Celestial Seasonings – September 2022

By Heather Durham | August 31, 2022

Hi there, folks!

Welcome to the eventful astronomical month of September 2022!

Along with the season of astronomical autumn north of the equator, we have three meteor showers and … if all goes as planned, the Artemis 1 liftoff, scheduled for September 2, will lift off. Unfortunately, the launch, scheduled for August 29 had engine issues and more…

This month’s equinox on the 22nd of the month, brings approximately 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of darkness to the whole planet. It also marks the first day of spring in the Southern Hemisphere.

The Double Asteroid Redirection Test, otherwise known as D.A.R.T. will occur on the 26th of this month. This will be the first test of NASA slamming an object the size of a dishwasher into an asteroid, directing it away from Earth. The success of this mission will prevent future asteroids from making contact with Earth and destroying humanity as it did with the dinosaurs.

On September 29, Spacex Crew 5 will send four people to the International Space Station. A few days later, the space crew that has been on the space station will return to Earth. The new crew will perform scientific experiments without gravity.

Wow!!! Now, let’s get into specific event dates …

September 1. Aurigid meteor shower will peak today. Your best chance of seeing any will be close to dawn.

September 3. The Moon will be at first quarter.

September 8. The Moon and Saturn will rise towards the right and will appear close to one another.

September 9. The September ε-Perseid meteor shower event occurs today with ideal viewing before dawn or after dusk today.

September 10. The full Harvest Moon should shine brightly this evening.

September 11. The Moon and Jupiter will rise to the right and appear close to each other.

September 16. The Moon and Mars will travel close to each other and will appear to rise to the right.

September 17. Our Harvest Moon will be in its final quarter.

September 22. Today is the first day of astronomical autumn.

September 26. Jupiter will be opposite of the Sun and should be visible all evening.

September 27. The Daytime Sextantid meteor shower will display this evening with prime viewing near dawn.

References:

Anonymous. (2022, August 29). Artemis. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemis_program

Dunbar, Brian. (2022, August 29). Artemis. Retrieved from www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis/

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (2022, January 17). Don’t Miss! September 2022 Astronomy Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/Wixh93aiTo8

Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1855-1909

By Muriel Bristol | August 28, 2022


Continued from Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854


FIRST FREE BAPTIST CHURCH. The First Free Baptist Church was reorganized by Rev. Gershom Lord, in 1802, and consisted of eight members. Samuel Runnells and Bart. Miller were first deacons, and Elder Lord was clerk. Rev. Gershom Lord was the first preacher, and was succeeded by Humphrey Goodwin, who was ordained in 1807, and continued to preach until his removal to Hollis in 1814. Elder David Blaisdell supplied from 1815 to 1830. A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840. Theodore Stevens became pastor in 1834, left in 1836, returned in 1839, and was succeeded, in 1843, by Elder J. Fullerby; Horace Stanton, in 1847; and subsequently by Z. Jordan, Wm. Hurlin, Seth Perkins, Aaron Ayer, Dexter Waterman, James Potter; Rev. Mr. McLain, in 1872; Hosea Quimby, 1875; and at Mr. Quimby’s death, in October 1878, by Rev. B.F. Sherwood, who remained until about 1880, when Rev. H.P. Mansur came. He remained until about 1885. The following have been pastors since that time: Revs. G.A. Anderson, 1887; C.E. Hurd, 1888-93; E.W. Fernald, 1894-7; R.W. Churchill, 1898- (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

The Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist ministers described from this period were: Seth W. Perkins, William Hurlin, Aaron Ayer, Samuel Jones, Edward A. Stockman, David Boyd, Dexter Waterman, James S. Potter, Alexander S. McLean, Hosea Quinby, Benjamin A. Sherwood, Hiram P. Mansur, Clifford M. Anderson, Charles E. Hurd, Ebenezer N. Fernald, and Edgar W. Churchill.

Seth Perkins – 1855-56

Seth Warren Perkins was born in ME, August 26, 1810, son of Seth and Nancy (Warren) Perkins.

Seth W. Perkins married in Belgrade, ME, June 11, 1830, Clarinda C. Damren. She was born in Belgrade, ME, May 9, 1816, daughter of Joshua B. and Theodate D. (Marchant) Damren. (Theodate: a Greek-Latin compound meaning “God Giveth Thee”).

Seth W. Perkins headed a Gardiner, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], two females aged 20-29 years [Clarinda C. (Damren) Perkins], one female aged 15-19 years, and one female aged 5-9 years.

Seth W. Perkins and Elias Hutchins were Free-Will Baptist ministers in Dover, NH, in 1846.

Seth W. Perkins, a Baptist clergyman, aged forty years (b. ME), headed a Kittery, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Clarinda Perkins, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and Ellen Perkins, aged ten years (b. ME).

Seth W. Perkins appeared in the Maine Register of 1852, as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church at Kittery, ME.

Rev. Seth Perkins was minister in Candia, NH, from 1852 to 1855.

Rev. Seth Perkins was performing marriages in Acton, ME, as early as May 1855. Seth W. Perkins appeared in the Maine Registers of 1856, and 1857, as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church at Acton, ME.

Clergymen. YORK COUNTY. Perkins, Seth W., [F.B.], Acton (ME Register, 1856).

Seth W. Perkins, an F.W. Baptist clergyman, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Corinth, VT, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Clarinda C. Perkins, aged forty-two years (b. ME), Ellen A. Perkins, aged twenty years (b. ME), and Eugene J. Perkins, aged eight years (b. ME). Seth W. Perkins had real estate valued at $300.

Revivals in Vermont. Seth W. Perkins writes the Morning Star: “The Lord is reviving his work within the limits of the first F.W. Baptist church in Corinth, Vt. Three new converts spoke in the prayer-meeting last eve, and numbers of others are seeking Christ. To God be all the praise” (Vermont Christian Messenger (Montpelier, VT), December 1, 1860).

Seth W. Perkins appeared in the NH Register of 1866, as an F. Bap. minister in Sutton, NH.

About the year 1866 he settled in South Wheelock, Vt., and remained three years; then he was pastor of the Eaton and Newport church, Province of Quebec, three years (Burgess & Ward, 1889).

Seth W. Perkins, an F.W. Baptist minister of the gospel, aged sixty years (b. U.S.), headed a Newport, Quebec, Canada, household at the time of the Canadian Census of 1871. His household included [his wife,] Clorinda C. Perkins, aged fifty-three years (b. U.S.), A. Ellen Perkins, aged thirty years (b. U.S.), Eugene J. Perkins, aged nineteen years (b. U.S.), and Winona Perkins, aged nine years (b. U.S.).

After this he was pastor one year in each of the following places in Maine: Canton, Wilton, Weld, New Sharon, South Montville and New Gloucester (Burgess & Ward, 1889).

MARRIAGES. Canton – July 28th by Rev. Seth W. Perkins, Mr. Chas. H. Berry of Hartford and Miss Abbie F. Robinson of Sumner (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), August 1, 1873).

Seth W. Perkins appeared in the Maine Registers of 1874-75, as pastor of the Baptist church at Canton, ME.

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. A correspondent (M) writes: Rev. Seth W. Perkins who has been preaching with the churches at Wilton and Weld for two years past, and been highly esteemed as a minister of the gospel, has accepted a call to the pastorate of the churches in New Sharon and Mercer and has commenced his labors there (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), March 17, 1875).

Seth W. Perkins appeared in the Augusta, ME, directory of 1876, as pastor of the Brunswick Street Freewill Baptist Church, boarding at William Whitney’s Oak. (William Whitney appeared a cooper on Oak street, at its corner with Water street, with his house at the same address).

Seth W. Perkins of Gardiner, ME, filed for divorce from Clarinda C. Perkins of Canton, ME, in Kennebec County, ME, in October 1876.

STATE ITEMS. There were twenty-eight divorces decreed at the recent term of court in Kennebec county. One case was that of Seth W. Perkins of Gardiner, divorce from Clarinda C Perkins of Canton. Cause, alienation in affection, covering a period of four years, manifesting a strong dislike, culminating in actual hatred of him, so that she refused to offer him to remain in the same house, and he had to leave for the “sake of keeping peace in the family.” The libellant is a minister of the Gospel, and has not been able to live with his wife for more than three years (Portland Eastern Argus (Portland, ME), February 16, 1877).

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. Rev. Seth W. Perkins has accepted a call to the pastorate of the South Montville church and has already entered upon the discharge of his duties in that place (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), March 22, 1877).

Religious Intelligence. Rev. Seth W. Perkins of Montville has received and accepted a call to the pastorate of the Free Baptist church at New Gloucester and entered upon its duties (Daily Eastern Argus (Portland, ME), November 10, 1877).

Seth W. Perkins married (2nd), circa 1878, Eleanor (Waite) Waite. She was born in Dixfield, ME, circa 1820, daughter of Isaac and Sally (Goodwin) Waite. (Her first husband, Chandler D. Waite, had died in 1867).

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. Our correspondent writes: Rev. Seth Perkins will close his second year with the Free Baptist church in New Gloucester on the 12th of October. He has spent two pleasant years in the community and leaves many kind friends in the town and surrounding society. Any church, community or society wishing to correspond in view of future services aro invited to do so by directing to him at North Gray, Maine (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), August 27, 1879).

Seth W. Perkins, a minister, aged sixty-nine years (b. ME), headed a New Gloucester, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eleanor Perkins, aged forty-seven years (b. ME).

Clarinda Perkins, keeping house, aged sixty-four years (b. ME), headed a Lyndon, VT, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Winnie Perkins, a teacher, aged eighteen years (b. ME), and her boarders, Frank Dunklee, teaching school, aged twenty years (b. VT), and Loran Prescott, a clerk in railroad office, aged forty-five years (b. VT). (Clarinda Perkins was described as a widow, anticipating her [ex-] husband’s death in the following year).

Seth W. Perkins died in Hollis, ME, June 14, 1881, aged seventy years.

MINISTERIAL OBITUARY RECORD. REV. SETH W. PERKINS died in Hollis, Me., June 13 1881, aged 70. [Vol. 56, No. 25] (Free Will Baptist Register, 1882). 

Elenor ((Waite) Waite) Perkins died of senile debility in Livermore Falls, VT, December 23, 1904, aged eighty-four years.

Ex-wife Clarinda C. (Damren) Perkins died of pneumonia in Lyndon, VT, January 23, 1907, aged ninety years, eight months, and fourteen days.

Mrs. Clara Perkins. Mrs. Clara Perkins died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ellen Prescott, last week Wednesday, Jan. 23. Clara Clark Damren was born in Belgrade, Me., on May 9, 1816. She was the last surviving member of sixteen children and her family belonged to a hardy, long lived race. Although Mrs. Perkins died at an advanced age, being 91 years, 6 months and 14 days old, yet she was a wonderfully well-preserved woman, appearing many years younger than she really was, and had not only retained her physical health, but her mental faculties as well. She was a great reader and her eye-sight was so good that she did very fine needle work up to the very time of her last illness. She was taken ill on January 12th, with a heart trouble which had been about her for several years and pneumonia did not develop until the 18th. Although an intense sufferer during this last illness, she showed great fortitude and patience. On June 11, 1830, she was married to Seth Warren Perkins, of Anson, Me. Mr. Perkins was a Free Baptist minister, preaching in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Canada. He was at one time located in Sheffield, Vt. Three children, all of whom are now living, were born to them. They are: Mrs. Ellen A. Prescott, of Lyndonville, Mrs. Fred Harvey, of Sandy Hill, N.Y., and Eugene Per-kins, of Brooklyn, N.Y. Mrs. Fred Harvey and her husband are well-known in this vicinity. Mr. Harvey was a native of Lyndon Center, where they lived until a few years ago. The son, Eugene Perkins, was at one time employed in the railroad office at this place. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Perkins decided to make her home at Lyndon Center and moved there 29 years ago last November. She resided there until eight years ago when she came to live with her daughter, Mrs. George Prescott, at the time of Mr. Prescott’s death. Mrs. Perkins was greatly beloved by her children and to them she had been a model mother. She was a woman of the old school, her interests being wrapped up in her home. She was a model housekeeper, a woman of strong character, excellent judgement and decided ideas of right and wrong. Her warm sympathies and lively interests in old and young and her pleasant manner attracted a large circle of warm friends. Funeral services were held at the house on Friday, Jan. 25th at 10 A.M. Rev. W.H. Lyster assisted by Rev. J.W. Burgin and Rev. E.G. French were the officiating clergymen. A great many beautiful flowers from young and old friends bore silent testimony to the esteem in which she was held (Vermont Union-Journal (Lyndonville, VT), January 30, 1907).

Wm. Hurlin – 1856-1858

See Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854 for details of this second pastorate of Rev. William Hurlin (1814-1905), as well as of his life in general.

Aaron Ayer – 1859

Aaron Ayer was born in Buxton, ME, April 3, 1802, son of Timothy Jr. and Hannah (Merrill) Ayer.

Aaron Ayer married in Lyman, ME, May 19, 1840, Mary Olive Cleaves. She was born in Windsor, ME, August 7, 1810, daughter of Joseph and Hannah (Hanson) Cleaves.

In April 1844, Rev. Aaron Ayer began a successful pastorate of two years. During this time the church took decided action in relation to temperance, in the following votes: “Dec. 5, 1844. Voted not to receive any person as a church member who shall make use of distilled liquors or wines as a beverage. Also Resolved that it is improper for church members to make use of Cider as a beverage” (McDuffee, 1892).

Rev. Aaron Ayer was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Joseph Fullonton, Zachariah Jordan, Theodore Stevens, Jr., and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Aaron Ayer, a Freewill Baptist, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Woolwich, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary O. Ayer, aged forty years (b. ME), George W. Ayer, aged five years (b. ME), and Daniel Ayer, aged three years (b. ME).

FREE WILL BAPTIST CLERGY. Ayer, A., Acton, Me. (Clark & Meeker, 1860).

John S. Rowe, a farmer, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Deerfield, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Delia Rowe, aged forty-six years (b. NH), Aaron Ayer, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), Mary O. Ayer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), Mary E. Rowe, a T. [teacher] of schools, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), John L. Rowe, aged ten years (b. NH), and Anson B. Rowe, aged three years (b. NH). John S. Rowe had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $450. Aaron Ayer had personal estate valued at $2,200.

Rev. Aaron Ayer was a bold, solid and powerful preacher; a man that never feared the face of clay and was never afraid to advocate what he believed to be right in the face of the most strenuous opposition, but in the plenitude of his intellectual and physical powers he became demented, losing the equilibrium of his mind and was ever afterwards semi-insane. However, like many in his condition, his wit was as keen as ever and the sarcastic language employed by him was original and beyond imitation. His repartee was caustic and irresistible and many a person who thought they could play fast and loose with him because of his dementia had found out their mistake and sneaked away like an exhausted gamecock. He retired to a farm and discontinued professional work; and also declined every invitation (with one or two exceptions) to attend religious services (Portland Telegram (Portland, ME), October 19, 1913).

Aaron Ayer, a farmer, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Naples, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary O. Ayer, keeping house, aged sixty years (b. ME), and Aaron E. Ayer, at school, aged nineteen years (b. ME). Aaron Ayer had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $800.

Aaron Ayer died in Naples, ME, October 8, 1876.

Mary O. Ayer appeared in the Portland, ME, directories of 1883, 1884, 1885, and 1886, as the widow of Aaron Ayer, with her house on Woodford street, Woodfords. Mary O. Ayer appeared in the Portland, ME, directories of 1887, and 1888, as the widow of Aaron Ayer, with her house at 11 Congress place.

Mary O. (Cleaves) Ayer died of old age in Naples, ME, November 3, 1894, aged eighty-five years, three months.

Samuel Jones – 1859

Ministerial Removals and Settlements. Jones, Samuel. [Whence:] Elizabethtown, N.Y. [Where:] Milton Mills, N.H. (Baptist Family Magazine, 1859).

Edward A. Stockman – 1860-6?

Edward Ainsley Stockman was born in Poland, ME, February 3, 1821, son of Robert and Thankful Davis) Stockman.

Rev. Edward A. Stockton married in Standish, ME, October 25, 1847, Elizabeth Ann Thomas, he of Limington, ME, and she of Standish, ME. Rev. Andrew Hobson performed the ceremony. She was born in Maine, in 1829, daughter of Stephen and Dorothy M. “Dolly” (Parker) Thomas.

Edward A. Stockman, a Methodist clergyman, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Worthington, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Elizabeth A. Stockman, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), and Lucy A. Stockman, aged one year (b. MA). (Another Methodist clergyman, James Wright, aged forty-nine years (b. England), headed another household on the same page).

Rev. Edward A. Stockman was an ardent abolitionist and associate of the leaders of the anti-slavery movement. He was a personal friend of William Lloyd Garrison, editor of The Liberator abolitionist newspaper. He was said to have maintained an “underground railroad” station at all of his ante-bellum residences. (See also Milton and Abolitionism).

REV. E.A. STOCKMAN, an Agent of the Mass. Anti-Slavery Society, will lecture as follows: West Cummington, Sunday, April 24. Plainfield, Monday, [April] 25. Ashfield, Tuesday and Wednesday, [April] 26 and 27. Hawley, Thursday, [April] 28 (Liberator (Boston, MA), April 22, 1853).

MR. STOCKMAN IN CHESHIRE. That eloquent and fearless friend of the friendless, Rev. E.A. Stockman of Cummington, addressed our citizens, on the slavery issue, in its moral and political aspects, on the first three evenings of this week, at the Universalist Church. The house was well filled through the course; and the most profound attention given. Those who have had the pleasure of hearing Mr. S. on this topic need not be told that a marked sensation was produced by the lectures in this hunkerish community. A company of anti-slavery singers from Mr. Stockman’s choir in Cummington were present at the last lecture, and added greatly to the interest of the occasion by a variety of appropriate songs – Northampton Courier (Liberator (Boston, MA), October 28, 1853).

(Dictionaries define being a “hunker” or being “hunkerish” as being old-fashioned and conservative).

Stephen Thomas, a farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Standish, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Dorothy Thomas, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), Orlando Thomas, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Edward A. Stockman, a medicine agent, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), Elizabeth A. Stockman, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and  Lucy A. Stockman, aged eleven years (b. MA). Stephen Thomas had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $200.

Rev. Edward A. Stockman did not appear in the Mitchell-Cony list of ministers, However, in his own later 1890 book, Rev. Edward A. Stockman mentioned briefly his pastorate of the Acton-Milton Mills Freewill Baptist Church, and especially his interactions with the Farnham family.

Quite many years ago the author of this little volume was pastor of the F. Baptist church at Milton Mills, N.H. At an extreme quarter of the parish stood the Farnham homestead. The dwelling, a plain farm-house, was then occupied by John Farnham [(1797-1884)] and his wife Fanny [(1802-1891)]. They were most excellent Christian people, greatly beloved. Ralph Farnham [(1756-1860)], father of John, was a revolutionary soldier and had spent most of his days on that homestead, an excellent citizen, a devoted Christian. He was converted to God by witnessing the phenomenon called the “dark day” which occurred on the 19th of May 1780, and which, to his latest hour, he was accustomed to describe in very glowing and impressive language. He lived to a remarkably old age. On his one hundred and fourth birthday, he was carried to Boston, Mass., where he was received, and for some days entertained, with much eclat, as the oldest living soldier of the Revolution (Stockman, 1890).

Ralph Farnham died in December 1860, so this account would seem to fix Rev. Stockman’s time at the Acton-Milton Mills Freewill Baptist church as having started while Farnham still lived and having run for some undefined duration before Rev. Boyd’s pastorate began in May 1864.

LOCAL AND STATE ITEMS. Rev. E.A. Stockman, agent of F.W.B. Home Mission Society, will lecture at the Freewill Baptist Church to-morrow evening, at 7 o’clock, on the Freedmen. Mr. S. has been among the Freedmen, and his lecture will be of interest to those who may attend (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), August 25, 1866).

Edward A. Stockman of Wells, ME, was an original incorporator of Storer College, September 5, 1867, having purchased one of the nine $100 initial shares.

The undersigned agree to become a corporation by the name of the “Storer College,” for the purpose of establishing and maintaining an institution of learning, embracing a normal school, an academy and a college, for teaching all classes of persons, without distinction of color all the branches of useful information usually taught in similar institutions; and for the purpose of receiving, holding, managing and applying funds, moneys and property, to an amount not exceeding nine hundred thousand dollars, devised, bequeathed or granted in aid thereof; which corporation shall keep its principal office or place of business at Harper’s Ferry, in the county of Jefferson, and State of West Virginia, and is to expire on the thirty-first day of December, in the year nineteen hundred and sixty-seven … (WV Legislature, 1868). 

Edwd. A. Stockman, a clergyman, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Pittsfield, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Ann E. Stockman, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. ME), Lucy A. Stockman, a school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. ME [SIC]), and Lilian M. Stockman, aged two years (b. ME). Edwd. A. Stockman had personal estate valued at $800.

New Hampshire Local News. Strafford County. The Rev. E.A. Stockman, recently pastor of the Charles-street Church, Dover, has withdrawn from the Free Baptist denomination and joined what is known as the Evangelical Adventists (Vermont Journal (Bellows Falls, VT), June 21, 1873).

THE SUBURBS. CHELSEA. Pulpit News. A protracted meeting will he held, during the week, in the Heard Street Adventist Chapel, commencing tomorrow evening. Among the preachers announced to be present is Elder E.A. Stockman, formerly a Baptist clergyman in Dover, N.H. (Boston Globe, January 12, 1874).

New Bedford. At Pope’s Island yesterday morning three candidates were baptized by Rev. James H. Lee, pastor of the Salem Baptist church, North Sixth st. At the same place, at noon, four candidates were baptized by Elder E.A. Stockman, who is temporarily filling the pulpit of the Christian Advent church on Kempton street (Fall River Daily News (Fall River, MA), May 5, 1879).

Edw. A. Stockman, a clergyman, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Chelsea, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elizabeth A. Stockman, keeping house, aged fifty years (b. ME), and his children, Lucy A. Stockman, at home, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Lillian M. Stockman, at school, aged twelve years (b. ME [SIC]). They were one of four families residing at 87 Orange Street.

Vernon. Elder E.A. Stockman of Boston, editor of the World’s Crises, will preach, at the chapel in Vernon July 16, 10:30 A.M., and 1:30 P.M. (Vermont Phoenix (Brattleboro, VT), July 14, 1882).

Church Dedication. The dedication of the Emerald Street Advent Church took place last evening. Elder E.A. Stockman pronounced the invocation. J. Hemenway read from the Scriptures, and was followed by a dedicatory prayer by Elder D. T. Taylor. H.H. Tucker, the pastor, then preached the dedicatory sermon, taking for his text: “The true principles of the interpretation of signs.” Voluntary talks were made by Elders Boutelle and Goodrich (Boston Globe, May 13, 1887).

Edward A. Stockman, a preacher, aged seventy-nine years (b. ME), headed a Chelsea, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-four years), Elizibeth N. Stockman, aged seventy years (b. ME), and his servant, Annie McCool, a servant, aged twenty-three years (b. Canada (Eng.)). They were one of two families renting at 87 Orange Street. Elizabeth N. Stockman was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Edward A. Stockman died of marasmus [severe malnutrition] in Chelsea, MA, February 1, 1901, aged seventy-nine years, eleven months, and twenty-seven days.

The Rev E.A. Stockman Dead. BOSTON, Feb. 2. The Rev. Edward A. Stockman, editor of The World’s Crisis, died at his home in Chelsea Friday night. He was eighty years old and one of the leaders of the Christian Advent denomination in the United States. He established Storer College. After preaching as a Free Will Baptist for years, Mr. Stockman became an Adventist, and in addition to preaching was in 1883 chosen assistant editor of The World’s Crisis. In 1885 he was made editor in chief and held that place until three years ago (NY Times (New York, NY), June 3, 1901).

Elizabeth A. (Thomas) Stockman died of marasmus [severe malnutrition] in Chelsea, MA, June 5, 1901, aged seventy-two years, eight months, and eighteen days.

Mrs. Elisabeth A. Stockman. Mrs. Elizabeth A. Stockman, widow of Rev. E.A. Stockman, who was at the time of his death last February, editor of The Worlds Crisis, died at her home, 108 W. Orange street, Chelsea, last night, after a long illness. Mrs. Stockman was born in Standish, Me., seventy-two years ago. She had lived in Chelsea about twenty-eight years, and had a large number of friends there. The deceased was interested in the work of the Advent Christian Church of Chelsea, of which she was a member. The only near relatives who survive her are two daughters, Mrs. P.T. Edwards and Miss Lucy A. Stockman. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2.30 o’clock at her late home. Rev. George Haines, pastor of the Advent Christian Church, will officiate. He will be assisted by Rev. F.L. Piper of Malden, who will offer prayer, and Rev. Roger Sherman of Salem, who will lead the scriptures. A quartet will sing (Boston Evening Transcript, June 6, 1901).

Rev. David Boyd – 1864-1865

David Boyd was born in South Berwick, ME, March 2, 1836, son of Charles and Harriet (Davis) Boyd.

Boyd, Rev. David, brother of Rev. James Boyd, was born at South Berwick, Me., Mar. 2, 1836. He was converted in 1851, licensed in 1858, and ordained May 12, 1861. Rev. A. Lovejoy and others serving on the council. His pastorates have been at Exeter, Acton, and Rockland, Me., Pawtucket, R.I., and Oneonta, N.Y. He has baptized about 200 converts, served as delegate at the General Conference, and has occupied a prominent position in temperance work, especially in connection with the I.O.G.T. He married Olive Gray in 1856, has four children, and is at present Superintendent for the American Bible Society with headquarters at Oneonta, N.Y. (Burgess & Ward, 1889).

David Boyd married, in 1856, Olive Gray. She was born in South Berwick, ME, January 20, 1834, daughter of Charles and Sylvina (Thurrell) Gray.

Rev. O.A. True has accepted the call of the F.W. Baptist Church in West Lebanon to become their pastor and Rev. David Boyd has assumed the pastoral care of the F.W. Baptist Church at Milton Mills (Acton) (Daily Eastern Argus (Portland, ME), May 26, 1864).

David Boyd appeared in the New England business directory of 1865, as the Acton, ME, Free-Will Baptist minister.

Rev. David Boyd of the Rockland, ME, Free-Will Baptist Yearly Meeting was sent as a delegate to a Congregational ministerial convention in June 1868.

DELEGATES FROM CORRESPONDING BODIES. Rev. David Boyd of Rockland Free Will Baptist Yearly Meeting (General Conference, 1868). 

David Boyd, a clergyman, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Rockland, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Olive Boyd, keeping house, aged thirty-six years (b. ME), and his children, William A. Boyd, at school, aged twelve years (b. ME), Vesta E. Boyd, at school, aged eleven years (b. ME), Flora Boyd, at school, aged four years (b. ME), and David C. Boyd, at home, aged three years (b. ME). David Boyd had personal estate valued at $700.

Religious News. BAPTIST. Rev. David Boyd, pastor of the Free Baptist Church, Rockland, Maine, has resigned his pastorate, in order to accept the position of State lecturer offered him by the Good Templars of the State (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), June 3, 1871).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. The Rev. David Boyd of Maine, having accepted a call to the Free Baptist church of Pawtucket, was installed as pastor on Monday evening last. The sermon was preached by Rev. A.H. Heath, formerly of Auburn in this State (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), October 12, 1872).

David Boyd, a clergyman, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Pawtucket, RI, household at the time of the RI State Census of 1875. His household included his wife, Olive Boyd, a house keeper, aged forty-one years (b. ME), and his children, William A. Boyd, a scholar, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Vestie E. Boyd, aged fifteen years (b. ME), Flora A. Boyd, aged nine years (b. ME), and David C. Boyd, a scholar, aged eight years (b. ME).

Rev. David Boyd appeared in the Pawtucket, RI, directories of 1875, and 1877, as pastor of the Second Free Baptist church, with his house at 87 Summit street.

A PASTOR UNDER A CLOUD. Serious Charges Against a Pawtucket Clergyman. Suspicious Familiarity With the Organist and Conspiracy to Break Up the Society Alleged Against Him. Special Despatch to The Boston Globe. Pawtucket, R.I., April 18. A council of clergymen to consider the troubles in the Free Baptist Church of this place has been in session in the vestry of the church. It was not called to try the pastor for any offence, nor any member of the church, but to listen to the statement of such facts as the official members of the church should present and give such advice as circumstances warranted. The clerk read the proceedings of the late church meeting at which letters of dismissal were said to have been granted to about forty members of the church, including the pastor thereof, the Rev. David Boyd. Afterwards regular charges against the pastor were presented. The first three relate to an alleged improper intimacy between the pastor and the organist, which was followed up and persisted in even when he was admonished of the improprieties by the Trustees of the church. The fourth and fifth charges assert that the pastor opposed all efforts to harmonize existing troubles and difficulties in the church, and to having an Advisory Council called to consider them, he is charged, sixthly, with leading a movement to permanently divide the church. It is also claimed that all the present troubles in the church come from what is brought against the pastor in the first charges. Nothing criminal has yet been charged upon the minister, but several suspicious acts have been noticed which gave occasion to much scandal. The Council, after rehearsing the charges, etc., gave the following decision: “We, therefore, advise you, members of the First Free Baptist Church, entirely to ignore the organization claiming to be the Second Free Baptist Church, and proceed at once to prefer such charges against the Rev. David Boyd as in your judgment the case requires.” Mr. Boyd protested against the action of tlie Council as hasty and unjust, and declared his intention to appeal to the community for justice. He claimed that the Council had exceeded its jurisdiction, and that he had not been informed of the charges be preferred against him till he saw them in the Providence papers (Boston Globe, April 20, 1877).

MORE INDIGNATION MEETINGS. Newport, Me., Dec 30. – The Republicans held a large indignation meeting last night, presided over by the Rev. David Boyd. Several earnest speeches were made by prominent Republicans and resolutions severely condemning the action of the governor and council were adopted (Rutland Weekly Herald & Globe (Rutland, VT), January 1, 1880).

David Boyd, a clergyman, aged forty-four years (b. ME), headed a Newport, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Olive Boyd, keeping house, aged forty-six years (b. ME), and his children, Vesta E. Boyd, at home, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Flora A. Boyd, at home, aged fourteen years (b. ME), David C. Boyd, at home, aged thirteen years (b. ME). They resided on Pleasant Street.

David Boyd died of apoplexy in East Newport, ME, March 7, 1900, aged sixty-four years, and five days. He had resided there for twenty-two years, i.e., since circa 1877-78.

ASHLAND. It is with regret that the people of this section learn of the death of Rev. David Boyd of Newport, Me., who was pastor of the Free Baptist church at Presque Isle several years and was well known here (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), March 19, 1900).

Olive Boyd, a farmer, aged seventy-six years (b. ME), headed a Newport, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Flora A. Boyd, a public school teacher, aged forty-four years (b. ME), and David C. Boyd, a farm laborer, aged forty-three years (b. ME). Olive Boyd owned their farm, free-and-clear. She was the mother of five children, of whom four were still living.

Olive (Gray) Boyd died of old age in Newport, ME, March 5, 1919, aged eighty-five years, one month, and fifteen days. She had resided there for forty-one years, i.e., since circa 1877-78.

Hiatus – 1865-1870

There appears to have been a hiatus in this sequence of ministers in the immediate post-war period that fell between the pastorates of David Boyd and Dexter Waterman. There might have been one or more pastorates not yet traced or perhaps there was a run of short-term “supply” pastors

Dexter Waterman – 1870-1872

Ebenezer Dexter “Dexter” Waterman was born in Litchfield, ME, January 30, 1807, son of Sylvanus and Abigail (Jackson) Waterman.

Ebenezer D. Waterman married (1st) in Bristol, ME, June 2, 1834, Mahala Wentworth, he of Boothbay, ME, and she of Bristol, ME. She was born in Bristol, ME, January 29, 1806, daughter of James and Susan (Williams) Wentworth.

Dexter Waterman headed a Phillips, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years, one female aged 30-39 years, one male aged 5-9 years, and one female aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in the Learned Professions.

Rev. Dexter Waterman was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Joseph Fullonton, Zachariah Jordan, and Theodore Stevens, Jr., signed also.

Dexter Waterman, an F.B. preacher, aged forty-three years (b. ME), headed a Unity, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mahala Waterman, aged forty-four years (b. ME), Granville Waterman, a student, aged fifteen years (b. ME), and Achsa H. Waterman, aged twelve years (b. ME). Dexter Waterman had real estate valued at $800.

The First Free-Will Baptist Church of Farmington, NH, organized itself in 1854, with Rev. Dexter Waterman as its pastor.

FREE BAPTIST CHURCH. The first Free Baptist Church was organized in 1854, with the Rev Dexter Waterman as pastor. Meetings were held in the meetinghouse on Peavey Hill, where the Congregationalists worshipped. During the pastorate of Mr. Waterman the church membership increased to thirty-two. He resigned in 1856, and was succeeded by Rev. J.M.L. Babcock, who remained until 1858 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Mahala (Wentworth) Waterman died of pneumonia in Farmington, NH, April 16, 1856, aged fifty-one years.

Dexter Waterman married (2nd) in Unity, ME, January 11, 1859, Mary Ann (Rich) Roberts. She was born in Jackson, ME, July 24, 1815, daughter of Joseph and Judith A. Roberts. (She was the widow of Hamlin M. Roberts of Jackson, ME).

Dexter Waterman, a Baptist clergyman, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), headed a Charleston (“West Charleston P.O.”), VT, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary Waterman, aged forty-five years (b. ME), and Cassius Waterman, aged fifteen years (b. ME). Dexter Waterman had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $500.

Correction. Mr. Editor: In your paper of August 17th, we notice an item stating that “The Freewill Baptists of New Hampshire have just held their yearly meeting at Sandwich. The denomination is mostly confined to that state, where it has 75 ministers, and 10,000 church members.” The writer then gives statistics of the Baptists in Kentucky, and Methodists in England, placing us in an unfavorable contrast with them. That the writer intended to misrepresent us we will not say, but that article is calculated to give the readers of your paper a very unfavorable and incorrect idea of the Baptist denomination. We therefore request you to do is the justice to publish the following statistics and facts. Not having the returns for the present year, we give the statistics officially reported for 1859. The denomination had its rise in New Hampshire. No. [Number] members in N.H. in 1859, 9,928; Ordained ministers in N.H., 184. So far from being “mostly confined to that state,” we have in Maine, 15,045 church members, Rhode Island, 3,293 [church members], New York, 9,701 [church members]. And churches, quarterly meetings, and yearly meetings, in nearly every free state and in Canada. Our uncompromising opposition to American slavery caused the conferences of North and South Carolina, of about 2090 members, to refuse to associate with us about twenty-five years ago.  We might have had a large portion of the “eighty thousand Baptists of Kentucky,” if in general conference about twenty years ago, we had endorsed slavery by receiving and ordaining D. Homely of Kentucky, who attended the general conference of Conneant, Ohio, for that purpose.  We have flourishing institutions of learning of the highest grade (below a college,) in Maine, New Hampshire, and New York, a college in Michigan, and several other seminaries in New England and the west. We have also a theological school at New Hampton, N.H. In these institutions we have invested in lands, buildings, and permanent funds, between $300,000 and 400,000. The Morning Star, a paper published by the denomination, has a circulation of about eleven or twelve thousand copies. DEXTER WATERMAN, H.C. HENDERSON. August 25, 1860 (Orleans Independent Standard (Irasburgh, VT), August 31, 1860).

Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared in the Bates College directories of 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, and 1868, as a member of the [Maine State Seminary] Corporation. Rev. Hosea Quinby, A.M., appeared also in the same lists. (Rev. Quinby was a D.D., i.e., a Doctor of Divinity, in 1867 and 1868, rather than an A.M., i.e., a Master of Arts, as he had been earlier).

Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared also in the Bates College directories of 1868, 1869, and 1870, as a member of the Maine State Seminary Board of Trustees.

Dexter Watterman, a clergyman, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed an Acton (“South Acton, P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. Watterman, keeping house, aged fifty-five years (b. ME).

D. Waterman appeared in the Milton directory of 1871, as the Milton Mills Free Baptist minister.

Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared also in the Bates College directories of 1871, 1873, 1874, 1876, 1878, and 1879, as a member of the Maine State Seminary Board of Trustees.

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Rev. Dexter Waterman will enter upon his pastoral charge in Phillips the second Sabbath in March (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), March 9, 1872).

Sunday in the Churches. Religious services, under the charge of City Missionary Tarbox, was held on the park Sabbath afternoon. Interesting remarks were made by Rev. Dexter Waterman of Wilton. His theme was the prodigal son. There was a large assembly present (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), July 17, 1876).

Mary A. ((Rich) Roberts) Waterman died in Wilton, ME, October 8, 1877, aged sixty-two years, two months, and fifteen days.

Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared also in the Bates College directories of 1881, 1882, 1883, and 1885, as a member of the Maine State Seminary Board of Trustees. (The list of 1882 gave him a residence of Laconia, NH, and the lists of 1883, and 1885 gave him a residence of Dover, NH).

Dexter Waterman died of heart failure in Littleton, NH, February 8, 1890, aged eighty-three years, and twenty-five days.

Rev. Dexter Waterman, pastor of the Freewill Baptist church at Carroll, who died at Littleton recently of heart failure, at one time held a pastorate at West Charleston, Vt. He was one of the founders of its Education society, has been a member of the Board of Corporators of its printing establishment for more than 40 years, and a trustee of Bates college from its foundation. He has been well known to the guests of the Twin Mountain House during the last three years, as his church was nearer than any other to the hotel. (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), February 15, 1890).

GRANBY. Rev. Dexter Waterman died at Littleton, N.H., the 8th inst. Rev. Mr. Waterman was the last pastor of the Free Baptist Church in Carroll, N.H., having closed his labors there only a few weeks ago (Essex County Herald (Island Pond, VT), February 28, 1890).

James Potter – 1873-1874

James Soule Potter was born in Kenduskeag, ME, in 1823, son of David and Nancy (Soule) Potter.

James S. Potter married Laura J. Grant. She was born in Winterport, ME, August 1, 1832, daughter of Hezekiah and Margaret A. (Scribner) Grant.

James S. Potter, a clergyman, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Corinth, ME, at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Laura J. Potter, aged seventeen years (b. ME).

J.S. Potter. an F.W. Baptist clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Bridgton, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Laura J. Potter, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), Anna R. Potter, aged eight years (b. ME), Charles F. Potter, aged four years (b. ME), and [her sister,] A.M. Grant, aged sixteen years (b. ME). J.S. Potter had personal estate valued at $400.

James S. Potter appeared in the Maine Business directory of 1869, as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church in Raymond, ME.

James Potter, a clergyman, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Scarboro, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Laura J. Potter, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), Annie E. Potter, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Charles F. Potter, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and James A. Potter, aged four years (b. ME).

James S. Potter appeared in the Maine Business directory of 1871, as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church in Raymond, ME.

J.S. Potter appeared in the Milton directories of 1873, and 1874, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister. (Rev. Ebenezer N. Fernald served as a Milton supply pastor in September 1874 (See below)).

Religious. NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. Rev. J.S. Potter, who has been laboring with the church in Lyman for the past three years, has accepted an invitation to continue his pastorate. He is now assisted by the neighboring ministers in holding a series of meetings with some encouragement (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), February 22, 1879).

James S. Potter, a farmer & preacher, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Lyman, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Laura J. Potter, keeping house, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), his son, James A. Potter, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Annie C. Strout, house work, aged sixty-six years (b. ME).

James S. Potter died of uremia in Lyman, ME, July 17, 1897, aged seventy-four years, eleven months, and twenty days.

DEATHS. POTTER – In Lyman, July 17, Rev. James S. Potter, aged 74 years, 11 months, 20 days (Portland Evening Express, July 23, 1897).

Laura J. (Grant) Potter died in Lyman, ME, December 31, 1920, aged eighty-eight years.

LYMAN’S OLDEST WOMAN, 89, HAS PASSED AWAY. LYMAN, Jan. 4. – The funeral of Mrs. Laura G. Potter, wife of James Potter, the oldest woman in town, who died Friday in her 89th year, was held at her home here yesterday afternoon. The body was taken to Alfred for burial (Portland Evening Express, January 4, 1921).

Rev. Mr. McLain – 1875-76

Alexander Stewart McLean was born on Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada, November 1, 1843.

Alexander S. McLean, a clergyman, aged twenty-seven years (b. PEI), headed a Gray, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Julia McLean, aged twenty years (b. PEI). Alexander S. McLean has personal estate valued at $500.

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. The Star says that Rev. A.S. McLean lately of the Acton and Milton Mills F.B. church has accepted a call to the Charlestown, Mass., church and entered upon his duties last Sunday (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), October 15, 1875).

One might suppose these locations to have been reversed in error, i.e., he accepted a call to leave Charlestown, MA, and go to Acton & Milton Mills F.B. Church. A.S. Maclean appeared in the Milton directories of 1875, 1876, and 1877, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister.

When Rev. A.S. McLean left his pastorate at the Acton & Milton Mills Baptist church he went next to Boston, MA,

MARRIED. In this [Boston, MA] city, May 1, by Rev. A.S. McLean, Mr. James M. Milk to Miss M. Justina Shedd (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), May 12, 1877).

First Baptist Church in Hingham – Mr. Sankey Expected, But Does Not Preach –  The Rev. A.S. McLean Delivers an Eloquent Sermon. It was expected that the “singing evangelist,” Mr. Ira D. Sankey, would take a prominent part in the morning service at the First Baptist Church in Hingham yesterday. But Mr. Sankey was unable to come, having, it is supposed, been called away to attend the dedication of the monument to P.P. Bliss in Rome, Pa. The evangelist is, however, sojourning at the cottage of Franklin W. Smith, Esq., in Cohasset for the summer, and will doubtless soon be heard in Hingham. In his absence yesterday the pastor of the Baptist Church, the Rev. A.S. McLean, preached an earnest and forcible sermon, taking as his text Matthew, xi., 30: “For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” The speaker showed at the outset the peculiar force of these words to those who had been educated under the dominion of the secularized theocracy of Judaism in its latter days. But the text was also proved to be full of meaning to followers of Christ in this age. It sets forth, on the one hand, the fact that there is a Christian yoke and a Christian burden, and on the other, that strength is given to bear these. Restraint and self-denial are often enforced in the New Testament as duties, and the Christian life is represented as a warfare. Christianity does not remove every yoke and burden, but makes the one easy and gives strength to bear the other. While the yoke of sin is heavy and its burden grievous and there is no hope for the future, the Christian finds strength for all his temptations, nobility of character from self-denial, and is assured of attaining a glorious reward at the last (Boston Globe, July 16, 1877).

HINGHAM. The Rev. A.S. McLean will preach the sermon at the service of the Baptist Church. and the Rev. E.C. Hood will conduct the union service in the Congregational Church, Fast Day (Boston Globe, April 10, 1878).

New England Items. The Rev. A.S. McLean has been presented with a pair of gold-lined silver goblets by the Old Colony Lodge of Free Masons in recognition of the services he has rendered the Hingham Lodge (Boston Globe, July 20, 1878).

Alexander S. McLean married, perhaps in Canada, circa 1878-79, Julia S. Skilling. She was born in Kempt, Nova Scotia, Canada, in January 1850, daughter of Capt. John E. and Phebe D. (Card) Skilling.

Alexander McLean, a Free Baptist clergyman, aged thirty-eight years (b. PEI), headed a Kempt, Nova Scotia, Canada, household at the time of the Canadian Census of 1881. His household included his wife, Julia McLean, aged thirty-three years (b. Nova Scotia), and his son, Stewart McLean, aged eleven months (b. Nova Scotia).

Alexander Lean, aged forty-two [forty-eight] years, headed a Summerville, Nova Scotia, Canada, household at the time of the Canadian Census of 1891. His household included his wife, Julia Lean, aged thirty-eight [forty-three] years (b. Nova Scotia), and his son, Stewart Lean, aged twelve years (b. Nova Scotia).

Alexander McLane, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. Canada), headed a Milford, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-two years), Julia McLane, aged fifty years (b. Canada), and his children, Stewart McLane, a teamster, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), and Phoebe McLane, aged five years (b. MA). Alexander McLane rented their farm on Silver Hill Street. He had become a naturalized citizen in 1868. Julia S. Mclean was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Alexander S. Mclean, a railroad gate tender, aged sixty-six years (b. Canada), headed a Winthrop, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-two years), Julia S. Mclean, aged sixty years (b. ME), and his daughter, Phebe Mclean, aged fifteen years (b. MA). Alexander S. Mclean rented their house at 35 Siren Street. He had become a naturalized citizen in 1868. Julia S. Mclean was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Alexander S. McLean died in Medfield, MA, February 16, 1916.

Julia McLean, a lodging house keeper, aged sixty years (b. ME [SIC]), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Ernestine McLean, aged twenty-five years (b. MA). Julia McLean rented their house at 31 Bowdoin Street. There were twenty-three lodgers.

Julia (Skilling) McLean died in Warren, MA, in 1925.

Hosea Quimby – 1876-1878

Hosea Quinby was born in Sandwich, NH, August 25, 1804, son of Moses and Doreathea (Atkins) Quinby. (His surname of Quinby was often misspelt as Quimby).

Hosea Quimby, D.D., Free Baptist, son of Moses and Dolly (Atkins) Quimby was born Aug 25, 1804. Preparatory studies at New Hampton Institution and Wolfborough Academy, 1824-8; Tutor, New Hampton, 1828-9. Graduated at Colby University, 1832, the first of his denomination, preaching during his entire course. Ordained Sandwich, June 2, 1833. Principal, Parsonsfield (Me.), Academy, 1832-9, and Smithville (R.I.) Seminary, 1840-51, meanwhile preaching at Greenwich for a time. Pastor, Meredith, June 20, 1839-40, and Jan. 18, 1855-7; Pittsfield, Feb. 28, 1857-61. Pastor and principal of Academy, Lebanon, Me., 1861-4; Lake Village, now Lakeport, 1861-7, retiring from teaching, 1864. Without charge, Concord, 1868-71, meanwhile chaplain of New Hampshire State Prison, July 1869-71. Pastor, Nottingham, Oct 1872-4; Pittsfield, Jan. 9, 1875-6; and Milton Mills, 1876-8. Delegate and secretary, First General Conference, Tunbridge, Vt., Oct. 11, 1827. Delegate to the General Conference, Lowell, Mass., 1859, and Fairport, N.Y., Oct, 1877. Is said to have done the work of two men for 30 years. Died, Milton Mills, Oct. 11, 1878. Married Dorothea Burleigh of Sandwich, May 10, 1828. She died Concord about 1870. Publications: 1. Review of Butler’s Letters. 2. Treatise on the Faith and Usages of the Free Baptist Denomination. 3. Prison Chaplaincy and Experiences, 1873. 4. Christian Baptism (Carter, 1906).

Hosea Quinby married in Sandwich, NH, May 10, 1828, Miss Dolly Burley, both of Sandwich, NH. Dorothea Burleigh was born in Sandwich, NH, in 1806, daughter of Josiah and Rosamond Burleigh.

Hosea Quimby headed a Waterville, ME, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Dolly (Burley) Quinby].

Hosea Quimby headed a Meredith, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Dolly (Burley) Quinby], one female aged 20-29 years, one male aged 5-9 years, and one male aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in Agriculture.

Hosea Quinby, president of seminary, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a residence hall in Scituate, RI, at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Dorothea Quinby, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Josiah S. Quinby, a student, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Hosea M. Quinby, aged ten years (b. NH), and Caroline J. Quinby, aged six years (b. RI). The residence hall house also four teachers and fifty-three students.

Rev. Hosea Quimby, principal of the Smithville [RI] Seminary invited Anti-slavery activist Alonzo J. Grover to speak before the student body in September 1852.

In this dilemma, Rev. Hosea Quimby, Principal of the Smithville Seminary, a flourishing institution, situated short distance from the village, proposed that I should speak in the Seminary Hall to the students, who could attend without going out of doors. Of course, I gladly accepted the invitation, and at the hour of meeting, about a hundred students, and a few of the villagers, assembled in the hall, and listened apparently not without interest for upwards of two hours. I endeavored to show the relation of the North to slavery, giving as full an account as I could, in the time, of the action of the Federal Government in its behalf, from the striking out of the clause deprecatory of slavery in the Declaration of Independence, as originally presented by Jefferson, down to the adoption of the late Baltimore platforms. I presume this was a chapter in American history not found in the text books of the institution, and probably not the most familiar to my audience; but no one expressed any doubts in regard to its authenticity (Liberator (Boston, MA), September 10, 1852).

Hosea Quinby, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Pittsfield, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Dorothy Quinby, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), Stillman J. Quinby, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Hosea M. Quinby, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Caroline Quinby, aged sixteen years (b. RI). Hosea Quinby had personal estate valued at $1,000.

Rev. Mr. Stevens, of Biddeford, has resigned the charge of the Free Baptist Church, and his resignation has been accepted. The society has extended an invitation to Rev. Hosea Quimby of Lebanon, to become their pastor (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), August 8, 1863).

Rev. Hosea Quinby, A.M. appeared in the Bates College directories of 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, and 1868, as a member of the [Maine State Seminary] Corporation. (Rev. Quinby was a D.D., i.e., a Doctor of Divinity, in 1867 and 1868, rather than an A.M., i.e., a Master of Arts, as he had been earlier). Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared also in the same lists.

A Funny Story. A few years ago, there was sent to Rumford, or the circuit in which the said town was, a Rev. Mr. Quinby. While there he was called upon to go about two miles to perform the marriage ceremony. It proved to be a very rainy and muddy time, but on such an occasion as this it would not do to disappoint the parties, so he hitched up his team, and in due time met his appointment, for which he received the sum of one dollar and fifty cents; but, on the next day, what was his surprise when the bridegroom came and requested him to return the sum of twenty-five cents, as he had paid him that much more than the law demanded of him to pay for such services – OWT (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), April 30, 1872).

Hosea Quimby appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1870, as chaplain of the NH State Prison, with his house at 19 Monroe street.

Hosea Quimby, a clergyman, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Dorathea B. Quimby, keeping house, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), and Carrie J. Quimby, at home, aged twenty-four years (b. RI). Hosea Quimby had personal estate valued at $400; and Carrie J. Quimby had personal estate valued at $200.

Hosea Quimby appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1872, as a clergyman, with his house at 164 State street.

MARRIAGES. MISCELLANEOUS. In Concord, N.H., June 25th, by Rev. Hosea Quimby, C.L. French, M.D., of Glover, Vt., and Nellie Burleigh of Concord, N.H. (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), July 6, 1872).

Dorothea (Burleigh) Quinby died in Concord, NH, in 1872.

RELIGIOUS NEWS. BAPTIST. Rev. Hosea Quinby entered upon the pastorate of the Pittsfield, N.H., church last Sabbath (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), December 26, 1874).

Elder Hosea Quinby, D.D., died in Milton Mills, October 11, 1878.

DIED. In Milton Mills, N.H., Oct. 11, Rev. Hosea Quinby, D.D., 74 yrs. (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), October 19, 1878).

Rev. Benjmain A. Sherwood – 1878-1879

Benajmin Atherton Sherwood was born in Kings, New Brunswick, Canada, August 7, 1843, son of George R. and Elizabeth “Betsy” (Colpitts) Sherwood.

Benjamin A. Sherwood married (1st) in New Brunswick, Canada, December 16, 1865, Lucy Anna Estey. She was born in York, New Brunswick, Canada, in 1845, daughter of George and Ammia “Ann” (Burtt) Estey. She died in Narrows, New Brunswick, Canada, August 22, 1868.

Benjamin A. Sherwood married (2nd), in November 1870, Ann DeWolfe. She was born in Harvey, New Brunswick, Canada, in 1843, daughter of Henry and Delilah (Copp) DeWolfe.

Benjamin A. Sherwood married (3rd), in 1874, Elizabeth Mary Murray. She was born in Providence, RI, in December 1846, daughter of George and Harriet J. (McKenzie) Murray.

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. The Star says that Rev. B.A. Sherwood has accepted a call from the F.B. church in Richmond, Me., and commenced his labors on Sunday, Oct. 3 (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), October 15, 1875).

Sutton. The Rev B.A. Sherwood of Milton Mills, N.H., occupied the desk Sunday forenoon as a candidate for the pastorate of the church. We learn the committee intend to secure his services as soon as possible if the people will sign liberally and raise his salary. The church has been without a pastor and regular preaching since Mr. Atwood ceased his labors last March (St. Johnsbury Caledonian (St. Johnsbury, VT), October 24, 1879).

Sutton. Rev. B. A. Sherwood has moved his family, and commenced his labors with the church here as pastor, last Sabbath. We are glad to have a settled minister again after being without one nearly eight months. The people volunteered and drew his goods from the depot, helped set them up, and carried in provisions and set him up in housekeeping in good shape (St. Johnsbury Caledonian (St. Johnsbury, VT), November 28, 1879).

B.A. Sherwood, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Sutton, VT, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lizzie [(Murray)] Sherwood, aged thirty-three years, and his children, Fred Sherwood, aged six years, George Sherwood, aged four years, and Nellie Sherwood, aged two years.

Daughter Nellie M. Sherwood died of scarlatina in Manchester, NH, May 15, 1882, aged three years, eleven months, and five days. (She had been born in Rochester, NH).

Sutton. It is with sincere regret that we learn of the death of Rev. Mr. Sherwood’s little daughter, Nellie. She died May 15th of scarlet fever; she was a lovely child of four years, and during Mr. Sherwood’s pastorate here was every one’s pet (Orleans County Monitor (Barton, VT), May 29, 1882).

MAINE MEN & WOMEN. Rev. B.A. Sherwood of Georgetown, Me., has received a unanimous call from the Free Baptist church of Farnumsville, [Grafton,] Mass., reports the Springvale Advocate (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), February 6, 1888).

Son Fred H. Sherwood died in Johnston, RI, in August 1894, aged nineteen years.

Sutton. The friends of Rev. B.A. Sherwood, a former pastor here, will be sorry to learn of the death of their son Fred recently in Rhode Island, after a long sickness (Sr. Johnsbury Caledonian (St. Johnsbury, VT), August 30, 1894).

Benjamin A. Sherwood, a clergyman, aged fifty-six years (b. Canada), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Elizabeth M. [(Murray)] Sherwood, aged fifty-three years (b. Canada [SIC]), George H. Sherwood, a teacher in Brown University, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Ralph A. Sherwood, a student in Brown University, aged nineteen years (b. Vermont), Grace M. Sherwood, aged sixteen years (b. ME), and Howard G. Sherwood, aged twelve years (b. ME). Benjamin A. Sherwood owned their house at 324 Laurel Hill Avenue. He was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated in 1871. Elizabeth M. Sherwood was the mother of six children, of whom four were still living. She immigrated in 1872.

Benjamin Sherwood, own income, aged sixty-six years (b. Canada), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Elizabeth [(Murray)] Sherwood, aged sixty-three years (b. Canada), and his daughter, Grace Sherwood, a State House assistant librarian, aged twenty-five years (b. ME). Benjamin A. Sherwood owned their house at 324 Laurel Hill Avenue, free-and-clear. Elizabeth Sherwood was the mother of six children, of whom four were still living.

Benjamin A. Sherwood, a Baptist clergyman, aged seventy-six years (b. Canada), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elizabeth M. [(Murray)] Sherwood, aged seventy-three years (b. Canada), and his daughter, Grace M. Sherwood, a State House reference librarian, aged thirty-five years (b. ME). Benjamin A. Sherwood owned their house at 324 Laurel Hill Avenue, free-and-clear.

George H. Sherwood, retired, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), headed a New York, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Alverda B. Sherwood, aged fifty-five years (b. RI), and his mother, Elizabeth M. Sherwood, aged eighty-three years (b. NJ [SIC]). George H. Sherwood rented their apartment at 1 West 85th Street, for $200 per month. They had a radio set. Meanwhile, Benjamin A. Sherwood, aged eighty-five years (b. Canada (Eng.)), was one of ninety-two patients at the Butler Hospital, in Providence, RI, at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census.

Benjamin A. Sherwood died in Providence, RI, October 26, 1930, aged eighty-seven years.

Bates Graduate Dies. Providence, R.I., Oct. 26. – (AP) – The Rev. Benjamin Atherton Sherwood, veteran Free Baptist clergyman, died here today after a long illness, in his 88th year. A native of New Brunswick, the Rev. Sherwood graduated from Cobb Divinity School, Bates College, in 1875. During his active career he held pastorates in every state of New England. He was a frequent contributor to religious periodicals. Survivors include his wife, a daughter, Grace M. Sherwood of Providence; and four sons, Dr. George H. Sherwood, New York City; Rev. Ralph Sherwood, Salem, Mass.; Charles B. Sherwood, Boston; and Howard G. Sherwood, McCleary, Washington (Morning Sentinel, October 27, 1930; Portland Press Herald (Portland, ME), October 27, 1930).

Elizabeth M. (Murray) Sherwood died in New York, NY, May 15, 1933, aged eighty-six years.

Obituary. Mrs. Elizabeth Mary Murray Sherwood, 86, contributor of articles to women’s magazines, The Youths’ Companion and religious publications, died at the home of her son, Dr. George H. Sherwood, director of the American Museum of Natural History, in New York (Elmira Star-Gazette (Elmira, NY), May 16, 1933).

Rev. Hiram P. Mansur -1879-1885

Hiram Pierce Mansur was born in Monroe, ME, July 6, 1825, son of James and Polly (Pierce) Mansur.

Father James Mansur published an “emancipation” of his son, Hiram Mansur, in July 1840, after the son’s fifteenth birthday.

NOTICE. THIS certifies that I have given to my son Hiram Mansur, a minor, his time, that henceforth he may set and trade for himself. Hereafter I shall not claim any of his earnings nor pay any debts of his contracting. JAMES MANSUR. Witnesses, ELIJAH BATCHELDER, THOMAS MARDEN (Republican Ledger (Belfast, ME), July 9, 1840).

Hiram P. Mansur was admitted to membership in the Mount Vernon Congregational Church in Boston, MA, March 3, 1850. He had formerly attended the First Freewill Baptist Church of Prospect, ME (Mt. Vernon Congregational Church, 1852).

Ward Litchfield, a mason, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included L. Litchfield, aged ten years (b. MA), H. Mason, aged sixty-six years (b. MA), Hiram Manson [Mansur], a carpenter, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), S.N. Fellows, a mason, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Wm. H. Hebard, a merchant, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Mrs. Hebard, aged thirty years (b. NH).

Hiram P. Mansur married in Boston, MA, March 30, 1851, Nancy W. Hutchins, both of Boston, ME. He was a carpenter, aged twenty-six years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. A.L. Stone performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, March 29, 1828, daughter of Joseph H. and Elizabeth “Betsy” (Wiggin) Hutchins.

Hiram P. Manser, a carpenter, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Nancy W. [(Hutchins)] Manser, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Herbert S. Manser, aged two years (b. MA), and Walter H. Manser, aged one year (b. MA). They shared a two-family residence with the household of James A. Newcomb, a trader, aged twenty-seven years (b. RI).

Hiram P. Mansur, a farmer, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield (“Horne’s Mills P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Nancy W. [(Hutchins)] Mansur, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Herbert S. Mansur, aged seven years (b. MA), and Walter H. Mansur, aged five years (b. MA). Hiram P. Mansur had real estate valued at $1,600 and personal estate valued at $500.

Hiram P. Mansur was ordained at the Wakefield, NH, Second Free-Will Baptist church, October 30, 1862.

Hiram P. Mansur, a minister, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH) registered for the Civil War military draft in Wakefield, NH, in May or June 1863.

Hiram P. Mansur and Joshua A. Stetson appeared in the Maine Political Manual of 1867, as the Wakefield, NH, F. Bap. ministers. Hiram P. Mansur (Milton Mills) and Joshua A. Stetson (Union) appeared in the Maine Political Manual of 1869, as the Wakefield, NH, F. Bap. ministers.

Hiram Manser, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield (“Milton Mills P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Nancy W. [(Hutchins)] Manser, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), Herbert S. Manser, a farm laborer, aged seventeen years (b. MA), Walter H. Manser, a farm laborer, aged fifteen years (b. MA), Hiram W. Manser, at home, aged six years (b. NH), and Joseph H. Manser, at home, aged four years (b. NH). Hiram Manser had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $957.

MARRIAGES. In So. Wakefield, Nov. 26, by H.P. Mansur, John G. McCullkins and Nellie A. Atkins, both of Gt. Falls (Farmington News, December 5, 1879).

Elder Joseph Spinney, pastor of the Wakefield, NH, Second Free-Will Baptist church, and twenty-two of his congregants converted to Adventism, and left the church.

After that the [Wakefield] church had as pastors Elder Cummins Parris, Elder John Chick, and Hiram P. Mansur, who was ordained October 30, 1862, and served quite a number of years (their last pastor); after that he served for some years as pastor of the Acton Free Baptist Church, Milton Mills, one of the five Free churches [founded] in that first year of Benjamin Randall’s ministry, 1780. His son, Herbert Mansur, is a recent graduate of Bates College and Theological School, Lewiston, Maine (Merrill, 1889).

H.P. Mansur appeared in the Milton directories 0f 1880, 1881, 1882, and 1884, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister. Hiram P. Mansur (P.O., Milton Mills, N.H.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1882, as pastor of the Acton, ME, F. Bapt. church.

Hiram P. Mansur, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nancy W. [(Hutchins)] Mansur, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his sons, Hiram W. Mansur, at home, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Joseph C. Mansur, at home, aged fourteen years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Lizzie L. Mansur, at home, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Maude E. Mansur, aged four years (b. NH).

Hiram P. Mansur (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1885, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

ACTON. Mrs. Ambrose Sanborn died of pneumonia April 18th. She has been a great sufferer for many years. Rev. H.P. Mansur preached the sermon (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME, April 20, 1892).

Hiram P. Mansur died of heart neuralgia in Wakefield, NH, June 22, 1892, aged sixty-six years, eleven months, and sixteen days. He was a clergyman. W.E. Pillsbury, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Nancy W. (Hutchins) Mansur died of heart disease at 633 Central Avenue in Dover, NH, December 27, 1900, aged seventy-two years, eight months, and twenty-eight days. (She had resided in Dover, NH, for only six weeks, with her previous residence in Wakefield, NH).

Rev. C.M. Anderson – 1887

Clifford M. Anderson was born in Hopewell, New Brunswick, Canada, December 20, 1847, son of Owen and Mary Ann Anderson.

Clifford M. Anderson married at the Broadway Methodist Episcopal Church in Chelsea, MA, June 15, 1875, [Mrs.] Francelia Medora (Clogston) Cook, he of Chelsea, MA, and she of Boston, MA. He was an oil dealer, aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-nine years. Methodist Rev. L.B. Bates performed the ceremony. She was born in Burke, VT, June 22, 1843, daughter of Abner P. and Rachel (Gould) Clogston. (She had married previously in Boston, MA, August 14, 1862, Charles H. Cook, he of Boston, MA, and she of South Strafford, VT. He died in Boston, MA, July 16, 1872, aged thirty-one years).

But they would separate not long after their marriage, and certainly before 1880, by which point they had a single child, Charles L.B. Anderson.

Page H. Mack, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. VT), headed a Lebanon, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hannah A. [(Clogston)] Mack, keeping house, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), his boarder, Mary P. Gould, without, i.e., without occupation, aged seventy-two years (b, NH), his sister-in-law, Francelia Anderson, without, aged thirty-six years (b. VT), and his nephew-in-law, Charles L.B. Anderson, aged four years (b. NH).

LEXINGTON. Mr. Alfred B. Nichols, of the Cambridge Theological School, is to preach at the Episcopal Chapel this morning. Mr. Winford L. Rollins will preach May 4 and Rev. C.M. Anderson of Arlington on May 11 (Boston Globe, April 27, 1884).

Rev. C.M. Anderson held the pastorate of the First Baptist church at Kittery Point, Kittery. ME, between 1884 and 1887 (Mitchell, 1906).

KITTERY. Rev. C.M. Anderson, formerly of Manchester, N.H. has begun his labors with the Free Baptist church in Kittery to which he received a call three weeks ago (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), December 10, 1884).

C.M. Anderson appeared in the Milton directory of 1887, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister.

MAINE EVENTS. ACTON. Under the labors of Rev. C.M. Anderson the church is enjoying a revival interest reports the Morning Star (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), June 11, 1887).

KITTERY, ME. The funeral services over the remains of Richard Graham were held at the Baptist church at Kittery Point at 2 o’clock Friday afternoon and conducted by the pastor, Rev. W.H. Hall, assisted by Rev. C.M. Anderson of Newburyport, Mass., a former pastor, and Rev. F.K. Amazeen, pastor of the First Christian church. The body was placed in the receiving tomb (Portsmouth Herald, February 5, 1898).

Fransila M. [((Clogston) Cook)] Anderson, a seamstress, aged fifty-four years (b. VT), headed a Newburyport, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Charles L. Anderson, a student, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and her boarders, Elizabeth A. Bartlett, a seamstress, aged seventy years (b. MA), and Olivier S. Turner, aged sixty-four years (b. ME). Fransila M Anderson rented their house at 43 Fair Street. She had been married for twenty-five years, and had had one child, of whom one was still living.

Clifford M. Anderson of Hanover, NH, divorced his wife, Francelia M. [((Clogston) Cook)] Anderson, for abandonment in Grafton County Superior Court, October 19, 1903. (To judge from the Federal Census records, they had not lived together for over twenty years).

Francelia M. ((Clogston) Cook) Anderson died of acute broncho-pneumonia in Fairlee, VT, December 29, 1922, aged seventy-nine years, six months, and seven days.

LOCAL. Mr. and Mrs. John V. Kimball have sold their home on Bunker street to Rev. Clifford Anderson, a retired clergyman of Fremont. While Mr. Anderson will not occupy his purchase as a home and has rented the premises to Mr. and Mrs. Kimball, he will make occasional visits to Farmington and cultivate an acquaintance, as he is desirous of forming associations with the town along the line of community welfare work in which he is active and much interested. He spends his winters in South America with his son who enjoys prominent connections with the field of civil engineering (Farmington News, July 29, 1927).

PERSONAL. Rev. Clifford Anderson of Fremont and Albert Bishop of Reed’s Ferry have been guests of Mr. and Mrs. O.C. Baxter the past week (Farmington News, August 19, 1927)

Clifford M. Anderson died of colon cancer in Fremont, NH, January 29, 1929, aged eighty-six years, eleven days. He was a retired preacher, who had resided in Fremont, NH, for two years.

Rev. C.E. Hurd – 1888-1890

Charles Edwin Hurd was born in Gilmanton, NH, May 1, 1838, son of Caleb and Judith C. (Allen) Hurd.

Charles E. Hurd married in Gilmanton, NH, February 25, 1859, Anna Augusta Drake, both of Gilmanton, NH. He was aged twenty years and she was aged seventeen years. Thomas Keniston performed the ceremony.

Charles E. Hurd, a shoemaker, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), headed a Gilmanton (“Gilmanton Iron Works P.O.”), NH, at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Anna A. Hurd, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Charles E. Hurd had real estate valued at $350 and personal estate valued at $150.

Charles Edwin Hurd, Free Baptist, son of Caleb and Judith C. (Allen) Hurd was born May 1, 1838. Soldier in the Civil War, 1861-5. Moved to Dover, 1871. Preached his first sermon Manchester. Itinerating, 1878-80. Ordained, 1880. Pastor, Loudon, 1880-5. State evangelist, May to Aug 1885. Pastor, North Tunbridge, Vt., 1885-8; Acton, Me., and Milton Mills, 1888-90; Limerick, Me., 1890-2; Cape Elizabeth, Me., 1892-6; Contoocook, 1896-8. Without charge, Concord, 1898-1900 (Carter, 1906).

Charles E. Hurd, works for shoe factory, aged forty-two [thirty-two] years (b. NH), headed a Gilmanton (“Gilmanton Iron Works P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Anna A. Hurd, keeping house, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Frank D. Hurd, attending to school, aged ten years (b. NH), Flora B. Hurd, aged eight years (b. NH), Henry W. Chamberlin, works for shoe factory, aged twenty years (b. NH), Millet W. Merrow, works for shoe factory, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), and Electa Merrow, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Charles E. Hurd had real estate valued at $80 and person estate valued at $575. They shared a two-family residence with Levi Ayers, a farmer, aged eighty-one years (b. NH).

Charles E. Hurd, a minister, aged forty-two years, headed a Rye, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna A. Hurd, keeping house, aged thirty-seven years, his children, Frank D. Hurd, molder in factory, aged nineteen years, Florabel [(Hurd)] Page, aged eighteen years, Charles A. Hurd, at school, aged nine years, and his son-in-law, James B. Page, a shoemaker, aged twenty-three years.

Tunbridge. The Baptist society have secured the services of Rev. C.E. Hurd of Concord, N.H. (Vermont Watchman and State Journal (Montpelier, VT), October 28, 1885).

Tunbridge. Rev. C.E. Hurd gave his comrades of Whitney Post a brief but very interesting account of his four years’ service in the 4th New Hampshire regiment (Rural Vermonter (Montpelier, VT), July 16, 1886).

Rev. Charles E. Hurd left Tunbridge, VT, in or after March 1888, to take up the pastorate of the Milton Mills Baptist Church.

Tunbridge. Rev. Mr. Hurd of the Baptist church will move to New Hampshire soon (Vermont Watchman & State Journal (Montpelier, VT), March 7, 1888).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Rev. C.E. Hurd of North Tunbridge has accepted a call to the Free Baptist church at Milton Mills, N.H. (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), April 9, 1888).

C.E. Hurd (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1888, as the Acton F. Bap. minister. C.E. Hurd appeared in the Milton directory of 1889, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister. C.E. Hurd (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1891, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

Tunbridge Tid-Bits. Rev. C.E. Hurd and family, of Milton Falls [Mills], N.H., are visiting in town (Argus & Patriot (Montpelier, VT), August 19, 1889).

Charles E. Hurd appeared in the remaining Veterans Schedule of the Eleventh (1890) Federal Census. He resided in Limerick, ME. He had served three years, ten months, and ten days (September 13, 1861 through August 23, 1865) in Company D of the 4th NH Volunteer Infantry Regiment.

RELIGIOUS SUMMARY. Rev. C.E. Hurd has resigned the pastorate of the Free Baptist church at Limerick (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), March 2, 1892).

Sunday Service Notice. Rev. C.E. Hurd of Cape Elizabeth will preach at the Free Baptist church opposite the public library tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. (Portland Evening Express (Portland, ME), July 30, 1892).

LOCALS. Rev. Charles E. Hurd and wife of Cape Elizabeth, Me., were guests of E.H. Crosby and wife last week (Farmington News, August 11, 1893).

SUNDAY SERVICES. So. Portland F.B. Church. Rev. C.E. Hurd, pastor. Services 2 p.m. Rev. G.H. Adalian of the Orient will preach. All are welcome (Portland Daily Press (Portland, ME), June 1, 1895).

MAINE TOWNS. CAPE ELIZABETH. Cape Elizabeth, October 19. – The many friends of Rev. C.E. Hurd, formerly pastor of the Baptist church at this place, will be pleased to learn that he has a nice pastorate, and is very pleasantly situated at Contoocook, N.H. His son Clarence, formerly a member of South Portland High school, is attending Henniker High school, where Osman C. Evans, formerly of Knightviile, is principal (Portland Daily Press (Portland, ME), October 20, 1896).

MINISTER’S MISTAKE In The Accounts of His Ward HAD TO BE SETTLED IN COURT. Much Surprise Caused in Religious Circles By Decision. He Paid Her $6.50 as The Amount Remaining From Her Father’s Estate But Must Now Pay $1,164. Concord, N.H., June 17. Chief Justice Blodgett’s decision in the case against Rev. Charles E. Hurd, a retired minister of this city, has caused something of a sensation, especially in church circles. The court decides that Miss Fannie Drake is entitled to recover from Mr. Hurd the sum of $1,164, instead of $6.50, which he tendered to her in full payment of a legacy. About 13 years ago the adopted father of Fannie Drake died at Chichester. He left to her in his will $1,500. She was then about nine years of age. The Rev. Mr. Hurd was appointed guardian of the child. He took her to his home, where she remained and grew up as a member of his family, until she reached the age of 15. Since then she has been working in different families and places. She was, however, in the habit of returning to the home of Mr. Hurd, during her vacations, and looked upon his dwelling as her home. Miss Drake reached her majority in February, 1898. In March, 1898, Mr. Hurd filed in the probate court his account as her guardian. He charged himself with the $1,500 and $600 for interest. He credited himself with something like $1,700 for her board and charged incidentals that amounted in all $2,093.50. After he had filed his account in the probate court he wrote to Miss Drake, who was then living in Andover, Mass., informing her that at the death of Mr. Drake she was willed the sum of $1,500 and that he was appointed her guardian. In the letter he told her that he had filed the account, and that after her expenses, such as board, clothes and spending money, for instance, had been paid that there still remained in her favor the sum of $6.50. That same letter contained the information, however, that Mr. Drake wanted to will the money to Mrs. Hurd. Miss Drake secured counsel, the matter was looked into and the minister was asked to make an appearance at the April term of the supreme court that was held in this city. The court proceedings were held, and it is now said that at the hearing the Rev. Mr. Hurd admitted that there had been errors in the accounts, but that they were there only through mistake. Mr. Hurd has preached in various sections of this State and in Maine. He is not now doing any active church work. The decision was rendered some days ago, but has just become known (Montpelier Evening Argus (Montpelier, VT), June 17, 1899)

Charles E. Hurd, a clergyman, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-one years), Annie A. Hurd, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and his son, Clarence E. Hurd, a telegraph operator, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Charles E. Hurd rented their portion of a two-family residence at 144 Rumford Street; its owner was Henry H. Proctor, a R.R. car inspector, aged forty-eight years (b. VT). Annie A. Hurd was the mother of five children, of whom four were still living.

Annie A. (Drake) Hurd died in Windsor, VT, May 20, 1908, aged sixty-four years.

WINDSOR CHIT CHAT. Mrs. A.A. Hurd died, Thursday of last week, at the home on West State street of her son, C.E. Hurd, after a comparatively brief illness, although she had been in poor health for some time. She was the wife of Rev. C.E. Hurd, and was 64 years of age. After a prayer at the house, her body was taken to Gilmanton Iron Works, N.H., her former home, here burial was had, after funeral services held in the church. The deceased had made her home in Windsor since last November, and is survived by her husband, three sons and a daughter (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), May 30, 1908).

Son Charles A. “Austin” Hurd died of Bright’s disease in Claremont, NH, October 29, 1909, aged thirty-nine years, four months.

WINDSOR PARAGRAPHS. Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Hurd, accompanied by Rev. C.E. Hurd, attended the funeral services of the son and brother Austin, in Claremont on Monday of this week. The deceased leaves a wife and six children (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), November 5, 1909).

Clarence A. Hurd, a machine shop bookkeeper, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Windsor, VT, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Amy E. Hurd, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Charles E. Hurd, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), Clarence C. Seaver, a machine shop bookkeeper, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Florence E. Willard, a private family servant, aged twenty-four years (b. VT). Clarence A. Hurd rented their house at 12 North Main Street. Florence E. Willard was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

Charles E. Hurd died in Windsor, VT, January 26, 1911, aged seventy-four years.

REV. C.E. HURD DEAD. Veteran of the Civil War Entered Shoe Business Before Becoming Minister at Windsor, Vt. WINDSOR, Vt., Jan. 27 – Rev. Charles E. Hurd, aged 74, died yesterday at the home of his son, Clarence E. Hurd. He was born in Gilmanton, N.H., and there married Anna A. Drake. At the outbreak of the civil war he enlisted in Co D, 4th N.H. volunteers, for three years, then reenlisted and served until the close of the war. His regiment was called the Bloody Fourth. He was in many hard battles. After the close of the war he engaged in the shoe business, and later studied for the ministry, being ordained by the Free Will Baptist denomination. He held pastorates at Loudon, N.H., Tunbridge, Vt., Acton, Me., South Portland, Me., and Contoocook, N.H., retiring at the latter place from the ministry and coming to Windsor, where his wife died on May 20, 1908. He is survived by two sons, Frank D. of Concord, N.H., and Clarence K. of Windsor; also two brothers, Henry L. and James A. of Gilmanton, N.H. (Boston Globe, January 27, 1911).

Rev. Ebenezer N. Fernald – 1890-1897

Ebenezer N. Fernald was born in Lebanon, Maine, March 10, 1833, son of Joseph and Polly (Nichols) Fernald.

Ebenezer N. Fernald, a student, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), resided in an Amherst College dormitory residence, in Amherst, MA, at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census.

Class of 1862. EBENEZER NICHOLS FERNALD, the son of Joseph and Polly (Nichols) Fernald was born in Lebanon, Maine, March 10, 1833, and was fitted for college at New Hampton Literary and Biblical Institute, N.H. The first year after graduation he was teacher of Latin and Greek in the State Seminary at Lewiston, Me., one term, and the remainder of the year instructor in the English department, Williston Seminary. From 1863 to 1865 he was principal of Rockford High School, Ill. This position he resigned to take charge of educational work among the Freedmen, at Chattanooga, Tenn., under the auspices of the North-Western Freedmen’s aid commission. After accomplishing this work in a most satisfactory manner, he entered Andover Theological Seminary, and graduated there in 1869. He was ordained, Nov. 12, 1869, at Winthrop, Mass., and was pastor of the Free-will Baptist church there one year; from 1870 to 1874 he was pastor of the church in Auburn, Me.; from 1874 to 1885 he was financial secretary and treasurer of the Free-will Baptist home and foreign missionary societies, and the education society of the same denomination, with his residence at Lewiston, Me. From 1885 to 1890 he treasurer and publisher of the Free Baptist printing establishment in Boston, and resided in that city. From 1878 he was a trustee of Stover College, an institution for freedmen at Harper’s Ferry, W. Va. In October,1890, he became pastor of the Free Baptist church at Milton Mills, N.H., and continued in that relation until the failure of his health compelled his resignation in November, 1897. He died of tuberculosis of the liver at Milton Mills, N.H., Jan. 15, 1898.
“Mr. Fernald was a strong preacher a profound thinker, with a clear, terse, and impressive diction, with large sympathies as well as intense convictions, ruling a great heart that drew to him friends, and held them as with hooks of steel. Mr. Fernald’s good-nature, ready wit, and capacity for ardent friendship made him a delightful social companion; and these qualities joined with keen insight, practical judgment, and great interest in the prosperity of the churches made the visits of the financial secretary a godsend to many a perplexed pastor and discouraged church. The common sense of his finely prepared and stirring addresses and the eloquence he gave to figures in his annual reports are still remembered. Their influence will long abide. Its effects are seen in the system inaugurated by him for collecting benevolent funds, and now found indispensable. Mr. Fernald was catholic in his sympathies, but not indiscriminate. He was no bigot, but his devotion was enthusiastic for the cause he served, for his own division of the church militant, and the doctrines he believed.” – The Morning Star, Boston, Mass.
Mr. Fernald was married, Dec. 27, 1863, to Anna B., daughter of David Tuxbury of Saco, Me., who, with two of their five children, survives him (Amherst College, 1883).

Ebenezer N. Fernald married December 27, 1863, Anna B. Tuxbury. She was born in Saco, ME, August 12, 1839, daughter of Col. David and Lucinda (Hill) Tuxbury.

The 61st anniversary of the Andover Theological Seminary occurred last week. Diplomas were awarded to the following graduates from Maine, viz. James Brand of Saco, Ebenezer Nichols Fernald of West Lebanon, George Harris, Jr., Columbia Falls, George Thomas Packard of Brunswick (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), July 28, 1869).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. BAPTIST. Mr. Ebenezer N. Fernald, of the senior class at Andover, was licensed on the 9th at Lawrence, by the Freewill Baptist Association (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), February 6, 1869).

Colby University – Programme for the Commencement Week. The 61st anniversary of the Andover Theological Seminary occurred last week. Diplomas were awarded to the following graduates from Maine, viz. James Brand of Saco, Ebenezer Nichols Fernald of West Lebanon, George Harris, Jr., Columbia Falls, George Thomas Packard of Brunswick (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), July 28, 1869).

Eben. N. Fernald, a clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Winthrop (“East Boston P.O.”), MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Anna T. [(Tuxbury)] Fernald, keeping house, aged thirty years (b. ME), and Agnes Carney, at school, aged fifteen years (b. MA).

Rev. Ebenezer N. Fernald took up a pastorate at the Court Street Free Baptist Church in Auburn, ME, in October 1870.

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Rev. E.N. Fernald pastor of the Court street Free Baptist church, Auburn, is dangerously ill at his father’s house in Lebanon, N.H., whither he had gone to spend his vacation (Bangor Daily Week & Courier (Bangor, ME), August 3, 1872).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. There was a very interesting and impressive baptismal service on Sunday morning at Little Androscoggin. Nine persons were baptized in the river by Rev. E.N. Fernald of Court street Free Baptist church in Lewiston [Auburn] (Bangor Daily Week & Courier (Bangor, ME), June 28, 1873).

Court Street Free Baptist Church. … Rev. E.N. Fernald commenced a pastorate of three years in October, 1870. October, 1873, in consequence of an injury on the cars, he resigned. He raised $3,300 to pay the debt of the society and added 34 to the church (Merrill, 1891).

While recovering from his 1872 illness and his 1873 accident, Rev. Ebenezer Fernald presaged his later pastorate (1890-1897) at the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church by preaching there as a “supply,” i.e., temporary or substitute, pastor.

City and County. The Morning Star learns that Rev. E.N. Fernald, formerly of Auburn, is getting some relief from the difficulties with his eyes, which have afflicted him. He is at present supplying the Free Baptist church at Milton, N.H. (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), September 1, 1874).

Eben. N. Fernald, a clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Lewiston, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna T. [(Tuxbury)] Fernald, keeping house, aged forty years (b. ME), and his children, Annie S. Fernald, aged six years (b. ME), and Horace W. Fernald, aged two years (b. ME).

To Let. To Rent. – About September 1st, a tenement at 243 College Street, occupied for several years by Rev. E.N. Fernald. J.F. BOOTHBY. aug13tf (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), August 20, 1885).

OUR NEIGHBORS AND FRIENDS. Gossip About Lewiston and Auburn and Other People. Rev. I.D. Stewart, agent of the Morning Star corporation, which paper is the Free Will Baptist national organ, has resigned. He will be succeeded by Rev. E.N. Fernald of Lewiston, treasurer of the Free Will Baptist Home and Foreign Missions and Education Society. The office of the Star is to be removed to Shawmut avenue, Boston, next week, where a new building has just been built for it (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), August 26, 1885).

Rev. E.N. Fernald gave the funeral sermon in the Free Baptist church at Milton Mills, NH, for medical resident William C. Buck, on Tuesday, May 2, 1893. Buck’s fellow medical students were his pallbearers (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), May 4, 1893). Buck was a son of Jeremiah C. and Eunice C. (Swasey) Buck (and grandson of Reuben and Alice (Jacquith) Buck).

Eben. Fernald appeared in the Milton directories of 1894, and 1898, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister.

Ebenezer N. Fernald died of tuberculosis of the liver at Acton, ME, January 15, 1898, aged sixty-four years, ten months, and three days. Charles W. Gross, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Anna T. [(Tuxbury)] Fernald, a widow, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a North Tonawonda, NY, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included her children, Annie S. Fernald, a music teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), and Horace W. Fernald, a traveling salesman, aged twenty-two years (b. ME). Anna T. Fernald rented their house at 191 Vandervourth Street. She was the mother of five children, of whom two were still living.

Horace W. Fernald, a wholesale iron co. manager, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), headed a Newton, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Anadine H. [(Hoyt)] Fernald, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), his children, Leland H. Fernald, aged seven years (b. NY), Florice E. Fernald, aged three years (b. MA), Margaret L. Fernald, aged one year (b. MA), and Alison T. Fernald, weeks old (b. MA), his mother, Anna T. [(Tuxbury)] Fernald, aged seventy years (b. ME), Claudia F. Hoyt, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), and Delia Gerage, aged thirty years (b. Ireland). Horace W. Fernald rented their house at 347 Cabot Street. Anadine H. Frenald was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living. Anna T. Fernald was the mother of five children, of whom two were still living.

Anna B. (Tuxbury) Fernald, died in Bedford, MA, October 22, 1915.

Deaths. MRS. ANNA TUXBURY FERNALD. Anna Tuxbury Fernald, daughter of and Lucinda (Hill) Tuxbury, was born in Saco, Me. on Aug. 12, 1839. At twelve years of age she was converted and was a member of the Baptist church in Saco until after her graduation from New Hampton Institute. In 1863 she married Ebenezer N. Fernald of Lebanon, Me., and went to Rockford, Ill., where they taught for a year. In 1864 they became interested in the call for teachers for the Freedmen and were the first to report for duty at Chattanooga, Tenn. While in this work her husband received his call to the Christian ministry in the Free Baptist denomination where later he became a leader doubly efficient because of the constant loyalty and help of his wife. As minister’s wife she was intensely interested in both foreign and home missions, and India, China and America can all testify to the work of her heart and hands. She was the mother of three daughters, and two sons, of whom one daughter, Mrs. Annie F. Wentworth of Haven, Ct., and one son, Horace W. Fernald of Bedford, Mass., are living. She is survived by eight grandchildren. Some years after the death of her husband she and her children joined the Congregational denomination and at the time of her death she was a non-member of the Central Congregational Church of Newtonville, Mass. Since 1902 she lived with her son and was called home Oct. 22, 1915. Throughout her entire life was remarkable for her deep piety and Christian faith. Hers was a life of prayer, praise and service and her good works will continue to follow after her. H.W.F. (Congregationalist & Christian World, November 18, 1915). 

Rev. R.W. [E.W.] Churchill – 1898-1909

Edgar W. Churchill was born in Shapleigh, ME, December 15, 1858, son of Nathaniel and Abigail W. (Stevens) Churchill. (His elder brother, Roger W. Churchill, i.e., “R.W. Churchill” would also become a minister, although not at the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Church).

Abbie W. [(Stevens)] Churchill, keeping house, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her sons, Roger W. Churchill, a lawyer, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and Edgar W. Churchill, a farmer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME). Abbie W. Churchill was a divorcée.

Edgar W. Churchill graduated from the Cobb Divinity School at Bates College with its Class of 1892.

Class of 1892. Edgar Whiting Churchill, b. 15 Dec., 1858, Shapleigh, Me. Son of Nathaniel and Abbie (Stevens) Churchill. Pastor, Free Baptist Ch., Oakland, Me., 1893-95; Richmond, Me., 1895-99; Milton Mills, N.H., 1899-10; Bridgewater, Me., 1910-13; Milo, Me., 1913- (Bates College,1915).

Edgar W. Churchill married in Belmont, NH, June 14, 1892, Amy Weymouth Cushing, he of Oakland, ME, and she of Belmont, NH. He was a clergyman, aged thirty-three years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-three years. Rev. J.B. Davis performed the ceremony. She was born in Cambridge, MA, July 7, 1868, daughter of Thomas R. and Arminda (Weymouth) Cushing.

Fairfield. Rev. E.W. Churchill preached his farewell sermon at the Free Baptist church Sunday and will move to Richmood sometime during the present week. Tbe people of the church regret very much to lose the work of Rev. Mr. Churchill, as he is a man who works continually for the best interests of the society and this community, and their best wishes go with him to his new field (Kennebec Journal (Augusta, ME), April 4, 1894).

Religious Summary. The Free Will Baptist church at Acton have given Rev. Edgar W. Churchill a call to become their pastor (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), January 19, 1898).

R.W. [E.W.] Churchill (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1899, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

Edgar W. Churchill, a clergyman, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Amy W. Churchill, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and his daughter, Dorothy M. Churchill, aged three years (b. ME). Edgar M. Churchill rented their house. Amy W. Churchill was the mother of one child, if whom one was still living.

E.W. Churchill appeared in the Milton directories of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister. R.W. [E.W.] Churchill (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1907, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

Rev. Edward W. Churchill gave a sermon at the annual Maine Free Baptist Association on Thursday, September 27, 1906.

FREE BAPTISTS LAST SESSIONS. Closing Events in an Interesting and Profitable Annual Meeting. … At 11 o’clock Rev. E.W. Churchill of Milton Falls [Mills], N.H., delivered an able, scholarly and interesting sermon, taking his text from Ephesians, 3:19 – “And to know the love of Christ which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with the fullness of God” (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), September 28, 1906).

Edgar W. Churchill, a Free Baptist Church pastor, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed a Bridgewater, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Amy W. Churchill, aged forty-one years (b. MA), and his daughter, Dorothy M. Churchill, aged thirteen years (b. ME). Edgar M. Churchill rented their house. Amy W. Churchill was the mother of one child, if whom one was still living.

Edgar W. Churchill, a United Baptist clergyman, aged sixty-one years (b. ME), headed a Phillips, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Amy W. Churchill, aged fifty-one years (b. MA), his daughter, Dorothy M. Churchill, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Arminda Cushing, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH). Edgar M. Churchill rented their house on Sawyer Street.

MAINE. Rev. E.W. CHURCHILL of Phillips has accepted a call to the Free Baptist Church, Rochester, N.H. WT (The Baptist, November 27, 1920).

MAINE. REV. J.K. MILLER, Convention missionary pastor, has completed a successful series of meetings with the Rochester Church, Rev. E.W. Churchill, pastor. Mr. Miller now has engagements for evangelical work with churches at Milton Mills, Milton. and Rumney, which will require his attention until the middle of May (The Baptist, April 15, 1922).

Edgar W. Churchill died of valvular disease at Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NH, October 23, 1929, aged seventy years, ten months, and eight days. He had resided for in Rochester, NH, for nine years, i.e., since circa 1920, with his previous residence having been Phillips, ME.

REV. E.W. CHURCHILL DIES AT AGE OF 70. Had Held Several Pastorates In Northern New England. ROCHESTER, N.H., Oct 24 (AP). Rev. Edgar W. Churchill, 70, former pastor of True Memorial church here, died today after an illness of several months. He was graduated from Bates college in 1892 and was ordained the same year at Oakland, Me. Rev. Churchill held pastorates in Oakland, Fairfield, Richmond, Bridgewater, Marlow, Phillips, all in Maine, and in Milton Mills, N.H. He was secretary-treasurer of the Ministers association of Maine for 20 years, president of the Rochester Ministers association and past president of the New Durham Association of Baptist churches. A widow and daughter, Miss Dorothy M. Churchill of Shrewsbury, Mass., survive (Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, VT), October 25, 1929).

Amy Churchill, a widow, aged sixty-one years (b. MA), headed a Nashua, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her sister, Charlotte A. Cushing, a public-school teacher, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Amy Churchill rented their house at 5 Mt. Pleasant Street, for $35 per month. They had a radio set.

Amy W. Churchill, a widow, aged seventy-one years (b. MA), headed a Laconia, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. her household included her lodger, Laura H. Williams, aged seventy years (b. ME). Amy W. Churchill rented their house at 124A Church Street, for $30 per month.

Amy W. (Cushing) Churchill died of broncho-pneumonia in the Laconia Hospital in Laconia, NH, October 8, 1941, aged seventy-three years, three months, and one day. Earl J. Grey, M.D., signed the death certificate. (Daughter Dorothy Churchill of Shrewsbury, MA, supplied the personal information).


Continued in Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1910-1962


References:

Amherst College. (1883). Obituary Record of Graduates. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=adqNz395hywC&pg=RA2-PA199

Burgess, Gideon A., & Ward, John T. (1889). Free Baptist CyclopaediaHistorical and Biographical: The Rise of the Freewill Baptist Connection and of Those General and Open Communion Baptists Which, Merging Together, Form One People, Their Doctrines, Polity, Publications, Schools and Missions, with Brief Biographies of Ministers and Others Identified with the Growth and Strength of the Denomination. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3GXiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA617

Carter, Nathan F. (1906). Native Ministry of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3KUeAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA714

Clark, W.R.C. & Meeker. (1860). American Christian Record. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=1oQPAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA412

Cochrane, W.R. (2001). Families of Antrim, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mYIJRrJZDDUC&pg=PA550

Find a Grave. (2008, June 9). Fannie M. Clogston Anderson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/27440032/fannie-m-anderson

Find a Grave. (2012, June 27). Rev. Aaron Ayer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92676048/aaron-ayer

Find a Grave. (2015, July 18). Rev. David Boyd. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/149469327/david-boyd

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Find a Grave. (2009, January 25). Seth W. Perkins. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/33239342/seth-w-perkins

Find a Grave. (2013, October 22). Rev. James S. Potter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/119144514/james-s-potter

Find a Grave. (2018, July 19). Rev. Hosea Quinby. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/191512725/hosea-quinby

Find a Grave. (2009, January 14). Rev. Benjamin A. Sherwood. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/32917652/benjamin-a.-sherwood

Find a Grave. (2015, January 19). Rev. Theodore Stevens. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/141533652/theodore-stevens

Find a Grave. (2011, February 20). Elder Edward Ainsley Stockman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/65921915/edward-ainsley-stockman

Find a Grave. (2009, August 25). Rev. Dexter Waterman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/41135026/dexter-waterman

General Conference. (1868). Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the General Conference of the Congregational Churches in Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=8oAHHmbuMrEC&pg=PA57

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Waterman, E.F. (1939). Waterman Family. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=VLhYAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA373

Wikipedia. (2022, May 15). Hosea Quinby. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hosea_Quimby

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Milton Millwright Charles C. Hayes (1822-1893)

By Muriel Bristol | August 21, 2022

Charles Chesley Hayes was born in Milton, September 1, 1822, son of James Jr. and Apphia “Effie” (Card) Hayes.

(His parents had been married in Milton, January 28, 1817, by Levi Jones, justice-of-the-peace. NH Gov. William Plumer commissioned his father, James Hayes, Jr., as a lieutenant of the Seventh Company, Second Regiment of NH Militia, July 17, 1818. He was promoted to captain of the Sixth Company, Thirty-Ninth Regiment of NH Militia, September 4, 1822).

James Hayes headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [James Hayes], one female aged 50-59 years [Apphia (Card) Hayes], one male aged 15-19 years [Charles C. Hayes], one female aged 15-19 years [Sarah C. Hayes], and one male aged 10-14 years [Cyrus A. Hayes]. Three members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

Father James Hayes died in Milton, February 18, 1845, aged fifty-four years.

The Milton selectmen of 1849 were Jos. Mathes, C.C. Hayes, and Jos. Cook. Those of 1850 were Jos. Mathes, C.C. Hayes, and Asa M. Durrell.

Sister Mary J. Hayes died in Milton, April 6, 1850, aged seventeen years, eight months. Brother Cyrus A. Hayes died in Milton, April 24, 1850, aged twenty-one years, seven months.

Apphia Hayes, aged sixty-four years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Charles Hayes, a farmer, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and Sally Hayes, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Charles Hayes had real estate valued at $900. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Comfort Laskey, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), and David M. Corson, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH).

Charles C. Hayes and John E. Goodwin received five-year appointments as Milton justice-of-the-peace, July 5, 1850.

Sister-in-law Mary E. Spinney died in Milton, September 8, 1850, aged twenty-one years, eleven months, and fifteen days.

Charles C. Hayes married in Somersworth, NH, November 26, 1851, Abigail Paul “Abby” Spinney, he of Milton and she of Somersworth, NH. Richard Russell, a Somersworth justice-of-the-peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, November 3, 1826, daughter of Parker F. and Mary E. (Dearborn) Spinney.

Son Eugene Augustine Hayes was born in Milton, November 24, 1854.

Charles C. Hayes was the Milton town moderator for fourteen years from about 1855. He was preceded in that office by Charles A. Varney (1834-1893), and succeeded by Charles Jones (Scales, 1914).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 26, 1855.

Son Eugene A. Hayes died in Milton, January 17, 1856, aged thirteen months, twenty-three days.

Our treasure is in heaven. – Eugene A. Hayes epitaph

Mother-in-law Mary E. (Dearborn) Spinney died in Milton, February 10, 1856, aged fifty years.

C.C. Hayes of Milton filed a report with the NH Board of Education, March 29, 1856. He was a member of Milton’s superintending school committee, who made forty-eight visits to local schools during the 1855-56 academic year, and had been paid $28.50 (NH Board of Education).

MILTON. The Committee are of opinion that we have far too many districts in town for the best interest of our schools. We believe that if the number of districts was reduced one third or one half even, that the benefit derived from our money would be increased in the same proportion. Many object to this reduction of districts because the children having farther to walk, will be unable to attend the schools regularly. We believe this to be no argument, from the fact that we find the per cent of absentees in our villages much larger than it is in the more sparsely settled districts; and that those scholars who live remote from the school-house are much the most punctual in their attendance at school. In many of our schools the past year, there has been a manifest want of good wholesome discipline; very many teachers who are well qualified in other respects are wholly incompetent to govern a school in a proper manner. Those teachers only should be employed who are thorough disciplinarians. We would call your attention to the importance of parents manifesting a greater interest in our schools. It is a duty devolving upon every parent to see that his children attend school regularly, that they are there in season, and that they conform to the reasonable regulations of the school. It is the duty of every parent to show both teacher and scholars by his frequent presence in the school-room, that he is deeply interested in the welfare of the school. Every parent should visit each term of the school at least twice. This would encourage the scholars in their efforts for improvement and stimulate the teacher to greater exertions in their behalf. – Charles C. Hayes, Committee (NH Board of Education, 1856).

Dr. Charles F. Elliott (1804-1876) of Somersworth, NH, who was Strafford County Commissioner of [Common] Schools, made his own report on Milton’s district or common schools.

MILTON – The schools in this town are improving. A new school-house for two schools has been erected at the Ponds within the last year, which does credit to the citizens of that village. At the Mills – the Branch – are houses and schools worthy [of] notice. If the school districts suffer no further division they will be fortunate (NH Board of Education, 1856).

C.C. Hayes of Milton filed a report with the NH Board of Education, March 25, 1857. He was a member of Milton’s superintending school committee, who made thirty-nine visits to local schools during the 1856-57 academic year, and had been paid $32.97 (NH Board of Education).

The Milton selectmen of 1857 were D. Wallingford, Jr., C.C. Hayes, and S.S. Wakeham.

Daughter Abbie Louisa Hayes was born in Milton, September 5, 1857.

The Milton selectmen of 1859 were C.C. Hayes, J.F. Hart, and C.H. Goodwin.

Daughter Mary Elizabeth Hayes was born in Milton, May 5, 1859.

Charles C. Hayes received a reappointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 19, 1860.

Chas. C. Hayes, a farmer, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Abba P. Hayes, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Abba L. Hayes, aged three years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, aged one year (b. NH). Chas. C. Hayes had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $300. His household immediately preceded in the enumeration that of [his mother,] Aphie Hayes, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Her household included Sarah C. Hayes, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). Aphie Hayes had personal estate valued at $300.

Milton - 1871 (Detail) - Hayes, CC
Milton in 1871 (Detail). The “C.C. Hayes” farm off what is now Applebee Road, near its junction with Plummer’s Ridge Road (NH Route 125).

Charles C. Hayes, a millwright, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Abbie P. Hayes, keeping house, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Abbie L. Hayes, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH). Chas. C. Hayes had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $250. He shared a two-family residence with the household of Apphia Hayes, keeping house, aged eighty-two years (b. NH). Their households appeared in the enumeration between those of Parker Spinney, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), and John P. Nute, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. NH).

Milton sent Charles C. Hayes to Concord, NH, as its NH State Representative for the 1874-75 biennium. (Milton’s state representatives of 1874-75 were Charles Hayes (1822-1893) and George E. Simes (1832-1914)).

Father-in-law Parker F. Spinney died in Milton, August 1, 1874, aged seventy years, eleven months, and fifteen days.

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year appointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, July 2, 1875.

Mother [Apphia] “Effie”(Card) Hayes died of a brain hemorrhage in Milton, October 4, 1878, aged ninety-two years, twenty-three days.

The Milton selectmen of 1878-79 were Chas. C. Hayes, Asa A. Fox, and M.V.B. Cook. (They appeared belatedly as such in the Milton business directory of 1880).

C.C. Hayes appeared in the Milton business directories of 1880, 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, and 1889, as a justice-of-the-peace).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, June 24, 1880.

Charles C. Hayes, a farmer & sets water wheels, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Abbie T. Hayes, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), Abbie L. Hayes, at home, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, at home, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Jonas S. Laskey, a farmer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and Geo. W. Fellows, connected with the press, aged forty years (b. NH).

(A young Ira W. Jones (1854-1946) appeared in this same 1880 census as being engaged in setting water wheels. Might they have been working together? (See Milton’s Hydraulic Engineer: I.W. Jones)).

Charles C. Hayes compiled a Milton historical sketch, including lists of its public officials, which was included in D. Hamilton Hurd’s History of Rockingham and Strafford Counties, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, as published in 1882. (Much of his information was reprinted in John Scales’ History of Strafford County, New Hampshire, and Representative Citizens, when it was published in 1914). (See for example Milton’s NH State Representatives – 1803-1902).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, May 26, 1885.

The Milton selectmen of 1888 were J.H. Avery, Chas. Hayes, and C.C. Hayes. (They appeared belatedly as such in the Milton business directory of 1889).

The Milton selectmen of 1889 were C.C. Hayes, Chas. Hayes, and C.A. Jones.

Milton sent Charles C. Hayes as a its delegate to the NH Constitutional Convention of January 1889. His mileage was calculated to be 176 miles. He was assigned to the Committee on the Bill of Rights and Executive Department.

The delegates of the Constitutional Convention assembled in the hall of the House of Representatives on Wednesday, January 2, 1889, at 11 o’clock A.M., and were called to order by John W. Morse of Bradford (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889). 

On Tuesday, January 8, 1889, delegate Hayes presented a petition from the Union Law and Order League of Wakefield, Brookfield, Milton, and Middleton. (Daniel S. Burley of the Burley & Usher Shoe Company was the leader of this league. New Hampshire was then operating under what was called “semi-prohibition” (see Milton Under “Semi-Prohibition” – 1855-02)).

Mr. Hayes of Milton presented a memorial of the Union Law and Order League, of Wakefield, Brookfield, Milton, and Middleton, praying for the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution prohibiting the manufacture or sale of all malt or distilled liquors. The memorial was laid on the table pending the appointment of the special committee to consider petitions on the same subject (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889).

On Wednesday, January 9, 1889, delegate Hayes reported his committee’s majority opinion that it would be inexpedient to pass an amendment limiting the terms of police court justices. The convention agreed with his committee.

Mr. Hayes, from the Committee on Bill of Rights and Executive Department, to which was referred the proposed amendment limiting the term of office of justices of police courts to a period of five years, reported the following resolution: Resolved, That it is inexpedient to adopt such amendment. The report was accepted and the resolution adopted (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889).

On Thursday, January 10, 1889, delegate Hayes proposed that a select committee be appointed to consider the question of female suffrage. (There was no female suffrage at this time, nor would there be for another thirty-one years).

Mr. Hayes of Milton offered the following resolution: Resolved, That a select committee of ten, one from each county, be appointed by the chair to take into consideration the subject of the suffrage of women. The resolution was adopted, and the president announced the following gentlemen as said committee: Messrs. [Charles C.] Hayes of Milton, [George F.] Merriam of Greenville, [Aaron L.] Mellows of Newmarket, [Oran E.] Randall of Chesterfield, [Frank M.] Beckford of Laconia, [Granville J.] Marshall of Unity, [Charles W.] Gray of Jackson, [Hazen D.] Smith of Plymouth, [Charles] Danforth of Concord, [Daniel E.] Cummings of Colebrook.

On Friday, January 11, 1889, Delegate Hayes’ proposed amendment regarding religious freedom was one of three similar proposals considered by the convention.

Mr. [Samuel D.] Felker of Rochester: I introduced the resolution to strike out the word “Protestant” from article 6 of our Bill of Rights. I did it, in the first instance, because I believed that the word “Protestant” is distasteful to a certain class of our citizens. They are entitled to as much consideration as we are. Suppose the word “Catholic” instead of “Protestant” was there, would it not be just as distasteful to us? I do not care which form the resolution takes; the one proposed by the gentleman from Hanover (Mr. [Edward R.] Ruggles) or the one proposed by the gentleman from Milton (Mr. Hayes). I am for religious freedom, even if it is a matter of sentiment, for sentiments are sometimes very dear to us. I have as much veneration for the works of the fathers as the gentleman from Dover (Mr. [James] Thurston). If he will look in the old Bill of Rights of Massachusetts, he will see somewhat similar language, which was thoroughly revised in 1833; but it would do no harm, if it were satisfactory to our Methodist brethren, to retain the old form stripped of its objectionable features. Ours is the last State in the Union that retains any such article in its Bill of Rights, and it seems to me that it should be changed so as to give everybody equality in matters of religion (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889).

After some debate an amendment proposed by the delegate from Hanover (Mr. Ruggles) was adopted and that amended alteration to the NH Bill of Rights was passed by the convention.

(NH constitutional conventions was the mechanism for constitutional change for many years. In more recent years, constitutional amendments have originated in the NH legislature rather than in a convention of delegates).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, May 21, 1890. He would not live to complete this final term.

C.C. Hayes appeared in the Milton business directory of 1892, as a justice-of-the-peace).

Charles C. Hayes died of Bright’s disease (and a carbuncle) in Milton, February 10, 1893, aged seventy years, five months, and ten days. Charles W. Gross, M.D., of Milton Mills signed the death certificate.

MILTON. The death of Mr. Charles Hayes which occurred last Friday removes from our midst one who will long be missed in public life as well as by many warm personal friends. He was an active, earnest and efficient member of the school board, a skilled surveyor, one of the trustees of the Nute High school and much respected by every one. He was connected with the Masonic fraternity and stood high in their circles. The funeral took place Tuesday, the school closing in memory of his labors with and for its interests, and teachers and pupils attended. Rev. Frank Haley officiated (Farmington News, February 17, 1893).

UNION. The late Charles C. Hayes, whose death was mentioned by your Milton correspondent last week, was a charter member of the above lodge and in the years 1875 and 1876 filled the master chair in the most acceptable manner. The lodge was instituted in June 1857, and of the thirteen persons who have been elected to the office of Worthy Master, Brother Hayes was the first to be “called from labor to reward.”
Farewell, dear brother, farewell; Thou has gone with Christ to dwell. Though we shall greet thee here no more, Yet we shall meet on the other shore (Farmington News, February 24, 1893).

Sister Sarah C. Hayes, a housekeeper in Haverhill, MA, died of a strangulated hernia in Milton, September 6, 1896, aged sixty-six years, two months, and nine days.

Brother-in-law Nathaniel D. Spinney died in Milton, April 7, 1900, aged sixty-five years.

Abby P. Hayes, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included Abby L. Hayes, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, aged forty-one years (b. NH). She owned their farm, free-and-clear. She was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living.

Brother Benjamin F. Hayes died of a strangulated hernia in Milton, October 8, 1902, aged eighty-five years, six months, and fifteen days. James J. Buckley, M.D., of Milton, signed the death certificate.

Daughter Mary E. Hayes died of a bowel obstruction, appendicitis, and ovaritis in Milton, March 3, 1904, aged forty-four years, nine months, and twenty-eight days. Charles W. Gross, M.D., of Milton Mills, signed the death certificate.

Abbie P. Hayes, a farmer, aged eighty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Abbie L. Hayes, aged fifty-two years (b. NH). Abbie P. Hayes owned their farm, free-and-clear. She was the mother of four children, of whom one was still living.

Abigail P. (Spinney) Hayes died of acute indigestion (followed by heart disease) in Milton, NH, April 10, 1913, aged eighty-six years, five months, and seven days. H.E. Anderson, M.D., of Milton Mills, signed the death certificate.

Abbie L. Hayes, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Abbie L. Hayes owned her farm, free-and-clear.

Daughter Abbie L. Hayes died of Addison’s disease on Branch Road in Milton, June 17, 1927, aged sixty-nine years, nine months, and twelve days. H.E. Anderson, M.D., of Milton Mills, signed the death certificate.


References:

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Abbie Louisa Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130390001/abbie-louisa-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Abigail Paul “Abbie” Spinney Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130388134/abigail-paul-hayes

Find a Grave. (2012, October 7). Benjamin F. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98444912/benjamin-f-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Charles Chesley Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130387666/charles-chesley-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Cyrus Augustus Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130383936/cyrus-augustus-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Eugene Augustine Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130389206/eugene-augustine-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Cpt. James Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336842/james-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Mary A. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237337115/mary-adaline-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Mary D. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336998/mary-d-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130389688/mary-elizabeth-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Mary Jane Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130383602/mary-jane-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Sarah Card Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130384568/sarah-card-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Mary E. Dearborn Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130405538/mary-e-spinney

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Mary E. Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336379/mary-e-spinney

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Nathaniel D. Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130382579/nathaniel-d-spinney

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Parker Foster Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130406637/parker-foster-spinney

NH Board of Education. (1856). Annual Report Upon the Common Schools of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qYQ-AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA3-PR60

NH Constitutional Convention. (1889). Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the State of New Hampshire, January, 1889. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Vw0MAAAAMAAJ

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA508

Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854

By Muriel Bristol | August 14, 2022

FIRST FREE BAPTIST CHURCH. The First Free Baptist Church was reorganized by Rev. Gershom Lord, in 1802, and consisted of eight members. Samuel Runnells and Bart. Miller were first deacons, and Elder Lord was clerk. Rev. Gershom Lord was the first preacher, and was succeeded by Humphrey Goodwin, who was ordained in 1807, and continued to preach until his removal to Hollis in 1814. Elder David Blaisdell supplied from 1815 to 1830. A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the [Acton] town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840. Theodore Stevens became pastor in 1834, left in 1836, returned in 1839, and was succeeded, in 1843, by Elder J. Fullerby; Horace Stanton, in 1847; and subsequently by Z. Jordan, Wm. Hurlin, Seth Perkins, Aaron Ayer, Dexter Waterman, James Potter; Rev. Mr. McLain, in 1872; Hosea Quimby, 1875; and at Mr. Quimby’s death, in October 1878, by Rev. B.F. Sherwood, who remained until about 1880, when Rev. H.P. Mansur came. He remained until about 1885. The following have been pastors since that time: Revs. G.A. Anderson, 1887; C.E. Hurd, 1888-93; E.W. Fernald, 1894-7; R.W. Churchill, 1898- (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

The Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist ministers described from this period were: Gershom Lord, Humphrey Goodwin, David Blaisdell, Theodore Stevens, Joseph F. Fullonton, Horace Stanton, Zachariah Jordan, Benjamin F. Hubbard, and William Hurlin (his first and second pastorates).

Rev. Gershom Lord – 1802-07

Gershom Lord was born in Lebanon, ME, January 18, 1752, son of Elder Ebenezer and Martha (Emery) Lord.

Gershom Lord, son of Elder Ebenezer Lord, was born in 1752, and died in 1817, in Lebanon; he married Esther Hanson (Cutter, 1926).

Gershom Lord married in Dover, NH, September 30, 1776, Esther Hanson, both of Dover, NH. Rev. Jeremy Belknap performed the ceremony. (Rev. Jeremy Belknap, D.D, was pastor of Dover’s First (Congregational) Church). She was born circa 1757.

Gershom Lord was one of some hundred inhabitants of Dover, NH, and vicinity that petitioned, August 30, 1786, for a lottery to finance refurbishing the bridge at the [Dover] Falls (Hammond, 1882).

State of New Hampshire } AN ACT TO ENABLE GERSHOM LORD TO FILE A COMPLAINT AT THE NEXT SUPERIOR COURT OF JUDICATURE FOR THE COUNTY OF STRAFFORD
[Passed February 7, 1788. Not found in Original Acts; recorded Acts, vol. 5, p. 403].
Whereas Gershom Lord of Dover in the County of Strafford and said State, Potter, hath Petitioned the General Court setting forth that at the inferior Court common pleas holden at Dover in and for said County on the third Tuesday of November AD., 1786, he recovered Judgment against Jona Simonds of said Dover, sadler, for the sum of thirty-six pounds and one penny debt or damage and one pound six shillings and ten pence cost of Suit; from which Judgment the said Simonds appealed to the then next Superior Court of Judicature but failed to enter his said appeal; And that the said Gershom Lord, prevented by sickness, did not file a complaint as the Law directs by means of which the said Lord hath lost the benefit of the said Judgment. Wherefore he prayed that he might be empowered to file a complaint at the next Superior Court for said County if the said Simonds should not then enter his said appeal. Which appearing reasonable.
Therefore be it enacted by the Senate and house of Representatives in General Court convened that the said Gershom Lord be and he hereby is empowered to file a complaint for affirmation of the said Judgment with Interest and cost at the next Superior Court of Judicature to be holden at said Dover in and for said County of Strafford on the third Tuesday of April AD .,1788, if the said Jonathan Simonds should not then enter and prosecute his said appeal as the law in other cases directs which he is hereby enabled to do. And the said Superior Court of Judicature are hereby authourized to take cognizance thereof and render Judgment thereon in the same manner as in other cases of appeal to the said Court (Metcalf, 1916).

Gershom Lord headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], one female [Esther (Hanson) Lord], three males aged under-16 years.

Lord, Rev. Gershom, brother of Rev.’s Tosier and Daniel, was ordained along with John Blaisdell by a council from the New Durham Q.M. convened with the Lebanon church, Me., Nov. 21, 1799. “He appeared to be a serious young man; he had an extraordinary gift in speaking, and was much admired by many.” But a lawsuit between him and the clergyman of the place having been decided against him, he soon moved to eastern Maine (Burgess, 1889).

A council from the New Durham Quarterly Meeting, N.H., convened with the Lebanon church, November 21st [1799], and ordained John BLAISDELL and GERSHOM LORD (Steward, 1862). 

Gershom Lord of Lebanon, ME, was “accepted” at the monthly meeting of the Dover Friends, i.e., Quakers, in 1801. A distinction was made between those “received” and those “accepted” (Tibbetts, 1909). As Rev. Lord was and remained a Free-Will Baptist, one might suppose that new or relocating Friends were “received,” while visiting attendees, such as a Baptist minister, were “accepted.”

Gershom Lord headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 45-plus years [Esther (Hanson) Lord], two females aged 16-25 years [Mary Lord and Esther Lord], two females aged 10-15 years [Abigail Lord and Hannah Lord], and one male aged under-10 years [Gershom Lord, Jr.].

Gershom Lord died in Lebanon, ME, March 5, 1817, aged sixty-five years, one month. Esther (Hanson) Lord died in Lebanon, ME, March 30, 1840.

Humphrey Goodwin – 1807-1814

Humphrey Goodwin was born in Hollis, ME, in January 1774, son of Timothy and Mehitable Goodwin.

Humphrey Goodwin married in Biddeford, ME, circa 1795, Hannah Long. She was born in Andover, MA, October 1, 1778, daughter of Josiah and Mary “Molly” (Carlton) Long.

Humphrey Goodwin headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census, His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 10-15 years, and two males aged under-10 years [Timothy Goodwin].

Goodwin, Humphrey - 1802Humphrey Goodwin signed the Rochester Division petition of May 28, 1802. (See Rochester Division Petition – May 1802).

Humphrey Goodwin was ordained in 1807.

Eldr Humpy Goodwin headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 10-15 years [Timothy Goodwin], three males aged under-10 years [Benjamin L. Goodwin, John R. Goodwin, and Josiah L. Goodwin], and two females aged under-10 years [Hannah Goodwin and Harriet Goodwin].

The first Freewill Baptist Church was organized in 1810, in Rodolphus Young’s house, on “Grammar Street.” There were fourteen (or fifteen) members, one of whom, William Tripp, became a Methodist minister, and died in Ripley, Maine. Humphrey Goodwin, who had been ordained as an elder, three years before, became their pastor. There are no records of this church, but there are strong evidences of its organization, possibly as a branch of the Freewill Baptist Church of Shapleigh (Acton). Its existence was not long continued, probably because when Elder Goodwin removed to Hollis from Acton, in 1814, he left them destitute of a leader, and was unable to return at stated intervals (Emery, 1901).

The First Free-Will Baptist Society of Hollis was formed at a meeting held March 21, 1815. John Smith, son Elisha Smith, was chosen Moderator; Benjamin Warren, Clerk; and Elder Humphrey Goodwin, Daniel Smith (3d), and Nathaniel Kimball, Committee to attend to the legal requirements. Elder Humphrey Goodwin was chosen. There were 22 members including Canell Tarbox, James Smith, Joseph Linscott, Amos Mason, Moses Goodwin, Nathaniel Kimball, and others (Clayton, 1880).

FREEWILL BAPTIST [OF HOLLIS]. First society formed March 21, 1815, with 22 members. House of Worship erected 1834-5. Elder Humphrey Goodwin pastor until 1838. Succeeding pastors, Revs. Lewis T. Witham, Perkins Smith, Edwin Brown and others (Mitchell, et al., 1905). 

Humphrey Goodwin headed a Hollis, NH, household at the time of the Fourth (1820) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 26-44 years, one male aged 16-25 years [Josiah L. Goodwin], one male aged 10-15 years [Timoty Goodwin], one female aged 10-15 years, and one male aged under-10 years. Three members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

Son Rev. Josiah L. Goodwin, son of Elder Humphrey and Hannah Goodwin of Hollis, ME, died in Rochester, MA, September 4, 1828, “in the first year of his ministry.”

Humphrey Goodwin headed a Hollis, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 20-29 years, two females aged 20-29 years, one male aged 10-14 years, and three females aged under-5 years.

Elder Humphrey Goodwin died in Hollis, NH, October 3, 1837, aged sixty-three years, ten months. Hannah (Long) Goodwin died in Hollis, NH, December 1, 1846.

Elder David Blaisdell – 1815-1833

David Blaisdell was born in Lebanon, ME, July 28, 1777, son of Ephraim and Hannah (Burrows) Blaisdell.

David Blaisdell married in Lebanon, ME, March 22, 1799, Sarah “Sally” Blaisdell. She was born in Lebanon, ME, January 29, 1782, daughter of Rev. John and Abigail (LeGro) Blaisdell.

David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-25 years [himself], one female aged 16-25 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell] and one male aged under-10 years.

Dean David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], one male aged 10-15 years, three males aged under-10 years, and one female aged under-10 years.

In 1815, when a powerful revival occurred in Lebanon and Acton, “Elder David Blaisdell was invited into Sanford from the place, and many were there converted, and a branch of the Lebanon church was there constituted.” Elder Blaisdell and his brother, Edward, came as evangelists and held meetings in a school-house. According to Rev. C.E. Blake, the brothers Blaisdell came into town in 1817, and organized a branch church of fifteen members. A certificate filed with the town clerk, on September 3, 1817, on behalf of persons desirous of avoiding payment of the legal ministerial tax for the support of a Congregational minister, shows that on that date. Francis Pugsley, Elias Littlefield, Solomon Littlefield, and Theodore Emery (clerk), of Sanford, Benjamin Webber and Edward Standley, of Shapleigh, and James Ridley and John Beedle of Alfred, were members “of the religious society in sd town of Sanford called by the name of the first freewill Baptist Church and Society in sd town of Sanford” (Emery, 1901).

ACTON. … The first Free-will Baptist church was formed in 1801, by Gershom Lord, – its first preacher. In 1818, a house of worship was erected in the west part of the town, near Milton Mills near where their house of worship now stands. A second society, called the Union Society of Acton, was formed in 1840, and a house built the same year at the south part of the town (Varney, 1881). 

A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Elder Davis Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fourth (1820) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], one male aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, one female aged 10-15 years, two males aged under-10 years, and one female aged under-10 years.

Elder David Blaisdell ministered to the church from 1829 to 1833; at first one-fourth of the time, and later, one-eighth. During his ministry, meetings were held at the house of Elias Littlefield, and a school-house at Springvale (Emery, 1901).

David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], two males aged 15-19 years, on female aged 15-19 years, one female aged 10-14 years, and two males aged 5-9 years.

David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 60-69 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], one female aged 20-29 years, two males aged 15-19 years, and one male aged 5-9 years. Two members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

Religious Intelligence. Milton Mills, N.H. A number has been hopefully converted to God and are rejoicing in his love (Free-Will Baptist Quarterly Magazine, March 1841).

Rev. David Blaisdell died in Lebanon, ME, July 25, 1842, aged sixty-five years, eleven months, and twenty-eight years.

Moses E. Varney, a carpenter, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah [(Blaisdell)] Varney, aged forty years (b. ME), Sarah M. Varney, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Isaac Varney (b. ME), aged eleven years (b. ME), George Varney, aged three years (b. ME), Mary Varney, aged five months (b. ME), and Sarah [(Blaisdell)] Blaisdell, aged eighty years (b. ME). Moses E. Varney had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $350.

Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell died in Lebanon, ME, September 3, 1868.

Theodore Stevens – 1834-1836, 1839-1843

Theodore Stevens was born in Limington, Me., October 11, 1812, son of Theodore and Mary (Boyd) Stevens.

Rev. Theodore Stevens died at his home in Saco, Me., Oct. 21, 1880. He was a younger brother of Rev’s James and John Stevens, and was born in Limington, Me., Oct. 11, 1812. He was converted at the age of nineteen, and began to preach when about twenty-one years of age, and in 1835 was ordained in Limington. He first settled in Lebanon, and preached half of the time in Acton, where he married Miss Susan Brackett, who survived him. In 1838 he moved to Great Falls, N.H., but returned to Acton in one year. After three years he settled in Springvale, Me., and was there four years, when he moved to his native town. He never entirely recovered from the arduous toil of these years. In 1847-48 he made a strenuous effort to restore the Saco church to new life. He returned home and for years he could neither preach nor labor. When strength began to return, he supplied at Limerick, Hollis and other places and preached a year and a half at Springvale, when he was forced to retire again. After three years on a farm in Somersworth, N.H., his health improved so that in 1860 he became pastor of the North Berwick church, Maine. After preaching in Lebanon six years he moved to Saco, where he lived the rest is life. During this time, he supplied at Carver’s Harbor a season, two years at Doughty’s Falls, two years at Cape Elizabeth, during which time their house of worship was repaired, and two years at Kennebunk Port. He was a member of the executive committee of the Foreign Mission Society from 1857 to his resignation in 1875, and a member board of corporators of the Printing Establishment from 1847 till his death. With unswerving integrity and a fearless fidelity to convictions he united a tender heart and deep concern for the welfare of men (Burgess & Ward, 1889).

REVIVAL INTELLIGENCE. We design in each number to give a summary of revival intelligence, ordinations, dedication of meeting houses, & c. The following summary embraces the four months ending Aug 31, 1839. … Br. Theodore Stevens of Acton, Me., has baptized 28 in a recent revival in the church in that place (Freewill Baptist Quarterly Magazine, June 1839).

The Baptists of Milton Mills donated $9.00 and those of Acton, ME, donated $4.75 for missionary work in May-June 1839 (Baptist Missionary Magazine, July 1839).

Religious Intelligence. Milton Mills, N.H. A number has been hopefully converted to God and are rejoicing in his love (Freewill Baptist Connection, 1839). 

A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Theodore Stevens headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 20-29 years, one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged under-5 years, and one female aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in the Learned Professions. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ebenezer Osgood and James Berry.

Rev. Theodore Stevens was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Joseph Fullonton, Zachariah Jordan, and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Theodore Stevens, Junr, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Limington, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Susan B. [(Brackett)] Stevens, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Mary A. Stevens, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Jacob B. Stevens, aged eleven years (b. ME), Benjamin F. Stevens, aged ten years (b. ME), Theodore Stevens, 3d, aged eight years (b. ME), Newell F. Stevens, aged eight years (b. ME), Eunice V. Stevens, aged seven years (b. ME), Milton H. Stevens, aged four years (b. ME), and John Q.A. Stevens, aged two years (b. ME). They shared a two-family residence with the household of his father, Theodore Stevens, a farmer, aged seventy-seven years (b. ME). (It was the elder Theodore Stevens that owned the farm, which was valued at $1,300).

Theodore Stevens was the pastor at the Free-Will Baptist church at Doughty’s Falls in [North] Berwick, ME, in the years 1858-60 (Clayton, 1880).

Rev. Theodore Stevens of North Berwick, ME, offered a prayer at the funeral of Rev. Elizas Hutchins of Dover, NH, in September 1859. He was also one of the eight ministers that served as pallbearers (FWB Printing Estab., 1860).

Theodore Stevens, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Census. His household included Susan E. [(Brackett)] Stevens, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), Eunice B. Stevens, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Milton H. Stevens, aged fifteen years (b. ME), John Q. Stevens, aged twelve years (b. ME), Samuel R. Stevens, aged nine years (b. ME), Susan C. Stevens, aged seven years (b. ME), Charles E. Stevens, aged six years (b. ME), Arabella Stevens, aged four years (b. ME), and Hannah F. Stevens, aged one year (b. NH). Theodore Stevens had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $450.

Theodore Stevens was the first pastor at the new Free-Will Baptist church building at Beech Ridge in [North] Berwick, ME, in 1860 (Clayton, 1880).

Thedore Stevens, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan [(Brackett)] Stevens, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), Mary A. [(Stevens)] Hasty, aged thirty-three years (b. ME), Newell T. Stevens, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. ME), Clara Stevens, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Charles Stevens, at school, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Belle Stevens, at school, aged fourteen years (b. ME), Fanny Stevens, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), Frank L. Hasty, at school, aged nine years (b. ME), and James E. Hasty, aged four years (b. ME). Thedore Stevens had real estate valued at $3,250 and personal estate valued at $700.

Theodore Stevens was the pastor at the Free-Will Baptist church at Doughty’s Falls in [North] Berwick, ME, in the years 1871-72 (Clayton, 1880).

Thedore Stevens, a Free Baptist minister, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Saco, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Susan [(Brackett)] Stevens, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, Chas. Stevens, a farmer, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), and Fanny Stevens, a printer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME). His household was on Ferry Road.

Rev. Theodore Stevens died at his home in Saco, Me., October 21, 1880, aged sixty-eight years.

MAINE PERSONAL AND POLITICAL. Elder Theodore Stevens of Saco was taken with apoplexy on the train from Boston to Saco Monday. He is improving (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), October 21, 1880).

MINISTERIAL OBITUARY RECORD. REV. THEODORE STEVENS died in Saco, Me., Oct. 21, 1880, aged 68 (FW Baptist Register, 1882). 

Susan (Brackett) Stevens died in Saco, ME, August 13, 1898.

Elder J. Fullerby [Fullonton]- 1843-1847

Joseph F. Fullonton was born in Raymond, NH, January 31, 1808, son of Deacon Jeremiah H. and Hannah (Dudley) Fullonton.

Joseph Fullonton married in North Hampton, February 26, 1835, Abigail Dow Robinson. She was born in North Hampton, April 9, 1813.

Sources identify him – Joseph Fullonton – as having been the acting pastor of the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church between 1843 and 1847. (The “J. Fullerby” of the Mitchell-Cony directory was some sort of transcription error). While he was the pastor there, he wrote a History of Acton, Maine, which was published in 1847.

Joseph Fullonton, Free Baptist, son of Dea. Jeremiah and Hannah (Dudley) Fullonton, was born Jan. 31, 1808. Preparatory studies at Pembroke and Hampton Academies, and Deerfield Parade High School. Licensed to preach by the New Durham Quarterly Meeting, at Barrington, May 21, 1834. Ordained pastor Danville, Feb. 16, 1837-43. Acting pastor, Acton, Me., 1843-7. Left the ministry on account of failing voice. Editor, The Granite Pillar, a temperance paper, Exeter, 1843-5; Myrtle, a Sunday School paper, Dover, 1847 54. Farmer, Raymond, occasionally supplying there and at Danville, 1847-80. Clerk of the Rockingham Quarterly Meeting 33 years. Died, Raymond, Oct. 27, 1880. Married Abigail D. Robinson of New Hampton, 1834. Publications – (1) History of Acton Me, 1847. (2) History of Raymond, 1875 (Carter, 1906).

Rev. Fullonton summarized his own career in his History of Raymond, N.H., thus:

It has been seen that the author of this History [of Raymond, N.H.,] came up in this church. An Autobiography is not to be written, but a few items may be put down. The Psalmist said, “I am as a wonder unto many.” We are a wonder to none but ourselves. Thirsting for knowledge, an Academy was attended part of three terms. Engaged in teaching; poorly qualified; studied and taught, taught and studied, carrying books on the road into fields and to bed to study. Talked with the learned for improvement, studied the trees, plants, flowers, winds, clouds and stars. Continued thus, teaching and studying much for 25 years. Engaged in the ministry; no chance for Theological training in the denomination of our choice then, so studied as best we could. Ordained at Danville, Feb. 16, 1837, continued there six years, then held a pastorate in Acton, Me., four years. Lost all voice for public speaking, and came here in Jan. 1847 (Fullonton, 1875).

Fullonton, Rev. Joseph - CarterRev. Joseph Fullonton was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Zachariah Jordan, Theodore Stevens, and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Joseph Fullington, a Free Will Baptist clergyman, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Abagail Fullington, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Susan Fullington, aged fifteen years (b. ME), and Sarah Fullington, aged twelve years (b. ME).

Rev. Joseph Fullonton succeeded Rev. Tobias Foss the pastorate of the Free-Will Baptist church in Raymond, NH, in or around September 1853.

Mr. Foss left in September 1853. Rev. Joseph [Fullonton] succeeded as stated supply and continued nineteen years. In 1858 good revival brought an addition of twelve. Rev. John Fullonton, T. Robie, and Rev. Mr. Fullenten became ministers while members of this church and later J. Woodbury Scribner (Hazlett). 

Joseph Fullonton, an F.W.B. preacher, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Abigail Fullonton, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), and Sarah A. Fullonton, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Joseph Fullonton had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000.

Rev. Joseph Fullonton of Raymond, NH, published a paper or sermon entitled Government of God in July 1862 (FWB Printing Establishment, 1862).

Joseph Fullerton, a clergyman, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond (“West Epping P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Abigail Fullerton, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), Sarah A. Fullerton, a school teacher, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and Charles Healey, a farm laborer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). Joseph Fullonton had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $2,000.

John [i.e., Joseph] Fullonton, a retired minister, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Abbigale Fullonton, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), Cyrus M. Roberts, works on railroad, aged forty-one years (b. NH), [Roberts’ wife,] Sarah A. [(Fullonton)] Roberts, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and [Roberts’ son,] Frank F. Roberts, aged five years (b. NH).

Joseph F. Fullonton died of septicemia in Raymond, NH, October 27, 1880, aged seventy-two years. True M. Gould, M.D., signed the death certificate.

MINISTERIAL OBITUARY RECORD. REV. JOSEPH FULLONTON died in Raymond, N.H., Oct. 27, 1880, aged 72 (FW Baptist Register, 1882).

Abigail D. (Robinson) Fullonton died of bronchitis in Raymond, NH, April 25, 1892, aged seventy-five years, and sixteen days. A.W. Mitchell signed the death certificate.

Horace Stanton – 1847

[Horace Stanton appears in both this Mitchell-Cony list of Acton-Milton Mills ministers and – perhaps in error – in another: Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1843-50].

Horace Stanton was born in Lebanon, ME, August 27, 1818, son of James and Sabra (Wentworth) Stanton.

The Farmington, NH, Baptist Elders voted to ordain Brother Horace Stanton [in August 1846].

Tuesday, Aug. 25 — This morning between day and Sunrise we heard and felt the Shock of an Earthquake while at Elder [Edward] Blasdell’s, the only one I have been sensible of hearing for many years. It seemed to pass from South to North, and to be mostly to the west of us. We have since learned it was verry heavey in the central part of New-Hampshire and continued Some two minutes. Went to the New-Durham Q.M. [Quarterly Meeting] at LeGrow’s Corner. I was chosen moderator of the conferance, which will detain me from my journey longer than I intended. We passed through our business rapidly, and in the Elders conferance voted to ordain Br. Horace Stanton (NEHGS, 1998).

Rev. Horace Stanton died in Lebanon, ME, January 28, 1847.

Z. Jordan – 1848-49

Zachariah Jordan was born in Raymond, ME, July 2, 1787, son of Samuel and Sarah (Jackson) Jordan.

It is said of Rev. Zachariah Jordan, the second pastor [of the Second Free Baptist Church of Raymond, ME], that he made a preaching tour of ten weeks, speaking nearly every day, and as a reward for his labor received besides his board, a cotton handkerchief and the munificent sum of twelve and one-half cents. He was born July 2, 1787, was ordained June 10, 1818, and died at Limerick, Me., May 27, 1864, being nearly 87 [77] years of age (Portland Press Herald, November 13, 1894).

The West Falmouth [ME] Church dates from May 6, 1829 when a group met at the Poplar Ridge schoolhouse and termed the church organization. Elders Zachariah Jordan and Hubbard Chandler were present, the former delivering the sermon. Meetings were held in homes and school-houses until through the efforts of Elder Charles Bean the present church building was erected and dedicated. The Rev J.M. Lowdon, a Portland minister preached, the dedication sermon (Portland Evening Express, October 6, 1939).

Zachariah Jordan married (1st) in New Gloucester, ME, May 20, 1832, Esther Merrill, he of Raymond, ME, and she of New Gloucester, ME. Esther (Merrill) Jordan died of cholera morbus in South Berwick, ME, July 3, 1838, aged forty-three years.

Zachariah Jordan married (2nd), April 22, 1840, Sabrina Page. She was born in Parsonsfield, ME, in 1811, daughter of Dudley and Elizabeth (Weeks) Page.

Zachariah Jordan headed a Parsonsfield, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], and one female aged 20-29 years [Sabrina (Page) Jordan]. One member of his household was engaged in the Learned Professions.

Rev. Zachariah Jordan was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Joseph Fullonton, Theodore Stevens, Jr., and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Zachariah Jordon, a trader, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Biddeford, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sabrina P. Jordon, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), Merill P. Jordon, aged seven years (b. ME), and John Knox, aged twenty years (b. ME). Zachariah Jordon had real estate valued at $900.

Zachariah Jordan, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged seventy-one years (b. ME), headed a Limerick, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sabrina Jordan, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), Merrill R. Jordan, a clerk in store, aged seventeen years (b. ME).

Sabrina (Page) Jordan died in Limerick, ME, April 5, 1864, aged fifty-two years. Zachariah Jordan died in Limerick, ME, May 27, 1864, aged seventy-six years.

Benjamin F. Hubbard – 1850-1851?

The Mitchell-Cony list of Acton & Milton Mills Baptist Ministers has a gap between the pastorate of Rev. Zachariah Jordan, which concluded in 1849, and the first pastorate of Rev. William Hurlin, which did not begin until December 1852. However, a Baptist clergyman named Benjamin F. Hubbard, appeared in the Seventh (1850) Federal Census as residing in Milton Mills during that time. (The Acton-Milton Mills parsonage was situated in Milton Mills). He might possibly have been the Baptist minister whose pastorate should perhaps bridge the gap.

Benjamin F. Hubbard was born in Maine, circa 1821.

Rev. B.F. Hubbard was pastor at Sanford, ME, in at least the years 1847-49. Visiting Rev. John Peacock remembered Hubbard and his ordination there:

During these three years that I labored with them, I attended several meetings out of the place. One was at Mount Hope in Sanford, which was considerably blessed to that little church and to several of the impenitent. It continued nearly two weeks in February, 1847. Here the Rev. B.F. HUBBARD was laboring, and was ordained pastor of the church, March 31, 1847. I was called by the council to preach on the occasion (Peacock, 1851).

A discussion was to take place between the Rev. E.H. Lake (Universalist,) and Rev. B.F. Hubbard (Baptist,) at Sanford, Me., last Friday. Question: “Do the Scriptures teach the doctrine of endless punishment, or the final holiness and happiness of all mankind?” (Portland Press Herald (Portland, ME), February 19, 1849).

Benjamin Hubbard, a Baptist clergyman, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Betsy F. Hubbard, aged thirty-four years (b. ME). They were enumerated on the same page as Gilman Jewett, postmaster [of Milton Mills], aged seventy-three years (b. NH).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard succeeded Rev. William H. Copeland as pastor of the Baptist church in Sanford, ME, in 1851-52.

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. Rev. B.F. Hubbard, of Milton, N.H., has become pastor of the First Baptist church, Sanford, Me. (Bigelow, 1851).

Rev. William H. Copeland began to labor among the people in the summer of 1848 and continued his service until the spring of 1850. He was followed the next year by Rev. B.F. Hubbard who preached one year. Rev. Thomas Jameson supplied the pulpit two years (Emery, 1901).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard of Lebanon, ME, was clerk of the Free-Will Baptist York Association in 1852. Its post office address, i.e., his post office address, was Sanford, ME (Burrows, 1852).

Frederic A. Wood married in Lebanon, ME, January 19, 1853, Miss Ruth Libby. Rev. B.F. Hubbard performed the ceremony.

Rev. B.F. Hubbard was clerk of the Free-Will Baptist York Association in 1857. Its post office address, i.e., his post office address, was Lebanon, ME. The York Association comprised thirteen churches, nine ministers, had baptized fourteen converts, making for a total of eight hundred seventy-four congregants (American Baptist Publication Society, 1857).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard was clerk of the Free-Will Baptist York Association in 1860. Its post office address, i.e., his post office address, was Lebanon, ME (Clark & Meeker, 1860).

Benjamin F. Hubbard, Baptist clergy, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a North Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Elisabeth Hubbard, aged forty-one years (b. ME). He had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $150.

Rev. B.F. Hubbard and Rev. James Ferguson were employed as supply preachers by the Baptist church in Springvale, ME, for a time beginning in the summer of 1862.

In August, 1861, W.T. Emerson, a licentiate of the Baptist Church, Saco, accepted a call to preach one year, and in October was ordained to the ministry. The following summer he asked for his dismission, and enlisted in the army. Rev. B.F. Hubbard and Rev. James Ferguson, of Alfred, were his successors in the pulpit supply (Emery, 1901).

Benjamin F. Hubbard, a minister, aged forty-one years (b. ME) registered for the Civil War military draft in Shapleigh, ME, in May or June 1863. He was assessed $1 in US Excise Tax for his carriage in Shapleigh, ME, in May 1865.

Benjamin F. Hubbard appeared in the NH Business Directory of 1868, as proprietor of a Milton Mills country store. (The other Milton Mills country store proprietors were Asa Fox & Son, Bray U. Simes, and John U. Simes).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard died, probably in Milton, September 10, 1870, aged forty-eight years, one month, and twenty-nine years.

Elizabeth Hubbard, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census.

Wm. Hurlin – 1853-1854 and 1856-1858

William Hurlin, Jr., was born in Bethnal Green, London, England, 1814, son of William and Elizabeth (Evans) Hurlin.

William Hurlin married in St. Matthew’s Church, Bethnal Green, London, England, December 25, 1836, Harriet Brown, both of St. Matthew’s Parish. George Parnet and Ann Berkell signed as witnesses.

Rev. William Hurlin was born in London, Eng., July 31, 1814. From his early childhood he was a great reader of history, biography, natural history, voyages and travels, science, religious magazines, etc. He was converted in early life and preached his first sermon in March, 1835, and for five years was a gratuitous lay preacher in London and vicinity. In April, 1840, he became a London city missionary and continued until May 31, 1849. Then on account of ill health he came to this country with his wife and five children, and was pastor of Baptist churches in New England until October, 1878, when he was elected secretary of the New Hampshire Baptist Convention and held that office until October, 1900, twenty-two years. He still preaches occasionally. He married, December 25, 1836, Miss. Harriet Brown, who died December 30, 1905, having commenced the seventieth year of married life. For many years he has resided in Antrim, N.H. – Editor (Granite State Magazine, 1906).

William Hurlin immigrated to New York, NY, arriving there, August 3, 1849. He took up a pastorate in Danville, VT.

William Harlen, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged thirty-six years (b. England), headed a Danville, VT, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Harlen, aged thirty-two years (b. England), Harriet Harlen, aged twelve years (b. England), Elisabeth Harlen, aged ten years (b. England), Wm. Harlen, aged seven years (b. England), Sarah Harlen, aged three years (b. England), and John M. Harlen, aged two years (b. England).

Rev. Hurlin left Danville, VT, in 1851, and held next a pastorate in Alton, NH, until December 1852.

Rev. William Hurlin was pastor of the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church from January 1853 to October 1854. After which he took up a pastorate in Amesbury, MA.

Wm. Hurlin, an F.B. clergyman, aged forty years (b. England), headed an Amesbury, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Harriet Hurlin, aged thirty-seven years (b. England), Harriet Hurlin, aged seventeen years (b. England), Elisabeth Hurlin, aged fifteen years (b. England), Wm. Hurlin, Jr., aged twelve years (b. England), Sarah Hurlin, aged eight years (b. England), John M. Hurlin, aged seven years (b. England), Sophia E. Hurlin, aged four years (b. VT), and Martha A. Hurlin, aged two years (b. ME).

Rev. William Hurlin immigrated in 1849, and held initially pastorates in Danville, VT; and Alton, NH, before his first pastorate at the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church (See Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854). After that he was pastor at Amesbury, MA, before returning to Acton, ME.

Religious Intelligence. Rev. W.H. Hurlin, late of Amesbury, Mass., has accepted the pastorate of the Baptist church in South Acton, Me., where he enters at once on his labors (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), March 15, 1856).

William Hurlin filed a declaration seeking naturalization in Alfred, ME, April 23, 1857. He stated that he had traveled from London, England, arriving in New York, NY, August 3, 1849,

and thence went to reside in Danville in Vermont, where he resided till July, 1851. Thence removed to Alton in N.H. and continued till December 1852, thence to Acton in Maine till Oct. 1854, thence to Amesbury, Mass., residing there till March 1856, and in that month removed again to Acton, & in June 1858 removed to Sumner in our county of Oxford.

William Hurlin of Lewiston, ME, became a naturalized U.S. citizen, in an Androscoggin County court, in Auburn, ME, in September 1859. (He had been born in London, England, in 1814). Orin B. Cheney and G.H. Ricker, both of Lewiston, ME, vouched for him.

William Hurlin, a Cal. Bpst. clergyman, aged forty-five years (b. England), headed a Sumner (“Sumner P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Harriet [(Brown)] Hurlin, aged forty-two years (b. England), Harriet Hurlin, a common school teacher, aged twenty years (b. England), Elizabeth Hurlin, aged nineteen years (b. England), William Hurlin, aged seventeen years (b. England), Sarah Hurlin, aged thirteen years (b. England), John M. Hurlin, aged twelve years (b. England), Sophia E. Hurlin, aged nine years (b. ME), Martha A. Hurlin, aged seven years (b. ME), Albert H. Hurlin, aged three years (b. ME), Charles S. Hurlin, aged two years (b. ME), and Clara M. Hurlin, aged eleven months (b. ME). William Hurlin had real estate valued at $200 and personal estate valued at $750.

William Hurlin, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. England), headed an Antrim, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Hurlin, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. England), Henry Hurlin, at home, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Clara Hurlin, at home, aged eleven years (b. NH). William Hurlin had personal estate valued at $1,200.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. Rev. William Hurlin of Antrim has accepted a call from the Baptist Church in Plaistow, and commences his labors there on the first of March (Boston Globe, February 19, 1873).

William Hurlin, a clergyman, aged sixty-five years (b. England), headed an Antrim, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Hurlin, keeping house, aged sixty-two years (b. England), Henry A. Hurlin, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and Clara M. Hurlin, a schoolteacher, aged twenty years (b. ME).

Recalling a Happy Event. Contoocook, N.H., December 25. Rev. William Harlin and wife of Antrim celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage today. Rev. Mr. Harlin is a native of London, England (Boston Globe, December 26, 1886).

Rev. William Hurlin expressed his opinion that the British and American exhibitors at World’s Columbian Exposition, which was planned to be held in Chicago, IL, in 1893, should close their doors on Sundays.

RELIGIOUS MATTERS. Events and Opinions. The Rev. William Hurlin, writing in the Sunday School Times on International Expositions, notes that of the seven already held, the three in English speaking capitals (two in London, one in Philadelphia) were closed on Sunday, while in a fourth, that in Paris in 1889, the American and English exhibitors closed their departments on the Sabbath day. “With the above facts,” says the writer, “in view, what will the European peoples say of us if the exposition is opened on the Lord’s Day? Should not Christians bring all the influence they have to bear on this question, until it is settled rightly! And should they not declare, and adhere to the declaration, that they will have nothing at all to do with this Exposition unless it is closed on the Lord’s Day?” (Hartford Courant (Hartford, VT), April 2, 1892)

Hurlin, Rev. WilliamWilliam Hurlin, a clergyman, aged eighty-five years (b. England), headed an Antrim, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixty-three years), Harriet [(Brown)] Harlin, aged eighty-two years (b. England). William Hurlin rented their dwelling from their son-in-law, Bennett S. Buckminster, aged seventy-five years (b. NH). (He was married to Lizzie H. [(Hurlin)] Buckminster. Harriet Hurlin was the mother of twelve children, of whom seven were still living.

Harriet (Brown) Hurlin died of pulmonary oedema in Antrim, NH, December 30, 1905, aged eighty-seven years, six months.

CHURCH AND CLERGY. The oldest minister in New Hampshire is Rev. William Hurlin of Antrim, who in his ninety-second year is still preaching the gospel. He preached his first sermon seventy-two years ago (Springfield Reporter (Springfield, VT), August 23, 1907).

William Hurlin died of cardiac failure on North Main Street in Antrim, NH, June 28, 1910, aged ninety-five years, ten months, and twenty-eight days. He had resided in Antrim, NH, for forty-four years.

BUSINESS HOUSES CLOSE. Funeral of Rev. William Hurlin Held at the Baptist Church In Antrim, N.H. ANTRIM, N.H., July 2. – The funeral of Rev William Hurlin was held yesterday at the Baptist church, of which in former years he was a pastor for seven years. Rev C.L. White of New York city, secretary of the American Baptist home mission society, made an address and the Rev O.C. Sargent of Concord, N.H., secretary of the New Hampshire Baptist state convention, delivered the sermon. Rev J.H. Nichols of Derry, N.H., spoke. Rev Oren E. Kendall, pastor of the Baptist church, assisted. The business houses throughout the town were closed and the curtains were drawn during the service, as a token of respect for the memory of the venerable clergyman. Floral tributes were many. Interment was at Maplewood cemetery (Boston Globe, July 2, 1910).


Continued in Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1855-1909


References:

American Baptist Publication Society. (1857). The American Baptist Almanac for the Year of Our Lord 1857. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Dcw7AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA5-PA41

Amherst College. (1883). Obituary Record of Graduates. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=adqNz395hywC&pg=RA2-PA199

Bates College. (1915). General Catalogue of Bates College and Cobb Divinity School, 1863-1915. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=VsBBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA222

Bigelow, John R. (1851). Baptist Memorial and Monthly Record. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=9QARAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA208

Burgess, Gideon A., & Ward, John T. (1889). Free Baptist CyclopaediaHistorical and Biographical: The Rise of the Freewill Baptist Connection and of Those General and Open Communion Baptists Which, Merging Together, Form One People, Their Doctrines, Polity, Publications, Schools and Missions, with Brief Biographies of Ministers and Others Identified with the Growth and Strength of the Denomination. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3GXiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA617

Burrows. (1852). American Baptist Register for 1852. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RdgpAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA390

Carter, Nathan F. (1906). Native Ministry of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3KUeAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA714

Clark, W.R.C. & Meeker. (1860). American Christian Record. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=1oQPAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA412

Clayton, W. Woodford. (1880). History of York County, Maine: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-e8gAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA362-IA7

Cochrane, W.R. (2001). Families of Antrim, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mYIJRrJZDDUC&pg=PA550

Emery, Edwin. (1901). History of Sanford, Maine, 1661-1901. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=0nUUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA135

Find a Grave. (2018, May 26). Elder David Blaisdell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/190070565/david-blaisdell

Find a Grave. (2011, October 22). Josiah L. Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/79093461/josiah-l-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2012, September 21). Rev. B.F. Hubbard. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/97520104/b-f-hubbard

Find a Grave. (2015, August 18). Rev. William Hurlin, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/150928693/william-hurlin

Find a Grave. (2015, October 19). Deacon Zachariah Jordan. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/153974774/zachariah-jordan

Freewill Baptist Connection. (1839). Freewill Baptist Quarterly Magazine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qg4aAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA271

FWB Printing Establishment. (1860). Freewill Baptist Quarterly. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=oRsRAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA105

FWB Printing Establishment. (1862). Freewill Baptist Quarterly. Retrieved from Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=JxsRAAAAIAAJ&pg=Pa325

Hammond. (1882). Provincial and State Papers: Town Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mdtKAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA544

Hazlett, Charles A. (1915). History of Rockingham County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=amojAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA641

Lasher, George W. (1899). Ministerial Directory of the Baptist Churches in the United States of America. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=f9gpAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA377

Metcalf, Henry H. (1916). Laws of New Hampshire: First Constitutional Period, 1784-1792. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=iKkwAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA298

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). The Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA105

Mitchell, Daggett, Goodyear, Bassett and Russell. (1905). The Town Register of Alfred, Lyman, Dayton, Hollis and Waterbro, 1905. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3UQHjbsouQ4C&pg=PA219

NEHGS. (1998). Journal of Enoch Hayes Place.

Peacock, John. (1851). A Sketch of the Christian Experience, Call to the Ministry, and Ministerial Labors of the Rev. John Peacock, Domestic Minister. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ccoSAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA110

Stewart, I.D. (1862). The History of the Freewill Baptists: For Half a Century, with an Introductory Chapter. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Z3biAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA161

Tibbetts, C.W. (1909). New Hampshire Genealogical Record. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=0wxFAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA185

Varney, George J. (1881). Gazetteer of the State of Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=bLc-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA64

Williams, Alvin D. (1852). Rhode Island Freewill Baptist Pulpit. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=OX5HAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA99

Milton Taverner Elijah Horne (1764-1839)

By Muriel Bristol | August 7, 2022

Elijah Horne was born in Rochester, NH, May 4, 1764, son of Peter and Mercy (Wentworth) Horne.

(The known children of Peter and Mercy (Wentworth) Horne were: Daniel Wentworth Horn (1761–1843), Moses Horne (1762–1800), Elijah Horne (1764–1839), Rebecca Horne (1766–1800), Peter Horne (1768–1815), Edmund Horne (1769–1843), Jacob Horne (1771–1858), Rachel Horne (1773–1852), Abra Horn (1775–1862), and Richard Horne (1777–1854)).

Horn, Peter, Signature - 1762Father Peter Horn was one of the one hundred and one Rochester, NH, inhabitants that petitioned, February 8, 1762, for Rochester to be represented in the NH Provincial Legislature. Barnabas Palmer, John Plumer, and [Elijah Horn’s future father-in-law] Ichabod Corson were also among those that signed the petition.

The house he [Lewis B. Twombly] occupied, which is now owned by his son, is one of the oldest in Milton, and was originally the property of Lieutenant Elijah Horn. In an upper room, which was then unfinished, were held the first town meetings of Milton; and for some years it was customary for the people of the North-east Parish to hold religious services here on Sundays. Here old Parson Hasy, of Lebanon, and Parson Haven, of Newbury Plains, delivered eloquent discourses on the Word and taught the way to salvation. The children of the settlers and the early converts were baptized in this room (Biographical Review, 1897).

Father Peter Horn was among the one hundred ninety-eight men who signed the revolutionary Association Test in Rochester, NH, June 1, 1776.

WE, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our Lives and Fortunes, with ARMS, oppose the Hostile Proceedings of the British Fleets, and Armies, against the United American COLONIES (Batchellor, 1910).

Twenty-two Rochester men “refused” to sign. Another twenty-two Rochester Friends, i.e., “Quakers,” did not “choose” to sign, i.e., they were conscientious objectors.

Sister Rebecca Horne married in Rochester, NH, October 20, 1783, John Wentworth. He was born in Milton, April 14, 1762, son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Hodgdon) Wentworth.

Elijah Horn married in Rochester, NH, October 7, 1784, Anna Corson, both of Rochester, NH. Rev. Joseph Haven performed the ceremony (NEHGS, 1907). She was born circa 1765, daughter of Ichabod and Abigail (Roberts) Corson. (Ichabod Corson had been on Rochester’s Committee of Correspondence in 1775, and its military recruiting committee in 1778-79).

[The known children of Elijah and Ann (Corson) Horn were: Abigail R. Horne (1785–1834), Mercy Wentworth Horne (1788–1862), Charlotte Horne (1790–1809), James H. Horne (1793-1877), Anna Horn (1796–1838), Rachel Horne (1799–1840), Ichabod C. Horne (1801–1829), Elijah Horne, [Jr.] (1805–1842), and Daniel Wentworth Horne (1809–1876)].

Peter Horn was one of three hundred ten Rochester inhabitants that petitioned the NH legislature, August 30, 1785, seeking repeal of an act requiring milled boards to be square-edged and an inch thick (and other lumber in proportion). Those inhabitants described themselves then as being “largely Concerned in Lumber.” They sought also repeal of an act forbidding transport of lumber to the British West Indies, and seeking the issuance of a new paper money (Hammond, 1884). (See Rochester Lumber Remonstrance – August 1785).

Elijah Horn was doubtless the first blacksmith [at Milton], but was soon followed by Isaac Worster at the [Milton Three] Ponds, and later by Solomon Land and Joseph Rines at Milton Mills (Scales, 1914).

Lt Elijah Horne - 1770
Lt. Elijah Horne House, “c1770” (Photo: Google Maps).

Daughter Abigail R. Horne was born in Milton, March 24, 1785.

Elijah Horn signed the Rochester lumber remonstrance of August 1785. (See Rochester Lumber Remonstrance – August 1785).

Sister Rachel Horne married in Rochester, i.e., Farmington, NH, September 14, 1786, Richard Randlett. He was born in Rochester, i.e., Farmington, NH, August 16, 1764, son of Jacob and Abigail (Plummer) Randlett.

Daughter Mercy Wentworth Horne was born in Milton, July 20, 1788. (She was a namesake for her paternal grandmother, Mercy (Wentworth) Horne).

Elijah Horne headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], three females [Anna (Corson) Horne, Abigail R. Horne and Mercy Wentworth Horne], and one male aged under-16 years [James H. Horne]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Enoch Hayes and Gilbert Pirkins.

Daughter Charlotte Horne was born in Milton, December 18, 1790. Son James Howe Horne was born in Milton, June 18, 1793. (He was likely a namesake for Dr. James Howe (1755-1807) of Rochester, NH).

Father Peter Horn died in Farmington, NH, May 26, 1795. Sister Abra Horn married in Rochester, NH, October 11, 1795, Joseph Corson. He was born in Rochester, NH, December 11, 1772, son of Ichabod [Jr.] and Mary (Allen) Corson.

Daughter Anna Horn was born in Milton, April 18, 1796. Anna Horn, daughter of Elijah Horn, was baptized by Rev. Joseph Haven in Rochester, NH, June 30, 1796. Samuel, Peter, and Abigail Wallingford, children of David Wallingford, were baptized at that same time (Tibbetts, 1910). (The Wallingford children were cousins of Anna Horn, as their respective mothers were sisters).

Rachel Horn, daughter of Elijah Horn, was born in Milton, January 26, 1799. She baptized by Rev. Joseph Haven in Rochester, NH, April 27, 1800. (She was a namesake for her paternal aunt, Rachel (Horne) Randlett).

Brother Richard Horn married in Rochester, NH, May 9, 1799, Lucy Scates. She was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1778, daughter of Benjamin and Lydia Scates.

Sister Rebecca (Horne) Wentworth died in Milton, in 1800.

Lt. Elijah Horn (1764-1839), Capt. Samuel Nute, and Lt. Jotham Nute (1760-1835) were identified by their militia ranks in the Second (1800) Federal Census.

Lt. Elijah Horn headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Anna (Corson) Horn], one female aged 10-15 years [Mercy W. Horn], three females aged under 10-years [Charlotte Horn, Anna Horn, and Rachel Horn], and one male aged under-10 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Moses Davis and Mark Miller. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Brother Moses Horn died in Farmington, NH, October 20, 1800.

Brother-in-law David Corson (1761-1843) sold land in Rochester, NH, i.e., in Milton that would be, to Ephraim Drew (c1760-1845) in November 1801. It adjoined land he had sold formerly to Elijah Horn, and was situated north of the pond, i.e., Meetinghouse Pond, and south of the Wakefield road, i.e., what is now NH Rte. 125.

David Corson, husbandman of Rochester, for $50 sold Ephraim Drew, cordwainer of Rochester, 12¼ acres in Rochester, 3rd Division, drawn to original right of John Trickey, et al., lying between that of Jonathan Dorr and land David sold Elijah Horn, joining on north side of pond and south side of road leading to Wakefield. The deed was witnessed by John Fish and Pelatiah Hanson; deed dated November 16, 1801, and recorded June 14, 1802 (Strafford County Deeds, 40:34, as abstracted by TAL Publications, 1991).

A “division” was a division of common land. Original settlers of – in this case Rochester – would generally receive an original house or farmstead lot from an original township grant. They would have also rights in any undivided common land. People who had such rights were termed “commoners.” Commoners might have a sort of parallel government of only those that had such rights, in which they might decide on issues related to their commonly owned land and its management, including any further divisions of it into separate privately owned parcels.

Those having common rights were allowed use of that common land. (From which practice the economic concept of the “Tragedy of the Commons” arises). If a division of that common land were to be made at any point, only commoners were entitled to a share or lot drawn at random from the land being divided. (There might be successive divisions over a period of years until the common land had all been dispersed). Their division rights were separable. It would be possible for one to sell one’s original house lot, while still retaining one’s division rights. It might be possible to sell one’s share in a first division, while retaining one’s rights in future divisions. In this case, Corson sold Third Division land to Drew (as he had earlier to Horn) that he had acquired from John Trickey, et al., who had original division rights.

Son Ichabod Corson Horne was born in Milton, November 18, 1801. (He was a namesake for his maternal grandfather, Ichabod Corson, who had died earlier in that same year).

Horn, Elijah - Signature - 1802Elijah Horn signed the Rochester division petition (or Milton separation petition) in what was then Rochester, NH, May 28, 1802, as did his brother Richard Horn (1777-1854), and brother-in-law Joseph Corson (1772-1852) (husband of sister Abra (Horn) Corson).

This meeting convened at the tavern of Lieut. Elijah Horne, August 30, 1802, only a short time after the charter, which gave Milton its independent existence, had been signed by Governor Gilman. This instrument had been granted at the June session of the legislature of New Hampshire at the petition and largely through the efforts of Capt. Beard Plumer, one of the representatives from Rochester, who, with others, felt that the time had come for Milton to sever the ties which bound her to the mother town.

The very first act of the original Milton selectmen was to license Elijah Horn’s tavern, August 30, 1802. The first annual town meeting was held March 14, 1803, purportedly in the tavern, and presumably the second annual town meeting was held there also in March 1804. The Milton town house was completed “on or before” October 3, 1804 (Scales, 1914). So, the third and subsequent annual town meetings presumably took place in the new structure.

State of New Hampshire. Strafford, ss: We, the Selectmen of Milton, do by these presents license to Elijah Horn to keep a public tavern at his house in Milton from this date under such Rules and Regulations as the law directs. Given under our hand at Milton, this 30th day of August 1802. William Palmer, John Fish, John Remick. Jr. } Selectmen.

James L. Twombly, the subject and source of the quoted biography, was born there in 1840. (The younger Twombly would serve in the Civil War (See Milton in the Veterans Schedule of 1890)).

The house he [Lewis B. Twombly] occupied, which is now owned by his son [James L. Twombly], is one of the oldest in Milton, and was originally the property of Lieutenant Elijah Horn. In an upper room, which was then unfinished, were held the first town meetings of Milton; and for some years it was customary for the people of the North-east Parish to hold religious services here on Sundays. Here old Parson Hasy, of Lebanon, and Parson Haven, of Newbury [Norway] Plains, delivered eloquent discourses on the Word, and taught the way to salvation. The children of the settlers and the early converts were baptized in this room (Biographical Review, 1897).

Plummer's Ridge - Detail - 1892
Milton in 1892 (Detail of Plummer’s Ridge). The farmhouse of “F. Jones” (Fred P. Jones, grandson of Levi Jones), now the NH Farm Museum, is indicated at the upper left, and the Milton Town House of 1803 is indicated at the lower right. Between them, but closer to the Town House, is indicated the house of “L.B. Twombly” (Lewis B. Twombly, father of James L. Twombly), the occupant from c1840 to 1892 of what had been originally the Elijah Horn Tavern. Just beyond it, on the righthand side when heading towards the Jones farmhouse, is a “Sch.” (the still extant District One Schoolhouse) just before what is now called Bolan Road. (There seems to be yet another schoolhouse a bit further on beyond Bolan Road).

Apart from its primary function as tavern, Northeast Parish church services had been held also in the unfinished upper room of the Horn Tavern, by Rev. Isaac Hasy (1742-1812) of neighboring Lebanon, ME, and Rev. Joseph Haven (1747-1825) of the Norway Plains in Rochester, NH. (Norway Plains Road lies opposite what is now the Lilac Mall).

Son Elijah Horne [Jr.], was born in Milton, September 15, 1805.

Son Daniel Wentworth Horne was born in Milton, May 29, 1809. He was a namesake for his paternal uncle, Daniel Wentworth Horne (1761-1843)). “Elijah & Daniel Wentworth, Sons of Elijah Horn of Milton,” were baptized by Rev, Joseph Haven, October 8, 1809.

Daughter Charlotte Horne died in Milton, November 2, 1809, aged eighteen years, ten months, and fifteen days (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Daughter Mercy W. Horne married November 23, 1809, John Nute, she of Milton and he of Dover, NH. He was born in Rochester, NH, November 26, 1787, son of Samuel and Phoebe (Pinkham) Nute.

Elijah Horne headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Anna (Corson) Horne], one male aged 16-25 years [James H. Horne], two females aged 16-25 years [Abigail R. Horne and Charlotte Horne], two females aged 10-15 years [Anna Horn and Rachel Horne], and three males aged under-10 years [Ichabod C. Horne, Elijah Horne, Jr., and Daniel Wentworth Horne]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Thomas Nutter and Gilbert Perkin.

Son James Howe Horne married in Milton, February 13, 1814, Huldah Roberts. She was born in Somersworth, NH, June 26, 1794, daughter of James and Martha (Goodwin) Roberts.

Elijah Horn and his father, Peter Horn, were among forty-two Milton inhabitants that petitioned for incorporation of a Milton Congregational society, in June 1814.

Elijah Horn and his son, James H. Horn, were among the seventy-nine Milton inhabitants that petitioned to have James Roberts appointed as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, April 3, 1820. (James Roberts (1783-1839) was Elijah Horn’s nephew, a son of his sister, Rebecca (Horn) Wentworth).

A dispute arose in 1820 regarding Milton’s militia company (of which Jones had formerly been the captain). Milton’s area encompasses 34.3 square miles. Those required to attend periodic company training – they being all males aged 18-45 years – found the long distances to be traveled to musters burdensome. They asked that their largish (140% of standard size) town-delineated militia company be split into two companies. When their regimental field officers refused them, they sought to accomplish their objective by circulating a petition seeking instead to simply divide the town into two parts.

Some one hundred twenty-seven Milton men filed a competing remonstrance petition opposing a division of the town. It was intended for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature. Company officers Jeremy Nute, James Hayes, Jr., and Norton Scates all signed this remonstrance, as did former company officers Elijah Horn, Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, and future officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes. Jones’ brother, Joshua Jones, subscribed also to this petition (One may note that none of Milton’s then selectmen signed this petition).

Some eighty-eight Milton men filed a militia company division petition intended for the November 1820 session of the NH legislature. Captain Jeremy Nute signed this proposal, as did former company officers Elijah Horn, Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, future company officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes, and Milton selectman Hopley Meserve. A division of the company would have obviated the need or desire to divide the town in order to divide the company.

Daughter Anna Horne married in Boston, MA, February 20, 1822, Charles Flint. Rev. Sereno E. Dwight performed the ceremony (MA VRs; Columbian Centinel, February 23, 1822).

Daughter Rachel Horn married in Boston, MA, April 18, 1822, Emmanuel Chisholm. Rev. Hosea Ballou performed the ceremony.

 Elijah Horn married in Wakefield, NH, November 18, 1825, Nancy Durrell, he of Wakefield, BH, and she of Shapleigh, Me.

Mother Mercy (Wentworth) Horn died in Farmington, NH, before 1826.

Son Daniel W. Horne married (1st) in Milton, September 27, 1829, Sarah Ann Dore, both of Milton. Stephen M. Mathes, Justice-of-the-Peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Lebanon, ME, in 1811, daughter of Daniel G. and Margaret “Peggy” (Clark) Dore.

Son Elijah Horn [Jr.] married in Dartmouth, MA, November 8, 1829, Delila Brownell Tripp, both of New Bedford, MA. She was born in Westport, MA, January 7, 1812, daughter of Howard and Thankful Tripp.

Son Ichabod C. Horne died in Lebanon, ME, December 13, 1829 (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Elijah Horne headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one female aged 60-69 years [Anna (Corson) Horne], one female aged 40-49 years [Abigail R. Horne], and one male aged 10-14 years. Just beneath him was the household of Jas [James H.] Horne. His household included one male aged 30-40 years [himself], one female aged 30-40 years [Huldah (Roberts) Horne], one male aged 10-14 years, one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged 5-9 years, and one female aged under-5 years. Their households appeared in the enumeration between those of Nahum Tasker and Matthias Nutter.

Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. Her household included one female aged 40-49 years [herself], one male aged 15-19 years [Isaac M. Nute], one male aged 10-14 years [Joseph Plummer Nute], and one male aged 5-9 years.

Emanuel Chishole headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], two females aged 30-39 years [Rachel (Horne) Chisholm], one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged 5-9 years, two males aged under-5 years, and one female aged under-5 years.

Daughter Abigail R. Horne died in Lebanon, ME, August 9, 1834, aged forty-nine years, four months, and sixteen days (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Daughter Anna (Horne) Flint died in Lebanon, ME, March 16, 1838.

Elijah Horne died in Milton, NH, August 17, 1839, aged seventy-five years, three months, and thirteen years.

Daughter Rachel (Horne) Chisholm died in Lebanon, ME, in May 1840 (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. Her household included one female aged 40-49 years [herself], one male aged 20-29 years [Isaac M. Nute], one female aged 20-29 years [Mary A. (Jenkins) Nute], one male aged 10-14 years, one female aged under-5 years [Anne E. Nute], one male aged under-5 years [John H. Nute]. Two members of her household were engaged in Agriculture.

James H. Horn headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Huldah (Roberts) Horne], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 20-29 years, two males aged 15-19 years, one female aged 10-14 years, one male aged under-5 years, and one female aged 70-79 years [Anna (Corson) Horn]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Matthias Nutter and Edward Ellis. (And three entries below that of Lewis B. Twombly).

Elijah Horn headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Delia (Tripp) Horne], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 5-9 years [Mary A. Horne], one male aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in Commerce, and two members of his household were engaged in Navigation of the Ocean.

Daniel W. Horn headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years, one female aged 30-39 years, one male aged 15-19 years, two males aged 5-9 years, two males aged under-5 years, and one male aged 50-59 years, one female aged 50-59 years. Two members of his household were engaged in Manufacture and the Trades.

Son Elijah Horne [Jr.] died in New Bedford, MA, March 2, 1842. (He was the husband of Delilah B. Tripp) (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Son-in-law Charles Flint died in Boston, MA, June 25, 1847. Brother-in-law John Wentworth died in Milton, February 13, 1849.

Isaac M. Nute, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Jenkins)] Nute, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Ann Elisa Nute, aged thirteen years (b. NH), John H. Nute, aged eleven years (b. NH), Sarah D. Nute, aged six years (b. NH), and Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). Isaac M. Nute had real estate valued at $1,000.

James H. Horn, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Huldah Horn, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), Anna Horn, aged eighty-four years (b. NH), Rachel Horn, aged twenty years (b. NH), Roxann Scates, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Thomas M. Cheswell, aged fourteen years (b. NH). James H. Horn had real estate valued at $1,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of William S. Ellis, a shoemaker, aged forty-four years (b. MA), and Benjamin Scates, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Delilah B. Horne, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Mary Ann Horne, aged sixteen years (b. MA), Elijah H. Chisole, a sailor, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), Abby A. Chisole, aged nineteen years (b. MA), Thomas John, a rigger, aged fifty years (b. England), Panor B. Vaildell, a machinist, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and Cathrine Davis, aged thirty-six years (b. Gotenburg).

Daniel W. Horne, a farmer, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sarah A. Horne, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), Elijah Horne, a blacksmith, aged nineteen years (b. ME), Henry Horne, a shoemaker, aged sixteen years (b. ME), James W. Horne, aged thirteen years (b. ME), George S. Horne, aged five years (b. ME), Daniel G. Dorr, a farmer, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and Margaret Dorr, aged sixty-five years (b. ME). Daniel W. Horne had real estate valued at $1,000.

Brother Richard Horne died in Milton, February 16, 1854.

Daughter-in-law Sarah A. (Dore) Horn died in Lebanon, ME, October 29, 1855, aged forty-four years, two months, and fourteen days.

Son Daniel W. Horn married (2nd) in Lebanon, ME, December 22, 1855, Rachel DeMerritt Berry. She was born in Strafford, NH, February 19, 1820, daughter of Nicholas and Hannah (Atkins) Berry.

Delilah B. Horne appeared in the New Bedford, MA, directory of 1856, as a widow, keeping a boarding house at 97½ Middle Street, at its corner with Purchase Street.

Anna (Corson) Horne died in Lebanon, ME, March 19, 1857.

Isaac M. Nute, a farmer, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Jenkins)] Nute, aged forty-two years (b. NH), John H. Nute, aged twenty years (b. NH), Sarah D. Nute, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Mary A. Nute, aged six years (b. NH), and Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute, aged seventy years (b. NH). Isaac M. Nute had real estate valued at $3,000 and person estate valued at $550.

James H. Horne, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Huldah Horne, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), Charlotte A. Horne, aged forty years (b. NH), Rachel Horne, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Martha A. Horne, aged five years (b. NH), and Alfred D. Dore, a shoemaker, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). James H. Horne had real estate valued at $2,000 and person estate valued at $1,000.

Daniel W. Horn, a smith, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon (“West Lebanon P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Rachel D. Horn, aged forty-four years (b. NH), James W. Horn, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Sarah Horn, aged three years (b. ME), Mary A Horn, aged five months (b. ME), Daniel Dore, a laborer, aged seventy-six years (b. ME), Margaret Dore, aged seventy-one years (b. ME), Tamsund Bery, aged fifty years (b. NH). Daniel W. Horn had real estate valued at $2,000 and person estate valued at $500.

Daughter Mercy W. (Horne) Nute died in Lebanon, ME, November 16, 1862. (She was the wife of John Nute) (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Dehlia B. Horn, a boarding-housekeeper, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the MA Census of 1865. Her household included Mary A. Horn, a dressmaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), Charles M. Tripp, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Lizzie Tripp, aged twenty-one years (b. RI), Sarah B. Brush, a clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Martha A. Dagget, a clerk, aged twenty years (b. MA).

James H. Horne, a farmer, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Huldah Horne, aged seventy-six years (b. NH), Charlotte A. Horne, aged fifty years (b. NH), and Martha A. Horne, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NH). James H. Horne had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $1,150.

Delilah B. Hall [Horn], keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included Mary A. Hatt [Horn], a dressmaker, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Maria H. Francis, a dressmaker, aged twenty-four years (b. MA).

Daniel W. Horne, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon (“Lebanon P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Rachel Horne, keeping house, aged fifty years (b. NH), Sewell S. Horne, works for shoe manfy., aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Sarah A. Horne, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Mary A. Horne, aged ten years (b. ME), and Tamson Bery, aged sixty years (b. NH).

Daughter-in-law Huldah (Roberts) Horne died of dropsy in Milton, March 25, 1871, aged seventy-six years, nine months.

Son Daniel W. Horne died in Lebanon, ME, March 7, 1876, aged sixty-six years, nine months. (He had been, in succession, the husband of Sarah Ann Horne and Rebecca D. Horne) (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Son James H. Horne died of old age in Milton, February 22, 1877, aged eighty-three years, nine months. He was a widowed farmer.

Charles H. Fuller, a cigar dealer, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sophronia Fuller, keeps house, aged forty-six years (b. MA), his niece, Lusina Hallett, at home, aged twenty years (b. MA), and his lodgers, Clara W. Thompson, at home, aged sixty-four years (b. MA), Delila B. Horn, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and her daughter, Mary A. Horn, at home, aged forty-two years (b. NH). They resided at 129 Purchase Street.

Daughter-in-law Delila B. (Tripp) Horne died of pneumonia in New Bedford, MA, February 16, 1892, aged eighty years. She was the widow of Elijah Horne.

Daughter-in-law Rachel D. (Berry) Horne died of chronic bronchitis in Lebanon, ME, March 23, 1895, aged seventy-five years, one year, and four months. Charles Blazo, M.D., of Rochester, NH, signed the death certificate.


References:

Batchellor, Albert S. (1910). Miscellaneous Revolutionary Documents of New Hampshire: Including the Association Test, the Pension Rolls, and Other Important Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MIhQAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA127

Find a Grave. (2016, May 26). Ichabod Corson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/163301301/ichabod-corson

Find a Grave. (2020, November 10). Daniel W. Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/218383005/daniel-w-horne

Find a Grave. (2013, January 24). Edmund Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/104095651/edmund-horne

Find a Grave. (2015, March 16). Elijah Horne [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/143780583/elijah-horne

Find a Grave. (2022, February 3). Elijah Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236457865/elijah-horne

Find a Grave. (2010, April 19). Jacob Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/51357448/jacob-horne

Find a Grave. (2010, February 20). Moses Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/48404133/moses-horne

Find a Grave. (2014, December 6). Peter Horne [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/139643614/peter-horne

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA91

NEHGS. (1907). First Congregational Church Records, Rochester, NH. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MtM5AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA152

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=520

Tibbetts, Charles W. (1910). First Congregational Church Records, Rochester, NH. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Z61bAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA28

Wikipedia. (2022, March 12). Tragedy of the Commons. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons

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