the office in A.M. to meet Mr. Hall. Went over to see John Horne – Gordon & Louie on business for Henry’s estate.

[John E. Horne [(1878-1953)], a dry goods retail merchant, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife (of four years), Gertrude C. [(Coombs)] Horne, aged thirty-three years (b. IA), his child, John E. Horne, Jr., aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Amy H. Coombs, aged sixty-nine years (b. Canada (English)). John E. Horne owned their house on Main Street, which was valued at $2,500. They had a radio set].

I knew John Horne, but have no idea who Gordon and Louie are.  Gordon may not even be the right name as it is squished into the center fold of this very small diary and it looked as if he had trouble writing in that awkward spot.

April 14: Worked in the office all day – taking account of stock.

April 19: Worked in the office all day. Ing & Agnes were in to talk over the mill business in P.M.

April 23: Was in the office most of the day. Mr. Hall was up in P.M. & Ing, Agnes, and Halton were there. We got some affairs pretty well settled.

May 2: Busy day in the office. Agnes takes over the mill property to-day. Mr. Hall was up and Agnes & Ing signed agreements. Mr. Eastman from Newport, NH, who is looking for the Supt. job was here in A.M.

[Lyle B. Eastman, Herman L. Eastman, and Archie S. Eastman were all Newport, NH, woolen mill workers. The more likely prospect would seem to be: Trueman L. Eastman, a woolen mill foreman, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Newport, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Hazel L. Eastman, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Trueman L. Eastman rented their house at 177 Cheney Street, for $30 per month. They had a radio set].

May 9: Mr. Smith & another man from Limerick Mills were at the office this morning to see about our making some blankets for them.

[J. Henry Smith [(1871-1948)], a woolen mill general manager, aged fifty-eight years (b. England), headed a Limerick, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Edna [(Lightoller)] Smith, aged fifty-seven years (b. England), his child, Thelma K. Smith, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), and his servant, Clara Firth, a private family servant, aged fifty-seven years (b. England). J. Henry and Edna Smith had immigrated into the U.S. in 1906, while Clara Firth had immigrated in 1905. J. Henry Smith owned their house on Washington Street (in the Upper Village), which was valued at $6,000. They had a radio set].

May 11: In the office as usual. George Stevens came to-day to begin his work as Supt.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. George Stevens has accepted a position as superintendent of the Miltonia Mill at Milton Mills, N.H., and will take up his new work at once (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), May 14, 1932). Stevens’s wife remained behind at their home in Vermont. She appeared often in newspapers as visiting him in Milton Mills (See Milton in the News – 1932, 1933, and 1934)].

May 12: We moved things from the sales room where we have been the past winter back into the office. Mr. Richardson of the Mass. Farmers and Wool Growers was here in P.M.

[This might have been Evan F. Richardson [(1867-1951)], who been a Massachusetts Department of Animal Husbandry official and, more recently, a Massachusetts State Grange officer. Evan F. Richardson, a general farm farmer, aged sixty-three years (b. MA), headed a Millis, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Geneive Richardson, aged sixty years (b. MA). Evan F. Richardson owned their farm on Exchange Street, which was valued at $9,000. They did not have a radio set].

I believe this is the first day the mill has been operative since Henry closed it in January.

May 16: Began work in the mill. Started on some Camel Hair blankets for Limerick mill.

[The Limerick Mills were struggling and would go into receivership in the following year: LIMERICK MILLS ARE SOLD FOR $150,000. SANFORD, Me, Oct 5 – Attorney Hiram Willard of Sanford, acting as receiver, sold the Limerick Mills for $150,000. Robert Braum of Portland, representing note holder., was the purchaser. A firm of Rhode Island plush manufacturers was the only bidder. The sale was subject to a lease held by George A. Connors. This lease expires Nov 30. Thirteen banks and corporations hold notes against the mills which are located 20 miles north of here (Boston Globe, October 6, 1933)].

May 17: Busy in the office all day, and had to go over at 7 P.M. to meet a man about blankets.

May 20: Had to go to Limerick in P.M. to show the blankets we finished this A.M. to Mr. Smith. Was over to the office in the evening to sell some blankets to Mr. Johnson of York Beach.

Grant, D.H. - Trademark - 270128
Registration of D.H. Grant & Co.’s Trademark “Barden Lane” (U.S. Patent Office)

June 11: Mr. Grant from N.Y. was here this A.M. and we made arrangements for him to handle our blankets.

July 25: Had to go to the office in the evening. Mr. Richardson brought a load of wool.

Mr. Richardson came with more wool on August 18.

September 13: Mr. Youst from Mr. Grant’s office in N.Y. was here all day.

[This might have been  Winfred Lester Youst [(1899-1982)]. W. Lester Youst, a clothing buyer, aged thirty-one years (b. KS), headed a White Plains, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Edith Youst, aged twenty-nine years (b. KS), and his children, Thaine A. Youst, aged twelve years (b. KS), and Yvonne Youst, aged three years (b. MO). W. Lester Youst rented their apartment in the Shapham Court Apartments, for $100 per month. Youst would eventually settle in New Hampton, NH].  

Both Mr. Grant and Mr. Youst came on October 29.

November 3: Had to go to Dover with Agnes to see an Internal Revenue Man in A.M.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George Stevens leaves Friday for Lebanon, N.H., where she will stop with friends, and go by automobile from there to Milton Mills, N.H., to spend Thanksgiving with her husband. Mr. Stevens has a position as superintendent in the Miltonia Mills at Milton Mills (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), November 18, 1932)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George Stevens returned Monday from Milton Mills, N.H., where she spent Thanksgiving with her husband. Mrs. Emma Hubbard kept house for her while she was away (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), December 8, 1932)].

December 15: Mill not running to-day. Going to run 3 days a week for a few weeks.

Grandpa was a busy man in 1932.  He was in the mill office just about every day in addition to his work on the farms and his other enterprises!

1933

January 2: It is a holiday but I worked all day in the office. 

January 9: Mill is not running this week. No orders.

January 13: Mr. Richardson came with some wool about 7:15 and I had to be over at the office in the evening. He left about 9.

January 30: Halton went home from the office this P.M. sick with a cold. We expect to get finished up in the mill this week for 2 or 3 months.  There is no business.

It would appear that Aunt Agnes’ husband was taking an active role in the mill management.

February 1: Ruth Ramsey finished up in the office with us until we get started up in the spring.

[Ruth Ramsey [(1911-2015)] married in Acton, ME, September 25, 1936, Vincent Tanner, she of Milton and he of Lebanon, ME. She was a bookkeeper, aged twenty-five years, and he was a laborer, aged twenty-three years. She was born in Berwick, ME, daughter of Frank and Sophia (Smith) Ramsey. He was born in Lebanon, ME, son of Herbert and Marie (Devaney) Tanner. Rev. Frank H. Snell performed the ceremony].

I know who Ruth was, but not her role in the office.  I can only assume that she provided secretarial help.

February 7: They finished work in the mill today. The Finishing Room getting all cleaned up.

February 9: Finished up at the office for a while – let the fire in the boiler go out, and got about all closed up.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens is at his home here in town. He has had a position as superintendent of the Miltonia mill, in Milton Mills, N.H., for ten months. The mill has shut down for a few weeks (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), February 16, 1933)].

February 17: Mr. Richardson came with a little wool and got a few blankets about 7 o’clock to-night.

February 22: Halton brought over some checks that had come in and I spent most of P.M. on office work at the office and here at home.

March 7: Worked on the office books part of the day. Went up to the old Copp place with Frank Goodrich in A.M. to measure some wood for the mill.

March 8: Worked on the office books most of the day.

March 10: Went up to the Copp place with Goodrich to measure some more wood in A.M.

No more mention of the mill until …

May 3:  Went up to the old Copp place with Clarence Willey to measure some wood for the mill in A.M.

[Clarence D. Willey [(1883-1942)], a general farm farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Charlotte G. [(Twombly)] Willey, aged forty years (b. NH), and his children, Nelson F. Willey, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. NH), Chandler C. Willey, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Stella G. Willey, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Clarence D. Willey owned their house, which was valued at $2,000. They had a radio set].

May 18: Worked in the office in P.M.

May 23: Had to go over to the office in A.M. to figure prices with Halton.

June 1:  Mr. Grant is here. He & Halton came over to the house to see me in A.M. He went back before noon.

It would seem that the mill reopened about this time.  Grandpa only mentions occasionally being in the office and one day staying out of the office all day, so he was obviously working.  Also, he noted on July 21 that Norman went to work in the mill.  Dad had been laid off by the railroad and, like many others during The Depression, was picking up work wherever he could.

August 8: Halton & I went over to Manchester to attend a meeting of the N.H. Woolen Mfrs.

August 14: Started on 40 hour code at the mill to-day. Work from 7 to 4 for 5 days per week.

[In so doing Miltonia Mills anticipated the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 by four years].

August 18: Was in the office all day as usual. I work until 5 P.M.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Sims of Milton Mills, N.H., and Mrs. Charles Rhodes of Milton, N.H., were weekend visitors at the home of Mr. and Mrs. G.A. Stevens (News & Advertiser (Northfield, VT), August 24, 1933)].

September 9 (a Saturday): Went over to the office in A.M. Fred Sims is here and wanted to see about getting some blankets made. He & Harold are selling them in California and the Western States.

[Fred H. Simes (1868-1953), the retired mill superintendent, and his son, Harold E. Simes (1888-1970), resident in California from as early as 1914. Harold E. Simes, a California bean broker, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Los Angeles, CA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife, Frances E. Simes, a general insurance secretary, aged twenty-nine years (b. OH). Harold E. Simes rented their part of a duplex dwelling at 3625 Bellevue Avenue, for $42.50 per month. They had a radio set].

September 19: Halton went to N.Y. to-day to see Mr. Grant and try to get some business.

September 30 (another Saturday): Was over at the office in A.M. Expected Mr. Richardson for a load of blankets at 8 o’clock but he didn’t get here until after 10:30.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. F.S. Hammond, Mrs. H.A. McCauIey, Mrs. G.A. Stevens, motored to Lynn, Mass., last Thursday, to take Mrs. Frances Legier to her home, after visiting several weeks with Miss Harriet Legier. Mrs. Stevens visited her sister at Nantasket Beach, and will come home by the way of Milton Mills, N.H., and spend a few days with her husband and sisters in that place before returning home (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), October 12, 1933)].

October 17: Mill didn’t run, expected to work on Roe Dam but water is too high – will have to wait until later. We worked in the office.

October 18: Mill started up again this morning.

[CALAIS. Mrs. Hay[es] and Mrs. Townsend of Milton Mills, N.H., have been guests of Mrs. Lysander Richmond (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), October 20, 1933). Lysander Richmond was a textile salesman, formerly resident in Sanford, ME].

October 23: A broken steam pipe at the mill this morning put the boiler out of commission for a few hours so no heat in the office. I didn’t go over until P.M. Harold Sims from Los Angeles called on us this A.M. He is here for a day or two only.

October 26 (a Thursday): Didn’t take my day off to-day. (Maybe that is why he works some Saturdays!) Two Mr. Marshalls from N.Y. were here at the mill to see about selling our blankets.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George Stevens has returned from a trip to Nantasket, Mass., and Milton Mills, N.H. (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), October 27, 1933).

November 8: Halton and Agnes went to N.Y. on business.

November 20: Not doing much in the mill. I am working all the time so far. The girl in the office got through last Friday for a while anyway.

November 23: Halton went to Boston to-day.  I have been alone in the office.

December 13: Halton went to N.Y. to-night by train to meet Mr. Jenkins of Mill Associates to arrange for them to sell our blankets.

December 16: Halton got back from N.Y. this morning. He closed the deal with Mill Associates to sell our blankets this coming year.

1934

January 1: Worked in the office all day as usual.

January 14: Haven’t been doing much in the mill for the last few weeks but will be doing more soon.

January 19: George Stevens hurt his back in the mill this P.M. and had to be taken home.

January 22: Geo. Stevens’ back is so bad he is still at home in bed.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George A. Stevens returned home from Milton Mills, N.H., on Monday, where she was called four weeks ago on account of the illness of her husband. He has sufficiently recovered to resume his work (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), [Saturday,] February 24, 1934)].

January 29: Feed pipe of the boiler at the mill gave out this morning early and while they got it repaired before 8 o’clock they couldn’t warm the mill so no one worked. The office also was not warm enough to work in, so I wasn’t over there much.

[Tourist Activities. Recent arrivals registered at the Chamber of Commerce tourist bureau include: … New Hampshire – Mrs. Edward A. Barney, Lydia K. Barney, Canaan; Mrs. Halton R. Hayes, Milton Mills (Fort Lauderdale News (Fort Lauderdale, FL, February 14, 1934)].

 February 18: Had to have a little job done on the boiler at the mill so couldn’t work in P.M.

February 22: Halton has been under the weather to-day, was in the office only about an hour.

February 28: Halton went to N.Y. on the night train to-night.

March 16: Agnes got home from the South where she has been for about 6 weeks.  Halton went to Lawrence last night to meet her.

March 19: Didn’t work in the office as there isn’t very much to do there just now. No body working in the mill except some of the finishers who are packing & getting ready to ship all of the Wool Blankets we have in the storehouse.

[MILTON MILLS. Mr. and Mrs. Halton Hayes went to Boston one day last week and visited the flower show (Farmington News, April 5, 1935)].

May 8: Let the fire go out under the boiler at the mill for inspections and it was too cool to stay in the office. I was there about 1½ hours.

May 25: Went over to the office a few minutes in P.M. Nothing doing there yet.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. George Stevens, who is working in Milton Mills, N.H., was at home over Memorial Day (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), June 1, 1934).

June 15: Went over to the office a short time in P.M. They are putting in a new picker to-day. The old one blew up about a week ago.

[SHUTTLE FLYING OUT. This thing rarely occurs on a well-kept loom unless it is by accident, such as a broken picker stick, or picker strap, or a thread getting entangled in the shed in such a way as to hinder it from opening properly. In some cases the shuttle stops once in a while with the tip an inch or two sticking out of the box and the result is the box does not go down and it flies out. This is caused generally by an uneven pick or a badly shaped binder, probably both. The shuttle sticking in the picker is another cause, the remedy for which you will find in Chap. IX. A hard pick in combination with a shaky lay and a poorly shaped binder will often cause the shuttle to fly out  (Ainley, 1900)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George A. Stevens went to Milton Mills. N.H., on Monday to visit for a time with her husband and sister in that place. Mrs. Nellie Greenwood is keeping house for her (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), July 7, 1934)].

[APPOINTED AS FACTOR. NEW YORK, July 14 (Special). – James Talcott, Inc., has been appointed factor for the following: Miltonia Mills, Milton Mills, N.H.; Holden A. Bergida, Inc., New York City; Mayfair Mills, Inc., Philadelphia; Mount Alto Bedspread Co., Calhoun, Ga.; Union Fabrics Corporation, Scranton, Pa.; Hillerson Silk Co., Paterson, N.J.; York Silk Mills, Inc., and for Methuen Shoe Co., Methuen. Mass.(Evening Star (Washington, DC), July 15, 1934)].

July 17: Worked in the office all day. They are starting up the mill in a small way. Blew the whistle. I shall work 2 or 3 days per week for a while. 

How well I remember that whistle that announced for miles around that it was 7:00 a.m. and time for the day’s work to begin (or, in my case, time to get ready for school).

Grandpa records going to the office on a fairly regular basis through the summer and into the fall.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. George A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens, of Milton Mills, N.H., were in town over the week-end. Mrs. Stevens, who has been visiting in Milton Mills for the past month, returned home with them (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), August 2, 1934)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George A. Stevens was called to Milton Mills, N.H., Tuesday to attend the funeral of her sister’s husband, Charles Rhodes (News & Advertiser (Northfield, VT), August 9, 1934)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin, and Scott Bumford of Milton Mills, N.H., were in town Saturday, returning home Sunday. They brought Mrs. Stevens home from attending the funeral of a relative (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), August 16, 1934)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens, spent the weekend and holiday in town. They both have employment in Milton Mills, N.H. Elwin Stevens was involved in an automobile accident on Saturday night, in company with Harold Moody, and his car was wrecked beyond repair. The occupants of the car were unhurt (News & Advertiser (Northfield, VT), September 6. 1934)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens of Milton Mills, N.H., were at home over the week-end and holiday (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), September 7, 1934).

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens, who have employment in Milton Mills, N.H., were at their home over the week-end (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), October 5, 1934).

October 6: The mill ran to-day to make up for Wednesday. I worked in the office.

[LOCALS. Owing to the rain, the attendance from this [Farmington] town at the Acton fair Wednesday was rather small (Farmington News, [Friday,] October 7, 1934)].

It was a tradition for the mill to close for one day of Acton Fair and another one for Rochester Fair.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens, and Scott Bumford, of Milton Mills, N.H., were weekend visitors in town (News & Advertiser (Northfield, VT), October 18, 1934)].

November 1: Halton is out electioneering every P.M. this week so I am in the office all the time. 

Halton was running for state representative, but he lost the election.

November 8: Worked in the office. Have so many government reports to make out, it keeps me busy.

[NORTFIELD FALLS. Elwin Stevens is at home for ten days from his work at Milton Mills, N.H., the mill there being closed for repairs (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), November 8, 1934)].

November 14: Not doing much in the mill this week – making some changes in colors.

[MILTON MILLS. Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Wentworth had their Thanksgiving dinner at home. Mr. Wentworth has been having a very severe cold, but is reported some better (Farmington News, December 7, 1934)].

December 7: In the office all day. Mill not running this week waiting to see if samples are O.K.

December 12: Not much of anything doing in the mill. Colors not right. Mr. Lalley the dye man is here again.

[Harry E. Wentworth’s dye man might have been Gerald V. Lally of Boston, MA. Thomas P. Lally, aged eighty-three years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-eight years), Honora Lally, aged eighty years (b. ME), and his [twin] sons, Gerald V. Lally, a dyestuff chemist, aged forty-two years (b. MA), and Jerome A. Lally, a real estate agent, aged forty-two years (b. MA). Thomas P. Lally owned their house at 73 Fletcher Street, which was valued at $4,600. They had a radio set].

[UNION. At the regular meeting of Unity Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, on Tuesday evening, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Worthy matron, Thelma Tibbetts; Worthy patron, Louis Tibbetts; associate matron, Isabelle Fox; associate patron, Arthur Fox; secretary, Ruth Plummer; treasurer, Maud Moulton; conductress, Pauline Moulton; associate conductress, Louise Paul; representative, Louise Paul; associate representative, Ingeborg Townsend. A chicken pie supper was served in the banquet hall at 6:30, with Mr. and Mrs. Howard Beecham, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Kennett and others on the committee (Farmington News, December 14, 1934).

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens was home over the week-end from his work in Milton Mills, N.H. He and his grandson, Elwin Stevens, returned to Milton Mills Christmas day (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), December 28, 1934)].

December 31: In the office all day although there was nothing doing in the mill. Halton went away over the holiday.


Ms. Bristol contributed some supplementary research support.


Concluded in H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1935-54


References:

Ainley, Albert. (1900). Woolen and Worsted Loomfixing: A Book for Loomfixers and All Who Are Interested in the Production of Plain and Fancy Worsteds and Woolens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=631RAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA49

Find a Grave. (2016,June 22). Clarence L. Blaisdell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/165885448/clarence-l.-blaisdell

Find a Grave. (2017, June 15). John H. Burleigh, Sr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/180378969/john-h.-burleigh

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). George Edgar Carmichael. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114887435/george-edgar-carmichael

Find a Grave. (2013, August 13). Moses G. Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115370002/moses-g-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2010, November 28). John N. Emerson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/62247325/john-n-emerson

Find a Grave. (2016, October 2). Dana Hamilton Grant. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170786870/dana-hamilton-grant

Find a Grave. (2013, November 10). Dwight Hall. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/120133929/dwight-hall

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Halton R. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114892787/halton-r-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 2). John Everard Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114788057/john-everard-horne

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Ralph Wentworth Pike. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114912838/ralph-wentworth-pike

Find a Grave. (2014, May 25). Evan Fusell Richardson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130333966/evan-fusell-richardson

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Frederick H. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612396/frederick-h.-simes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Harold Edward Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612469/harold-edward-simes

Find a Grave. (2015, November 13). John Henry Smith. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154953698/john-henry-smith

Find a Grave. (2929, April 8). Rev. Frank H. Snell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/208834428/frank-h.-snell

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Rolland Harty Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42231184/rolland-harty-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2019, August 15). George A. Stevens. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/202167636/george-a-stevens

Find a Grave. (2015, November 12). Ruth Marion Ramsey Tanner. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154917895/ruth-marion-tanner

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Henry A. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893218/henry-a-townsend

Find a Grave. (2012,June 11). Edgar G. Varney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/91749309/edgar-g-varney

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Ella B. Buck Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938238/ella-b-wentworth

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Harry E. Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938247/harry-e-wentworth

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Norman Lowd Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938284/norman-lowd-wentworth

Find a Grave. (2014, May 25). Clarence Demeritt Willey. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130330043/clarence-demeritt-willey

Find a Grave. (2015, January 22). W. Lester Youst. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/141666981/w-lester-youst

NH Historical Society. (1972). Portsmouth, N.H. Railroad Station (Collection of Dana H. Grant). Retrieved from www.nhhistory.org/object/142965/lithograph

Tompkins, Daniel A. (1899). Cotton Mill Processes and Calculations: An Elementary Text Book for the Use of Textile Schools and for Home Study. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=703zAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA217

U.S. Patent Office. (1922, April 11). Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=IJ2PAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA381

U.S. Patent Office. (1927, March 15). Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=_GMbAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA748-IA20

Wikipedia. (2021, May 11). Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Labor_Standards_Act_of_1938

Wikipedia. (2021, May 6). Wall Street Crash of 1929. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wall_Street_Crash_of_1929

Entering Our Fourth Year

By John S. Frum | May 17, 2021

I’m a bit late in writing this, as the Milton Observer entered already a month ago into its fourth year of publication.

I’m pleased to report that we’ve had in our time tens of thousands of views and that our subscription list continues to expand. Most of our readers would be Milton people of course but, oddly enough, we’ve generated also some interest further afield, even from some residing overseas. Milton is just that interesting one supposes.

Ms. Bristol and Ms. Durham plan to continue with us, as does Mr. Aikens. (I’ve been struggling with some obstacles in providing direct logons for Ms. Durham and Mr. Aikens. Let’s hope that I can surmount those technical difficulties this year).

Mr. Plissken has been having a bit of a sabbatical lately, although he has been helping Ms. Bristol with her research. He just wearied of reporting the same inanities over and over again. (And it’s not like he’s getting paid for this). I know – because I’ve heard from you – that some of you do miss hearing his particular “take” on things. He’ll be back.

We’ve had the benefit recently of some valuable historical material from another guest writer and expect to publish a bit more from them, over the short term anyway.

Someone shocked me Saturday in reporting a minor cancellation furor at another publication based in a nearby town. Contemptable, really. I offered to publish the forbidden material here. That’s the way you handle that. I doubt I’ll be taken up on it, as we’re so small and, for them, so out-of-town, but you know I had to make the offer.

I’ve been also in communication with another interested party, who might want to provide some regular content for us.

Well, anyway, thanks for your interest so far and we’ll endeavor to merit it still in the coming year.

Regards,

John S. Frum, Publisher

Last Will of John E. Townsend (1871-1914)

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | May 16, 2021

John Edward Townsend (1871-1914) was the son of Henry H. and Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend. His father had founded the Miltonia Mill in Milton Mills in 1872, to which John had succeeded upon his father’s death in 1904. (His two grandfathers (and namesakes), John Townsend and Edward Brierley, had run earlier the Milton Mills Mfg. Co. and the Brierley Mill respectively).

We learn from Ms. Cunningham’s recent interesting article regarding selected excerpts from the diary of Miltonia Mills executive Harry E. Wentworth, that John E. Townsend’s health began to fail him as early as April 1910.

John E. Townsend, a woolen blankets manufacturer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Eda B. Townsend, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), and his children, Henry A. Townsend, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Agnes M. Townsend, aged ten years (b. NH). John E. Townsend owned their house, free-and-clear.

John E. Townsend died of Bright’s Disease (a kidney ailment) in Milton Mills on September 8, 1914, aged forty-two years, eleven months, and thirty days. He left a widow, Eda B. (Lowd) Townsend, and two children, Henry A. Townsend, and Grace M. Townsend.


Will of John E. Townsend

Know All Men by These Presents that I, John E. Townsend of Milton Mills, Strafford County, New Hampshire, do make this my last Will and Testament, revoking all other Wills by me at any time heretofore made.

After the payment of my just debts and funeral expenses I give, devise and bequeath as follows:

First: I constitute and appoint Harry E. Wentworth, for many years my secretary and confidential clerk, and the New England Trust Company of Boston, Massachusetts, the executors and trustees under this my last will, and exempt all executors of and trustees under this last will, whether original or substituted, from giving a surety or sureties upon the bonds required of them as said executors and trustees. By “substituted executors” are meant, of course, administrators with the will annexed.

Brother-in-law Harry E. Wentworth, a woolen mill bookkeeper, aged forty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census (April 22, 1910). His household included his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged six years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Melissa Lowd, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear.

The New England Trust Company of Boston, MA, declined their appointment as joint executor and trustee. Harry E. Wentworth traveled instead to Dover, NH, September 18, 1914, and secured Strafford County Solicitor Dwight Hall as a substitute for the trust company. (This substitution of Hall for the N.E. Trust Company altered their status somewhat. They became administrators, with will annexed, i.e., administrators guided or advised by the contents of a will, rather than its executors).

Dwight Hall, a lawyer and county solicitor, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Frances S. Hall, aged thirty-eight years (b. New Brunswick, Canada), and his servant, Margaret Cassidy, a private family servant, aged thirty-five years (b. Canada (Irish)). Dwight Hall owned their house at 119 Silver Street, free-and-clear.

I authorize my said executors to sell all real and personal estate not hereinafter  specifically devised or bequeathed by private sale or public auction for the payment of debts and for the purpose of investing the trust estates hereinafter created, and to execute and deliver such deeds of conveyance or other instruments of transfer as may be necessary to pass a proper title to the same.

I authorize my said Trustees from time to time to invest and reinvest the various trust estates hereinafter bequeathed to them, if in their judgment they deem it advisable, always purchasing sound securities or other reliable property real or personal; and to this end I empower them to sell real and personal estate at any time being a part of any trust estate in their hands, either by public auction or private sale, and to execute such instruments as may be necessary to transfer the title thereto; but no purchaser from my said executors or trustees shall see to the application of the purchase money, and the receipts of my said executors and trustees for all moneys and effects paid or delivered to others by virtue of this will shall exonerate the persons taking the same from all liability to see to the application or disposition of the money or effects therein mentioned.

I direct my said trustees to keep the funds of the several trust estates created by this will separate and distinct, and I enjoin upon them a similar caution in regard to keeping their accounts.

I declare that the number of my executors and of my trustees for each trust created under this will shall remain two so long as there are any duties to be discharged by said executors and trustees, and I also declare that the words “my said executors,” and “my trustees” and “my said trustees,” wherever occurring, shall be construed and taken to mean the executors or trustees for the time being, whether original or substituted.

I authorize my said trustees to take over from my said executors any or all funds, shares of stock and other securities belonging to me at the time of my decease, and retain the same as a part of the trust estates, even though such bonds, shares and other securities may not be of the nature and character permissible for trustees to invest in by the general rules of law or by statutory provisions, and my said trustees are not to be held answerable for loss or depreciation occasioned by holding such bonds, shares or other securities, or any other securities or investments, which may form part of the trust estates, provided they act in good faith.

Townsend MillSecond: I give and devise unto my trustees, but In Trust nevertheless, for the purposes hereinafter named, all my real estate situated in Milton Mills, and all buildings therein, water privileges, and all other rights appurtenant thereto, constituting the mill property, where I have for many years conducted the business of blanket manufacturing; and I give and bequest unto my said trustees all of said business carried on by me upon said property, including the plant, machinery, fixtures, utensils, stock in trade, book debts, and good-will and effects of every nature and description connected therewith.

My said trustees shall hold and manage said property for the benefit and to the use of my son, Henry A. Townsend, and to that end I authorize and empower them to carry on as trustees, in the name of my estate, my manufacturing business until my said son shall reach the age of twenty-five years, and for the purpose of carrying on said business my said trustees are authorized to risk as capital such part of the residue of my estate hereinafter bequeathed to them for the benefit of my said son, being one-third of the residue of my estate, as they may deem advisable so to do.

Townsend, JE Estate - 1917My said trustees shall pay over the net income derived from said business quarterly or oftener if in their discretion they deem it advisable so to do, to any duly appointed guardian for my said son during his minority, for his maintenance, education and bringing up, or to my wife should she survive me, for said purposes during said period, but if my said wife should fail to maintain, educate and bring up my said son to the satisfaction of my said trustees, I authorize them in their discretion to retain and appropriate for such purposes so much of said net income as they shall think expedient and to add in their discretion any part of the net income of said trust estate to the principal thereof, and the amount so added shall thereupon become as much a part of the principal as if originally a part thereof.

If in the opinion of my said trustees my said son shall prior to his attaining the age of twenty-five years be deemed competent and able to assume the management and control of said business and the property connected therewith forming said trust estate, I authorize my said trustees, in their sole discretion, to transfer, deliver and convey to my said son all of said business and property, and the same shall thereupon become his, solely and absolutely, free and discharged from all trust. In any event this trust shall terminate and said business and property be conveyed, delivered and transferred to my said son upon his attaining the age of twenty-five years, to be his sole and absolute property, free and discharged of all trust.

Trustees Wentworth and Hall set up Henry A. Townsend as manager of a branch factory (the Acton (or Actin) Blanket Company) in the Timson shoe factory building (formerly the Brierley Mill), after he reached the age of twenty-one years (January 2, 1919). (See H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27).

An industry directory of 1920 identified Henry A. Townsend as being then proprietor of the Miltonia Mill. He would then have been twenty-two years of age. (See H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27).

Henry A. Townsend, a blanket mill manufacturer, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ingeborg V. Townsend, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), and his nephew-in-law, Robert R. Anderson, aged eleven years (b. MA). Henry A. Townsend rented their house on the Springvale Road. (Robert R. Anderson would become principal of Nute High School in 1939-42).

Townsend House - Per JW CunninghamThird: I give, devise and bequeath to my wife, Eda B. Townsend, her heirs and assigns forever, the homestead estate on which I know reside in said Milton Mills, together with the household furniture and household effects, including all articles both of use and ornament, silverware, pictures, horses, carriages, sleighs, and stable furniture and equipment generally, and other personal property used in conjunction with the occupation of my said estate at the time of my decease. In case my said wife should not survive me, I give, devise and bequeath my said homestead estate and other property used in conjunction therewith in equal shares to my son and daughter, or the whole thereof to the survivor, to their heirs and assigns forever.

Eda B. Townsend, a widow, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census (January 2, 1920). Her household included her daughter, Agnes M. Townsend, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Eda B. Townsend owned their house on Church Street in Milton Mills, free-and-clear.

Fourth: I give and bequeath unto my executor Harry E. Wentworth in recognition of his faithful service to me the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars.

Harry E. Wentworth, a blanket mill manager, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife, Ella B. Wentworth, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), and his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged sixteen years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm on the Lebanon Road, free-and-clear.

Milton Mills CemeteryFifth: I give and bequeath to the Milton Mills Cemetery Fund or the trustees thereof the sum of one thousand dollars.

Sixth: I give and bequeath unto Oscar F. Marsh of Milton Mills, an old and close friend of my father, Henry H. Townsend, the sum of one thousand dollars.

Oscar F. Marsh [(1846-1928)] appeared in the census over the years as a woolen mill finisher (1870), a felt mill worker (1880), and a blanket finisher (1900). He appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as being retired, with his house at 30 Main street, M. Mills. His son, Forrest L. Marsh, appeared in that same 1912 directory as a lawyer, insurance [agent] and notary public, with his office at 37 Main street, with his house also at 30 Main street, M. Mills. Forrest L. Marsh’s wife, Mrs. Mildred T. [(Tebbetts)] Marsh, appeared as keeping a dry and fancy goods store at 40 Main street, corner of Church street, with her house also at 30 Main street, M. Mills.

Townsend, HH - GraveSeventh: I direct my executors to expend a reasonable sum for the proper care of the burial lot where my father’s remains are, and there my body shall be interred, and I authorize them to devote for the perpetual care of said lot or lots such sum as may be found necessary or expedient.

Eighth: All the rest, residue and remainder of my estate of every nature and description, both real and personal, of which I may be entitled at the time of my decease, I direct shall be divided into three equal parts or shares. I give, devise and bequeath one of said shares or parts being one-third of said rest and residue to my said wife Eda and to her heirs and assigns forever. Should my said wife not survive me said one-third share shall be equally divided among my son and my daughter and added to their respective shares in the residue of my said estate as hereinafter set forth, or the whole of said one third shall go to the survivor if but one survives me, and become part of his or her trust estate as the case may be.

I give, devise and bequeath to my said trustees In Trust nevertheless for the purpose hereinafter set forth two-thirds of the residue of my estate, one-third of which is to be held by said trustees in trust for the benefit of my said son, and the other third for the benefit of my said daughter, upon separate and distinct trusts for their benefit. My trustees shall collect and receive all income thereof and after paying therefrom the necessary expenses of administering said trusts shall apply such part of the balance or net income as they may deem best for the maintenance, support and education of my said daughter, Agnes M. and of my said son, paying said income to any appointed guardian for them, quarterly or oftener in their discretion, while they are under age, or to their mother, to be expended by her for said purposes, but if my said wife (their mother) should fail to properly maintain, support and educate my said daughter and son in the opinion of my said trustees, I authorize them in their discretion to retain and appropriate for said purposes so much of said net income as they shall think expedient for said purposes and to personally expend such part of said net income as may be necessary for said purposes, and to add any part of the net income of said trust estates to the principal thereof, and the amount so added shall thereupon become as much a part of the principal as if originally a part thereof.

When my said daughter shall arrive at the age of thirty years then the trust above stated shall terminate and I direct my said trustees to convey, transfer and pay over the entire principal and accumulated income then constituting the trust estate discharged of all trust to my said daughter, to be hers absolutely. If my said daughter shall die before arriving at the age of thirty years then the trust shall terminate and I direct my said trustees to convey, transfer and pay over in equal share the entire principal and a [any] accumulated income then constituting the trust estate to the issue then living if any of my said daughter, and if she leave no issue then to any person or persons she may name or appoint in and by her last will and testament, or failing such appointment to my son if living or any issue of his in equal shares.

We may note that Agnes M. Townsend (1900-1970) was not scheduled to come into her own until she was aged thirty years, i.e., not until May 25, 1930. Her older brother would have to be no older than twenty-five years (and under certain conditions even younger, as actually happened).

Agnes M. Townsend married in Milton Mills, April 24, 1920, Halton R. Hayes, she of Milton and he of Rochester, NH. He was a salesman, aged twenty-six years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. Lester E. Alexander performed the ceremony. Hayes was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1894, son of Edwin F. and Hattie (Pinkham) Hayes.

Halton R. Hayes, a biscuit sales agent, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Agnes T. Hayes, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his son, Paul T. Hayes, aged five years (b. MA). Halton R. Hayes owned their house at 35 Fernwood Avenue, which was valued at $10,ooo. They had a radio set. (This was just seven weeks short of her thirtieth birthday).

When my said son shall arrive at the age of twenty-five years then the trust for his benefit above stated shall terminate, and I direct my said trustees to convey, transfer and pay over the entire principal and accumulated income then constituting said trust estate free and discharged of all trust to him. Should my son not survive me or surviving me die before reaching the age of twenty-five years or before the mill property and business described in article Second hereof shall have been conveyed and turned over to him by my said trustees in accordance with said article Second, then and in that event his one-third share in said residue and all the property and business constituting the trust estate described in said article Second shall be added to and become a part of the trust established by this article for the benefit of my said daughter and said business and property shall be controlled and carried on by my said trustees for the benefit of my said daughter under the same terms and conditions as the trust of one-third of the residue for her benefit in the article set forth.

Should my said daughter not survive me I direct that her one-third share in the residue of my estate shall be added to that one-third herein given to my trustees for the benefit of my said son, to be held for his benefit upon like trusts and subject to the same conditions as hereabove stated.

No beneficiary under said will except my said wife shall so alienate, dispose of, anticipate, or in any way encumber or create a charge upon the income to which he or she is entitled under the above provisions of this will, nor shall the same be subject to attachment, diversion or seizure by any creditor by any legal process whatsoever; and if any beneficiary except my said wife shall alienate, dispose of, anticipate or create a charge upon the income to which he or she is entitled, or if he or she shall become a bankrupt or make any assignment for the benefit of creditors, or if said income shall become in any way attached, diverted or seized by any legal process, then my said trustees and their successors shall immediately cease to pay such income to said beneficiary and shall thereafter apply the same for his or her support, maintenance and education as they may in their discretion and judgment deem best.

In Testimony Whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 30th day of July, A.D. nineteen hundred and fourteen. John E. Townsend (seal)

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the testator as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us, Who, at his request and in his presence and the presence of one another have hereunto set our names as witnesses.

John C. Townsend, Everett F. Fox, Harper Luper.

Witness John C. Townsend (1871-1916) was both the testator’s cousin and his brother-in-law (he was married to John E. Townsend’s sister, Grace (Townsend) Townsend (1873-1953)).

Everett F. Fox (1856-1927) was a son of Elbridge W. and Sarah E. (Buck) Fox, and grandson of Asa and Harriet (Plummer) Fox. (See Milton Mills’ Asa Fox & Son General Store). Oddly enough, he had been also a witness to Henry H. Townsend’s 1904 will.

Although his name might seem to be readily distinguishable, Harper Luper remains a bit of a mystery. There were men of that name living in Louisiana and Pennsylvania in later years, but with no way to identify them as the erstwhile witness to the Townsend will.

The State of New Hampshire. STRAFFORD, SS. At a special Court of Probate holden at Somersworth in said County on the 21st Tuesday of September A.D. 1914.
The foregoing instrument purporting to be the last Will in writing of John E. Townsend, late of Milton Mills in said County, deceased, having been presented for Probate in common form by Harry E. Wentworth and Dwight Hall, the Execut_ therein named administrators with the will annexed, and Everett F. Fox, one of the subscribing witnesses thereto, having made oath before said Court that he saw the said testator sign and seal said instrument; that of the time of so doing the said testator was of the age of twenty-one years and of sound mind; and that the said Everett F. Fox, with John C. Townsend and Harper Luper (all credible witnesses,) attested and subscribed said instrument together in the presence and at the request of said testator. I do hereby approve and allow the same; and do DECREE that said instrument is duly proved and allowed in this Court in common form; as the last Will in writing of said John E. Townsend, deceased. Christopher H. Wells, JUDGE OF PROBATE.
Recorded agreeably to the original. Examined by William W. Martin, REGISTER (Strafford County Probate, 140:300).

Christopher H. Wells, a probate court judge, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census, His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Oriana Wells, aged fifty years (b. NH). Christopher H. Wells owned their house at 19 Mt. Vernon Street, with a mortgage.


See also Milton Mills’ Miltonia Mill – 1872-14 and H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27


References:

Dover Public Library. (1999). 1999 Heritage Walking Tour [117 Silver Street]. Retrieved from www.dover.nh.gov/government/city-operations/library/history/Heritage-Walking-Tours/1999-heritage-walking-tour.html

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Everett Fremont Fox. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114891790/everett-fremont-fox

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Agnes Townsend Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893159/agnes-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Forrest L. Marsh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115493759/forrest-l-marsh

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Oscar F. Marsh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115493700/oscar-f-marsh

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Eda B. Lowd Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893198/eda-b-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Henry A. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893218/henry-a-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Henry H. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352239/henry-h-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). John C. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352317/john-c-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). John E. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352496/john-e-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Harry E. Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938247/harry-e-wentworth

U.S. Patent Office. (1922, April 11). Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=IJ2PAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA381

H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27

By Joyce Wentworth Cunningham | May 9, 2021

Notes from Harry Eugene Wentworth’s Diaries

Wentworth, Harry E. - Per Joyce W. Cunningham
Harry E. Wentworth (Per Joyce W. Cunningham).

Harry E. Wentworth (1869-1955) was John E. Townsend’s brother-in-law. His first wife, Hattie M. Lowd (1873-1908), was a sister to John’s wife Eda (1870-1932). Harry had completed a course in business at Shaw’s Business College in Portland, Maine. He worked first for Miltonia Mills as bookkeeper. He became administrator and trustee of John’s estate upon his untimely death before John’s son, Henry A. Townsend (1898-1932), became of age.

Harry was my paternal grandfather and his diaries have languished in my storeroom for the last nine years since I retrieved them from my mother’s house upon her death. A positive benefit of COVID-19 has been much more free time to pursue “projects” I have postponed over the years. I was determined to learn more about my grandfather’s and father’s lives by reading the diaries. I soon realized what I was learning needed to be shared with succeeding generations in a more abbreviated form, so I began summarizing what I read.

The following entries and summaries of entries about Miltonia Mills are from the diaries I have completed to date. Keep in mind that I wrote these for my family’s information so they are casually and informally written and include my editorializing.

In many ways I am more frustrated by fragmented information that ever. The diaries are short on detail! If only I had read them earlier and asked Grandpa and my dad more questions!

As I worked my way through the early 1920s, I kept wondering exactly what was Grandpa’s role in the management of the Miltonia Mills. I knew that he had worked there both as bookkeeper and as manager, but which was he in the early 1920s? All his diary entries consisted of “I worked in the office all day.” “I worked in the office until noon,” “I didn’t go to the office today,” etc.

I knew that Miltonia Mills was owned by John Townsend, Grandpa’s brother-in-law. I also knew that John had died young, that he left a son too young to assume management of the mill, and that it was the wish of John to have Grandpa manage the mill until his son, Henry, was old enough to assume the role. Henry was mentioned occasionally in the early 1920s diaries, but only in terms of his comings and goings. He appears to have traveled quite a bit.

I kept moving ahead hoping for some clarification. When his position was not clearer by the end of his 1927 diary, I decided that maybe I needed to go back to earlier diaries to look for answers.

1910

The mill was owned and operated by John E. Townsend, who was married to Eda B. Lowd (Hattie M. (Lowd) Wentworth’s sister). John and Eda and family (Henry and Agnes) left for California on January 11.

Hollenbeck Hotel[PERSONAL. A party of tourist guests registered at the Hollenbeck is made up of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Townsend, Harry and Hynes [Agnes] Townsend, all of Milton Mills. N.H. (Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA), January 20, 1910)].

[Harry E. Wentworth, a woolen mill bookkeeper, aged forty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census (April 22, 1910). His household included his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged six years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Melissa Lowd, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear].

Grandpa (Hattie had died), Dad, and Mother (as Grandpa called his mother-in-law) moved into John’s house in the village (Milton Mills) while they were away. No reason for the move was given, but it may be that it was more convenient for Grandpa to get to the mill in winter weather. He appears to be in charge while John was away. John and Eda returned on April 23 and Grandpa, Dad, and Mother returned to the house on the Ridge.

John had a lengthy illness after he returned from California and was out of the office for six weeks. He went to Portland to see a doctor, but Grandpa gives no indication of a diagnosis. [John E. Townsend would eventually die of Bright’s Disease].

1911

Other than “went to the office” there is very little about the mill in this diary.

[Harry E. Wentworth married (2nd) in Acton, ME, November 29, 1911, Ella Buck, both of Acton. He was a widowed bookkeeper, aged forty-two years, and she was a music teacher, aged forty-one years. Rev. James W. Williams performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, circa 1870, daughter of John C. and Hannah (Brackett) Buck].

1912 and 1913 – no diaries

[COTTON MILL NEWS FROM THE NORTH. … A set of 60-inch cards has been added to the equipment of the Miltonia mill, Milton, N.H., operated by John E. Townsend. The plant has received increased business since Jan. 1, and is being operated on a full-time schedule (Evening Herald (Fall River, MA), May 18, 1912)].

[PRIMARY REGISTRATIONS. Large Number Have Already Filed Their Candidacy. … Those who have filed today include: … John E. Townsend, Milton, Republican, representative (Portsmouth Herald, July 27, 1912)].

1914

On February 16 Grandpa reported that John was not feeling well and was in the office for a little while in the afternoon. The next day he did not go to the office at all, and on the 18th Grandpa wrote that he was very sick with some kind of kidney trouble. Over the next two months, John’s health was constantly up and down – he would seem to be getting better and then have a relapse. He would have a good day and then a bad one. He got out of the house for a short ride for the first time in nine weeks.

On May 6 John began coming in to the office for short periods of time on days when he felt well enough. By June 6 he was back in bed and unable to get out. On August 6 he was taken to Boston. For doctor? To a hospital? Grandpa first reports he seemed better, then he was worse and the family was sent for. Finally, on August 31 he was brought back to Milton Mills where he passed away on September 8. His funeral was on September 12.

[DEATHS. TOWNSEND -In Milton Mills, N.H., Sept. 8, John E. Townsend, in his 43d year. Funeral Saturday, Sept. 12, at 2 p.m. (Boston Globe, September 10, 1914)].

Following is Grandpa’s account of the estate settlement.

September 9: According to John’s will the N.E. Trust Co. and myself are executors and trustees. He left me the sum of $2500.

[The New England Trust Co. appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1918, as having its offices at 135 Devonshire street (corner of Milk and Devonshire streets) and a telephone number of Main 4806].

[The New England Trust Company of Boston, the pioneer trust company of Massachusetts and the second oldest institution of its kind in New England, will soon celebrate the fiftieth anniversary since the Company began business. Just fifty years ago the New England Trust Company received its charter – the first trust company charter to be issued by the Massachusetts legislature – but business was commenced not until 1871. During all these years the Company has continued faithful to the best traditions of trust company business and in the administration of estates and execution of trusts it has acquired a reputation for fidelity and efficient management extending throughout the New England section (Trust Publications, 1919)]. 

September 15: N.E. Trust Co. refuses to accept trust under John’s will.

September 16: Went to Boston for business on John’s estate.

September 17: John C. [Townsend] wants to be appointed trustee. Eda doesn’t want him.

John C. Townsend (1871-1916) was a cousin of John E. Townsend, husband of John E. Townsend’s sister, Grace M. Townsend (1873-1953), and one of three witnesses to the last will.

[John C. Townsend, a general farm farmer, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Grace Townsend, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), his son, Frank Townsend, aged twelve years (b. MA), and his servant, Lucy Lilley, a private family servant, aged twenty years (b. NH). John C. Townsend owned their farm, free-and-clear].

September 18: Went to Dover in p.m. with Henry and Eda and secured Dwight Hall as Administrator and Trustee of John’s estate.

[Dwight Hall, a lawyer and county solicitor, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Frances S. Hall, aged thirty-eight years (b. New Brunswick, Canada), and his servant, Margaret Cassidy, a private family servant, aged thirty-five years (b. Canada (Irish)). Dwight Hall owned their house at 119 Silver Street, free-and-clear].

September 19 (a Saturday!): In office all day. Mr. Hall was up from Dover in P.M. on business of John’s estate.

Mr. Hall was still coming to see Grandpa at the mill three or four times a year in the 1920s!

September 21: Went to Dover and Somersworth in A.M. Wilbur Miller took us down. Everett Fox went with me. Got our appointments as Administrators and Trustees.

[Judge Christopher H. Wells (1853-1930) appointed Dwight Hall and Harry E. Townsend as joint administrators, with will annexed. Everett Fox appeared as one of the three witnesses to the will].

[Wilbur Gilman Miller, who gave them a ride, was a dairy farmer. He was born in Maine, November 25, 1872. He was married to Myrtle Winchell. He was living in North Lebanon, ME, but farming in Acton, ME, when he registered for the WWI military draft in September 1918. He was 5’8″ tall, with a medium build, blue eyes and light brown hair. At that time he was said to be confined to crutches. Perhaps recovering from injury?]

September 26 (a Saturday – this was still the era of six-day work weeks): Worked in office all day. Appraiser began taking inventory of John’s estate.

September 28: Went to Rochester in A.M. to meet Mr. Hall and get securities from vault. Came back with him and worked on inventories the rest of the day.

Mr. Hall made several more trips to Milton Mills before the end of the year. A Mr. James was with him on one of those trips. Grandpa made three more trips to Boston, two of them overnight. When he came home on December 10, he stopped in Somersworth to see Judge Wells.

[Christopher H. Wells, a probate court judge, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census, His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Oriana Wells, aged fifty years (b. NH). Christopher H. Wells owned their house at 19 Mt. Vernon Street, with a mortgage. (See also (Scales, 1914))].

1915

WOOL. TOWNSEND, JOHN E. Milton Mills, N.H., Miltonia Mill. Production and Equipment: Blankets, 4 sets cards, 29 broad looms, 960 spindles, dye, finish, 1 boiler, 2 water wheels, electric power. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co., New York and Boston, selling agents (American Wool and Cotton Reporter, July 29, 1915). 

1916

Unfortunately, his 1915 diary did not survive (or he may not have kept one), so we have a gap in the story of Miltonia Mills. We know that Grandpa and the lawyer Dwight Hall (whom Grandpa always called Mr. Hall) were co-administrators and trustees of John Townsend’s estate which included Miltonia Mills. That status continued to be borne out in 1916. Mr. Hall made short (sometimes as short as 20 minutes) visits to the mill almost every week, usually on a Wednesday afternoon. Grandpa made regular trips to Boston – once a month, at least, sometimes staying overnight, usually with Raish and Alice in Marblehead. On one trip, in addition to doing business, he attended a textile show.

[Raish and Alice would have been Horatio Brackett “Raish” Buck (1873-1941) and his wife, Alice H. Chandler (1868-1944). They then lived in Marblehead, MA. He was a grandson of Milton Mills’ Dr. Reuben Buck and had an uncle of the same name, Dr. Horation B. Buck].

Three entries cause me to wonder: “Why?”

May 12: Mr. Hall, Judge Wells, & Ex. Gov. Felker gave us a call [visit] in P.M. at the office.

[Former NH Governor Samuel D. Felker’s 1912 election was an unusual one. Neither candidate attained a majority in the election and Democrat Felker (1859-1932) was selected instead by the NH legislature. He served a single two-year term, and became thereafter a judge].

[Samuel D. Felker, a general lawyer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary D. Felker, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Samuel D. Felker rented their house at 19 Wakefield Street].

June 1: Mr. Hall was up in P.M. Mr. Southworth of Pacific Mills was with him.

[Irving Southworth was at this time an assistant agent of the Pacific Mills Co., with his house at Dover, NH. By 1920, Irving Southworth, mill agent of a cotton mill, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Columbia, SC, household. (His wife was a Southern woman, and Pacific Mills had also branches in Columbia, SC, and Dover, NH, as well as its home base in Lawrence, MA). He would return within a few years to Massachusetts].

Pacific Mills had textile mills along the Merrimack River in Lawrence, now upscale lofts which can be seen from I-495.

July 6: Mr. Peck of North Star Mills was here.

[Park W. Peck [(1869-1953)] appeared in the Minneapolis, MN, directory of 1916, as vice president of North Star Woolen Mill Co., boarding at 2613 Humboldt av., South. He was a bachelor, who seemed usually to favor boarding houses and hotels].

The North Star Mills were in Minneapolis, Minnesota. They dated back to the 1800s and by 1920 were the largest blanket manufacturers in the United States. A Mr. Park W. Peck is listed as a vice president. Those mills are now lofts, also!

Why were these people visiting Miltonia Mills? Were there talks of selling the mill? Were they planning a merger? Were other mills planning a take-over? Were the visitors interested in the superior blankets the mill was noted for? Was there any connection between the visit of Mr. Hall, Judge Wells, and Felker (a lawyer) – or were they there on other family estate business? We will probably never know!

The only other bit of mill news was that in February Eda signed off her rights to the mill. I assume she assigned them to Henry.

1917

Grandpa’s 1917 diary does not offer much more enlightenment about the mill’s operation and management. Mr. Hall continued to make frequent brief visits and Grandpa continued to make at least monthly visits to Boston.

[MILTON MILLS. Strafford Co. (SE) Pop. 1600. Stage, Union (4m.). RR47. Townsend, John E., Estate, Miltonia Mill. Harry E. Wentworth, Agt.; F.H. Simes, Supt. Blankets, 4 Sets Cards, 29 Broad Looms, 960 Sp. Dye. Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 WW. Electric. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co., New York and Boston, selling agents (Dawson’s Textile Blue Book, 1917)].

Here are the most significant entries pertaining to the mill:

February 11: Henry came home last night and telephoned up that he wanted to see me so I went down about 2 o’clock. Got back about 4.

When did Henry leave? Where had he been? Why did he request Grandpa to meet him at home and not at the office? Was it mill business or personal?

May 22: Mr. Hall was up and brought Mr. Allen of the Amoskeag Mfg. Co. to look into our power problem.

The Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. was one of the largest textile mills in the world. It was located in Manchester, New Hampshire, where it took advantage of the abundant water power provided by the Merrimack River.

[Henry W. Allen, a cotton mill civil engineer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Manchester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Georgia A. Lund, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his son-in-law, Bernard H. Lund, a cigar factory cigar maker, aged thirty-five years (b. MN). Henry W. Allen rented their house at 72 Market Street].

May 28: New looms for the mill have come. Got four of them over today.

I assume the looms had been delivered to the railroad station in Union.

May 31: They finished getting over the looms – all twelve of them are here now.

June 8: Fred & Henry started for California this morning to be gone 4 or 5 weeks.

[Frederick H. Simes, a woolen mill superintendent, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary A. [(Smith)] Simes, aged fifty years (b. NH). Frederick H. Simes rented their house on Main Street].

Remembering that Eda had relinquished her claim on the mill, was Henry now in charge of the mill?

[MILL NEWS. Cotton. MILTON MILLS, N.H. Six new automatic looms have arrived and will soon be set up in the plant of the estate of John E. Townsend, manufacturer of woolen blankets. It is possible that a small addition will have to be built to the weave room in order to accommodate the new equipment. At present 29 broad looms and 4 sets of cards are installed in the mill (Textile World Journal, June 16, 1917)].

June 27: Miss Jenness from Mr. Hall’s office was up in P.M. to figure out Agnes’ acct. I suppose this had to do with her inheritance.

[Miss Almie M. Jenness [(1886-1960)] appeared in the Dover directory of 1917 as a stenographer for Dwight Hall in his office at 349 Central av., corner of Washington street, with her home at 6 Richmond street. Emma F. Jenness, widow of George I. Jenness, had her house there also. Almie M. Jenness would marry Dwight Hall in 1950, after the death of his first wife (in 1948)].

[MILL NEWS. Cotton. MILTON MILLS, N.H. The management of the Estate of John E. Townsend gives out the following to supersede the item which was published last week regarding the installation of 6 new automatic looms. Twelve new automatic looms have arrived and will soon be set up in the plant of the Estate of John E. Townsend, manufacturers of blankets. Eight of the looms now in use will be taken out to make room for the new machines. The mill will then be equipped with 33 broad looms (24 of which are automatics) and complementary machinery (Textile World Journal, June 30, 1917)].

July 5: Went down to Dover with Mr. Northrop & Mr. Russell of the North Star Woolen Co. to have conference with Mr. Hall on the subject of this Co. handling our blankets.

“Handling” the blankets seems to imply that North Star would market them. Under their own label? Under the Miltonia Mills label?

[William G. Northrup, Jr., registered for the WW I military draft in Wayzata, MN, June 5, 1917. He was thirty years of age (b. June 13, 1886), and was employed as treasurer of the North Star Woolen Mill Co. of Minneapolis, MN. He was then single, but claimed an exemption as being engaged in government work. He was tall, with a medium build, brown eyes, and black hair].

August 28: Some of the help at the mill have demanded more pay and because we could not tell them to-day just what we will do they walked out this P.M.

August 29: Mr. Hall was up in P.M. to help straighten out the help question. Are going to give the help what they asked for. Mill did not run today.

August 30: Mill help all went to work this morning at 10% increase in pay.

September 5: Bargained for the shoe shop property for the Townsend Est. Mr. Timson is going away.

[Charles O. Timson, who was “going away” in September 1917, ran a shoe factory in the former Brierly mill at Milton Mills in 1915-18].

Modern Hospital - August 1921October 8: Went to Dover and finished Agnes’ acct. and filed it in court.

October 30: Went to Boston to see Mr. Hennesey in regard to a change in selling blankets.

[John J. Hennessey, James M. Morrison, and Frank F. Rogers, Jr., appeared in the Boston Chamber of Commerce’s annual report for 1915, as working for Thomas Kelley & Co. blanket manufacturers, of Boston. There was a lawsuit concerning this firm and these men, and Thomas A. Jenkins, in November 1918 (MA Supreme Judicial Court, 1919)].

November 20: Could not run the mill to-day. Had no water and the last can of coal is so poor it will not make steam.

November 22: Boiler at mill not working well. Couldn’t keep up steam enough to run. No water.

November 26: Couldn’t get steam enough to warm the mill with the coal we have, and no wood, so couldn’t run.

December 13: Went to Dover in morning to meet Mr. Rogers & Mr. Jenkins who came back with me at noon and were here in P.M.

[T.A. Jenkins, a blanket co. president, aged fifty years (b. NY), headed a Mount Vernon, NY, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah B. Jenkins, aged forty years (b. NY), his children, James H. Jenkins, aged fifteen years (b. NY), and Dorothy J. Whitney, aged twenty-four years (b. NY), his grandson, Harold Whitney, Jr., aged two years (b. MA), his mother-in-law, Susie L. Bennett, aged sixty-six years (b. NY), and his servants, Susie Speidell, a private family servant, aged thirty-one years (b. Ireland), and Anna M. Bennett, a private family servant, aged fifty-seven years (b. Ireland). T.A. Jenkins owned their house at 37 N. Fulton Street, with a mortgage].

December 15: Mr. James of T. Kelly & Co was at the office in P.M.

December 21: Went to Boston to meet Mr. Ransdell. [Ramsdell?]

December 26: Mr. James was here in P.M.

As usual, lots of questions, no answers! Who are all these people he mentions and why have they come to the mill or why has he gone to meet them? Where/what was the shoe shop property? Why did they want it? Did they get it? How did they resolve the boiler problem?

No diaries in 1918 or 1919 and nothing very helpful in the 1920s diaries!

[Henry A. Townsend married in Meredith, NH, March 29, 1918, Ingeborg V. “Ing” Svenson, both of Boston, MA. He was a student, aged twenty-one years, and she was at home aged twenty-three years. Edwin C. Mansfield, justice of the peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Sweden, circa 1895, daughter of Rev. Svante and Hilda C. (Lundgren) Svenson. (Her younger sister, Ruth H. Svenson, would marry (3rd), Seth F. Dawson, Jr., manager of the Milton Leatherboard Mill)].

ES191105 - Lanesburgh[Henry Albert Townsend of Milton Mills registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 18, 1918. He was twenty years of age (b. January 2, 1898) and employed as a blanket manufacturer for the John E. Townsend Estate in Milton Mills. His nearest relative was Eda B. Townsend of Milton Mills. He was of a medium height, and medium build, with brown eyes, and dark brown hair].

[MILL NEWS. Wool. MILTON MILLS, N.H. The Estate of John E. Townsend is now operating a branch mill in the same town under the name of the Antin Blanket Co. This plant has 1 set of cards, 220 spindles and 9 looms. The stock is picked and the blankets are finished at the main mills. The number of machines at the main mill has been increased to 32. Rogers, Hennessey & Jenkins, Boston, are the selling agents. H.A. Townsend is the agent in charge of this new branch (Textile World Journal, April 5, 1919)]. 

[New Hampshire. Milton Mills – The estate of John E. Townsend is now operating a branch mill company under the name of the Antin Blanket Company. This plant has 1 set of cards, 220 spindles and 9 looms. The number of machines at the main mill has been increased to 32 (American Wool and Cotton Reporter, July 31, 1919)].

[MILTON MILLS. Strafford Co. (SE) Pop. 1600. Stage, Union (4m.). RR47. Townsend, John E., Estate. Miltonia Mill. Harry E. Wentworth, Agt.; F.H. Simes , Supt . Blankets. 4 Sets Cards. 32 Broad Looms. 960 Sp. Dye. Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 W W. Electric. Employ 65. Rogers, Hennessey & Jenkins, N.Y., S. Agts. (Dawson’s Textile Blue Book, 1919)].

[Mrs. Ingeborg V. Townsend was a member (No. 8833) of the American Library Association in 1919 and 1920. The library she patronized was the Milton Mills Library (ALA, 1919)].

1920

At the time of this diary, 1920, Grandpa was working as bookkeeper and office manager for Miltonia Mills blanket factory. The mill had belonged to John Townsend, Grandpa’s brother-in-law. He began as bookkeeper and office manager. It was a small mill, but made very high quality wool blankets. Admiral Perry and Admiral Byrd carried Miltonia Mills blankets to the North and South Poles, respectively, and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge is reputed to have come to Milton Mills to purchase blankets personally.

[MILTON MILLS. Strafford Co. (SE) Pop. 1600. Stage, Union (4m.). RR47. Townsend, John E., Estate. Miltonia Mill. Henry A. Townsend, Prop.; F.H. Simes , Supt . Bed Blankets. 4 Sets Cards. 32 Broad Looms. 960 Sp. 2 Pickers. 3 Sew . Dye. Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 W W. Electric. Employ 65. Buy 14 and 18 C. Warp. Rogers, Hennessey & Jenkins, N.Y., S. Agts. (Dawson’s Textile Blue Book, 1920)].

[Harry E. Wentworth, a blanket mill manager, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella B. Wentworth, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), and his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged sixteen years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm on the Lebanon Road, free-and-clear].

John Townsend had died in 1914, a young man, leaving his widow (Eda, Grandpa’s first wife’s sister) and two teen-age children. His will named Grandpa Executor and Trustee, the court appointed him Administrator, and for the next few years, Grandpa managed the mill as well as continuing to do all the accounting.

[Agnes M. Townsend married in Milton Mills, April 24, 1920, Halton R. Hayes, she of Milton and he of Rochester, NH. He was a salesman, aged twenty-six years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. Lester E. Alexander performed the ceremony. Hayes was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1894, son of Edwin F. and Hattie (Pinkham) Hayes].

1921

Has only a few notes in the beginning of the year and nothing about the mill.

[SOUTH WOLFEBORO. Fred Sims and Henry Townsend of Milton Mills were visitors in this village Monday (Farmington News, September 2, 1921)].

[Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Spinney entertained as guests over the week-end Mr. and Mrs. H.R. Hayes and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Townsend of Milton Mills, N.H. (North Adams Transcript (North Adams, MA), October 10, 1921)].

[OXNARD AND VICINITY. Mr. and Mrs. Richard Stoehrer had as their house guests this week Mr. and Mrs. Henry Townsend of New Hampshire. Mr. Townsend, who is a blanket manufacturer in that state, has come with his wife to spend the winter in California and will reside in Los Angeles. They left here the first of the week intending to go to San Diego to witness the Centre-Arizona football game but owing to the flood conditions were unable to do so. They are expected to return to Oxnard to visit at the Stroehrer home until Saturday (Press-Courier (Oxnard, CA), December 28, 1921)].

1922

Bates Metallic Tooth Breast - TW220114The situation at the mill seems to have been the same. Although Henry Townsend is mentioned a couple of times, it is never in connection with the mill. Grandpa made business trips to both Boston and Dover on behalf of the mill. As was customary at the time, these trips were made by train. In February he mentioned that Ralph [W. Pike] was out of the office sick.

[Robert S. Pike, a retail butcher, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fannie [(Roberts)] Pike, aged sixty years (b. NH), and his children, Ralph W. Pike, a woolen mill bookkeeper, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Robert Pike, aged twenty-two years (b. NH)].

This is Grandpa’s first mention of anyone else in the office.

MILTON MILLS. Antin Blunhed [Blanket] Co. H.A. Townsend, agent. 1 set, 220 spindles, 9 looms. Townsend, John E., Est. of, Miltonia Mill. Harry E. Wentworth, agent; Fred H. Simes, superintendent. Production and Equipment: Blankets, 4 sets cards, 29 broad looms, 960 spindles, dye, finish, 1 boiler, 2 water wheels, electric power. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co., New York and Boston, selling agents (Cotton, 1922).

The Internal Revenue Service was alive and well in 1922 as witnessed by these entries.

March 1: Mr. Robbins, revenue man, came to the office to check up our Income Tax returns for the last four years.

[Carl C. Robbins, an Internal Revenue inspector, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), headed a Medford, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included Lottie L. Robbins, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and his children, Louise M. Robbins, aged two years, seven months (b. MA), and Dorothy C. Robbins, aged one year, five months (b. DC). Carl C. Robbins owned their house at 36 Tyler Street, with a mortgage].

March 4: Worked in P.M. at office with Mr. Robbins on Income returns.

No more mention is made of Mr. Robbins so the income tax returns must have been okay!

1923

Once again there are lots of empty pages in this diary and nothing about the mill.

[Milton Mills experienced an influenza epidemic in February 1923 (See Milton in the News – 1923)].

1924

There is still no mention of Henry’s role at the mill. Grandpa went regularly, but never mentions what he does, except once or twice a reference to his accounts. He seems to pretty much make his own hours, sometimes working all day, sometimes just a morning or an afternoon, sometimes not going in for several days at a time.

[The John E. Townsend Estate of Milton Mills, manufacturers of woolen blankets, had 40 male and 25 female employees, for a total of 65 employees, in 1924 (NH Bureau of Labor, 1924)].

[Milton Mills suffered a serious fire in the early hours of Thursday, November 20. The Townsend mill firemen and those of Rochester, NH, responded to the fire (See Milton in the News – 1924)].

[SANBORNVILLE. Some of the out of town visitors in the village last Thursday were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Spencer and Miss Doris Marsh of Milton Mills, Henry Townsend, Mr. and Mrs. Tom McAbby of East Wakefield, and Mrs. Jennie Spiller of Brookfield (Farmington News, November 28, 1924)].

1925

I am still unclear as to his status at the mill. There are only three mentions of Henry Townsend in this year’s diary. On Wednesday, January 26 he wrote that Henry had begun running the mill at night. On February 11 he reported, Henry took George Fox and went up to his camp at Bear Island [in Lake Winnipesaukee] to do some work on his wharf. Expects to be gone the rest of the week.

[George E. Fox, a general farm farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucia C. Fox, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and his son, Chandler P. Fox, aged twelve years (b. ME). George E. Fox owned their farm on the Fox Ridge Road].

Was Henry in charge or was Grandpa still in charge? Did Henry run the manufacturing part and Grandpa the business part? If they were both working there, one would think there would be some interaction and that there would, at least, be occasional references to Henry in Grandpa’s diary. In April, he and Henry went to Dover to meet with Mr. Hall, an annual occurrence.

I believe Mr. Hall had something to do with John Townsend’s will because in an earlier (before 1920) diary, Grandpa tells about Mr. Hall coming to Milton Mills and meeting with him after John died. Grandpa was to run the mill until Henry was of age and could take over. Henry would have been a little older than Dad and we know from a previous diary that he was married. He would, of course, have inherited enough to live on from his father’s estate plus the income from the mill. Perhaps, he preferred to travel (to California each year) and let Grandpa handle the business of the mill. Who knows?!? (I seem to be doing a lot of speculating here!!)

1926

Grandpa continued to work at the mill. Apparently, Henry was around, too, since Grandpa mentions that he was “at home” sick three days. Like Grandpa, Henry seemed to have multiple interests. He must have owned quite a bit of real estate since he hired George Marsh and George Fox to shingle the roofs of several buildings including some at the mill. George M. and Dad also did other maintenance jobs at the mill on occasion.

[George W. Marsh, a farm laborer (working out), aged forty years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eva M. Marsh, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Ithiel E. Marsh, aged ten years (b. ME), and Lester E. Marsh, aged nine years (b. ME). George W. Marsh owned their farm on the Lebanon Road, free-and-clear].

1927

My curiosity about Henry and Miltonia Mills has been piqued even further with a series of vague entries in this year’s diary.

[MILTON MILLS. Miltonia Mills. Agents: Covert & Workman, New York. Proprietor: Henry A. Townsend. Superintendent: F.H. Simes. Woollen Spinners and Manufacturers, Dyers and Finishers. Cards: 4 sets. Spindles: 1,680. Looms: 40. Fabric: Bed Blankets (Skinner, 1927)].

March 7: Henry came home this noon – has been gone 5 weeks. [California? Texas?]

May 18: Geo. [Marsh] worked for Henry 9 hours at the old counting room building. [Carpentry]

June 23: Geo. [Marsh] & Geo. Fox worked . . . and at the mill for Henry in the P.M.

October 7: Was in the office all day. Talked with Mr. D.H. Grant about our taking over the mill on a lease and running it. Went over to the office in the evening to talk with Mr. Grant again.

[D.H. Grant & Co., formerly Grant & Bullwinkel, have been appointed sole selling agents in the United States for J.H. Kippax, Manchester, England, manufacturers of fine ginghams, crepes and voiles. The concern, which is located at 225 Fourth Ave., is also engaged in the importation of high grade cotton from other countries, notably Switzerland (Textile World Journal, 1923)].

October 27: Mr. Grant from N.Y. to see about selling blankets for the mill if we take it over. Who are “we”?!

[Dana H. Grant, a manufacturer of dress goods, aged thirty years (b. U.S.), headed a Pelham, NY, household at the time of the NY State Census of 1925. His household included his wife, Dorothy R. Grant, aged thirty-one years (b. U.S.), and his mother, Mary H. Grant, a houseworker, aged sixty-nine years (b. U.S.). They resided at 128 Reed Avenue]. 

October 29: Went over to the office at 5:30 to meet with Chas. Wentworth of Rochester & a Mr. Bartlett who thought of coming into the mill business with us.

[Charles L. Wentworth appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1926, as secretary-treasurer of the Rochester Building and Loan Association and a teller at the Rochester Trust Co., with his residence at 12 Glen street].

November 2: I am in the office nearly all the time now trying to make arrangements for taking over the mill and running it.

November 7: I went to Rochester to see Mr. Bond about incorporating the business in the P.M. Went down with Henry and Ing. [Ing was Henry’s wife.]

[Bernard Q. Bond appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1926, as vice president-treasurer of the Rochester Trust Co., with his residence at 86 Wakefield street].

November 17: Grandpa explained that he had not attended prayer meeting because he had to attend the Board of Trade meeting at the hotel in the interests of mill business.

December 1: Norman [his son] took me over to Springvale in P.M. to see Judge Goodwin about incorporating the mill business.

[George Goodwin, a general practice lawyer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), headed a Sanford (“Springvale”), ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-six years), Etta Goodwin, aged sixty-three years (b. ME). George Goodwin owned their house at 24 Main Street, which was valued at $5,500. They had a radio set].

December 6: Norman and I went to Dover and Rochester on the mill business. Didn’t amount to much.

December 9: Got a letter from Mr. Grant [of] New York and it looks as if we might get the mill started.

December 15: Mill is now all shut down. No one working.

December 24: Henry & I went down to Dover to see Mr. Hall about making a lease for the mill. Henry started for Texas to-night. Will spend Christmas with Agnes and he and Joe Plummer start from there Tues. morning.

[Henry’s sister, Agnes M. (Townsend) Hayes, then lived with her husband in Bradford, MA. Halton R. (Agnes T.) Hayes appeared in the Haverhill. MA, directory of 1928, as manager of the Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co., with his house at 35 Fernwood av., Br. [Bradford]. Henry A. Townsend and Joe Plummer would have started for Texas from Bradford, after spending Christmas there (The Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co. of Kansas City, MO, made the Sunshine brand of biscuits and cookies. Hayes would have been the local sales manager)].


Ms. Bristol contributed some supplementary research support.


Continued in H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1928-34


References:

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Pacific Mills. (1924). Pacific Mills: Lawrence, Mass., Dover, N.H., Columbia, S.C. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=d_tvAiVRhoAC&printsec=frontcover

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA543

Trust Publications. (1919). Trust Publications. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=I7hGAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA479

Wikipedia. (2020, November 2). Bear Island (Lake Winnipesaukee). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bear_Island_(Lake_Winnipesaukee)

Wikipedia. (2021, May 1). Bright’s Disease. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bright%27s_disease

Milton Policemen – 1940-52

By Muriel Bristol | May 2, 2021

Continued from Milton Policemen – 1927-39

The Milton policemen identified in the Milton Town Reports of 1940-52 were: Oliver J. Diack, John P. Kimball, John P. Butler, Clemence C. Dixon, Roy Burroughs, John Reardon, Edwin H. Hutchins, and Howard J. Jedrey.

Oliver J. Diack – 1940

Oliver James Diack was born in Quincy, MA, September 22, 1909, son of Alfred O. and Jeannie (Wilson) Diack. (His father died in 1918).

Jeannie Diack, a widow, aged sixty-two years (b. Scotland), headed a Quincy, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Eva O. Diack, a school teacher, aged thirty years (b. MA), Mildred M. Diack, a gas co. secretary, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), Ethel B. Diack, an automobile secretary, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Oliver J. Diack, a gas co. clerk, aged twenty years (b. MA). Jeannie Diack owned their house at 47 Independence Ave., which was valued at $9,000. They had a radio set. Jeannie Diack was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1903.

BRAINTREE. The annual outing the Old Colony Gas Company of this town will be held tomorrow afternoon and evening at Pemberton. The general committee has arranged for the best time ever, end on the various committees are William Sullivan, chairman; Oliver Diack, secretary; John Swain, Joseph Shay, Miss Mildred Diack, transportation; Mrs. Margaret Jolicoeur, Miss Mary Walsh, Miss Anna Cassese, Mrs. Hazel Cassese, entertainment; David Condrick, William Webb, Joseph Shay, publicity; Oliver Diack, Joseph Shay, David Condrick, men’s sports; Miss Mildred Diack, Miss Mary Walsh, Miss Anna Cassese, Mrs. Margaret Jolicoeur, Miss Mary Tardlff, sports for the women. There will be indoor sports in case of rain. A number of local and out-of-town officials of the company have been invited to attend. (Boston Globe, August 22, 1930).

Oliver James Diack married in Braintree, MA, in 1935, Ruth Power. She was born in Milton, October 10, 1911, daughter of Lewis R. and Georgia W. (Quint) Power,

Oliver J. Diack, a farm laborer, aged thirty years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ruth Diack, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and his son, Oliver J. Diack, Jr., aged ten months (b. MA). Oliver J. Diack owned their house in the Milton Community, which was valued at $2,200. Oliver J. and Ruth Diack had resided in the same house in 1935.

Oliver James Diack of Union R.F.D., Milton, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, October 16, 1940. He was aged thirty-one years (b. Quincy, MA, September 22, 1909), and was employed by the State of New Hampshire. His telephone number was 41-12. His nearest relation was his wife, Ruth Power Diack of Union R.F.D. Milton. He was 6′ tall, weighed 200 pounds, and had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion. A later hand scratched out his Milton address and wrote in “Saint David, Arizona.”

Real Estate Transfers. Oliver and Ruth Diack of Milton sold to Robert S. and Susanne H. Bolan of Newton, Mass., land located on the north west side of “The Lane” in Milton (Farmington News, July 12, 1956).

Oliver J. Diack died in 1957.

ESTATES CONSIDERED. Oliver J. Diack, Milton. Petition to sell stocks and bonds granted (Farmington News, 1959).

Ruth (Power) Diack died in Arizona, October 11, 1970.

John P. Kimball (Chief) – 1942-43

John Pliny Kimball was born in Wolfeboro, NH, June 14, 1916, son of Fred J. and Clara M. (Dale) Kimball.

John Pliny Kimball married in Rochester, NH, June 28, 1939, Mary Elizabeth LeVangie, he of 37 White Place, Brookline, MA, and she of 87 Toxteth Street, Brookline, MA. He was a pharmacist, aged twenty-three years, and she was a stenographer and bookkeeper, aged twenty-four years. She was born in Brookline, MA, April 19, 1915, daughter of Thomas W. and Annie (Giblin) LeVangie.

Fred J. Kimball, a steam railroad laborer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Clara M. Kimball, aged fifty-two years (b. MA), his son, John P. Kimball, a drug store druggist, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Mary E. Kimball, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and his grandson, John P, Kimball, Jr., aged two months (b. NH). Fred J. Kimball owned their house on Remick Street, at its intersection with Silver Street, which was valued at $1,000.

Portsmouth Police Join in Hunt for Milton Girl. Milton police left late last night for Boston, as the search spread for Lena Anderson, 16, member of a trio of Milton girls who ran away Tuesday. The other two, Pauline Dupuis, 15, and Charlotte Weare, 16, returned to their homes yesterday but told police that they had left Lena in Boston. The girls had been sought in Portsmouth Wednesday night by Milton Chief of Police John P. Kimball and Patrolman Pierce Butler, with the assistance of City Marshal Leonard H. Hewitt, and members of the local police department. Hotels and rooming houses were investigated. It is alleged that the three girls skipped school Tuesday to go to Rochester. When they returned in the afternoon the headmaster told them to bring excuse notes from home before they would be admitted to their classes. The two girls told police that they returned to Rochester later that night and then hitch-hiked to Boston where they met three sailors. They left the Anderson girl in front of a Boston movie house in the company of one of the sailors as she refused to accompany them because she was afraid to go home, they explained. Police described Miss Anderson as being five feet six inches tall, weighing 130 pounds, having brown hair and brown eyes and wearing a red and blue flowered dress, brown and white saddle shoes, wine colored socks but no coat (Portsmouth Herald, May 8, 1942).

Rochester. Milton Girl For Whom Search Made Here, Found. (Correspondent: Basil Blake; 806-J). Lena Anderson, 16, missing since May 5, has been located Providence, R.I., where she has been working in a defense plant. Search was made for her with two other girls here and in Portsmouth at the time of their disappearance. The Milton girl, for whom a New England-wide search had been instituted, will return home Sunday, according to Patrolman John P. Kimball, of the Milton police who was in charge of the search and who has been working on the case since May. Claim Skipped Classes. On the afternoon of May 5, Lena and two companions, Charlotte Weare, 16, and Pauline Dupuis, 15, were allegedly sent home from the Nute High school and told to tell their parents that they had skipped classes in the morning. Instead they all hitch-hiked to Rochester, according to the other two girls who returned home a few days after their disappearance. Instead of going home the girls went to the Boston and Maine station in Milton and from the funds of the three which had been pooled, bought tickets for Rochester. They were seen in Rochester that night and then hitch-hiked to Boston. Patrolman John P. Kimball and Patrolman Pierce Butler of Milton went to Boston after two of the girls returned home voluntarily and said they left the Anderson girl in Boston. They told how the three girls and three sailors met outside a Boston theater and the Anderson girl, learning the others were going home, said said she was going to remain as she was afraid to return. Since then she had not been heard from until yesterday (Portsmouth Herald, August 8, 1942).

Injured Youths Leave Hospital. Treated at the Frisbie hospital late Monday for injuries sustained in an automobile accident in Milton, Stanley Parker of East Rochester and Technical Sergt. Melvin Wilkins of East Rochester, who is home on a furlough from Camp George G. Meade in Maryland, were released Tuesday. Sergeant Wilkins, said by police to have been the operator of the car, received lacerations on the face and complained of pains in his abdomen. Parker was cut on the head and was shaken up. Alfred Smith, another passenger in the car, received bruises and contusions but did not require hospital treatment. State Motor Vehicle Inspector Harold M. Foss of Dover, who was called by Patrolman John P. Kimball of the Milton police, said the car started to weave near the Boston and Maine crossing and about opposite the Wilson home, after traveling a hundred yards, left Route 16 and struck an electric light pole, snapping it (Portsmouth Herald, October 1, 1942).

John P. Kimball died in Marion, FL. June 19, 1996. Mary E. (Levangie) Kimball died in Wolfeboro, NH, April 28, 2006.

John P. Butler – 1942

John Pierce “Pierce” Butler was born in Milton, October 5, 1919, son of Edward T. and Margaret J. (Burbine) Butler.

John Pierce Butler married in Milton, November 25, 1939, Dorothy Margaret Wilson, both of Milton. He was a mill hand, aged twenty years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. Leland L. Maxfield performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, November 25, 1919, daughter of Charles W. and Florence E. (Blake) Wilson.

John P. Butler, a leatherboard mill dryer, aged twenty years (b. NH) headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Dorothy M. Butler, aged twenty years (b. NH), and his aunt, Margaret Curll, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME). John P. and Dorothy M. Butler had resided in the same place, i.e., Milton, in 1935, while Margaret Curll had resided in Newport, RI. John P. Butler rented their house on School Street, for $15 per month. Their household was enumerated between those of Fred Howard, a shoe shop shoeworker, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), and Leland Maxfield, a minister, aged thirty years.

John P. Butler enlisted in the U.S. Army in Boston, MA, October 26, 1942. He had attended four years of high school, stood 69″ tall, and weighed 155 pounds.

John P. (Dorothy M.) Butler appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1953, as a lineman for the PS [Public Service] Co. of NH, with his house at 71 Indigo Hill road.

Dorothy M. (Wilson) Butler died in Dover, NH, September 27, 2007. John P. Butler died in Dover, NH, July 13, 2018, aged ninety-eight years.

Clemence C. Dixon – 1944

Clemence Charles Dixon was born in Boston, MA, April 4, 1888, son of Joseph E. and Susanna (Mullen) Dixon.

Clemence Dixon, a U.S. government mail messenger, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. He rented his house on Charles Street, for $8 per month. He had a radio set. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Herbert F. Yeaton, a house carpenter, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and Harry L. Avery, a retail dry goods merchant, aged sixty-six years (b. NH).

Clemence Charles Dixon of Milton registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 27, 1942. He was a Milton-based U.S. government employee, aged fifty-three years (b. South Boston, MA, April 4, 1888). He stood 5′ 4″ tall, weighed 14p pounds, and had gray eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. His contact was Mr. Samuel Blaisdell of Milton.

Clemence C. Dixon died in Rochester, NH, May 10, 1951, aged sixty-three years, twenty-six days.

Roy Burroughs (Chief) – 1945-60

Leroy “Roy” Burroughs was born in Brookfield, NH, February 16, 1909, son of Howard W. and Mercy M. (Kimball) Burroughs.

Roy Burroughs married in Dover, NH, October 11, 1924, Marion G. Chamberlain, he of Brookfield, NH, and she of Milton. He was an iceman, aged twenty-one years, and she was a domestic, aged seventeen years. (She had the consent of her father). Rev. Leon Morse performed the ceremony. She was born in Chelsea, MA, July 10, 1907, daughter of Guy L. and Elizabeth (Cunningham) Chamberlain.

Roy Burroughs, an ice company laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Marian Burroughs, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and his brother-in-law, Gardner Chamberlain, a fibre mill laborer, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Roy Burroughs rented their house on North Main Street, for $10 per month. They had a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Warren Burroughs, State road trucking, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and Lyman S. Hayes, retired, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH).

Roy Burroughs, a leatherboard mill fireman, aged twenty-six [thirty-six] years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Marian G. Burroughs, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), and his brother-in-law, Howard Chamberlain, a State road laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Roy Burroughs rented their house in the Milton Community, for $12 per month. They had all resided in the same house in 1935. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Laura J. Littlefield, a widow, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and Roy M. Downs, a leatherboard mill laborer, aged forty-six years (b. NH).

MILTON. Girl Injured. The heavy rainstorm here Sunday afternoon has been reported as the reason for the one-car crash which caused the hospitalization of a Worcester, Mass., woman. Chief of Police Roy Burroughs reported the automobile left the road on Route 16, approaching Milton from the south, and hit a brick wall. Alice Dusoe of Worcester was taken to Frisbie hospital in Rochester. Her companion, said to be the driver of the car, Doris Pouliot of Boston, was released from the hospital at nightfall (Farmington News, August 11, 1955).

MILTON. Gilman, Burroughs, Mrs. Ramsey Victorious. Incumbents won reelection in the 3 contests at town meeting Tuesday. John Gilman again will serve as selectman. He defeated Leroy Forbes. Roy Burroughs defeated Robert Vachon for chief of police. Mrs. Emma Ramsey defeated Dorothy Carswell for tax collector. Town budget for Milton and the Mills will be $58,218.72, a boost of almost $3000 (Farmington News, March 12, 1959).

MILTON. SURGERY. Mrs. Roy Burroughs underwent surgery last Friday at the Frisbie Memorial Hospital and is making a good recovery (Farmington News, July 30, 1964).

Roy Burroughs died in Rochester, NH, August 8, 1975. Marian G. (Chamberlain) Burroughs died in Rochester, NH, June 28, 1978.

John Reardon – 1946-48, 1949-51

John Reardon has proven somewhat elusive. John Reardon and Anna Reardon neglected to pay their Milton poll tax for 1951, presumably because they moved from town. (Perhaps the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census may shed more light on them, when it becomes available).

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1953, as a G.E. employee, with his house at 179½ Main street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as D.S. Co. employee, with her house at 179½ Main street.

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1956, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 21 Copeland street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 21 Copeland street.

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1958, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 2 Copeland street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 2 Copeland street.

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1960, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 75 Berwick street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 2 Copeland street [75 Berwick street].

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1962, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 42 Berwick street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 42 Berwick street.

Edwin H. Hutchins – 1948, 1954-61, 1963

Edwin Henry Hutchins was born in Wolfeboro, NH, March 15, 1927, son of Bernard S. and Teresa (Hayes) Hutchins.

Bernard S. Hutchins, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Teresa H. Hutchins, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Edwin Hutchins, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Paul Hutchins, aged eleven years (b. NH), Marion Hutchins, aged nine years (b. NH), and Money Hutchins, aged seven years (b. NH). Bernard S. Hutchins owned their house on the Lovell Lake Road, which was valued at $1,000. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

Edwin Henry Hutchins married in Milton, July 27, 1947, Gloria June Clough, he of Sanbornville, Wakefield, NH, and she of Milton Mills, Milton. He was a farmer, aged twenty years, and she was a spooler, aged sixteen years (parental consent). She was born in Milton Mills, circa 1931, daughter of Dennis and Mamie V. (Marsh) Clough.

Young G.O.P. Plans Organization. Milton – A Young Republican Club is being formed to include the towns of Milton, Milton Mills, Union, Sanbornville, and Wakefield. In charge of organization is Mrs. Edwin Hutchins of Milton Mills, and anyone interested in joining the group should contact her. The first Meeting will be Monday, Feb 19 (Farmington News, February 15, 1962).

In the following article concerning the March 1963 town election is confirmed something we might have suspected before regarding Milton’s usual pair of policemen: Milton and Milton Mills had each their own elected policeman. One of them, presumably Milton’s policeman although it is not clear, would be also the chief. Edwin Hutchins received election as a Republican candidate for Milton Mills policeman.

Milton Elects Logan Selectman. Milton – Republican Charles H. Logan defeated democratic incumbent Stanley C. Tanner, 318 to 108, in Tuesday’s election in Milton. In other contested offices, George W. Meyers lost to republican Charles R. Whitehouse, by a vote of 319 to 95; Milton Mills police, Edwin Hutchins, R., 148, Frederick Meyers, 43, Frederick Morrill, 98, Norman Place, 70; 2nd engineer in the fire department, Donald Cheney, 244, Robert McIntire, 132. Pauline Clough was elected trustee of trust funds on a write-in. The other offices were uncontested. Town meeting was held and most of the articles passed without much controversy. Article 25, which had to do with a preliminary report and plan preparation for sewerage and sewage treatment facilities was passed with a provision that the job be put up for bid (Farmington News, March 14, 1963).

MILTON MILLS. Mrs. Edwin Hutchins has concluded her work at Sprague Electric in So. Sanford, Me., and has taken a position at General Electric in Somersworth (Farmington News, December 31, 1969).

Edwin H. Hutchins died in Milton Mills, July 19, 2003, aged seventy-six years.

Howard J. Jedrey – 1952

Howard J. Jedrey was born in Georgetown, MA, June 19, 1908, son of Benjamin H. and Eliza (Chaput) Jedrey.

Howard J. Jedrey married (1st) in Ipswich, MA, February 4, 1928, Bessie E. Kent, he of Broadway Avenue, Ipswich, MA, and she of Wethersfield Street, Rowley, MA. He was a laborer, aged nineteen years, and she was at home, aged sixteen years. Rev. Joseph C. Burns performed the ceremony. She was born in Rowley, MA, circa 1911, daughter of David A. and Etta E. (Wilson) Kent.

Howard J. Jedrey, a wood industry laborer, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), headed a Rowley, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Bessie K. Jedrey, aged eighteen years (b. MA), and his child, Ralph J. Jedrey, aged one year, eleven months (b. MA). Howard J. Jedrey rented their house, for $4 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Howard J. and Bessie E. (Kent) Jedrey divorced in 1933. Howard Jedrey married (2nd) in Nowata, OK, July 1, 1934, Mary E. Hoyle. She was born in Elsmore, KS, circa 1907, daughter of William G. and Myrtle M. (Ard) Hoyle.

Howard Jedrey, a cotton mill twister, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), headed a Stratham, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary Jedrey, aged thirty-two years (b. KS), and his children, Benjamin Jedrey, aged four years (b. KS), and Charles Jedrey, aged two years (b. NH). Howard Jedrey owned their house on Bunker Hill Avenue, which was valued at $50. Howard and Mary E. Jedrey had resided in Elsmore, KS, in 1935.

Howard James Jedrey of Bunker Hill Avenue, Stratham, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Stratham, NH, October 16, 1940. He was employed by the Exeter Manufacturing Co. in Exeter, NH. He was aged thirty-two years (b. Georgetown, MA, June 19, 1908). His contact was his wife, Mrs. Mary E. Jedrey, of Bunker Hill Avenue, Stratham, NH. He was 5′ 8″ tall, weighed 142 pounds, and had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. Warranty Deeds. From Howard J. and Mary E. Jedrey to Ralph D. Laskey of Milton Mills, parcel of land on southerly side of the road leading from Milton Mills to Sanbornville (Farmington News, September 1, 1955).

Howard Jedrey, aged forty-eight years, headed an Elsmore, KS, household at the time of a Kansas county census of March 1957. His household included Mary E. Jedrey, aged fifty years, Benjamin H. Jedrey, aged twenty-one years, and Charles W. Jedrey, aged nineteen years.

Howard J. Jedrey died in Moran, KS, March 4, 1977, aged sixty-eight years.

Howard James Jedrey. Howard James Jedrey, 68, Route 1, Moran, died Friday March 4 at his home. He was born June 19, 1908, in Georgetown, Massachusetts. On July 1, 1934, he was married to Mary E. Hoyle at Nowata, Oklahoma. Mr. Jedrey was a retired laborer and former member of the Eagle Lodge. Survivors include Mrs. Jedrey of the home; two sons, Benjamin Howard Jedrey of Anaheim, California, and Charles William Jedrey of West Covina, California; three brothers, Ben Jedrey of Jacksonville, Fla.; Victor Jedrey of Andover, Mass., and Harry Jedrey of Maine, two sisters, Mrs. Agnes Roberts of Providence, Rhode Island and Mrs. Grace Burns of Raymond, New Hampshire and eight grandchildren. The funeral service was held this afternoon at the Kunkel-Ralston- Hutton Chapel with the Rev. Jean Minnich officiating. Burial was in the Moran Cemetery (Iola Register (Iola, KS), March 7, 1977).

Mary E. (Hoyle) Jedrey died in Broken Arrow, OK, January 12, 1997.


See also Milton Policemen – c1891-1914 and Milton Policemen – 1927-39


References:

Find a Grave. (2009, August 27). Leroy “Roy” Burroughs. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/41231961/leroy-burroughs

Find a Grave. (2014, February 14). Oliver James Diack. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/125500635/oliver-james-diack

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Clemence C. Dixon. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214561425/clemence-c-dixon

Find a Grave. (2013, July 28). Edwin Henry Hutchins. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114529909/edwin-henry-hutchins