Celestial Seasonings – March 2022

By Heather Durham | February 28, 2022

Hi there one and all! The month of March has much to offer skywatchers. We have the first day of spring occurring on the 20th. Meteorologists declare March 1st to be the first day of spring, but the day of the equinox brings approximately 12 hours of daylight and nighttime.

The 28th will have the most activity with three planets in view and moving around until they form somewhat of a linear line in the night sky.

Last month, I wrote about Artemis One which had to be postponed and rescheduled for the 20th of this month. Let’s hope this time it will be successful.

The YouTube videos speak of additional activity sometimes referring to astrophotography. There are astronomical phenomena, referred to in the videos that cannot be seen with the naked eye, but that are depicted visually therein.

Let’s now delve into the month ahead.


March 10. Our Moon will be at first quarter.

March 12. Venus and Mars will rise to the right during which time Venus will be passing Mars.

March 15. Venus and Mars will be close to one another and pass each other as well.

March 18. The Worm Moon will be full. It is named as the earth worms begin their activity.

March 20. This is the first day of spring also known as the March equinox. Venus will travel to its farthest distance from our Sun.

March 21. Venus may be seen at its half phase.

March 25. Our Moon will reach its final quarter.

March 27. The Moon and Mars will rise right and travel as close as they ever get.

March 28. The Moon and Mars will travel close to one another again. The Moon and Venus will rise and closely approach one another. The Moon and Saturn will do the same. Our Moon with Venus and Saturn will travel together and pass one another. Our Moon and Saturn will closely approach one another too as well as Venus and Saturn.

March 29. Venus and Saturn will rise and travel closely to each other.


References:

Ford, D.F. (2021, January 5). June 2021. In-the-Sky.Org. Retrieved from https://in-the-sky.org

Insane Curiosity (2021, December). Artemis Project 1, The New Mission to Return to the Moon. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/agyd88M5YE8

Now Next. (2022, February). March 2022 Astronomy Events. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/nBqqETLQyzA

Sky of Stars (2022, February 21). Upcoming Astronomical Events, March 2022. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/hs1-bo7-br8

Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814

By Muriel Bristol | February 27, 2022

Prior to its establishment as its own separate town, Rochester’s Northeast Parish, as Milton was then termed, had been served in religious matters by several neighboring Congregational ministers, such as Rev. Joseph Haven (1747-1825) of Rochester, NH, Rev. Isaac Hasy (1742-1812) of Lebanon, ME, and presumably other visitors. Church services were held in an unfinished upstairs room of Elijah Horn’s tavern. (See Milton Taverner Levi Jones (1771-1847)).

This town formerly made a part of Rochester, and, for a year after being separated from it, received the labors of their old pastor, Rev. Mr. Haven, with deep gratitude. They hailed his regular and occasional visitings with great interest. But they needed more constant, steady labors among them than their old minister with a large home parish could give them. They set their faces therefore to having religious institutions among them separate from Rochester. The children wished to set up for themselves in religious, as they had in municipal, matters (Lawrence, 1856).

At Milton’s very first annual town meeting, which was held in the same Horn Tavern as the church services, a tax was voted by a majority for the support of the ministry.

March 14, 1803. Voted that each poll pay twenty-five cents for preaching, and other ratable estate in proportion (Hayes, 1882).

At this time, the Congregational church had been for nearly two hundred years New England’s “established” church. Contemporary sources generally referred to it as being the “standing order.” Everyone in a New England town was subject to compulsory taxation for its support and that of its local Congregational minister.

Religious dissenters, such as Baptists, Free-Will Baptists, Friends (“Quakers”), Methodists, etc., had never been best pleased with this coercive arrangement and, with the advent of the Republic and its constitution, they began to make their displeasure felt.

Many, if not most, towns contrived a rather dubious solution, adopted also by a nascent Milton. They continued to tax everyone for support of ministers. But they then attempted to distribute the money collected according to the relative size of the various religious denominations.

The same [Milton ministerial] tax was voted to be raised March 12, 1805, and also voted to tax all denominations alike with the privilege of directing what teacher may have their money (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

Of course, to implement such a distribution, one would need to compile and maintain lists or at least head-counts of the taxpayers’ differing religious affiliations [!!!].

As Milton had as yet no settled minister, it paid still visiting or occasional ministers and preachers on an ad hoc basis. “Prior to 1805,” i.e., in the years 1803-04, it paid Reuben Nason $82 for preaching; Mr. Brown $4; Mr. [Gideon] Burt $24; and Mr. Pillsbury $55. Capt. Plumer received $33 for boarding them (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

Being titled “Mister,” “Rev.,” or “Rev. Mister,” versus being merely named in such a list usually depended upon one’s ordination status. Many who would preach in Milton in these initial years were licensed to preach by this or that denomination or missionary society – they had become a “licentiate” – but had not yet achieved full status. That came with being “ordained” as a settled minister by a convocation of neighboring ministers. The honorific could be applied then and might be retained even if one moved on to a new parish or occupation.

Mr. Gideon Burt (1773-1845) had accepted a Congregational pastorate in Effingham, NH, in 1803, at the rate of $300 per annum. But, due to Effingham’s inability to tax all of its denominations for his support, it had come up short in paying his agreed salary.

In 1803 [Effingham] voted to divide the ministerial land between the Baptists and Congregationalists according to the number of rateable polls belonging to each. This was not done at this time. At the same time Rev. Gideon Burt was invited to settle at a salary of $300. He accepted the call, and was the only settled pastor the Congregationalists have ever had. In July 1805, [Effingham] voted to tax the Congregationalists only. The same year, his salary being unpaid, he sued the town for what was due – about $420 – they paid it, he was dismissed, and [they] gave the Baptists a deed of one-third of the ministerial land (Lawrence, 1856).

After Rev. Burt’s departure from Effingham, NH, its defaulting church was said to have “lost visibility,” i.e., it became inactive and remained so, until 1835.

Rev. Burt evidently made up some ($24) of his loss through hiring out as a “supply” preacher, i.e., an ad hoc preacher, in Milton.

Rev. Gideon Burt, born in Longmeadow, Mass., 1773, was graduated at Williams College, 1798, had been three years settled at Effingham, N.H., and was now [1814] supplying pulpits here and there (Robbins, 1886).

An instance of congregants cooperating to hire preaching services privately was recorded regarding this same Rev. Gideon Burt. He would be hired in 1814 for eight weeks’ worth of “supply” preaching through a collection taken up at Gilsum, NH.

About the year 1814, Mary Wilcox, not then a member of the church, was moved to make an effort to secure preaching, and herself went to the sisters of the church asking them to give something for that purpose. The women raised money enough to hire the Rev. Gideon Burt of Long Meadow, Mass., eight weeks. As a result of his preaching the church became more engaged and four persons united by profession, among them the one who started the movement (Hayward, 1881).

Reuben Nason (1779-1835) had graduated from Harvard College in Cambridge, MA, with its class of 1802. He studied further with Rev. Jesse Appleton (1772-1819) of Hampton, NH. He was approved then for religious teaching by the Piscataqua Association of Ministers in 1803, and by them “recommended for the use of the churches.” And so he preached for a time in Milton as a licentiate. He did so initially in the Horn Tavern and would seem to have been among the first, if not the very first, to preach in the newly built Milton meetinghouse.

Milton Town House - 1803
Milton Town House. This structure functioned as both the townhouse and the Congregational meetinghouse from 1803 to 1835, when its congregation built a separate new church at Milton Three Ponds. (It was said to have had originally another story that was later removed). (Photo: Magicpiano).

An attempt was made in Milton in 1804 to “settle” Nason as Congregational pastor for the Milton meetinghouse. The terms asked by him were quite similar ($300 per annum and use of a parsonage) to those that Effingham, NH, had offered Rev. Burt but on which it had then defaulted.

But immediately after the completion of the meeting house in 1804 an effort was made to settle a minister, as a regular town minister. At a meeting held Aug. 27, 1804, it was: “Voted to choose a committee to treat with Rev. Mr. Nason, and see on what terms he will agree to settle in town.”
At a meeting on the 5th of November the committee rendered the following report: “Milton, Nov. 5, 1804. Gentlemen, We have, according to your desire, talked with Mr. Nason, and we find that if the town are agreed to give him the use of a decent parsonage during his ministry and $300 yearly, that he would settle with us on these conditions. Committee { RICHARD WALKER, BENJAMIN SCATES (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

Not mentioned, but usually a part of such arrangements in some way, was access to a wood supply. Sometimes cords of cut wood were delivered to the parsonage, perhaps in partial payment of the minister’s salary, and sometimes the parsonage had merely access to its own wood lot.

Nason’s offer was not taken up. He preached some in 1805 but became then preceptor (principal) at Gorham Academy in Gorham, ME, in 1806. (The Academy would pay him $600 per annum, i.e., double his Milton proposal). He was remembered there as “a man of marked individuality.” He would be ordained finally in Freeport, ME, in 1810 (McLellan, 1903). He was the settled minister there until 1815, when he and his parish parted company due – in his own words – to a “prevalence of sectarian spirit, in part, and partly from the diminution of the means of paying his salary” (Nason, 1816). He returned then to Gorham Academy, again as its preceptor, and finally took a similar post in Clarkson, NY, dying there in 1835 (McLellan, 1903).

The basic (and perhaps insoluble) problem, for both Milton and other towns of a similar size, was that none of its denominations had sufficient resources to separately settle and support a minister of their own. (This would eventually be addressed in later years through forming instead more ecumenical “union” churches).

At the third annual town meeting (March 1805) Milton doubled its “ministerial tax.”

March 12, 1805. In town meeting, voted to raise 50 cents on a poll, and other ratable property in proportion, for support of the ministry (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

In that year Milton paid Reuben Nason $34.15 for preaching; and Christopher Page $84. Capt. Plumer received $26 for boarding them. In 1806 it paid John Dorrance $54 for preaching.

Rev. Christopher Paige, Jr. (1762-1822), was a Dartmouth graduate (Class of 1784), “and became a preacher of the standing order,” i.e., he was a Congregationalist. He was ordained in Pittsfield, NH, in 1789. He had “… preached for a brief season in Hopkinton and in Pittsfield,” NH (Lawrence, 1904). He was settled at Deering, NH, in 1796. Its church had been formed as a Congregationalist one, which then switched to Presbyterian, and then back to Congregationalist. After his ad hoc preaching stint in Milton in 1805, he preached in Washington, NH. He became for a time the settled minister at Roxbury, NH, in 1816, but died in Salisbury, NH, in 1822.

(Rev. Curtis Coe (1750-1829), resigned his parish in Durham, NH, in 1806, over similar sectarian and financial disputes. He became instead a Congregational missionary and would help establish Milton’s Congregational Church in 1815).

John G. Dorrance (1777-1825), who preached in 1806-07, was a Brown University graduate (Class of 1800). (He was a namesake for an older uncle who was the settled minister at Windsor, MA, 1795-1834). John Gordon Dorrence was admitted to membership in the church at Windham, CT, November 7, 1802, and dismissed from there on an unspecified date.

In 1807 Milton paid John Dorrance $21 for preaching; and Daniel Hayes received $20 for boarding him. In 1808 it paid Mr. Preston $5 for preaching; and in 1809 it paid Mr. Papkin $30 for preaching (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

The Mr. Preston who preached in 1808 might have been Willard Preston (1785-1856). He attended Brown University, where he initially studied law but then switched to theology. He graduated in 1808 and was licensed to preach. He would go south for his health for a time but could have preached briefly in Milton before he left. He would be “settled” later in Milton, VT, in 1811, where he was ordained in 1812, followed by St. Albans, VT, Providence, RI, in 1816, and Burlington, VT, before becoming president of the University of Vermont in 1825. He “settled” finally at an Independent Presbyterian Church in Savannah, GA, in 1833. He was remembered there for the aid he rendered during its yellow fever epidemic of 1845.

The Mr. Papkin who preached in 1809 might have been Rev. Dr. John S. Popkin (1771-1852). (His brother, William Popkin (c1782-1827), was also a minister). Rev. John S. Popkin was at this time the settled minister at Newburyport, MA.

His sound, intellectual, impressive and truly Christian preaching drew many occasional hearers; and his well-known character as a man and a scholar, as well as minister, induced a number of respectable families in Newburyport, with several professional gentlemen, to become his parishioners (Popkin, 1852).

His own church building was torn down in 1806, so that another might be constructed in its place.

MASSACHUSETTS. NEWBURYPORT. May 6. On the last Sabbath a valedictory Sermon was delivered by the Rev Mr. Popkin, to a crowded assembly, at the old town Meeting House, (Newbury,) that society being about to pull down the house, and erect a new one in the same place. This ancient fabric has stood 107 years, probably the oldest meeting-house in New England (Burlington Sentinel and Democrat (Burlington, VT), [Wednesday,] May 21, 1806).

He would join Harvard College as a professor of Greek in 1815.

In 1810 Milton paid Asa Piper $30 for preaching; and in 1811 it paid Asa Piper $2.50; and Mr. Goding $5 (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

Rev. Asa Piper (1757-1835) had been the first settled minister at neighboring Wakefield, NH, from 1785 to 1810. At that time he went into a sort of semi-retirement in which he did missionary work, mostly in Maine, but including also his preaching in Milton in 1810-13 (Edwards & Cogswell, 1839). During Milton’s 1820 militia dispute he would suggest calling the proposed new town – to have been composed of northern Milton and southern Wakefield – “Milfield.”

DIED. In Wakefield, Rev. Asa Piper, aged 74 (Vermont Phoenix (Brattleboro, VT), June 12, 1835).

Rev. Wiliam Goding (1761-1848), who preached in 1811, was the Baptist minister at neighboring Acton, ME. He was said to have been “a man of large stature and an eloquent and persuasive speaker.”

Rev. William Goding, of Watertown, Mass., was one of the earliest Calvinist Baptist preachers of central Maine. He was licensed by the church in Jay in 1800, ordained an evangelist in 1802, and preached in Wayne the most of the time for the four following years. He then removed to Shapleigh, and received the pastoral care of the church now known as the Acton Baptist church in 1807, over which he presided until 1835 (Cochrane, 1894).

In 1812 Milton paid Asa Piper $23 for preaching; and Mr. Thurston $3; and in 1813 it paid Asa Piper $4.50 for preaching and Israel Briggs $33 (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

Rev. James Thurston (1769-1835), who preached in 1812, had been ordained in South Newmarket, NH, in 1800, and was settled there until dismissed in 1808.

For more than twenty years subsequent to the dismission of Mr. Thurston (1808) there was little if any preaching of the Congregational order in the parish [of South Newmarket, NH]. And for ten years more, there were only occasional supplies. Besides, during more than ten or fifteen years from 1808 the “tables were turned” and the Methodists became the “standing order.” The town employed their preachers – voted them the use of their parsonage, the Meeting house and more or less salary year by year. And they lived on the Congregational parsonage, occupied their Meeting house and used their church service for some twenty years. It is a wonder that Congregationalism under such circumstances had not become entirely extinct (Lawrence, 1856).

Rev. Isaac Briggs (1775-1862), who preached in 1813, was a Brown University graduate (Class of 1795) who studied further under Rev. Dr. Sanger. He had been ordained at York, ME, August 2, 1798, and was the settled minister at the Second Congregational Church in the “Scotland” district of York, ME, for seven years, i.e., 1798-05. (He had no successor there for nearly twenty years). He resided in Portsmouth, NH, in 1807. He was installed as the settled minister at Boxford, MA, September 28, 1808, where he remained for many years (French, 1809). He would seem to have preached in Milton in 1813 as a visiting missionary.

At Milton’s 1813 annual town meeting, the proposed ministerial tax was not approved.

March 19, 1813. Voted not to raise any money for the support of the ministry (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

Seeking other sources, a town committee was chosen in May of that year to determine what, if any, property in town had been allocated by the parent town Rochester for support of the ministry. Milton historian Charles C. Hayes (1822-1893) observed that this committee does not seem to have ever returned a report (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

Milton’s Congregationalists decided finally to go their own way. They petitioned the NH legislature to have themselves incorporated as a religious society so that they might directly fund their own settled minister – or at least better supplement their share of any ministerial tax – through private levies on their own congregants.

Petition of sundry Inhabitants (of B. Plumer & others) of Milton Praying to be incorporated into a Religious Society

To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives to be convend at Concord, New Hampshire on the first Wednesday in June A.D. 1814 ~

The petition of the subscribers, inhabitants of the town of Milton, respectfully shews that they experience many inconveniences by reason of being in an unincorporated state. That they have been at considerable of expense to erect and complete a meeting-house and provide for themselves convenient pews on privileges in said house under the expectation of settling a minister to preach the gospel to them, but owing to a variety of different religious sects or denominations in said town they find by experience that they have not power to obtain that desirable object, nor even a vote to tax themselves towards the support of the ministry ~ they therefore pray that they and their associates may be incorporated into a religious society by the name of the Congregational Society in Milton ~ This we conceive would have a tendency to harmonize and moralize us, and finally have the happy effect of making us better citizens and better men ~ as we in duty bound do pray ~

[Column 1:] Moses Paul, James Hayes, Jr, Daniel Dore, Timo Roberts, Gershom Downs, Ira Fisk [Fish], Wm Scruten, Benjamin Dore, David Courson, Wm Adams, Caleb Wingate, Isaac Hayes, John Remick,

[Column 2:] Gilman Jewett, Nat Pinkham, Ichabod Wentworth, David M. Courson, Thomas Wentworth, Zebah Hanscom, Samuel N. Chamberlin, Elijah Horn, Peter Horn, John G. Remick, Daniel F. Melcher, Aaron Twombly, Jonathan Dore, John Dore, John Nutter,

[Column 3:] Beard Plumer, Joseph Plumer, Wm Palmer, Isaac Scates, Samuel Wallingford, Josiah Willey, Daniel C. Palmer, John Palmer, Barnibus Palmer, John Scates, James Pinkham, Edward Eles, Benjamin Scates, Norton Scates.

Upon receipt and consideration of the petition, the legislature voted to hold a public hearing on the matter at the next June session, i.e., a full year later, in June 1815. (This explains why the proposed Congregational Society would not be organized until September 1815).

State of New Hampshire

In the House of Representatives, June 7th 1814

Upon reading and considering the foregoing petition and the Report of the Committee thereon Voted that the Petitioners be heard on their petition before the General Court on the first Tuesday of the next June Session and that previous to the first day of February the Selectmen and the Town Clerk of Milton be served with Copies of their petition and the order of the Court thereon and that a Copy of said petition and Order of Court be posted up at the Meeting house in said Milton and some other public place in said town previous to the said first day of February, that any person or persons may then appear and shew cause, if any they have, why the prayer should not be granted.

Sent up for Concurrence. Thoms [Thomas W. Thompson (1766-1821)], Speaker.

In Senate the same day Read and concurred. Peter E. Farnum, Asst Clerk.

State of New Hampshire. In the House of Representatives, June 13th 1815

Upon hearing and considering the foregoing petition Voted that the prayer be so far granted that the Petitioners have leave to bring in a bill.

Sent up for concurrence. Geo. B. Upham, Speaker.

Con. In the Senate the same day Read and concurred. S.A. Trumbell, Clerk

The petitioners brought in a bill, which was approved a week later, June 21, 1815.

State of New Hampshire }
AN ACT TO INCORPORATE BEARD PLUMER ESQUIRE AND OTHERS INTO A SOCIETY BY THE NAME OF THE CONGREGATIONAL SOCIETY IN MILTON.
[Approved June 21, 1815. Original Acts. vol. 23. p. 13; recorded Acts, vol. 20, p. 321].
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General court convened, that Beard Plumer, Benjamin Scates, Caleb Wingate, John Scates, Joseph Plumer, and their associates, with such others as are or may be hereafter admitted into said Society, be and they hereby are made and erected into a body politic and corporate to have continuance and succession forever by the name and style of the Congregational Society in Milton, and by that name may sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, prosecute and defend to final judgment and execution, and hereby are vested with all the powers and privileges of corporations of a similar nature, and may enjoin penalties of disfranchisement, and may make, purchase and receive subscriptions, grants and donations of real and personal estate not exceeding Seven thousand dollars, for the use and benefit of said corporation, and may have and use a common seal, and the same at pleasure may break, alter and renew, and may ordain and put in execution such bye laws and ordinances, as to them shall appear necessary and convenient for the government of said Corporation. Provided such bye laws and ordinances are not repugnant to the laws & constitution of this State.
And be it further enacted that said Corporation be and they hereby are authorized and empowered to keep in repair the meeting house in said Milton, in which said association now worship, and to erect build, finish and keep in repair at any future period a house for public worship, and may assess and collect taxes for that purpose, and for the maintenance and support of the gospel Ministry.
And be it further enacted, that the first meeting of said corporation shall be holden in said Milton on the third Monday of July next, at two o clock in the afternoon, and notice thereof shall be given by a notification to be posted at two public places in said Milton, under the hands of the persons before named or any two of them, at least fifteen days prior to said meeting, who shall preside in said meeting until a moderator shall be chosen; at which, or any subsequent meeting, duly warned, said corporation may choose all such officers as may be necessary for the orderly conducting of the affairs of said corporation, who shall be duly sworn and continue in office until others are chosen and sworn in their room; and may fill up any vacancies that may happen in said offices, and do & transact any other business necessary to be done and transacted except the raising of money, which shall be done at their annual meeting and at no other time; at which annual meeting they shall vote to assess and collect all sums of money proper for carrying the designs of the corporation into execution, and for defraying the contingent expences of the same, and shall do and transact all other business necessary to be transacted for the benefit of said Society.
And be it further enacted, that the annual meeting of said Corporation, shall be holden in said Milton on the first Monday of October forever. ~
And be it further enacted, that those who are and may hereafter become associated in this Society and who are or may be at the same time proprietors and owners of pews in said meeting house, shall be liable to pay such taxes as shall be assessed thereon, for the purpose of repairing, and keeping in repair, said meeting house, and for other purposes connected with the well-being of said association, and on refusal or neglect to pay such taxes, the pew or pews of such delinquent owner or owners may be exposed to sale, under the rules and bye laws of said Corporation (NH Secretary of State, 1920).

Former Milton teacher Sophia ((Cushing) Hayes) Wyatt visited the Plummer “mansion house” on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton in the mid 1820s. Her host, an ailing son of the late Sen. Beard Plummer (1754-1816) – probably Joseph Plummer (1786-1826) – wished that his father and other town founders had been more religious men. (See Milton Teacher of 1796-1805).

I heard him a short time afterward remark, “If my father [Beard Plummer] and my uncle Joseph [Plummer], and Esq. [William] Palmer, had been religious men, what a good influence they would have exerted over this town.”

His assessment seems a bit harsh, given that all three signed the above petition. On the other hand, none of them were among the nine founding Congregational church members of the following year. (Although Palmer’s father and daughter were among them).

Rev. James Doldt (1809-1888), who would become Milton’s settled Congregational minister of 1848-70, described how some visiting preachers had been paid in the early days (presumably based on what he found in Congregational church records or had related to him by older parishioners).

… In some cases a single individual would pay for a Sabbath’s preaching, then his neighbor would do the same. After this they would all unite to get one or more. Beyond this, they sought the aid of the New Hampshire Missionary Society then recently formed [1801]. This Society responded to their call, and sent them among some others, Rev. Curtis Coe, formerly pastor of the church in Durham. He superintended the formation of a church in Milton (Lawrence, 1856).

Milton’s Congregational church continued to employ visiting ministers and missionaries, such as the Rev. Curtis Coe and Rev. Dyer Burge, until it settled Rev. James Walker, Jr. (1778-1826), on a “half-time” basis, in 1819. (See Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1815-26).

This church worshiped in the old meeting house until 1835, when the house was built at Three Ponds, which has since been transformed into a “Classical Institute.” After this time for several years the meetings were held alternately at the Three Ponds and Milton Mills. The present meeting-house of this church was built in 1860, and is a spacious and elegant edifice (Hayes, 1882; Scales, 1914).

And other denominations followed much the same course. Visiting Christian Baptist Elder Mark Fernald (1784-1851) preached in Milton as early as 1818, and a Christian congregation would organize itself in Milton in 1827. They met initially in private homes or barns, and, in season, held larger “general meetings” in the open. (See Milton’s Christian Church Elders – 1827-1845).

The Free-Will Baptists organized themselves at South Milton in 1843. They too met initially in private homes. (See Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1843-50).

The Milton town government continued to wrestle periodically and fruitlessly with ministerial taxation and its “ministerial fund” – evidently a non-lapsing one – for at least another sixty-six years. (But that is another story).


References:

Cochrane, Harry H. (1894). History of Monmouth and Wales, Maine [William Goding]. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=0IPu79c9R8sC&pg=PA459

Edwards, B.B., & Cogswell, E. (1839). American Quarterly Review [Asa Piper]. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qgJKAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA130

Find a Grave. (2013, May 5). Rev. Isaac Briggs. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/110045262/isaac-briggs

Find a Grave. (2012, October 6). Rev. Gideon Leon Burt. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98374371/gideon-leon-burt

Find a Grave. (2011, October 11). John G. Dorrance. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/78216394/john-g-dorrance

Find a Grave. (2013, November 7). Elder William Goding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/119936354/william-goding

Find a Grave. (2012, January 1). Rev. Isaac Hasey. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82812379/isaac-hasey

Find a Grave. (2010, February 20). Rev. Joseph Haven. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/48404096/joseph-haven

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Charles Chesley Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130387666/charles-chesley-hayes

Find a Grave. (2007, October 3). Martha Coffin Nason. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/21909970/martha-coffin-nason

Find a Grave. (2018, February 5). Christopher Paige. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/187122075/christopher-paige

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Rev. Asa Piper. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92206616/asa-piper

Find a Grave. (2015, July 28). Rev. John Snelling Popkin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/149927140/john-snelling-popkin

Find a Grave. (2009, November 18). Rev. Willard Preston. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/44548510/willard-preston

Find a Grave. (2017, November 20). Rev. James Thurston. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/185357112/james-thurston

French, Jonathan. (1809). A Sermon, Delivered September 28, 1808, at the Installation of the Rev. Isaac Briggs, to the Pastoral Care of the First Church and Society in Boxford. Haverhill, MA: W.B. Allen

Hawley, Elizabeth. (2005). The Olden Times: Stories for Betty. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=zXr5AAAAQBAJ&pg=PA24

Hayes, Charles C. (1882). History of Rockingham and Strafford Counties, New Hampshire: with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men. Philadelphia, PA: J.W. Lewis & Co. [Charles C. Hayes wrote the Milton portion of this multi-county historical compilation. The Milton information in John Scales’ later History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens was largely a direct copy from Hayes’ earlier work]

Hayward, Silvanus. (1881). History of the Town of Gilsum, New Hampshire: From 1752 to 1879. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=VWgjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA107

Lawrence, Robert F. (1856). The New Hampshire Churches: Comprising Histories of the Congregational and Presbyterian Churches in the State, with Notices of Other Denominations: Also Containing Many Interesting Incidents Connected with the First Settlement of Towns. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=KVUXAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA583

Lawrence, Robert M. (1904). Descendants of Major Samuel Lawrence of Groton, MA. Cambridge, MA: Riverside Press.

McLellan, Hugh D. (1903). History of Gorham, Me [Reuben Nason]. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=c1tAAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA698

NH Secretary of State. (1920). Laws of New Hampshire: Second Constitutional Period, 1811-1820. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RBFPAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA388

Nason, Rev. Reuben. (1816). Sketch of Freeport. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Sa8yAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA181

Popkin, John S. (1852). A Memorial of Rev. John Snelling Popkin, D.D. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=0ckRAAAAYAAJ

Preston, Willard. (1833). An Oration Delivered Before the Union Society in Savannah, April Twenty-third, 1833, Its Eighty-third Anniversary in the Independent Presbyterian Church. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nIQXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA3

Robbins, Thomas. (1886). Diary of Thomas Robbins, D.D., 1796-1854. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Ff_NAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA443

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA513

Smith, William. (1823). Some Remarks on the “Toleration Act” of 1819. Addressed to the Hon. John Taylor Gilman, by a “Friend to the Public Worship of the Deity.” Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=H8IrAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

Thayer, Elihu. (1801). A Sermon Preached at Hopkinton, at the Formation of the New-Hampshire Missionary Society, September 2d, 1801. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=XyZdAAAAcAAJ&printsec=frontcover

Wikipedia. (2022, January 27). Milton Town House. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Town_House

Milton Taverner Levi Jones (1771-1847)

By Muriel Bristol | February 20, 2022

Levi Jones was born in Lebanon, ME, October 21, 1771, son of Ebenezer and Susanna (Allen) Jones.

(His siblings were William Jones (1769-1845), James Jones, John Jones, Mary Jones (b. 1775), Sally Jones (b. 1778), who married Robert Mathes, Lydia Jones (b. 1781), Amos Jones (b. 1786), and Joshua Jones (b. 1789)).

Father Ebenezer Jones headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], three males aged under-16 years [John Jones, Amos Jones, Joshua Jones], and three females [Susanna (Allen) Jones, Mary Jones, and Lydia Jones. It appeared in the enumeration between those of Richd Horn and Jno [John] Jones.

Elder brother William Jones married in [the Northeast Parish of] Rochester, NH, June 13, 1798, Charlotte Cushing. (In the following, it seems more likely that the bride and groom were natives of Berwick, ME, and Dover, NH, rather than “of” those places at the time of their marriage).

Wm. Jones of Berwick, Me, married Charlotte Cushing of Dover in 1798, and settled here [in the Northeast Parish of Rochester, NH,] probably at about that time (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Levi Jones came to the Northeast Parish at about that time also, and certainly arrived before August 4, 1800, the date of the Second (1800) Federal Census.

Levi Jones, a native of Lebanon, Me., married Betsey Plumer of this town and settled here about the time of Milton’s incorporation (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

In fact, the given sequence of marriage and arrival should be reversed: Jones settled first in Milton – then the Northeast Parish of Rochester, NH – and then married Betsy Plumer afterwards.

Levi Jones headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself]. The alphabetized record can tell us little about his immediate neighbors. Father Ebenezer Jones and elder brother William Jones had also their own Milton households. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Meanwhile, future father-in-law Joseph Plumer headed also a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at that same time. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 45-plus years [Hannah (Bickford) Plumer], one male aged 16-25 years, two females aged 16-25 years [Betsy Plumer and Sally Plumer], two males aged 10-15 years, and one female aged 10-15 years [Hannah Plumer]. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

A tourist guidebook offered a circumstantial detail of Jones’ arrival on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton – he came to work in a Plummer-owned tavern – and then subsequently married Betsy Plummer.

… the New Hampshire Farm Museum (www.nhfarmmuseum.org), NH 125 off the Spaulding Turnpike at exit 18 in Milton, offers one of the most complete farm complexes anywhere. The 1780s Jones Farm house was home to Levi Jones, who came from Maine to work in a tavern owned by Joseph Plummer. He married Plummer’s daughter, Betsey, and eventually became the owner of the tavern. The buildings display a variety of architectural styles from the colonial period on, and old farm implements date to colonial days as well. Visitors may tour the house, barn, blacksmith shop, cobbler’s shop, and country store (Foulke, 2012).

Historian Sarah Ricker added an additional detail: the Jones Tavern, previously owned by his father-in-law, Joseph Plumer, was where Milton town meetings had been held before the Milton Town House had been built.

… before the Town House was built, Town Meetings were held at the Jones Tavern, which is now the New Hampshire Farm Museum, farther up on the [Plummer’s] ridge (Ricker, 1999).

But there is a competing account regarding the tavern in which those town meetings were held. In a biographical sketch of a later occupant, James L. Twombly (1840-1921), one learns that the tavern that had been used as the temporary town house had been the property of Lt. Elijah Horn (1764-1839), without reference to Joseph Plummer. Lewis B. Twombly (1808-1892), a Milton native who had lived “away” for a decade in Boston, MA, returned home and acquired the tavern building, which became his family residence. (He likely knew both Elijah Horn and Levi Jones). His son, James L. Twombly, the subject and source of the quoted biography, was born there in 1840. (The younger Twombly would serve in the Civil War (See Milton in the Veterans Schedule of 1890)).

The house he [Lewis B. Twombly] occupied, which is now owned by his son, is one of the oldest in Milton, and was originally the property of Lieutenant Elijah Horn. In an upper room, which was then unfinished, were held the first town meetings of Milton; and for some years it was customary for the people of the North-east Parish to hold religious services here on Sundays. Here old Parson Hasy, of Lebanon, and Parson Haven, of Newbury [Norway] Plains, delivered eloquent discourses on the Word, and taught the way to salvation. The children of the settlers and the early converts were baptized in this room (Biographical Review, 1897).

Plummer's Ridge - Detail - 1892
Milton in 1892 (Detail of Plummer’s Ridge). The farmhouse of “F. Jones” (Fred P. Jones, grandson of Levi Jones), now the NH Farm Museum, is indicated at the upper left, and the Milton Town House of 1803 is indicated at the lower right. Between them, but closer to the Town House, is indicated the house of “L.B. Twombly” (Lewis B. Twombly, father of James L. Twombly), the occupant from c1840 to 1892 of what had been originally the Elijah Horn Tavern. Just beyond it, on the righthand side when heading towards the Jones farmhouse, is a “Sch.” (the still extant District One Schoolhouse) just before what is now called Bolan Road. (There seems to be yet another schoolhouse a bit further on beyond Bolan Road).

Apart from its primary function as tavern, Northeast Parish church services had been held also in the unfinished upper room of the Horn Tavern, by Rev. Isaac Hasy (1742-1812) of neighboring Lebanon, ME, and Rev. Joseph Haven (1747-1825) of the Norway Plains in Rochester, NH. (Norway Plains Road lies opposite what is now the Lilac Mall). Census records show the Twombly household of 1840 and 1850, i.e., the household then occupying the former Horn tavern building, was situated near to – but a full enumeration page apart from – the Jones and Plummer households of 1840 and 1850.

How might these differing accounts be reconciled? If there were but one single tavern, i.e., the Horn Tavern, but with a sequence of owners, such that Plummer was at some point the owner of a tavern building that was not on or even adjacent to his own farmstead. (Plummer’s 1821 will would mention his owning property all over town). Horn might then have been the earlier owner, followed by Plummer, or else Plummer was all along the owner with Horn as his tavern manager. Jones arrived to be a tavern worker, or a subsequent manager, becoming later its owner.

Alternatively, there might have been always two separate taverns on Plummer’s Ridge: the Plummer-Jones Tavern and the Horn Tavern. (Strafford County Deed records might have some answers). If this latter two-tavern scenario were the case, then the Plummer-Jones Tavern would not have been the building that hosted early church services and the first two town meetings. That would have been instead the Horn Tavern. One may note that both Horn and Plummer petitioned for a Congregational Society in 1814. (Elijah Horne died in 1839, which is proximate to Lewis B. Twombly’s acquisition of the Horn tavern building and its conversion into a residence).

Levi Jones married (1st) in Rochester, NH, October 15, 1801, Elizabeth “Betsy” Plummer, both of Rochester. Rev. Joseph Haven performed the ceremony (NEHGS, 1908). The “Rochester” of their marriage might have been the Horn Tavern in Rochester, i.e., Milton as would be, as Rev. Haven was said to perform some of his offices there. She was born in Milton, October 28, 1779, daughter of Joseph and Hannah (Bickford) Plummer.

Levi Jones signed the Rochester division (or Milton separation) petition in what was then Rochester, NH, May 28, 1802, as did his father-in-law, Joseph Plumer, brothers William Jones and John Jones, and brother-in-law Robert Mathes (husband of sister Sally Jones).

The very first act of the original Milton selectmen was to license Elijah Horn’s tavern, August 30, 1802. The first annual town meeting was held March 14, 1803, purportedly in the tavern, and presumably the second annual town meeting was held there also in March 1804. The Milton town house was completed “on or before” October 3, 1804 (Scales, 1914). So, the third and subsequent annual town meetings presumably took place in the new structure.

Son Joseph P. “Plummer” Jones was born in Milton, April 4, 1803. He was a namesake for his maternal grandfather.

Milton’s selectmen of 1806 were Levi Jones, S.L. Wentworth, and Lt. Jotham Nute. (Captain Levi Jones then commanded the Milton militia company, in which Jotham Nute (1760-1836) was one of his lieutenants. S.L. Wentworth was likely S.S. Wentworth, whose florid middle initial “S” has been misread as an “L.” Samuel S. [Shackford] Wentworth (1756-1850) headed Milton households in 1800 and 1810. He decamped for Lancaster, NH, before 1820).

Father Ebenezer Jones died in Milton, in 1807.

Beard Plummer, Theodore C. Lyman, Levi Jones, and William Jones were among twenty-three Strafford County inhabitants that petitioned the NH Governor and Executive Council, January 31, 1810, to have Amos Cogswell, Esq., of Dover, NH, appointed as Strafford County Sheriff. Amos Cogswell was then a NH state representative and, during the War of 1812, would be elected to Dover’s twelve-man Committee of Defence, September 10, 1814.

Joseph Plumer headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 45-plus years [Hannah (Bickford) Plumer], one male aged 26-44 years [Levi Jones], two females aged 26-44 years [Betsy (Plumer) Jones and Sally Plumer], one male aged 16-25 years, one female aged 16-25 years, three males aged 10-15 years, one female aged 10-15 years, and one male aged under-10 years [Joseph P. Jones]. His household appeared between those of Widow Betsy Hayes and Beard Plumer. Elder brother William Jones and youngest brother Joshua Jones had also their own Milton households. (Their mother and sisters Mary and Lydia Jones resided with Joshua Jones).

Jones Tavern Sign, 1810
Jones Tavern Sign, 1810. “Oil on wood panel, 34 x 30 x 2. The Currier  Museum of Art, Manchester, NH; bequest of Miss Elizabeth Jones.” A Masonic square and compass symbol may be perceived faintly beneath the red paint.

Levi Jones kept his tavern at Plummer’s Ridge under his own name from at least the date on its signage: 1810. (He kept also a store).

The tavern barroom often served as a community bulletin board, either by custom or by vote of the town meeting. The taproom wall of David Bean’s tavern in Moultonborough was the official posting place for public notices, and the walls of Levi Jones’ tavern in Milton often displayed warrants for town meetings, newly passed legislation, ballots for forthcoming elections, notices of road reroutings, auction advertisements, and notices of lost animals or articles (Garvin, 2003).

Mother-in-law Hannah (Bickford) Plummer died in Milton, in February 1811.

Levi Jones was Milton’s third town clerk, serving in that office in the years 1811-22. He was preceded in that office by the second town clerk, John Fish, and succeeded by Stephen M. Mathes.

Levi Jones received his first appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, February 3, 1812. He joined Daniel Hayes, Beard Plummer, and Jotham Nute in that office.

Brother Amos Jones married in Berwick, ME, June 9, 1813, Martha Lord, he of Milton and she of Berwick, ME. Rev. Joseph Hilliard (of Berwick’s Second Congregational Church) performed the ceremony. (Their daughter Susan Jones was born in Milton, November 13, 1813).

Betsy (Plummer) Jones died in Milton, November 1, 1815, aged thirty-six years.

[Sally Worster married in Rochester, NH, November 12, 1815, Samuel Wallingford, both of Milton. Rev. Joseph Haven performed the ceremony (NEHGS, 1908)].

Levi Jones was among the ten Milton inhabitants that petitioned the NH General Court, in 1816, seeking a road weight limit. There were also four petitioners from Middleton, six from Rochester, and nine from Farmington, NH. (See Milton Road Weight Petition – 1816).

[Future stepson Zimri Scates Wallingford was born in Milton, October 7, 1816, son of Samuel E. and Sally (Worster) Wallingford].

Court rosters indicate that Levi Jones, of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on December 19, 1816.

Brother-in-law Robert Mathes of Milton sold land to brother Joshua Jones in 1817. Sister Sally [(Jones)] Mathes signified her assent. Joshua Jones married in Milton, December 10, 1818, Sally Cowell. She was born in Milton, May 6, 1793, daughter of Samuel and Amy (Kilgore) Cowell. Their daughter Susan A. Jones was born in Milton, February 23, 1820.

[Future stepson David Wallingford was born in Milton, April 4, 1819, son of Samuel E. and Sally (Worster) Wallingford].

A dispute arose in 1820 regarding Milton’s militia company (of which Jones had formerly been the captain). Milton’s area encompasses 34.3 square miles. Those required to attend periodic company training – they being all males aged 18-45 years – found the long distances to be traveled to musters burdensome. They asked that their largish (140% of standard size) town-delineated militia company be split into two companies. When their regimental field officers refused them, they sought to accomplish their objective by circulating a petition seeking instead to simply divide the town into two parts.

Some one hundred twenty-seven Milton men filed a competing remonstrance petition opposing a division of the town. It was intended for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature. Company officers Jeremy Nute, James Hayes, Jr., and Norton Scates all signed this remonstrance, as did former company officers Elijah Horn, Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, and future officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes. Jones’ brother, Joshua Jones, subscribed also to this petition (One may note that none of Milton’s then selectmen signed this petition).

Some eighty-eight Milton men filed a militia company division petition intended for the November 1820 session of the NH legislature. Captain Jeremy Nute signed this proposal, as did former company officers Elijah Horn, Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, future company officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes, and Milton selectman Hopley Meserve. A division of the company would have obviated the need or desire to divide the town in order to divide the company.

Father-in-law Joseph Plumer of Milton, husbandman, made his last will in Milton, March 12, 1821. (A husbandman is an ancient term for one who owns a freehold farm). His own wife and children were not mentioned, as they had all predeceased him. He devised $50 in cash to his beloved grandson (and namesake), Joseph Plumer Jones, to be paid by the executor within forty days. Joseph Plumer Jones was to receive also Pew #29 in the Milton Meeting-house, an in-common and undivided one-half of all the testator’s real estate, “consisting of a large number of lots of land, all lying in said Milton,” good farming utensils, one good horse, four working cattle, six cows, two yearling cattle, and twelve sheep.

Plumer gave $50 each to his “sisters,” in fact his sisters-in-law, Molly Bickford and Betsy [(Bickford)] Ham, and $50 each to [deceased sister-in-law] Sally Ham’s children, Sarah Ham and Lemuel Ham, when they had arrived at the age of twenty-one years. He gave $100 to Lydia Jones, sister of Levi Jones, Esquire, payable within two years. He gave Levi Jones, Esquire, the remaining undivided one-half of his real estate, and named him as executor. (Jones was titled “Esquire” because he was a Milton justice-of-the-peace).

Plumer gave “… unto the Town of Milton, for the use of the inhabitants thereof, a Pall or funeral cloth, to be made of Such materials as may be thought proper by my executor,” deliverable within four months. (This would have been a cloth or drapery, perhaps featuring Christian iconography, such as a cross, that is used to cover the coffin during a funeral service. When one sees a flag-draped coffin, the flag is being used as a pall). He gave to the “Congregational Church of Christ which is established in Milton” a Sacrament Table, as well as one good tankard, and two tumblers. Those vessels were to be made of silver and presented by the executor as soon as he might procure them. Benjamin Scates, Theodore C. Lyman, and Joseph Plumer, Jr., signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 24:506). (Witness Joseph Plumer, Jr. (1786-1826), was a son of Plumer’s younger brother, Beard Plumer (1754-1816). He was “Jr.” only in the sense that he was a younger man of the same name).

Father-in-law Joseph Plummer died in Milton, April 27, 1821, aged sixty-nine years. His last will was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held in Wolfeboro, NH, May 29, 1821 (Strafford County Probate, 24:506). (Wolfeboro was then in Stafford County, as Carroll County would not be established until 1840).

[Future stepdaughter Mary E. Wallingford was born in Milton, May 6, 1821, daughter of Samuel E. and Sally (Worster) Wallingford].

Levi Jones was one of twelve incorporators of the Humane Lodge of Masons of Rochester, NH, in June 1821. Incorporators Dr. Stephen Drew (1791-1872), Ira Fish (1790-1872), Hanson Hayes (1792-1851), and Jones’ older brother William Jones (1769-1845) were also Milton men; Giles W. Burrows (1821-1900) and Nathaniel Lord (1790-1870) were from Lebanon, ME; and John Chapman, Joseph Cross, Charles Dennett (1788-1867), Rev. Harvey Morey (1789-1830), and John Roberts, Jr. (1789-1861) were from Rochester, NH.

State of New Hampshire }
AN ACT TO INCORPORATE “HUMANE LODGE, No. 21”
[Approved June 27, 1821. Original Acts, vol. 26, p. 88; recorded Acts, vol. 22, p. 24]
Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General Court convened, that Levi Jones, William Jones, Charles Dennet, Nathaniel Lord, Hanson Hayes, Giles W. Burrows, John Chapman, John Roberts, Jun., Stephen Drew, Joseph Cross, Ira Fish, Harvey Morey and their associates and successors, shall be and hereby are erected and made a corporation and body politic by the name of “Humane Lodge, No. 21,” and by that name may sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, defend and be defended to final judgment and execution, and may have a common seal, and the same may alter at pleasure, and shall have and possess all the powers incident to corporations of a similar nature, and may have, hold and enjoy real and personal estate, not exceeding in amount two thousand dollars.
Section 2. And be it further enacted, that Levi Jones, William Jones, and Charles Dennet, or either two of them, may call a meeting of said corporation, to be holden at Rochester in the County of Strafford, at such time as they shall think expedient, by advertising in the Strafford Register, printed at Dover, fifteen days previous to meeting, at which meeting the members of said corporation, by a vote of the majority of those present, shall choose such officers and enact such by-laws, as they may think proper, for the regulation and government of said corporation. Provided, said by laws are not repugnant to the constitution and laws of this State (NH Secretary of State, 1921).

(An anti-Masonic party and movement would emerge in the late 1820s as America’s first third-party alternative. It lasted for about ten years. Might it have been during these years that the Masonic symbols on the Jones Tavern sign were overpainted?).

Court rosters indicate that Levi Jones, of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on November 9, 1821. It was at this time that he was advanced or promoted to justice in quorum.

The NH Register and Farmer’s Almanac of 1822 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum, as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and James Roberts.

Jones, Levi - Currier Museum
Levi Jones. Watercolor, circa 1825 (Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH). There is no companion portrait of his wife, as would have been usual, as he was then a widower.

Levi Jones was Milton’s State Representative in the NH state legislature in 1822-24. He was preceded in that office by Daniel Hayes, and succeeded by Hanson Hayes. He sat on the Military Committee.

Milton was said to have had five taverns in 1823. Those of Elijah Horn and/or Levi Jones on Plummer’s Ridge have been mentioned as being either one or two of them. There was also that of Theodore C. Lyman in South Milton. One might suppose that there was also one at Milton Mills and another at Milton Three Ponds.

[Future stepson Ira Wallingford was born in Milton, November 13, 1823, son of Samuel E. and Sally (Worster) Wallingford].

The NH Political Manual and Annual Register of 1824 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and J. Roberts. Jotham Nute was also identified as being Milton’s coroner (Farmer, 1824).

The NH House brought up a bill “appropriating $650 to the several agricultural societies in this State,” June 15, 1824. Rep. Levi Jones voted with the 85 representatives [44.3%] that were in favor, but it did not pass, as 107 representatives [55.7%] voted against it.

Mother Susanna [(Allen)] Jones of Milton, widow and relict of Ebenezer Jones, late of said Milton, deceased, made out her last will, November 3, 1824. She devised $30 to her eldest son, William Jones, and $1 each to her other sons, Levi Jones, James Jones, John Jones, and Amos Jones. (These token amounts might be taken as a sort of placeholder. Her sons would have received their shares from their parents when setting out in life or in the settlement of their father’s estate). She devised $10 to her granddaughter, Lydia Jones, a daughter of Amos Jones, and $1 each to grandchildren Hannah Mathes [b. April 8, 1804], Comfort Mathes (b. October 13, 1805], William B. Mathes, Ebenezer J. Mathes [b. c1810], Robert Mathes [b. June 15, 1812], Joseph Mathes [b. December 4, 1814], and Sally Mathes [b. September 9, 1817]. (The latter seven grandchildren were children of Robert and Sally (Jones) Mathes).

Antique Bed with Undersacking
An antique bedstead with its sailcloth undersack strung between its pegs with a cord. On top of this would have been placed the featherbed mattress, sheet(s), blanket, quilt, bolster and pillows (Photo: Weaving Haus Antiques).

She devised to granddaughter (and namesake) Susan Jones one good featherbed, two pillows, one bolster, one woolen bed quilt, one blanket, one sheet, two pillowcases, and one undersack, together with one good bedstead and cord. She devised $1 to Susan Lord, daughter of Samuel [and Abigail (Allen)] Lord. She devised $120 to her daughter, Mary Jones, as well as a four-foot square table, and one-half of the remaining bedsteads, beds, and bed clothes, one-half of her wearing apparel, and one-third of her pewter, crockery, tin and glassware. She devised $30 to her daughter, Lydia Jones, as well as the other one-half of the bedsteads, etc., the other one-half of the wearing apparel, and one-third of her pewter, etc.

Finally, she devised to her youngest son, Joshua Jones, all her real estate and whatever remained of her personal estate, including presumably the remaining third of her pewter, etc. She named son Joshua Jones as her executor, and signed with an “X.” Thomas Leighton, Daniel F. Jones, and Levi Jones signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 32:46).

In Susanna (Allen) Jones’ 1824 last will may be seen some residue of New England folkways associated with inheritance. Real property had been traditionally given mostly or entirely to sons, with daughters receiving instead portable furniture, household goods, personal effects, and cash. It was generally assumed that daughters would set up housekeeping in the farmsteads held by their husbands. (Husband literally means “householder”). In a division of real property, the eldest son would get a double share. For example, if there were three sons, the real estate would be split into fourths, with the eldest son getting a double share of two-fourths (or one-half) and the younger sons getting each a single share of one-fourth. It was a sort of modified or limited primogeniture.

These disparate eldest son and son versus daughter allocations were not as inequitable as they might seem at a first glance. The son might be called on to provide for his widowed mother, minor siblings, orphaned nieces and nephews, unmarried and disabled relations, etc. In a sense, he took up the family duties and responsibilities of the deceased father and needed the resources to do so. Land and houses were relatively cheap and, prior to widespread factory production, hand-crafted furniture and household goods had a greater relative value than they do now. Hard cash certainly did, and sometimes cash, farm animals, tools, clothing, or other items might be added in different amounts to equalize values.

A wife was entitled to a life-estate in one-third of her husband’s estate. Real estate transactions usually included a renunciation of these “dower rights” in the particular property being sold, usually for some nominal consideration, and required her signature. Her life-estate was not devisable as a legacy – it would expire with her – so what the Widow Jones was devising to her daughters (and grandchildren) in her will was mostly her own personal and portable “dower” goods – furniture, household goods, clothing and cash.

Mother Susanna (Allen) Jones died in Milton, January 9, 1825. Her will was proved in a Strafford County Probate Court held in Dover, NH, January 19, 1825.

The NH Annual Register and US Calendar of 1826 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and J. Roberts, Hanson Hayes, and Stephen M. Mathes (Farmer & Lyon, 1826).

[Samuel E. Wallingford died in Milton, August 11, 1826, leaving a widow, Sally (Worster) Wallingford, and four children].

Levi Jones headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], two males aged 20-29 years [Joseph P. Jones and another], one female aged 40-49 years, one female aged 30-39 years, one female aged 15-19 years, and one female aged 5-9 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of James Hayes, Jr., and Sarah Plumer. Elder brother William Jones had also a Milton household.

Court rosters indicate that Levi Jones, of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on October 14, 1831.

Col. Levi Jones married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, November 24, 1831, Mrs. Sally [(Worcester)] Wallingford, both of Milton. (She was the widow of Samuel E. Wallingford (1790-1826)). Rev. Isaac Willey performed the ceremony (NEHGS, 1908). She was born in Berwick, ME, July 22, 1793, daughter of Lemuel and Mary (Woodsum) Worcester. (The “Worcester” surname was more often spelled as pronounced: “Worster”). Among her eight siblings were Milton’s Isaac Worster (1772-1838), Dorcas (Worster) Nute (1777-1831), who was the mother of Lewis W. Nute (1820-1888), and Lydia Worster (1795-1863).

Son Charles P. Jones was born in Milton, July 21, 1833. He was a half-brother to the Wallingford children of his mother’s prior marriage.

Levi Jones was said to have been also a Milton storekeeper. The University of New Hampshire has his account book in its Special Collections area. It includes material from 1833 to 1847 (Find a Grave, 2017).

Levi Jones appeared as a Milton justice-of-the-peace in a regional directory of 1835. His name appeared in a different typeface than the others, indicating that he alone held also the justice in quorum position at this time.

Justices of the Peace. MiltonLevi Jones, Daniel Hayes, John Remich, James Roberts, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, Samuel S. Mason, Stephen Drew, Israel Nute, John L. Swinerton, Thomas Chapman (Hayward, 1834).

Court rosters indicate that Levi Jones, of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on August 27, 1836.

Sister-in-law Charlotte (Cushing) Jones died in Milton, November 12, 1838, aged fifty-eight years. Evidently prompted by his wife’s death, elder brother William Jones made his last will December 5, 1838. He devised a token $1 to his only son, William A. Jones (1809-1881),

… which sum, together with the real estate I have before given him by deed, is to be in full for his share of my Estate.

He devised $5 to eldest daughter Caroline [(Jones)] Page (1799-1872), and $20 to second daughter Sophia W. [(Jones)] Stone (1801-1869). Third daughter Elizabeth P. Jones (1807-1892) was to receive an undivided one-third of his real property, as well as

… two feather beds, with bedsteads, cord, pillows and bed cloth, suitable and sufficient to cover them well in summer and winter with equal goodness with my other beds and bedding.

And youngest daughter Charlotte C. Jones (1818-1872) was to receive the other undivided two-thirds of his real estate, as well as the rest and residue of his estate. He named her also as executrix. David Wallingford, Joseph P. Jones, and Levi Jones signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 61:174).

The NH Political Manual and Annual Register of 1840 identified Milton’s Justices of the Peace as being Levi Jones, Daniel Hayes, John Remick, JAMES ROBERTS, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, Samuel S. Mason, Stephen Drew, John L. Swinerton, Thomas Chapman, Joseph Cook, John J. Plumer, Daniel Hayes, Jr. (McFarland & Jenks, 1840).

Levi Jones headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years, one female aged 40-49 years [Sally ((Worster) Wallingford) Jones], one male aged 30-39 years [Joseph P. Plummer], one male aged 20-29 years [David Wallingford?], one female aged 15-19 years [Mary E. Wallingford], and one male aged 5-9 years [Charles P. Jones]. Three members of his household were employed in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Sarah Plumer and James A. Ricker. Elder brother William Jones had also a Milton household.

Stepson Zimri S. Wallingford married in Berwick, ME, August 26, 1840, Alta L.G. Hilliard. Rev. Joseph Hilliard performed the ceremony. She was born in Berwick, ME, February 17, 1810, daughter of Rev. Joseph and Sarah (Laughton) Hilliard.

Milton has never had a bank of its own. Rochester, NH, had the closest actual banking establishment at this time. It was even said of the Rochester Bank (incorporated 1834) that there was no other between it and Canada. Levi Jones was evidently successful enough financially to serve Milton as a small-scale local banker or money lender.

July 28, 1842. “Voted that the selectmen dispose of the notes in the hands of Levi Jones and appropriate the same towards the extinguishment of the debt due from the town to the several school districts by paying over to each district its proportion the present year.” Accordingly, $186.46 was paid to the districts (Scales, 1914).

A forger tried to pass a forged note, i.e., a bank draft, at the Rochester Bank in Rochester, NH, as having been drafted and signed (or co-signed) by Levi Jones of Milton. The bankers had been incautious – to say the least – in suggesting several names for him to forge. The other name they offered up was that of attorney Amasa Copp (1788-1871) of neighboring Wakefield, NH.

Another time a man from Brownfield, Me., claiming to be a drover, came in wanting to borrow $2,500 at once. He said that Mr. Towle, who was known to be wealthy, was an uncle of his and would sign the note. He was informed that he could have the money if he would get the name of Amasa Copp of Wakefield, or Levi Jones of Milton. A little before bank hours next morning, Mr. McDuffee saw him coming up the street on a sweating horse, as though he had been riding all night. Suspecting that all was not right he secured the presence of the sheriff. The man, whose name was Meade, brought his note with the name of Levi Jones, which was at once seen to be a forgery. Denying at first, he finally confessed, and was arrested and lodged in jail. He belonged to a notorious gang of forgers and counterfeiters, who had money enough to almost ensure the escape of any one of their number who should be detected. John P. Hale, his counsel, set up insanity as defence, got him admitted to bail which proved to be worthless, and the man escaped to Canada (McDuffee, 1892).

Levi Jone's Signature (1816)
An authentic signature of Levi Jones (from 1816).

Court rosters indicate that Levi Jones, of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on July 2, 1841.

Justices of the Peace. MiltonLevi Jones, Stephen Drew, Daniel Hayes, Hanson Hayes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, John L. Swinerton, Joseph Cook, John J. Plumer, Daniel Hayes, jr., Enoch Banfield, Daniel P. Warren, Joseph Cook, James Berry, Wm. B. Lyman (NH Register and Farmer’s Almanac, 1844).

Levi Jones was one of twenty initial incorporators of the Great Falls & Conway Railroad, June 19, 1844.

Sect. 1. Be it enacted, &c., That Samuel Quarles, John Crocker, Josiah H. Hobbs, Lory Odell, Luther D. Sawyer, Zebulon Pease, Thomas P. Drake, Brackett Wiggins, James Garvin, Adam Brown, Joel Eastman, John A. Burley, Levi Jones, William Sawyer, Artemas Harmon, Nathaniel Abbott, James Willey, Zara Cutler, John H. White, and Samuel Atkinson, and their associates, successors and assigns be and they hereby are incorporated and made a body politic under the name of the Great Falls and Conway Railroad … the said corporation is hereby authorized and empowered to locate, construct, and finally complete a railroad, beginning at or near the depot of the Boston and Maine Railroad, in Somersworth, and thence running through said Somersworth, Rochester, Milton, Wakefield, Ossipee, Effingham, Freedom, or Tamworth, and Eaton, to any place in Conway, in such manner and form as they may deem expedient … (Gregg & Pond, 1851).

The incorporators’ names might be rearranged in proposed railroad route order as Lory Odell (1801-1883) of Portsmouth, NH; John H. White (1803-1882) of Dover, NH; John A. Burley (1800-1860) of Somersworth, NH; Levi Jones (1771-1847) of Milton, NH; James Garvin (b. 1796), Josiah H. Hobbs (1795-1854), Joseph Brackett Wiggins (1803-1873), Luther D. Sawyer (1803-1884), and William Sawyer (1805-1881), all of Wakefield, NH; Adam Brown (1793-1880) and Samuel J. Quarles (1807-1865), both of Ossipee, NH; Thomas P. Drake (1793-1861) of Effingham, NH; Zebulon Pease (1795-1863) of Freedom, NH; Samuel Atkinson (1793-1858), John Crocker (1795-1848), and Artemas Harmon (1808-1882), all of Eaton, NH; and Nathaniel Abbott (1796-1863), Zara Cutler (1786-1861), Joel Eastman (1798-1884), and James Willey (1786-1860), all of Conway, NH.

The initial 10,000 stock shares were to be issued at a price of $100 apiece. Many of these incorporators (and presumed initial investors) were farmers, militia officers and justices of the peace in their respective communities. Many of them did not live so long as to see the PGF&C railroad actually reach its destination at Conway, NH, in 1872, and some few of them, including Levi Jones, he being easily the eldest among them, did not live long enough to see it reach even so far as Milton Three Ponds.

Stepson David Wallingford married, in 1844, Susan A. Jones. She was born in Milton, February 23, 1820, daughter of Joshua and Sally (Cowell) Jones.

Sister-in-law Martha [(Lord)] Jones died in Sullivan, ME, May 26, 1844, aged fifty-five years.

Stepdaughter Mary E. Wallingford married in Canterbury, NH, September 18, 1844, Thomas C. Neal, she of Milford [SIC], NH, and he of Loudon, NH.

Brother William Jones, Esq., died in Milton, January 26, 1845, aged seventy-five years. His estate was proved in a Strafford County Probate Court in Rochester, NH, February 4, 1845 (Strafford County Probate, 61:174).

Son Joseph P. “Plummer” Jones died in Milton, February 13, 1845, aged forty-one years, ten months, and nine days. If, as it would seem, he died without issue or will, his undivided one-half share in the Plummer-Jones real estate would have devolved to his father.

Justices of the Peace. MILTONLevi Jones, Stephen Drew, Hanson Hayes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, John L. Swinerton, Joseph Cook, John J. Plumer, Daniel Hayes, Jr., Enoch Banfield, Daniel P. Warren, James Berry, William B. Lyman, Levi Hayes, Jr., James Furnald (NH Register and Farmer’s Almanac, 1846).

Court rosters indicate that Levi Jones, of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 30, 1846. His term in office should have extended out to June 1851, but there is instead an undated marginal notation that he was “dead.”

Levi Jones died in Milton, August 18, 1847, aged seventy-five years.

Stepson Ira Wallingford married in Dover, NH, May 13, 1848, Delania D. Thompson.

Sally [((Worster) Wallingford)] Jones, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Charles P. Jones, a farmer, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Mary [E. (Wallingford)] Neal, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Kirk B. Neal, aged five years (b. NH), Jonathan Abbott, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. ME), and Charles W. Conway, a farmer, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Sally Jones had real estate valued at $10,000. (Mary E. (Wallingford) Neal was Sally Jones’ widowed daughter and Kirk B. Neal was her grandson). Her household was enumerated between those of Nahum Tasker, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), and William Sanborn, aged forty-six years (b. NH [ME]).

Brother Joshua Jones, a farmer, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed also a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sally [(Cowell)] Jones, aged fifty-six years (b. ME), George Jones, a farmer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), William Jones, a farmer, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Lydia Jones, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Mary Jones, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), and Lydia Jones, aged sixty-nine years (b. ME). Joshua Jones had real estate valued at $1,500. He had living with him his elder sisters, Mary and Lydia Jones. (His son, George [H.] Jones (1828-1918), would be the father of Ira W. Jones (1854-1946)).

Stepson Ira Wallingford died in Milton, November 13, 1853, aged twenty-nine years.

Son Charles P. Jones married in Milton, November 11, 1857, Betsy Varney, both  of Milton. Rev. Andrew Peabody performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, March 18, 1834, daughter of John H. and Betsy W. (Cloutman) Varney.

Charles Jones, a farmer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Betsey [(Varney)] Jones, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Fred P. Jones, aged eight months (b. NH), Salley [((Worster) Wallingford)] Jones, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), Lydia Worster, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), Abba Corliss, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and F.E. [Frank E.] Wallingford, aged eight years (b. NH). Charles Jones had real estate valued at $16,000 and personal estate valued at $6,000. Salley Jones had personal estate valued at $1,000. His household was enumerated between those of E.W. Plummer, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and William Sanborn, aged fifty-six years (b. NH). (Baby Fred P. Jones (1860-1941) would become the father of Robert E. Jones (1887-1954). Lydia Worster (1795-1863) was a sister of Salley ((Worster) Wallingford) Jones. Frank E. Wallingford (c1852-1914) was an orphaned son of Ira and Delania D. (Thompson) Wallingford, his father having died in 1853 and his mother having died only several months before).

Sally ((Worster) Wallingford) Jones died in Milton, January 12, 1863, aged sixty-nine years, five months, and twenty-one days.

Son Charles Jones and Theodore Lyman (1812-1891) were Milton’s NH State Representatives in the 1863-64 biennium.

Sister Mary Jones died of dysentery in Milton, August 20, 1866, aged ninety years.

Brother Joshua Jones died of palsy in Milton, June 17, 1868, aged seventy-nine years, three months, and eight days. His last will, dated March 9, 1868, devised to his wife, Sally K. [(Cowell)] Jones, and children, Mary E. [(Jones)] Varney, William A. Jones, Susan A. [(Jones)] Wallingford, Lydia T. [(Jones)] Tasker, and George H. Jones. Charles Jones, Betsy [(Varney)] Jones, and Nancy J. [(Holland)] Varney signed as witnesses.

Charles Jones, a farmer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Betsey [(Varney)] Jones, keeping house, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Fred P. Jones, at school, aged ten years (b. NH), Nellie V. Jones, at school, aged eight years (b. NH), Dana Jones, at school, aged six years (b. NH), George H. Pike, a farm laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Josaphine Kimball, a domestic servant, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), and Frank E. Wallingford a farm laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Charles Jones had real estate valued at $12,000 and personal estate valued at $21,000. His household was enumerated between those of Enoch W. Plummer, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), and William Sanborn, a farmer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME). (Young [Charles] Dana Jones (1863-1908) would become a Milton physician).

Son Charles P. Jones died in Milton, May 8, 1873, aged thirty-nine years, nine months. His wife (and Levi Jones’ daughter-in-law), Betsy (Varney) Jones, died in Milton, February 28, 1878, aged forty-one years.

Grandson Fred P. Jones, a farmer, aged twenty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his siblings, Nellie V. Jones, keeping house, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Charles D. Jones, aged sixteen years (b. NH). They shared a dwelling with a second household. It consisted of James W. Nutter, a farmer, aged fifty-one years (b. NH) and his wife, Ruth V. [(Varney)] Nutter, a housekeeper, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Ruth (Varney) Nutter was the maternal aunt of the Jones siblings.

Sister-in-law Sally (Cowell) Jones died in Milton, May 8, 1884, aged ninety-one years, one day.

Stepson Zimri Scates Wallingford died in Dover, NH, May 28, 1886, aged seventy-nine years.

Hon. Zimri Wallingford Dead. DOVER, N.H., May 28 – Hon. Zimri S. Wallingford died today aged 69 [79]. He was a master machinist and builder, and was an alderman in ’57, ’58, ’61 and ’62. He was a member of the constitutional convention and presidential elector in ’76, being always a strong Republican. He was president of the following: Savings bank for Strafford county, Dover Library Association, proposed Dover & Barrington railroad, Dover horse railroad, and director in Stratford National Bank, Dover & Winnepiseogee railroad, Elliot Bridge Company, Dover Navigation Company. He was an honored member of St. Paul’s Commandery Knights Templar. He leaves a widow and two daughters. The funeral will occur Tuesday afternoon, when the Cocheco works will shut down in respect to the deceased (Boston Globe, May 29, 1886).

Alta L.G. (Hilliard) Wallingford died of general debility in Dover, NH, March 5, 1891, aged eighty-one years, and sixteen days.

Niece Susan A. (Jones) Wallingford died in Milton, February 11, 1902.

MILTON. David Wallingford of Plummer’s ridge is slowly failing (Farmington News, January 9, 1903).

Stepson David Wallingford died in Milton, February 22, 1903, aged eighty-three years.


References:

Biographical Review. (1897). Biographical Review: Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Strafford and Belknap Counties, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=C2sjAQAAMAAJ&pg-PA31

Claremont Manufacturing Co. (1822), NH Register & Farmer’s Almanac. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=KgIXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA36

Claremont Manufacturing Co. (1846). NH Register & Farmer’s Almanac. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=5ucWAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA55

Farmer, John. (1824). NH Political Manual and Annual Register. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=FMEwAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA44

Farmer, John & Lyon, G. Parker. (1826). NH Register & US Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=L8EwAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA44

Farmer, John & Lyon, G. Parker. (1844). NH Annual Register & US Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=BJIBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA50

Find a Grave. (2012, June 14). Amasa Copp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/91927088/amasa-copp

Find a Grave. (2022, February 3). Elijah Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236457865/elijah-horne

Find a Grave. (2021, November 1). Charles [P.] Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/233615967/charles-dana-jones

Find a Grave. (2021, November 4). Joseph Plummer Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/233702174/joseph-plummer-jones

Find a Grave. (2017, October 24). Levi Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184574201/levi-jones

Find a Grave. (2020, October 22). William Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217586882/william-jones

Find a Grave. (2021, November 4). Joseph Plumer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/233700428/joseph-plumer

Find a Grave. (2017, October 26). David Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184628124/david-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2017, October 29). Ira Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184732220/ira-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2017, October 16). Samuel Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184333199/samuel-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2015, July 19). Zimri Scates Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/149504393/zimri-scates-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2022, February 3). Lydia Worcester. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236461190/lydia-worcester

Foulke, Robert, and Foulke, Patricia. (2012). A Visitor’s Guide to Colonial & Revolutionary New England: Interesting Sites to Visit, Lodging, Dining, Things to Do. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=knbucC2iq1AC&pg=PA236

Garvin, Donna-Belle, & Garvin, James L. (2003). On the Road North of Boston: New Hampshire Taverns and Turnpikes, 1700-1900. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=PtZDVgSvFp8C&pg=PA11-IA9

Gregg, Washington P., and Pond Benjamin. (1851). Railroad Charters of the United States. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=gRpRAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA408

Hayward, John. (1834). New-England and New-York Law-register, for the Year 1835. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RXc8AAAAIAAJ&pg=86

Humane Lodge. (2021). Welcome to Humane Lodge, No. 21,
Free & Accepted Masons. Retrieved from www.humanelodge21.org/

McDuffee, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rL0yAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA481

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA91

NEHGS. (1908). First Congregational Church Records, Rochester, NH. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=8cwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA38

NH Secretary of State. (1921). Laws of New Hampshire: Second Constitutional Period, 1821-1828. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Ku8KAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA19

Ricker, Sarah. (1999). Milton and the New Hampshire Farm Museum. Arcadia Publishing.

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=520

Wikipedia. (2022, January 23). Anti-Masonic Party. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Masonic_Party

Wikipedia. (2021, September 1). John P. Hale. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_P._Hale

Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1813

By Muriel Bristol | February 13, 2022

Milton’s NH State Representative William Palmer (1757-1815), speaking for a “respectable number of inhabitants,” petitioned NH Governor John Taylor Gilman and his Executive Council in 1813, seeking appointment of a Milton justice-of-the-peace. (Gilman was a Federalist, as opposed to a Democratic-Republican).

The nominee, John Remick, “Jr.,” was born in Kittery, ME, April 17, 1777, son of Sergeant William and Lydia (Staples) Remick. (He acquired the appellation “Junior” in Milton to distinguish him from his older cousin, John Remick, who was a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Deed) Remick and who came to Milton after him, in 1799).

John Remick married (1st) in Kittery, ME, August 17, 1794, Mary “Polly” Butler. She was born in Portsmouth, NH, May 18, 1770, daughter of Captain Edward and Elizabeth (Langdon) Butler.

John and his wife, Mary, bought land in Rochester, 1795, 1798 and 1799. 7 June 1799 he signed a deed as “Jr.,” and also in 1800 (Remick, 1933).

John Remick, Jr., headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Mary (Butler) Remick], one female aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, one male aged under-10 years [Edward B. Remick], and two females aged under-10 years [Lydia S. Remick and Eliza Remick].

John Remick, Jr., signed the petition seeking to divide what would be Milton from its parent Rochester, NH, in 1802. He was one of the newly established town’s first three Selectman in 1802, along with William Palmer and John Fish. He served in that capacity in 1802, 1804, 1805, 1807-11, and 1819-20 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

He served as a selectman from 1802 to 1812 and again in 1820 and was a Justice of the Peace from 1814 to 1838 (Remick, 1933).

In May 1806, he bought land in Wakefield of which he sold part to Andrew Libby of Kittery, 12 Apr 1809. He sold property in Milton Mills in January 1810 and April 1821, and in both deeds is called “Jr.” (Remick, 1933).

John Remick, Jun., headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], two females aged 26-44 years [Mary (Butler) Remick], one male aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years [Edward B. Remick], two females aged 10-15 years [Lydia S. Remick and Eliza Remick], and one female aged under-10 years [Mary B. Remick]. Their household appeared first in the enumeration, just before those of Moses Paul and Joseph Libby.

In 1813 former selectman and then NH State Representative William Palmer penned his personal petition recommending John Remick, Jr., for appointment as justice-of-the-peace. (In it he alluded to several business entities then active in the Northeasterly part of Milton, i.e., Milton Mills).

To His Excellency the Governor And the Honorable Council of the State of New Hampshire

Wm Palmer, A Representative from the town of Milton, respectfully beg leave to represent, that a respectable number of Inhabitants who live in the Northeasterly part of said town, experience many inconveniencies by reason of there not being any Justice of the peace living within three or four miles of them, that it is a considerable place of trade – 3 Sawmills, 3 Gristmills and one carding machine in the village, where much business is done, and where much company resorts – that it would be very convenient and gratifying to the inhabitants to have some suitable person, who resides among them, appointed to that office ~ that it would have a happy tendency to preserve peace, insure tranquility and promote the public good ~ I therefore ask leave to recommend Mr John Remick, Junr, as a suitable person for that office ~ A man in my opinion whose natural and acquired abilities are good, of correct morals and temperate habits ~ And if appointed it will be Gratifying to the town at large ~ And in particular to your Excellency and Honors.

Humble Petitioner

Wm Palmer

Palmer’s petition was labeled on its reverse side:

For a Justice
In Milton
Nominated 1813

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 18, 1813.

The Records of Elder Joseph Spinney of Wakefield from 1835 to 1898 have been preserved and among the items contained therein were a list of marriages performed by John Remick, Jr., Justice of the Peace of Milton, N.H., from 1814 to 1838, and an extract of the will of [his father-in-law,] Captain Edward Butler (Remick, 1933).

John Remick, Jr., was Milton’s State Representative during the 1816-17 biennium.

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 18, 1818.

Remick was at the center of the dispute that arose over Milton’s militia company in 1820.

… in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

The NH Register and Farmer’s Almanac of 1822 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum, which was the higher or senior office, as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and James Roberts (Claremont Manufacturing Co, 1822).

In 1822 he acted as the administrator of the estate of Mark Langdon Butler of Portsmouth, his brother-in-law (Remick, 1933).

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 10, 1823.

His older cousin, John Remick (son of Corporal Benjamin Remick), the existence of whom had caused him, the younger cousin, to be identified for many years as “Junior,” died in Milton, June 25, 1823. The elder cousin’s widow, Susanna (Cole) Remick, died in Milton, August 28, 1824.

The NH Political Manual and Annual Register of 1824 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and J. Roberts. Jotham Nute was also identified as being Milton’s coroner (Farmer, 1824).

Mary (Butler) Remick died in Milton, sometime before February 1826.

The NH Annual Register and US Calendar of 1826 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and J. Roberts, Hanson Hayes, and Stephen M. Mathes (Farmer & Lyon, 1826).

John Remick, Esq., married (2nd) in Wakefield, NH, February 9, 1826, Sally Nudd, he of Milton and she of Wakefield, NH.

In his second marriage record he had the appellation of “Esq.” given to him, because of this latter [justice-of-the-peace] office (Remick, 1933).

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 14, 1828.

John Remick headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Sally (Nudd) Remick], one female aged 15-19 years [Salome Remick], and one male aged 10-14 years. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Nathl Dearborn and Francis Chapman. (Milton Mills merchant B.U. Simes appeared on the other side of Nathl Dearborn).

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 15, 1833. He did not continue as a justice beyond the June 1838 expiration of this last appointment.

John Remick headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], two females aged 60-69 years [Sally (Nudd) Remick and her sister, Betsy Nudd], and one male aged 20-29. One person in the household was engaged in Agriculture.

John Remick made out his last will, May 29, 1840. In it he devised a life estate in all of his real estate, as well as two cows, six sheep, furniture and personal property, to his beloved wife, Sally Remick, and her sister, Betsy Nudd, while they remained unmarried. Should either die or marry, their share in the life estate would pass to the survivor or, in the event of a marriage, to the one that remained single. Once both had either passed or married, the property was to pass to his children or trusts set up on their behalf. Daughter Lydia S. Page was to have a life estate, which would pass eventually to grandson J.W.R. Page at her decease. Of the remainder, daughter Eliza L. Copp was to receive one-third outright. Amasa Copp was to hold one-third in trust in order to pay an allowance to son Edward B. Remick. John Wingate of Wakefield, NH, was to hold one-third in trust in order to pay an allowance to daughter Mary Copp, widow of William Copp. He appointed his wife, Sally Remick, and James Berry, as joint executors. David Witham, Josiah Farnham, and Josiah Hussey signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 58:325).

John Remick died in Milton, September 12, 1840. His will was proved in Somersworth, NH, October 6, 1840.

Sally (Nudd) Remick died in Milton, November 23, 1845, aged sixty-seven years, seven months.


References:

Find a Grave. (2015, October 17). Sgt. William Palmer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/153850898/william-palmer

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA96

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 42: June 1812-1813

NH Secretary of State. (1920). Laws of New Hampshire: Second Constitutional Period, 1811-1820 [1816 Representatives]. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Cb9GAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA464

NH Secretary of State. (1920). Laws of New Hampshire: Second Constitutional Period, 1811-1820 [1817 Representatives]. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Cb9GAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA594

Remick, Oliver P. (1933). Remick Genealogy. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=5X5MAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA126

Thompson, Rev. Albert H. (1886). Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Organization of the First Church, and Ordination of the First Settled Town Minister of Wakefield, N.H. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EKm15quwMhsC&pg=PA42

South Milton Miller T.C. Lyman (1770-1863)

By Muriel Bristol | February 6, 2022

Theodore Cushing “T.C.” Lyman was not born under that name. He was born as Theodore Ham in Dover, NH, in 1770.

His grandson, John D. Lyman (1823-1902), would devise in his will a number of mementos to family and friends. Among them was a fire shovel, which he gave to his son, John T. Lyman (b. 1862).

The little old fire shovel (the one used by John Twombley born about 1732 and who lived on my father’s farm and brought up my grandfather Theodore Cushing Lyman, and my first property excepting a dollar given me by Wm. Allen Lord) (Rockingham County Probate, 220:182; Portsmouth Herald, September 25, 1902).

Through which one may learn that John Twombly (1732-1825) had raised Theodore Cushing Lyman – then Theodore Ham, – as a child, and had late in life lived on Micah Lyman’s Milton farm. (And that William Allen Lord had given a dollar to a young John D. Lyman (perhaps as a gift on the occasion of Lord’s marriage to his paternal aunt)).

The Mitchell-Cony account of Milton’s first settlement had John Twombly settling in the “Varney neighborhood” around 1771-72.

About ten or a dozen years later, in 1771 or 1772, John Twombly established himself in the so-called Varney neighborhood. His nearest neighbor was a man named Jenkins upon Goodwin Hill at the time.

As one may see later, Theodore C. Lyman had several South Milton mill associates named Varney. “Goodwinville” was later a neighborhood on the ridgeline in West Milton (along the Governor’s Road).

Milton Town Clerk Ruth L. (Plummer) Fall (1886-1960) claimed Twombly as one of her own.

John Twombly died in Milton in 1825, aged ninety-three years. He is buried on the farm of my great-great-grandfather, who was taken when a young boy by John Twombly. This Twombly was a native of Madbury. When our New Hampshire troops, stationed at Ticonderoga during the Revolution, were reported to be in need of supplies, John Twombly yoked up his oxen, and drove to Portsmouth, where his team was loaded with flour, powder, bacon and rum. Then he journeyed across New Hampshire and Vermont to Fort Ticonderoga where he was gladly welcomed by our needy soldiers (Bartlett, 1952).

John Twombly headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 16-plus years and one female. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Richard Mason and Ebenezer Jones. (See Northeast Parish in the First (1790) Federal Census).

Theodore Ham married (1st) in Rochester, NH, January 3, 1797, Dorothy “Dolly” Allen, both of Rochester (NEHGS, 1908). She was born in Rochester, NH, August 24, 1769, daughter of William and Hannah (Emerson) Allen.

Son Micah Ham was born in Rochester (Milton as would be), NH, November 23, 1797. Daughter Lovey Ham was born in Rochester, NH, in 1800.

Theodore Ham headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Dorothy (Allen) Ham], one male aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, one male aged under-10 years [Micah Ham], and one female aged under-10 years [Lovey Ham]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Clement Hayes and Nicholas Harford. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Daughter Clarissa L. Ham was born in Milton, October 9, 1802. Son George D. Ham was born in Milton, August 27, 1804. Son William Blake Ham, was born in Milton, April 23, 1807.

State of New Hampshire }
AN ACT AUTHORIZING THEODORE HAM AND HIS FAMILY TO ASSUME THE NAME OF LYMAN. ~
[Approved December 13, 1808. Original Acts, vol. 20, p. 26; recorded Acts, vol. 18, p. 32] 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General Court convened, That Theodore Ham of Milton in the County of Strafford, be, and he hereby is authorized and empowered to assume and bear the name of Theodore C Lyman, and the children of the said Theodore are hereby authorized and empowered to assume and bear the name of Lyman, instead of that of Ham and the name of Lyman to annex to each and every of their christian, given or baptismal names instead of the name of Ham as aforesaid, and by those names respectively, in future, shall be called and known, any law, usage or custom to the contrary notwithstanding. ~
Provided, that nothing in this act contained, shall impair any contract or obligation by them or either of them made, or affect any action or suit now pending in any Court of law, within this State wherein the said Theodore or either of his children is a party ~ (NH Secretary of State, 1918).

Roxana A. Lyman was born in Milton, in 1809. She would have been the first child born under the name Lyman. (The others had their surnames changed from Ham to Lyman in the prior year).

Theodore C. Lyman and twenty-two other Strafford County inhabitants petitioned the NH Governor and his Executive Council, January 31, 1810, to have Amos Cogswell (1752-1826), Esq., of Dover, NH, appointed as Strafford County Sheriff. Cogswell had been an officer during the Revolutionary War and was a Colonel in the militia. (Beard Plumer, Levi Jones and William Jones signed also this petition).

[T.] C. Lyman headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], two females aged 26-44 years [including Dorothy (Allen) Lyman], one male aged 10-15 years [Micah Lyman], one female aged 10-15 years [Lovey Lyman], two females aged under-10 years [Clarissa Lyman and Roxana A. Lyman], two males aged under-10 years [George D. Lyman and William B. Lyman], and one female aged 45-plus years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ebenr. Gate and Jno. Twombly.

At the U.S. Congress, in January 1811, Milton’s Theodore C. Lyman and [Rep.] John Fish (c1760-1819[?]) sought salvage rights in any public property that might be lying at the bottom of Lakes George and Champlain in New York state. (U.S. Representative William Hale (1765-1848) of Dover, NH, presented their petition).

Mr. Hale presented a petition of Theodore C. Lyman and John Fish, of the State of New Hampshire, stating that they have invented a machine for exploring the bottoms of Lakes Champlain and George; and praying that they may have the exclusive property in all articles which belonged to the public prior to being lost, and which they may recover. Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Committee of Commerce and Manufacture (US Congress, 1826).

This begs so many questions. What was the nature of their machine? Perhaps a floating derrick, a diving bell, or something truly innovative, such as a submarine. What public property did they hope or expect to find? Perhaps something lost in those lakes during the Revolutionary War. Did they experiment by exploring the depths of Milton Three Ponds or Lake Winnipesaukee? At any event no further information has come to hand and that distant lakes region would become again a seat of war during the War of 1812.

Milton sent Theodore C. Lyman twice as its representative to the NH legislature, first in the 1811-12 biennium. (He succeeded his salvage associate, John Fish, in that office).

Theodore C. Lyman was one of ten petitioners that recommended Mr. Dominicus Hanson (b. 1760), then Strafford County Registrar of Deeds, for appointment as justice-of-the-peace. Their June 1812 petition was dated Concord, NH. (Hanson did receive his appointment as a justice in Dover, NH, November 8, 1813).

Son Theodore Lyman was born in Milton, August 23, 1812.

The Mitchell-Cony directory relates that there was a “famous” celebration at the T.C. Lyman tavern in [South] Milton, April 15, 1815, “which fitly manifested the joy and satisfaction of the people here over the outcome of the war,” i.e., the War of 1812. (In 1876, Betsy ((Meserve) Pinkham) Lyman would remember that there was also a thanksgiving service on that occasion at the Tuttle school in West Milton).

State of New Hampshire }
AN ACT TO INCORPORATE GRAPE ISLAND MILL COMPANY
[Approved June 20, 1817. Original Acts, vol. 24 p. 73, recorded Acts, vol. 21, p. 32]
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened, that Jacob Varney, Theodore C. Lyman and Job Varney and their associates, successors and assigns be, and they hereby are, incorporated and made a body corporate and politic, by the name and style of Grape Island Mill Company. and by that name may sue and be sued prosecute and defend to final judgment and execution. and they are hereby vested with all the powers and privileges which by law are incident to similar institutions.
And be it further enacted, that said Jacob Varney and Theodore C. Lyman or either of them may call the first meeting of said Corporation, at any suitable time and place in the town of Milton, in the County of Strafford, by posting up notifications for that purpose in said Milton and in the towns of Farmington and Rochester, at some public place in each of said Towns, fourteen days prior to the time of holding said meeting; at which meeting they may elect a Clerk, who shall be sworn, and all other officers necessary for such an institution; and shall also agree on a method of calling future meetings, and determine on the time of their annual meeting, and make and establish, generally, such rules, by laws and regulations, not inconsistent with the laws of the State, as shall be deemed necessary and proper for the government of said Corporation; and may divide the same into a convenient number of shares ~ and all absent members may be represented at any meeting, by written authority, which shall be filed by the Clerk; and in all cases each share shall be entitled to one vote ~
And be it further enacted, that said Corporation be and they hereby are authorized and empowered to build, support and keep in repair in Milton aforesaid, on Salmon fall river, so called, any buildings or works necessary and convenient for sawing lumber, grinding and bolting grain and meal and carding wool and cotton, and the business necessarily connected therewith, and may purchase and hold in fee simple or otherwise any lands adjoining said buildings and works, necessary and convenient for said Proprietors not exceeding three acres. And the share or shares of any proprietor may be sold by said Corporation for non payment of assessments duly made, agreeably to the by laws of said Corporation ~ and any proprietor may alienate his share or shares in said Corporation by deed duly executed and recorded by the Clerk (NH Secretary of State, 1918).

President Monroe visited New England in the summer following his 1817 inauguration. He traveled from Boston, MA, to Portsmouth, NH, and Portland, ME, returning via Dover, NH.

The President was then escorted by the principal inhabitants of Dover, a part of Capt. [Theodore C.] Lyman’s troop from Rochester & Milton, under the command of Col. Edward Sise, and a great cavalcade of citizens to this town. On his arrival he received a national salute from the artillery. After passing a few moments at Wyatt’s Inn, the President, attended by his suite, proceeded to an eminence arranged for the purpose, near Col. Cogswell’s, decorated with the rural simplicity of evergreens and roses, where he was addressed by the Hon. Wm. King Atkinson … (Wadleigh).

Milton sent Theodore C. Lyman as its representative to the NH legislature for a second – non-contiguous – term in the 1818-19 biennium. (He succeeded William Plumer in that office).

Theodore C. Lyman and thirteen other Strafford County inhabitants petitioned the NH Governor and his Executive Council, June 24, 1818, to have Jonathan Locke of Dover, NH, appointed as Warden of the state prison. Locke was then keeper of the Strafford County jail or prison. (Amos Cogswell signed also this petition).

Theodore C. Lyman and twenty other NH Representatives from Strafford County petitioned the NH Governor and his Executive Council, June 8, 1819, to have John P. Hale (1775-1819), Esq., of Rochester, NH, appointed as Strafford County Registrar of Probate. Hale would die later that same year.

DIED. At Rochester, (N.H.,) in the 45th year of his age, John P. Hale, Esquire, counsellor at law (New York Evening Post, October 19, 1819).

(Hale was father of John P. Hale, Jr. (1806-1873), who would be U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator, and one of the principal anti-slavery politicians of the ante-bellum period. (There is a statue of him in front of the NH State House and a portrait painting of him hanging in the NH House chamber)).

Theodore C. Lyman and six others petitioned the NH Governor and his Executive Council, June 10, 1819, to have John Hill of Middleton, NH, appointed as a second Middleton justice-of-the-peace.

The NH House passed a housekeeping measure, June 30, 1819, in order to correct an error in the travel allowances of Representatives Theodore C. Lyman of Milton and Joshua Lane of Chichester.

Presented. A resolve that Theodore C. Lyman, esquire, and Joshua Lane, esquire, members of the House of Representatives, have and receive out of the Treasury the following sums, viz. the said Lyman two dollars and the said Lane one dollar and sixty çents, those sums being deficiencies in their travel the present session, as certified by the Clerk. Was brought up read and concurred (NH General Court, 1819). 

Lyman, TC - Signature - 1819Captain Theodore C. Lyman was one of fourteen officers of the Second NH Militia Regiment that petitioned the NH legislature, September 23, 1819, for appointment of a regimental surgeon’s mate. The regimental surgeon, who resided in Dover, NH, was too distant from them to fulfill all their needs alone. (Ensign Norton Scates was another of the petitioners).

Daughter Lovey Lyman married in Rochester, NH, January 27, 1820, Benjamin Scates, Jr., both of Milton. Rev. Haven performed the ceremony. He was born in Milton, April 10, 1794, son of Benjamin and Lydia (Jenness) Scates.

A dispute regarding the Milton militia company – and especially the great distances some militiamen had to travel to attend its training days – arose in 1820. The regimental field officers refused a request to divide the company into two parts. Those seeking two companies petitioned the NH legislature to simply divide the town instead, which would achieve the same object of having two companies.

Some 127 Milton men filed a remonstrance petition intended for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature. It opposed dividing the town to solve the militia problem. Company officers Jeremy Nute, James Hayes, Jr., and Norton Scates all signed this remonstrance, as did former company officers Levi Jones, Jotham Nute, and Theodore C. Lyman, and future officer Bidfield Hayes.

Some 88 Milton men filed a company division petition intended for the November 1820 session of the NH legislature. Company Captain Jeremy Nute signed this proposal, as did former company officers Levi Jones, Jotham Nute, and Theodore C. Lyman, future company officer Bidfield Hayes, and Milton selectman Hopley Meserve.

Son Micah Lyman married in Milton, December 27, 1820, Mary Kelly, both of Milton. Rev. James Walker performed the ceremony. She was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1795. (Foster grandfather John Twombly would live with them).

Theodore C. Lyman and thirteen other NH citizens petitioned the NH General Court, December 6, 1824, seeking a law to prevent rocks, stones and other debris being thrown in the Piscataqua River.

Son George D. Lyman died in Milton, August 31, 1825.

John Downs sued Theodore C. Lyman over a mill privilege – the “privilege of the floom,” i.e., the flume, in July 1825. Downs asserted a one-sixteenth share in the land of which Lyman’s mill stood. The original privilege had been granted to Samuel Ham by the city of Rochester, NH, in 1763. Ham had sold a one-eighth share to Joseph Roberts in 1769. One might suppose that this was how capital was raised.  Ham’s grantees built a mill in 1770. Roberts sold his share to to D. Garland and Joseph Tibbetts in 1776. The mill had burnt in 1785, at which point some of the interested parties declined to rebuild. They seem to have developed some reason to doubt their right to do so. D. Garland sold his one-sixteenth interest (half of a one-eighth interest) to John Downs in 1797.

Lyman maintained that the actual “privilege of the floom” was a riverine feature that lay 200 rods [3,300 feet (or 5/8 of a mile)] above the mill site. The ruling had gone to the demandant, i.e., John Downs. The higher court appeal focused on this issue of whether the flume and the mill site that it fed were the same thing, and whether the unspecified verbal refusal by long-dead people to rebuild on the land might be taken as an acknowledgement by them that they did not have title to the land. The higher court sustained the verdict of the lower one, i.e., they ruled against Lyman (NH Supreme Court, 1827).

Theodore C. Lyman received his initial appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on May 16, 1829.

Theoph C. Lyman headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 60-69 years [Dorothy (Allen) Lyman], one male aged 20-29 years [William B. Lyman], two females aged 20-29 years [Clarissa Lyman and Roxana A. Lyman], and one male aged 15-19 years [Theodore Lyman]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Isaac Wentworth and Joseph Walker on one side and Micha~ Lyman on the other side.

Daughter Clarissa Lyman married, circa 1831, William Allen Lord. He was born in Berwick, ME, March 20, 1801, son of Samuel and Abigail (Allen) Lord. (They were cousins, being as their respective mothers, Dorothy (Allen) Lyman and Abigail (Allen) Lord, were sisters).

Theodore C. Lyman received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on May 20, 1834.

Justices of the Peace. MiltonLevi Jones, Daniel Hayes, John Remich, James Roberts, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, Samuel S. Mason, Stephen Drew, Israel Nute, John L. Swinerton, Thomas Chapman (Hayward, 1834).

Son Theodore Lyman married, probably in Milton, circa 1837-38, Betsy Bragdon. She was born in Milton, in 1818, daughter of Samuel and Lydia (Walker) Bragdon. (Her younger sister, Louisa A. Bragdon, would marry in Milton, February 4, 1841, Luther Hayes, he of Rochester, NH, and she of Milton).

Theodore C. Lyman received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on May 21, 1839.

The NH Political Manual and Annual Register of 1840 identified Milton’s Justices of the Peace as being Levi Jones, Daniel Hayes, John Remick, JAMES ROBERTS, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, Samuel S. Mason, Stephen Drew, John L. Swinerton, Thomas Chapman, Joseph Cook, John J. Plumer, Daniel Hayes, Jr. (McFarland & Jenks, 1840).

Theodore C. Lyman headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], and one female aged 20-29 years [Roxana A. Lyman]. (His wife, Dorothy (Allen) Lyman, does not seem to have been counted with his household). One member of his household was engaged in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Isaac Wentworth on one side and his sons, Theodore Lyman, William B. Lyman, and “Michael” [Micah] Lyman on the other side.

Theodore C. Lyman appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1843, as a h. [house] carpenter, upper end of Waldron street. (Some much later death records of several children recorded him as having been at sometime a “contractor”).

According to Scale’s History of Strafford County, Milton’s Free-Will Baptist church organized itself at Theodore Lyman’s house in May 1843.

A Free-Will Baptist Church was organized at the house of Theodore Lyman, on the 11th day of May, 1843, with seventeen members, viz.: Hazen Duntley, Daniel M. Quimby, Luther Hayes, William Fernald, James O. Reynolds, Drusilla Jewett, Betsey Lyman, Mary H. Downs, Mrs. D.W. Wedgwood, William B. Lyman, Theodore Lyman, E.S. Edgerly, Dearborn Wedgwood, Phoebe Duntley, Sophia Quimby, Sally F. Downs, Mrs. A. Hubbard.

This church organizer would seem to have been Theodore C. Lyman’s son, Theodore (without the “C”) Lyman, based at least partly on the presence and membership of that son’s wife, Betsy [(Bragdon)] Lyman). (See also Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1843-50).

Son William B. Lyman had received his first appointment as a Milton justice, June 29, 1843, but there was an additional notation of “gone,” i.e., he left town before the expiration of his five-year term. Theodore C. Lyman received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, on May 20, 1844, there is next to his entry also a notation of “gone.” So, it would seem that for a time they found it more convenient to live where they were contracting, i.e., Waldron street in Dover, NH. (The railroad not having reached Milton at that time).

Justices of the Peace. MiltonLevi Jones, Stephen Drew, Daniel Hayes, Hanson Hayes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, John L. Swinerton, Joseph Cook, John J. Plumer, Daniel Hayes, jr., Enoch Banfield, Daniel P. Warren, Joseph Cook, James Berry, Wm. B. Lyman (Farmer & Lyon, 1844).

Son William B. Lyman appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1848, as a pump-maker, with his house at 8 Lyman’s court.

Dorothy (Allen) Lyman died in Milton, November 25, 1848.

Theodore C. Lyman, a carpenter, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Roxann A. Lyman, aged forty years (b. NH). Theodore C. Lyman had real estate valued at $5,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Giles Burrows, a farmer, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Abigail Tuttle, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). (And Luther Hayes, a lumber dealer, aged thirty years (b. NH), just beyond Tuttle).

Theodore C. Lyman married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, in 1850-51, Betsy [(Meserve)] Pinkham, he of Milton and she of Rochester, NH. He was aged eighty-one years, and she was aged sixty-eight years. She was born in Dover, NH, in 1782, daughter of Stephen and Abigail (Yeaton) Meserve.

Betsy ((Meserve) Pinkham) Lyman’s new home in Milton would have been for a time adjoining a PGF&C railroad construction site. A legislative report of 1848 described the intended route from Great Falls, i.e., Somersworth, NH, to Conway, NH.

Commencing near the covered bridge at Great Falls and running northwesterly, on the west side of Salmon Falls river, to the Parade at Rochester Village; thence from Rochester Village, running a northerly course across the plain, to near where the road that is travelled leaves the Pine Woods; thence running in the vicinity of George Hays’s house and Theodore Lyman’s house to near where the new factory frame of A.S. Howard & Co. is erected, in Milton; thence up by the Milton Ponds and west of the Plummer bridge, so called to Union Village, in Wakefield; thence by Lovell’s Pond, in said Wakefield to the head of Pine River; thence down said river to the east side of the Ossipee Lake; thence across the Ossipee river, to near where Thomas Andrews lives, in Freedom; thence up the valley of what is called the Burke Pond, in Eaton; thence by Daniel Lacy, 2d, and Wm. Stacy’s to Eaton Corner; thence through the valley of the Pequacket, to Conway (NH Senate, 1849).

Daniel G. Rollins, treasurer of the Great Falls & Conway Railroad, sent a letter to his stockholders, June 1, 1850. The railroad intended to issue preferred stock to complete the railroad track between Rochester, NH, to Lyman’s Crossing in South Milton, and, if any funds remained, from there to Milton Three Ponds.

7th. The funds realized by the issue of this preferred stock shall first be appropriated to the completion of the road from Rochester to the road crossing in Milton, near the house of Theodore C. Lyman, and fitting the same for the transportation of passengers and freight, in providing furniture to run and operate the same, and in paying all the debts of the corporation. Any balance remaining shall be appropriated to the completing of the road from Lyman’s crossing to Milton Three Ponds (NH General Court, 1850).

Lyman’s Crossing in South Milton would in future years be known as Hayes Crossing or Hayes Station. (See South Milton’s High Sheriff Luther Hayes (1820-1895)).

Sophia ((Cushing) Hayes) Wyatt stopped to view the Lyman family tomb at South Milton in January 1854. (See Milton Teacher of 1796-1805). (Despite the coincidence of their Cushing names, they do not seem to have been related).

Daughter Lovey (Lyman) Scates died in Milton, in 1855.

Son William B. Lyman appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1859, as a builder, with his house at 12 Charles street.

Son Micah Lyman died in Milton, September 14, 1860. Son-in-law Benjamin Scates, Jr., died of consumption in Milton, November 10, 1862, aged sixty-seven years, ten months.

Son Theodore Lyman and Charles Jones were Milton’s NH State Representatives in the 1863-64 biennium.

Theodore C. Lyman died of old age in Milton, July 30, 1863, aged ninety-two years.

Daughter-in-law Betsy (Bragdon) Lyman died in Milton, September 22, 1864. Daughter Roxana A. Lyman died in Milton, January 19, 1865.

Betsy [((Meserve) Pinkham) Lyman of Rochester, NH, made out her last will in Rochester, NH, July 21, 1868. In it she bequeathed a life estate in her Rochester house and furniture to Louisa F. [(Davis)] Mathes [(1818-1901)], widow of Stephen Mathes [(1797-1857)], which was to go next to the son, George Frederick Mathes [(1856-1934)]. She bequeathed her wearing apparel, beds and bedding to her nieces, May Pinkham, Abigail Twombly [(1809-1893)], and Betsy M. [(Twombly)] Minot [(1820-1904)]. She bequeathed the rest and residue to her nephews, Bidfield Meserve [(1807-1891)] and Samuel Meserve [(1808-1900)], who were sons of John Meserve [(1785-1871)]; Stephen M.Y. Meserve [(1811-1876)], who was a son of Hopley Meserve [(1789-1875)]; and the Methodist Church of Rochester, NH, in equal parts. She nominated John McDuffee [(1803-1890)] of Rochester, NH, as her executor. Dominicus Hanson [(1813-1907)], Ezekiel Wentworth [(1823-1905)], and Frankin McDuffee [(1832-1880)] signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 89:413).

(Witness Franklin McDuffee, A.M., wrote historical articles for the Rochester Courier, which would later be assembled, edited and printed in 1892 as The History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890).

Betsy Lyman, aged eighty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1870) Federal Census. She had real estate valued at $1,000.

NEW ENGLAND NEWS. NEW HAMPSHIRE. Mrs. Betsy Lyman, now living in Rochester Village, at the age of ninety-four years, took part in a thanksgiving service at the Tuttle schoolhouse in West Milton, on the occasion of the arrival of the news of peace with England in 1815, by reciting an original poem (Boston Evening Transcript, September 19, 1876).

The last will of Betsy [((Merserve) Pinkham)] Lyman, late of Rochester, deceased, was proved in Strafford County Probate Court held in Somersworth, NH, in February 1878 (Strafford County Probate, 89:413).

Things in General. Fifty years ago a Dover (N. H.) who was on the Island of St. Helena, cut some sprigs from a willow tree grew over the grave of the great Napoleon. He afterward gave them to William B. Lyman, of Dover, who planted them at his residence, and willow tree was the result. This tree was destroyed during the high wind Friday (Standard (Albert Lea, MN, October 12, 1882).

(Napoleon died in exile on the remote South Atlantic island of St. Helena, May 5, 1821. His remains were disinterred and returned to France in 1840. The spring would have to have been cut between 1821 and 1840. “Fifty years ago” would have been about 1832.

Daughter-in-law Mary (Kelly) Lyman died of old age in Milton, December 31, 1885, aged ninety years.

LOCALS. Mary, widow of the late Micah Lyman, Esq., of Milton, and mother of Hon. John D. Lyman, and ex County Commissioner Lyman of South Milton, died at her home in Milton, Thursday, aged 90 years 6 months She was the oldest lady in the town (Farmington News, January 8, 1886).

Son William Blake Lyman, died in Dover, NH, November 13, 1889.

Son Theodore Lyman died of heart disease and dropsy in Milton, August 1, 1891, aged seventy-eight years, eleven months, and nine days. He was a widowed farmer. J.W. Lougee, M.D., of Rochester, NH, signed the death certificate.

Daughter Clarissa L. (Lyman) Lord died of old age in Berwick, ME, March 18, 1893, aged eighty-nine years, five months, and eighteen days. O.M. Boynton, M.D., of Somersworth, NH, signed the death certificate.


References:

Bartlett, Genevieve W. (1952). Forefathers and Descendants of Willard & Genevieve Wilson Bartlett. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=88AwAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA95

Black, Mary. (1978). Isle of St. Helena. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEVYB10bsjo

Find a Grave. (2013, July 6). Clarissa Lyman Lord. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/113415255/clarissa-lord

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). George Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612555/george-lyman

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Micah Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612236/micah-lyman

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Roxana A. Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612786/roxana-a-lyman

Find a Grave. (2013, August 15). Theodore Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115539802/theodore-lyman

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Theodore Cushing “TC” Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612665/theodore-cushing-lyman

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). William Blake Lyman. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612931/william-blake-lyman

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McDuffee, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RY0-AAAAYAAJ

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Wadleigh, George. (1913). Notable Events in the History of Dover, New Hampshire: From the First Settlement in 1623 to 1865. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=A3ywiDfSrY8C&pg=PA206

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