Celestial Seasonings – October 2021

By Heather Durham | September 30, 2021

Greetings everyone and welcome to the latest edition of Celestial Seasonings! This month, we have a plethora of meteor showers along with a new YouTube video for this month that I highly recommend you start with before planning your sky watching shows. Included as well, is a link to meteor showers created and maintained by NASA. You can put a meteor shower date on this NASA page and view prior showers. 

Our autumn equinox began in the afternoon of September 22. It’s pumpkin spice and apple picking season. Warm days and cool nights produce the changing color of the leaves on our trees. Then we are able to feast our senses on all that nature has to offer this time of year along with our journeys into the night skies. 

Have a pleasant month, enjoy yourselves and look forward to your astronomical offerings.


October 5. The Camelopardalis meteor shower will put on a fine display this evening. This comes from the Constellation Draco and should produce overnight with its finest show just before dawn. According to Wikipedia, this “is a large but faint Constellation in the northern sky representing a giraffe.”

October 8. On this date, we will enjoy another meteor shower from the Constellation Draco – the Draconids. Dusk will be ideal time for viewing. In 1933 and 1946, the Draconids were “among the most impressive meteor storms of the 21st century.”

October 9. The Moon and Venus will rise closely to one another while rising to the right.

October 10. The Southern Taurid meteor shower in the Constellation Cetus will display for approximately 12 hours from 7 pm until 7 am the next morning. Because of their occurrence in late October and early November, they are also called Halloween Fireballs.” Saturn will begin moving towards the east again.

October 11. The δ-Auridid [Delta-Auridid] meteor shower in the Constellation Auriga will bring a display tonight. The comet Kiess (C/1911_N1) is the source of this shower.

October 12. Tonight, our Moon will be at first quarter.

October 14. The Moon and Saturn will come close to each other and ascend right.

October 15. The Moon and Jupiter will come close to one another and rise to the right.

October 18. Jupiter will begin moving east again. The ε-Geminid [Epsilon-Geminid] meteor shower from the Constellation Gemini should be visible most of the evening. This is one of two meteor showers that do not stem from comets, but from object 3200 Phaethon, an asteroid.

October 20. The full Hunter’s Moon is tonight.

October 21. The Orionids meteor shower from the Constellation Orion will display tonight. According to Wikipedia, this “is the most prolific meteor shower associated with Halley’s Comet.” A dwarf planet known as 136108 Haumea, will travel close by the Sun. The Moon and Uranus will closely approach one another in the evening sky.

October 23. Mercury will move towards half phase and will be visible just before dawn.

October 24. Tonight, the Leonis Minorid meteor shower will put on a display but is faint. This comes from the Constellation Leo Minor. The Moon will move as far away from the Earth in its orbit. Mercury will travel to its farther distance from the Sun.

October 26. The open star cluster, NGC869 in Perseus will be in the evening sky, but difficult to see without equipment.

October 27. NGC884 also from Perseus will be on display but difficult to see with a naked eye.

This and NGC869 may be referred to as a Double Cluster.

October 28. Mercury will reach its highest location in the sky on this date. Venus will move towards half phase. The Moon will be at its last quarter.

October 29. Venus will move to its furthest distance from the Sun.

References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). October 2021. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org.

Jenniskens. P. (n.d.). NASA Meteor Shower Portal. Retrieved from cams.seti.org/FDL/index.html

Wikipedia, (2020, April 2). Aurigids. Retrieved from en.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurigids.

Wikipedia. (2021, July 28). Camelopardalis. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camelopardalis.

Wikipedia. (2021, April 27). Draconids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draconids.

Wikipedia, (2021, August 13). Geminids. Retrieved from en.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Geminids.

Wikipedia, (2021, July 4). Taurids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taurids.

YouTube. (2021, September 15). October 2021 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/rCr6y2RIFsY

Celestial Seasonings – September 2021

By Heather Durham | August 31, 2021

This month brings a great deal of activity for sky watchers. We have three meteor showers, the Harvest Moon and also the autumnal equinox along with other sites. I’ve included a Youtube video in the References, which should be viewed first for a close up visual effect. Enjoy folks and feel free to write or comment please. Thank you so much and I hope you have an opportunity to enjoy what’s ahead!


September 1. The Aurigid meteor shower should reach its peak today. From the eastern horizon, this will become visible after 10 pm and remain active until dawn. This shower comes from the constellation Auriga. You may be able to see about 5 showers per hour providing the weather cooperates. The Aurigid does not appear every year according to Wikipedia. The last time it peaked was in 2007.

September 9. The September e-Perseid meteor shower will peak today and will be most vibrant. This is from the Constellation Perseus. The Moon and Venus will rise and head towards the right together. According to Wikipedia, “the constellation gives its name to the Perseid cluster, a massive galaxy cluster located 250 million miles from Earth.

September 10. The Moon and Venus will travel closely to one another.

September 13. The first quarter of the Moon will appear in the shy tonight. Mercury will travel to its further distance from the Sun heading east.

September 15. The Moon and Saturn will rise together and pass each other as closely as ever.

2021-09 - PlanetsSeptember 18. The Moon and Jupiter will rise to the right in close proximity to one another this evening.

September 20. The full Harvest Moon will brighten up the night sky. This is the Harvest Moon for it is the closest one to the autumnal equinox.

September 22. The autumn equinox arrives today in the northern hemisphere and spring in the Southern Hemisphere. An equinox date brings us almost 12 hours or daylight and nightlight.

2021-09 - EarthThis is the second of two equinoxes each year where the center of the Sun lies directly over the Equator.

September 27. The Daytime Sextanid meteor shower from the Constellation Sextans will peak today and might be visible from New Hampshire from around 4:23 pm in the evening until dawn comes just past 6:00 am. According to Wikipedia,” the Constellation is the location of the field studied by the COSMOS Project, under taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.”

September 28. The Harvest Moon will show its last quarter.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). September 2021. Retrieved from In-the-Sky.Org/Newscal.Php?Month=9&year=2021&maxdiff=1#datesel.

Wikipedia. (2020, April 22). Aurigid. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurigids

Wikipedia. (2021, July 13). September e-Perseids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseus_(constellation)

Wikipedia. (2021, July 13). Sextans. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sextans

Youtube. (2021, August 14). September 2021 Astronomical Calendar. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDDAXcbbkKg

Celestial Seasonings – August 2021

By Heather Durham | July 31, 2021

Greetings Folks! I hope you are enjoying your summer and sky watching. This month, I added three videos that will give you a greater perspective as well as more in-depth information on our evening skies this month. There is one about our Moon, the most popular as well as easily visible happenings, plus.

The day will come when diligent research over long periods will bring to light things that now are hidden. A single life time, even though entirely devoted to research, would not be enough for the investigation of so vast a subject… And so this knowledge will be unfolded through long suggestive ages. There will come a time when our descendants will be amazed that we did not know things that are so plain to them… Many discoveries are reserved for ages still to come, when memory of us will have been effaced. Our universe is a sorry little affair unless it has in it something for every age to investigate… Nature does not reveal her mysteries once and for all (Seneca, Natural Questions, Book 7, ca. first century).

This month, we have the Perseids, the Seasonal Blue Moon and more so let’s get to reading this summarization.

August 2. Saturn will align with the Earth and Sun. Saturn will be as high as it ever is as well as very bright.

Sunrise Behind EarthWhen a planet is at opposition, it forms a straight line with the Earth and the Sun, with the Earth at the center of the three. According to Royal Observatory in London, opposition typically presents the best opportunities for viewing far-off planets like Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune because the planets will be brightly illuminated and riding high in the sky (Smithsonianmag.com).

August 11. The Moon and Venus will rise and ascend close together.

August 12. The Perseid meteor shower will peak today. Between moonset and dawn the next morning will be for prime viewing.

August 15. The Moon will be at first quarter.

SaturnAugust 20. The Moon and Saturn will ascend closely together.

August 22. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to one another. Jupiter will be bright and right above the moon then later, to the right of the Moon. The Sturgeon Blue Moon will be full.

The moon’s name derives from America’s largest freshwater fish, the lake sturgeon. While they used to thrive, sturgeon fish are now one of the most critically endangered species. Legend has it that, during August’s full moon, you can still catch a glimpse of a sturgeon fish in America’s lakes (Countryliving.com).

August 24. Mercury will peak today.

August 30. The Moon will be at its last quarter.


References:

Brian Dunbar, B.D. (2020, April 10). Planets. Retrieved from https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/overview/

Eyes Turned Skyward. (2021). Astronomy & Cosmology. Retrieved from www.eyesturnedskyward.com/astronomyquotes.html 

Ford, D.F. (2021, July 10). August 2021 Events. Retrieved from https://in-the-sky.org/newscal.php?month=8&year=2021&maxdiff=1#datesel

McGreevy, N.M. (2021, January 7). 10 Celestial Events to Look Forward to in 2021. Retrieved from https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/ten-celestial-events-look-forward-2021-180976687/

Nieskins, A.N. [Old Farmer’s Almanac]. (2019, April 30). The Full Moon [Video]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/jiRUNI_GDwk

Now, N.N. [New Now]. (2021a, June 26). Perseids Meteor Shower 2021 [Video]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/tnluA3d6ehA

Now, N.N. [New Now]. (2021b, July 1). Blue Moon, August 22, 2021 [Video]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/MmDP6WKUe4c

Walden, L.W. (2020, August 2). The Sturgeon Moon. Retrieved from https://www.countryliving.com/uk/news/a28560453/full-sturgeon-moon-august/

The Long Arm of The Commonwealth

By Ian Aikens | July 21, 2021

Is there such a thing as a “temporary tax”? Having come from the late great State of California several years ago, I never experienced such a phenomenon myself, but perhaps Granite State workers who work for Massachusetts companies will experience it themselves come September 14, 2021.

This tale of government overreach began on April 21 of last year when the Massachusetts legislature passed “The Proposed Rule,” which allowed work performed in New Hampshire to be taxable to the State of Massachusetts.  Things went from bad to worse in October of 2020 when the Massachusetts Department of Revenue extended the ruling indefinitely as the lockdown and emergency orders dragged on and on. To make things look kosher, there was a public hearing on the issue, but it was held five months after the rule went into effect.

The plot thickened when the State of New Hampshire filed a lawsuit with the US Supreme Court on October 20, 2020 suing the State of Massachusetts for violating the US Constitution, specifically the Commerce Clause and Due Process Clause. The Commerce Clause is supposed to restrict individual states’ powers of regulation, and the Due Process Clause prohibits the government from depriving life, liberty, or property unless authorized by law.

Aside from the moral and constitutional issues involved, we’re talking about a lot of money here. Massachusetts charges a 5% state income tax, and the number of employees affected by this issue ranges from 80,000 to 110,000 New Hampshire residents who work for companies based in Massachusetts.

Here’s the issue. Prior to the lockdowns, New Hampshire residents who commuted to Massachusetts for their jobs did not have to pay Massachusetts state income tax for the days they worked from home. Thus, if employees commuted to Boston 4 days/week and worked at home on Fridays, they would only pay Massachusetts income tax on 80% of their wages that week.  But when the lockdowns were decreed, most New Hampshire residents were commuting into Massachusetts 0% of the time. The ruling, which went into effect March 10, 2020 meant they would still pay Massachusetts state income tax on 80% of their wages as if they were still commuting, as it used the period of January 1, 2020-February 29, 2020 as a tax basis.

Switching away from a user fee standard was clearly an outrage. If New Hampshire residents were no longer using Massachusetts roads, police, and other infrastructure services while they remained in New Hampshire (which did provide those services or at least the availability of them), why should they have to pay for them? A residence-based taxation model where taxes are paid where public services are consumed is a fairer way to collect taxes. What justification did the bureaucrats provide for changing the rule midstream? If it was a reasonable rule before the lockdown—which it was—by what right did they change it?

Government bureaucrats never lack for excuses when it comes to overreaching into people’s lives—and especially their pocketbooks. They don’t miss a beat.  Acting Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar, who advised the US Supreme Court not to take the case because she sided with tax-hungry Massachusetts, did concede that police and fire protection for the New Hampshire residents who work at home would be provided by New Hampshire, not Massachusetts. However, she noted, “Yet that resident’s work also may continue to depend on and benefit from services provided by Massachusetts. For example, Massachusetts and its municipalities may provide similar protections to the infrastructure and staff critical to the work of the New Hampshire resident who is temporarily working at home—such as computer servers that enable and store the employee’s work product, courts that enforce contracts, and financial institutions and transactions necessary to the work.”

This is quite a stretch. Computer servers? They are often stored in a different state, especially to protect the company’s data if there is some type of natural disaster. Yes, the courts are there to support businesses, but aren’t they in existence to support all of society? Wouldn’t they be there even if the New Hampshire employee didn’t work for the Massachusetts firm? Besides, the courts charge all manner of fees for their services to the users, so why should an employee in another state also have to pay? As for financial institutions, aren’t these supposed to be private institutions supported by fees paid by their customers?

The obvious truth to the matter is that Taxachusetts earned its shameful name because of its model of extreme tax extraction to support a bloated bureaucracy. Instead of cutting back and laying off unneeded employees—just like private, voluntary businesses were forced to do during the lockdowns—the state arbitrarily changed the rules so it would have enough revenue to continue to pay its army of bureaucrats. An army of workers, I might add, that suffered no economic losses during the lockdowns and continued to get the same pay for doing less work. “Nice work if you can get it.”

Although ultimately the US Supreme Court declined to hear the case, we haven’t heard the last of this issue. The lawsuit was watched nationally because other states also apply the “convenience of the employer” (COTE) rule, which says that if the employee is working at home for his convenience, not the company’s, then the income is taxable to the employer’s location. The states of Arkansas, Delaware, Nebraska, New York, and Pennsylvania use the COTE rule, and Connecticut uses it too but only if the taxpayer resident’s state applies a similar rule. With many state governments operating on oversized budgets and the impending economic troubles ahead, you can bet that they are going to be very creative to change their rules too like Massachusetts to extract as much income as possible from employees working remotely in another state.

What is most interesting about this bruhaha between New Hampshire and Massachusetts is the reaction of several of our Congressional representatives. They have all been outraged by Massachusetts’ sudden change of the rules to sustain its bureaucracy. US Senator Jeanne Shaheen called the Massachusetts tax an “abuse of Granite State workers.” US Senator Maggie Hassan proclaimed her opposition by saying, “I’ve long said that attempts by other states to unfairly tax New Hampshire residents are unconstitutional.” US Rep Annie Kuster called the tax grab “outrageous and an unfair tax burden on our state’s workers.” US Rep Chris Pappas also complained about workers “being forced to pay an unfair income tax.”

Unfortunately, this deathbed conversion to supporting lower taxes seems at odds with their voting records. Senator Sheehan sponsored S.411, which increased the federal tax on all tobacco products. When she was governor, Maggie Hassan signed SB367, which increased New Hampshire state gas and diesel taxes by 4.2 cents per gallon. When it came to amending the state constitution with an income tax ban, Annie Kuster’s vote was a definitive NO because “we shouldn’t tie the hands of future generations.” (Actually yes, we should tie the hands of politicians from increasing taxes.) To his credit, Rep Pappas has been particularly aggressive in the fight against Massachusetts taxing New Hampshire workers, but he has repeatedly called for the repeal of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which even the New York Times admitted lowered taxes for most Americans.

Sadly, I suspect that our congressional representatives are more concerned about getting in trouble with their constituents back home and getting voted out of office than any principled opposition to higher overall tax extractions. Furthermore, if the shoe were on the other foot and they were senators and congressional representatives for Massachusetts, I’ll bet they’d take a completely different stance on the issue.

In the end, since Massachusetts Governor Baker gave notice that the latest COVID-19 state of emergency ended on June 15, 2021, the tax rule remains in effect for an additional 90 days. We will have to wait and see what the bureaucrats cook up when the telecommuting tax ends on September 14, 2021 and they can no longer collect the tax on days when New Hampshire residents still work from home. Those who supported the rule change always said that it was meant to be temporary and strictly in response to the pandemic as an emergency measure only. While more residents will be back to working in the office in Massachusetts, clearly more telecommuting is here to stay.

What will Massachusetts bureaucrats do to fill the black (tax) hole? I don’t believe they will tighten their belts as it’s not in their DNA, but I hope that I’m wrong. Maybe someone can invent a vaccine to inoculate taxpayers against politicians and bureaucrats.

References:

Berube, Selene. (2021, March 24). New Hampshire v. Massachusetts: Massachusetts Extraterritorial Taxation of New Hampshire Residents. Retrieved from New Hampshire v. Massachusetts: Massachusetts Extraterritorial Taxation of New Hampshire Residents – The Justice Journal (gwjusticejournal.com)

Bookman, Todd. (2021, May 26). Justice Department Sides with Massachusetts in Cross-Border Tax Fight With N.H. Retrieved from Justice Department Sides with Massachusetts in Cross-Border Tax Fight With N.H. | New Hampshire Public Radio (nhpr.org)

Brown, Samuel. (2021, June 7). State of New Hampshire v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved from State of New Hampshire v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Marcum LLP | Accountants and Advisors

Cline, Andrew. (2021, May 28). Biden administration argues that states can tax non-resident telecommuters. Retrieved from Biden administration argues that states can tax non-resident telecommuters – THE JOSIAH BARTLETT CENTER FOR PUBLIC POLICY (jbartlett.org)

DiStaso, John. (2021, May 27). Hassan, Shaheen join in introducing bill to stop Massachusetts from taxing NH home workers. Retrieved from Hassan, Shaheen join in introducing bill to stop Massachusetts from taxing NH home workers (wmur.com)

DiStaso, John and Mackin, Jean. (2021, May 27). NH Primary Source: Biden administration sides with Massachusetts over NH in income tax court battle. Retrieved from NH Primary Source: Biden administration sides with Massachusetts over NH in income tax court battle (wmur.com)

Graham, Michael. (2020, September 23). Mowers Targets Pappas Over Support for New Taxes, Tax Hikes. Retrieved from Mowers Targets Pappas Over Support for New Taxes, Tax Hikes – InsideSources

Landrigan, Kevin. (2021, Jan 25). High court seeks help in settling NH-Mass tax fight. Retrieved from High court seeks help in settling NH-Mass tax fight | Courts | unionleader.com

Pinho, Rute. (2021, January 15). Convenience of the Employer Rule.  Retrieved from Convenience of the Employer Rule (ct.gov)

Sahadi, Jeanne. (2021, March 30). Tax experts focus on possible Supreme Court case over NH lawsuit against Mass. Retrieved from Possible Supreme Court case over NH lawsuit against Mass. could affect other states (wmur.com)

WMUR9. (2012, November 3). Kuster, Bass differ on taxes, foreign policy in debate.  Retrieved from Kuster, Bass differ on taxes, foreign policy in debate (wmur.com)

H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1935-54

By Joyce Wentworth Cunningham | July 4, 2021

Continued from H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1928-34

1935

Wentworth, Harry E. - Per Joyce W. Cunningham
Harry E. Wentworth (Per Joyce W. Cunningham).

January 2: Was in the office as usual. Not doing much in the mill.

January 5: Norman is driving [the town snowplow] part of the time as there is no work in the mill just now.

[WEST MILTON. The new snowplow made its appearance this week and did a good job. It was run by Bard Plummer, Jr. (Farmington News, January 4, 1935). The diarist’s son, Norman L. Wentworth (1903-1991) might have been driving an older snowplow, presumably in Milton Mills or Milton, or the new one on a different shift].

The next mention of the mill was the day following a “North-easter” that had deposited up to 18 inches of snow over the countryside.

[BLIZZARD HITS NEW ENGLAND. SNOW COVERS ALL SIX STATES. New England was buried in snow today after an all-night blizzard, the worst in 14 years, which took seven lives and completely disrupted transportation. Sixteen inches of snow fell in Boston, 28 in Portland, .Me., while hundreds of highways were impassable because of drifts which swirled to depths of 10 and 12 feet. Four men succumbed in Massachusetts to exertion caused by battling snow drifts, while Connecticut reported one death indirectly due to the storm. Two persons died in Rhode Island from over exertion. Not a ship moved in or out of Boston harbor during the night; not a train was able to leave either the North or South terminals from shortly before midnight until after 5 o’clock this morning. Coast Guards along the storm-tossed seas of Massachusetts Bay sought for in vain the little fishing schooner, the Josephine, missing since yesterday noon with a crew of 3. All hotels were taxed t0 capacity during the night and thousands were forced to sleep in railroad and bus terminals. At Nashua 200 employes in a mill who completed work at 2 a.m. were unable to go to their homes. Cots were provided for them and they slept in the mill. It was 11 above in Boston early today, 8 above in Portland and 4 above at Keene, N.H. Rhode Island had 11½ inches of snow. Trolley and bus services were stalled and hundreds were marooned in theatres. Spectators at a hockey game were forced to spend the night in the auditorium on benches. Vermont was the .only New England state to escape the full fury of the blizzard. Only four inches of snow fell at Montpelier, but a strong wind and near zero temperature caused considerable discomfort (Portsmouth Herald, January 24, 1935).

January 24: So bad traveling the mill didn’t run. I didn’t go over at all.

The following day the mill still did not fun, but he worked in the office. Obviously, sometime between January 5 and 24 the late December dye problem had been resolved and the mill was back in production.

February 4: Halton has gone to Boston for 2 or 3 days. They are not doing anything in the Finishing Room at the mill for a few days.

February 11: Not doing much at the mill.

February 18: Not doing much in the mill. Halton went to N.Y. last Saturday night. Will probably be back Wednesday.

February 28: Nothing doing in the mill now – nobody working. I am in the office every day so far. Expect to get going again soon.

[MILTON MILLS. Mr. and Mrs. Halton Hayes went to Boston one day last week and visited the flower show (Farmington News, April 5, 1935)].

April 8: Didn’t go to the office. Going to be out Mondays & Thursdays for a while.

April 24: Nothing doing at the mill so I didn’t go over.

June 10: They started up the mill this morning. I shall probably be in the office more after this week.

July 29: Our new Supt. went to work this morning. George [Stevens] will stay a few days with him. His father is here as Boss Spinner.

[The father, John H. Gard, a blanket mill foreman [i.e., the “Boss Spinner,”] aged sixty-five years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie I. [(Mitton)] Gard, aged sixty-six years (b. OH). John H. Gard rented their house at 329 Main Street, for $10 per month. They had resided in the same house in 1935].

August 6: Our new Supt. at the mill, Mr. Gard, is starting in well. It looks as though we would be going better soon.

[The new superintendent was said to have been the son of the boss spinner, who had six sons. Only one lived anywhere near Milton Mills at this time. Frank C. Gard, a restaurant proprietor, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included Mary M. Gard, a restaurant proprietor, aged forty-two years (b. ME). Frank C. Gard rented their house in the Milton Community, for $6 per per month. They had resided in the same place, i.e., in Milton although not in the same house, in 1935. (It would seem that he filled the frequent downtime at the mill in having a mom-and-pop restaurant)].

August 9: Geo. Stevens finished up at the mill to-day and will go home to Vt. to-morrow. His health is poor.

Stevens, GA - NA360527[Retired Superintendent George A. Stevens advertised his 10-room Northfield, VT, house for sale in August 1935. It was steam heated, with modern improvements (Burlington Free Press, August 15, 1935). Mr. Wentworth’s assessment of Stevens’ health was correct. He was in the Mayo Memorial Hospital in Northfield, VT, for a septic sore throat in December 1936, but was recuperating in January 1937 (News and Advertiser (Northfield, VT), December 30, 1936; News and Advertiser (Northfield, VT), January 7, 1937). He and his wife were living in Manchester, NH, by June 1938 (News and Advertiser (Northfield, VT), June 16, 1938). He died in the Masonic Home in Manchester, NH, May 7, 1943, aged seventy-five years, four months, and eight days. Mrs. Stevens predeceased him. NORTHFIELD FALLS. Word has been received of the death of George A. Stevens of Manchester, N.H. Burial took place Thursday afternoon in the Northfield Falls cemetery. Mr. Stevens was superintendent of the Charles M. Davis Co. Woolen mill and has many friends in this vicinity (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), May 7, 1943)].

August 26: Halton & Mr. Gard went to N.Y. to-night.

August 28: Lots of trade in the Blanket Sales Room these days.

October 1 (a Tuesday): Mill closed to-night for the rest of the week – waiting for binding.

October 26: Worked in the office all day – sold quite a lot of blankets. Halton went to the Harvard-Dartmouth football game.

[HARVARD OPPOSES DARTMOUTH TEAM. Cambridge. Mass, Oct. 26 (AP.) Dartmouth’s Indians, unbeaten in four games in which they scored 188 points, today encountered a Harvard team that was sent on a comeback after losses to Holy Cross and Army. Despite signs of improvement by the Crimson, Dartmouth remained the favorite in the 42nd clash of the series (North Adams Transcript (North Adams, MA), October 26, 1935). Dartmouth won the game, 14-6].

November 7: So much work in the office I have to be there about every day.

November 22: Halton, Agnes, Paul [their son], & Ing started for a trip to Cuba & The West Indies. Will be gone about 10 days.

[Ing and Agnes at least had been to Cuba before. Ingeborg V. Townsend of 2509 Binz Ave., Houston, TX, sailed on United Fruit’s S.S. Atenas from Havana, Cuba, December 30, 1932, arriving in New Orleans, LA, January 2, 1933. She was forty years of age (b. Boston, MA, March 21, 1892). Agnes Hayes of Milton Mills, NH, sailed on the S.S. Munargo from Havana, Cuba, February 23, 1934, arriving in Miami, FL, February 24, 1934. She was thirty-four years of age (b. Milton Mills, NH, May 25, 1900)].

November 23: Worked in the office all day – most of the help worked. Getting out quite a lot of blankets now.

November 30 (a Saturday): Worked in the office all day. Mill was running to make up for Thurs. [Thanksgiving].

December 4: Halton & Agnes came home last night.

December 28 (a Saturday): Not feeling very well. Went over to the office about 2 ½ hrs. in A.M. and 2 hrs. in P.M. Halton is away to-day. The mill is running to make up for Christmas.

1936

January 1: The mill was running to-day, so I was in the office.

January 6: Stacking up a little in the mill to let the finishing room catch up. They are some 125 or more cuts behind.

January 10: Slowing down quite a bit in the mill – letting part of the help go for a few weeks.

January 20: Not doing much of anything in the mill this week – waiting for instructions from N.Y. on a large order we have.

Although, Grandpa appears to be working regularly at the mill, the next mention of its operation was on . . .

April 15: Starting to do a little more in the mill this week.

From time to time, Grandpa records some of Uncle Hal’s trips to Boston and New York, apparently in connection with mill business, especially sales.

June 23 (a Tuesday): Mill closed to-night for the rest of the week. One of the cards needs repairs.

July 17: The mill closed down for 2 weeks to do some repairs and wait for shipping orders.

On August 4: Grandpa records that about 4:30 a very heavy shower with a small hurricane struck us. He goes on to describe the damage done to a number of homes in Milton Mills. The next day [August 5] he continues with more storm destruction ending with Shingles were blown off several buildings including the mill.

[Headlines of the Boston Globe for August 5 were: STORM ENDS HEAT; LOSS HEAVY. Wind and Rain Wreak Havoc. Peak Rush Here Hit – Streets Flooded. Lighting Cut Off in Many Places].

August 10: Mill hasn’t started up yet. They are shingling the main building.

August 22 (a Saturday): Worked in the office in P.M. Halton went away. We keep the office open on Saturdays on acct. of the blanket trade which is pretty good this year.

August 27: Didn’t work to-day – am going to be in the office only 3 days per week unless Halton is out.

September 21: The mill started up this morning.

September 24: In the office all day. Halton & Agnes took Paul to West Newton where he is going to school.

[Educational Opportunities. … Among other well-known private schools within the [Newton, MA] city are Mt. Ida School, Allen, Fessenden, and Country Day Schools (Newton Directory, 1936)].

October 12 (Columbus Day): We did not observe the holiday. Business in the Sales Room was rushing – sold more blankets than any day this summer.

Other than noting Worked in the office today, as usual from time to time, the mill is not mentioned again in his 1936 diary. Apparently, this was a good year for the mill and its workers.

[MILTON MILLS TO BE HOST TO ROCHESTER DISTRICT SCOUTERS. Announcement has been made by Edward H. Young, field executive of the Daniel Webster Council, that Milton Mills will act as host to the Rochester district committee and its guests on the occasion of the regular bi-monthly meeting of the district on Monday, December 21. The Milton Mills Scout committee, composed of Halton Hayes, Herbert Nickerson, William Woodbury, Frank Gard, and Rev. Frank Snell, are in charge of the program. A supper will be served at 6.30 and following that a court of honor and the business meeting of the district committee will be held. All Scouts who have earned awards are requested to be present to receive their certificates. … (Farmington News, December 18, 1936)].

1937

Grandpa recorded that he worked in the office all day on a regular basis throughout January and February.

March 6: Worked in the office all day. Lots to do for me there now. So many gov. reports to make out.

April 21: Halton went to N.Y. last night.

May 5: Took a day off.

June 21: Halton’s mother is very sick and he has been out of the office most of the day. She is here with him and Agnes.

June 22: Halton’s mother died this morning.

[Hattie [(Pinkham)] Hayes died of bronchial pneumonia at 26 Lowell Street, Milton Mills, June 22, 1937, aged seventy-five years, seven months, and fifteen days. P.A. Kimball, M.D., of Union signed the death certificate].

June 24: Funeral of Halton’s mother occurred at Rochester this P.M.

August 4: Nothing doing at the mill yet.

August 10: Halton went to Boston this A.M. – will be back to-morrow night.

August 30: Started up the mill this morning with a few hands in.

September 6: Labor Day Mill & office closed.

September 7: Mill is getting started pretty well, half of the looms going today.

September 22: Pretty busy in the Sales Room these days. Halton was out this P.M. and I was so busy I didn’t get home until 6:30.

September 27: Halton went to N.Y. Louie is staying in the office while he is away.

That might have been Louie Young.

[Louis A. Young, a cotton & woolen mill salesman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Melrose, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Dorothy [(Goodale)] Young, aged thirty-five years (b. NY). Louis A. Young rented their apartment at 71 West Wyoming Ave., for $35 per month. They had resided in Strafford County, NH, in 1935].

October 15: Halton is having the office painted and re-modeled a little inside.

October 26: Halton went to N.Y. to-night – will come back tomorrow night.

December 11: Went over to the office and got some of my books and did a little work on them in the P.M. They are oiling the office floors.

1938

This was another quiet year at the mill with the usual “ups and downs” of business. Judging by his occasional entries of “went to the office to-day as usual” Grandpa worked all the time, but sometimes for only three days a week.

February 22 (Washington’s Birthday): Holiday and the mill didn’t run, but I worked all day.

[The Federal Uniform Holidays Bill of 1968 would cause most Federal holidays to fall on Mondays. It consolidated also Washington’s Birthday (February 22), which was a Federal holiday, and Lincoln’s Birthday (February 12), which was not (although many states celebrated it), into a single Presidents’ Day, which acknowledged all of the presidents].

March 1: Halton is about sick with a cold. Was in the office a few minutes this morning and went home for the day.

March 3: We had a little fire scare at about 3:30. Sparks from the chimney ignited the shingles on Eugene Runnell’s house causing quite a little blaze, but not doing much damage. They put it out with the chemical from the mill.

The mill must have had its own fire department as Grandpa has mentioned at other times that the mill’s firemen helped put out a fire.

[Othello D. Runnells, a leatherboard mill counterman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Pearl E. Runnels, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), his children, June E. Runnels, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Robert D. Runnels, aged eight years (b. NH), his father, Eugene E. Runnels, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), and his landlord [landlady], Susie Steven, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH). Othello D. Runnells rented their house, for $8 per month].

April 11: Halton went to N.Y. last night.

April 13 (a Wednesday): Halton came home this morning. We are going to run only 3 days per week for a while. There is almost no business in N.Y. We closed to-night for the rest of the week.

April 29: I went over to the office in A.M. but there was nothing to do.

May 18: Mill closed to-night for 2 weeks. No business.

Grandpa continued to work in the office throughout the summer – presumably on his three-days-a-week schedule.

Miltonia Blanket - 1938September 19: The mill started up this morning.

September 20: Worked in the office. Shall be in there more now.

November 23: Mill closed to-night for the rest of the week. [Thanksgiving weekend].

Grandpa was still working regularly at the end of the year with no further mention of the mill being shut down, so we may assume the year ended well for the mill and its workers.

1939

[$7.50 Pepperell Miltonia Blankets, pure wool in rose, blue, green, peach, rust and tan – 72×84 … Sale Price $6.48 (Brattleboro Reformer, January 5, 1939)].

January 11: Worked in the office all day. Mill closed to-night for the rest of the week – going on 3 days a week for a while.

January 25: Worked in the office. Business is poor – doubt if we do much for a while after this week.

January 30: Mill not running this week so I didn’t go over to the office to-day.

Grandpa was still working in the office periodically, but evidently not regularly as he complained that he “was doing a lot of sitting around these days.”

March 21: Worked in the office. They have been getting out a new blanket, 2 ¼ lb. which seems to be taking well. They call it the “Wentworth,” and have some orders already.

The mill must have shut down again soon after this. Perhaps the “Wentworth” blanket didn’t “take” as well as hoped!

April 17: Mill started this morning and the whistle blew.

For the next five months Grandpa appears to have been working in the office only one day a week (usually Tuesday) judging by his other days’ “work” activities – painting, papering, plowing, planting, and picking, and trips to his camp on Wilson Lake on the other side of Acton. I was mystified until I came to his late September entries.

September 26 (a Tuesday): Worked in the office. We have a new Supt., Mr. Herrick, who went to work yesterday.

[The new superintendent was William E. Herrick (1888-1970). As was the case with the former superintendent George A. Stevens, Mr. Herrick left his wife behind at their home base of West Newton, MA, and came to Milton Mills on his own. Despite taking the superintendent’s job in Milton Mills in 1939, he would be enumerated both in West Newton, MA, and Concord, MA, in 1940, while registering for the draft in Milton in 1942. (Ms. Cunningham has noted throughout the intermittent nature of Miltonia Mills’ production runs during these years)].

[William E. Herrick, a textile superintendent, aged fifty-two years (b. MA), headed a Newton, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elsie M. [(Crowninshield)] Herrick, aged fifty-one years (b. NY), and his children, Roger Herrick, assistant buyer for a retail department store, aged twenty-six years (b. NY), Louise Herrick, a cemetery bookkeeper, aged twenty-one years (b. NY), and Stewart A. Herrick, aged nineteen years (b. Canada). William E. Herrick owned their house at 129 Randlett Park, which was valued at $8,000. Elsie M. Herrick supplied the census information. They had all resided in Troy, NY, in 1935].

September 27: Worked in the office. Halton went to N.Y.

October 2: Worked in the office. Peggy is sick.

Peggy Fletcher was out for over a week and Grandpa worked in her stead. I am guessing that the mill had been running throughout the summer, but Grandpa had chosen to work only one day a week. He would have been 70 years old in 1939 and had been cutting back on his farm work load as well. Although he still had a large garden and hens, he no longer had his cows and horses and the care they entailed.

[Harry P. Fletcher, a painter (own shop), aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Laura E. [(Young)] Fletcher, aged forty-two years (b. ME), and his children, Fanny E. [“Peggy”] Fletcher, a blanket mill bookkeeper, aged twenty years (b. ME), Harry Fletcher, Jr., a shoe factory packer, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Maurice Fletcher, aged seventeen years (b. ME), and Harvey Fletcher, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Harry P. Fletcher owned their house in Milton Mills Center, which was valued at $1,000. They had all lived in the same house in 1935. The household of Halton R. Hayes appeared on the same census page].

The only entries for the rest of the year were Worked in the office on Tuesdays and once when he worked in the office because Uncle Halton had gone to New York.

1940

For two weeks in the middle of January Grandpa worked nearly every day “closing up the books for the year.”

January 23: Around home all day. Can’t do much more in the office until Halton gets the inventory ready for me.

He continued his one-day-a-week schedule for the next couple of months. There is nothing in his diary to indicate whether or not the mill was operating.

March 26: Worked in the office all day. Halton has gone to N.Y. and Peggy is sick.

March 27: Worked in the office. Halton came home this morning. He got an order for blankets and will start the mill as soon as he can get the colors wanted.

April 22: Worked in the office all day. Peggy is out this week and Halton is going away next week so I shall have to be there about all of the time.

April 29: Peggy came back to work this morning. Halton & Agnes started their vacation yesterday.

He continued to work every day until Halton came back.

May 9: Halton came home last night so I didn’t have to work to-day.

May 21: Worked in the office. Halton has gone on a vacation so I will have to work until he returns.

May 22: Worked in the office. Mill hasn’t started up yet, but they have got one or two looms going.

Uncle Halton must have had a very short vacation; he returned two days later and Grandpa went back to his every Tuesday workday for the next few months.

July 1: Mill started up this morning – whistle blew.

August 26: Worked in the office. Shall probably work 3 days this week as they are quite busy. Lots of people in the sales-room. Sold over $400 worth to-day. They are running 2 shifts in the mill now – began a week ago.

September 3: Worked in the office. Ruth Ramsey Tanner came in to work. Don’t know whether they will need me much more or not.

[Ruth Ramsey married in Acton, ME, September 20, 1936, Vincent Tanner, she of Milton and he of Lebanon, ME. She was a bookkeeper, aged twenty-five years, and he was a laborer, aged twenty-three years. Rev. Frank H. Snell performed the ceremony].

September 5: Worked in the office. They called me back for a day or two. Lots of work there now.

Grandpa continued to work in the office on Tuesdays for the rest of the year, but the diary contains nothing else about the mill.

1941

In January and February, Grandpa recorded working an occasional day here and there.

February 27: Worked in the office. They haven’t got the books closed for last year.

He worked in the office a couple of days a week for the next two or three weeks.

March 19, 20, 21, and 24: Worked in the office.

March 24: Worked in the office. Peggy is having a hard time. Blood poison or something of that kind. She is down at Rochester to see the Dr. every day.

Grandpa continued to work full time until . . .

April 2: Worked in the office. Peggy got home yesterday and was in to see us to-day. She expects to be back to work next week.

That was a Wednesday. Grandpa worked Thursday and Friday. Presumably, Peggy returned to work on Monday.

I am not sure how long Peggy Fletcher worked there after this year, but I do know that at some time Marion Lowd (Willey) replaced her. Marion was my teacher in the one-room school house on Fox Ridge in Acton for many years. That school closed at the end of the 1940-41 school year and not long after that she became the mill’s bookkeeper.

[Albert Lowd, a farmer (dairy farm), aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Doris [(Rowell)] Lowd, a [Milton Mills] public school teacher, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), his children, Enid Lowd, aged thirteen years (b. ME), and Lois Lowd, aged eleven years (b. ME), his mother, Clara [(Page)] Lowd, aged seventy years (b. NH), and his sister, Marian Lowd, a public school teacher, aged thirty-two years (b. ME). Albert Lowd owned their house “near Milton Mills,” which was valued at $2,500. They had all resided in the same house in 1935].

[Fanny Ellen [“Peggy”] Fletcher married in Sanbornville, [Wakefield,] NH, October 9, 1943, William Hanson, she of Milton Mills and he of Sanbornville, [Wakefield,] NH. She was a secretary, aged twenty-three years, and he was a dairy farmer, aged twenty-five years. Rev. Bradford Ketchum performed the ceremony].

[Marion E. Lowd married in [Acton,] ME, February 8, 1945, Charles P. Willey, she of Acton, ME, and he of Sanbornville, [Wakefield,] NH.

There are no more references to the mill that year, including no mention of him having “worked in the office.”

Nowhere does Grandpa indicate that he has retired, but all indications are that he has, in fact, done so. As you can see from the following entries, he adds very little to the mill’s history from this time on. I had hoped to learn a little more about what led to its demise and how it became Greene Tanning Company.

1942

Not a word about the mill!

[Halton Rex Hayes of Church Street, Milton Mills, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 27, 1942. He was forty-eight years of age (b. Rochester, NH, December 29, 1893), and employed in Milton Mills. His telephone number was Milton Mills 39-3. His contact was Mrs. Agnes T. Hayes, of Milton Mills. He was 5′ 10″ in height, weighed 180 pounds, and had blue eyes, gray hair, and a light complexion].

[William Edward Herrick of Milton Mills registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 27, 1942. He was fifty-four years of age (b. Lowell, MA, March 3, 1888), and employed at the Miltonia Mill in Milton Mills. He had no telephone number. His contact was Mrs. Elsie M. Herrick, of 129 Randlett Park, West Newton, Mass. He was 5′ 10″ in height, weighed 175 pounds, and had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion].

1943

February 12: Fire broke out in the picker room of the mill about 3 P.M. and caused quite an excitement in town for a while. It was put out without a great deal of damage, mostly from water.

June 12: They are having a new smokestack over at the mill. The old one was taken down this morning and they are getting ready to put up the new one.

September 18: Fred Simes [former mill superintendent] is here from California. He called on us after we got home from the camp.

Grandpa had a camp on Wilson Lake in Acton.

[Fred Sims, a whl. [wholesale] textile manager (own business), aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Los Angeles, CA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary Sims, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), and his son, Harold Sims, a whl. [wholesale] textile manager (own business), aged fifty-three years (b. NH). Fred Sims rented their house at 3966 West Avenue, for $38 per month. They had all resided in the same place, i.e., Los Angeles, CA, in 1935].

December 13: Fred Simes, who has been here from Cal. for over 2 months waiting for train accommodations to return and take Laura with him, got word this morning that May is dead. He has reservations for the 16th and can’t go until then.

Fred’s wife’s name was Mary. Was May a “familiar” name for Mary? Or did Grandpa make a rare spelling mistake?!

[Frederick H. “Fred” Simes and Laura E. (Simes) Roberts were siblings, children of Edwin S. and Mary E. (Lowd) Simes (and grandchildren of Milton Mills’ Bray U. Simes (1801-1885)). Fred’s wife, Mary A. “May” (Smith) Simes died in Los Angeles, CA, December 13, 1943, aged seventy-three years, eight months, and twenty-seven days].

1944

February 12: Heard to-day that Ing Townsend is married to Harold Simes in Los Angeles. She went out there in December.

[Ingeborg V. Townsend married in Anaheim, CA, January 14, 1944, Harold E. Simes. Later, Ingeborg V. Townsend Simes divorced Harold E. Simes, both of Milton Mills, in Strafford County Court, June 9, 1949].

Harold was Fred Simes’ son.

1945

Miltonia Blanket - 1945January 8: A boy was born to Mr. & Mrs. William Hanson of Wakefield. [Peggy Fletcher]

There is nothing about the mill in Grandpa’s 1946, 1947, 1948, and 1949 diaries.

[The diarist’s second wife, Ella (Buck) Wentworth, died June 21, 1947, aged seventy-six years, ten months, and two days].

Miltonia Blanket - 19491950

[The Miltonia Mill was placed in receivership, i.e., became bankrupt, in early 1950].

March 24: Went to Rochester with Agnes in A.M. Had to go to the bank. I am letting her have some money to help save the mill and get it out of Receivership. She hopes to get it incorporated and going again.

1951

June 18: Mr. John Bentley called to see me this evening. He is interested in planning some way to get the mill going.

[John W. Bentley (1873-1962) lived on both Pelham Avenue in Methuen, MA, and Townhouse Road in Milton, NH. He was president and treasurer of Bentley Hair Co., manufacturers of hair brushes, but he had formerly manufactured “shoddy.” Shoddy is reclaimed wool from unfelted materials of a better quality and longer staple].

October 3: Agnes was over to see me about the mill – nothing doing there yet, and not any very good prospect.

1952

July 17: Went over to talk with Agnes a little while in P.M. about the mill. She has another prospect of selling. Don’t know as it will amount to anything.

1953

April 14: Fred Simes funeral was this P.M. at the house. I wanted to go but the weather was bad [snow] and I didn’t feel hardly able to go over.

[Fred H. Simes died of cardiac failure in Milton, April 11, 1953, aged eighty-five years. He was a widowed [retired] mill superintendent. Robert E. Lord, M.D., signed the death certificate].

Grandpa was 83 and had multiple health issues at this time; some days were good, but others were not.

1954

[Granite State Briefs. Tanning Firm Buys Mill. MILTON MILLS (AP) – The Greene Tanning Corp., newly organized company for tanning sheep hides, has purchased a vacant mill here and will begin operations within 30 days, it was announced today. According to attorney Wesley Powell of Hampton Falls, the Miltonia Mills plant has been obtained by a firm headed by James C. Greene of Peabody, Mass. The mill has been vacant since Miltonia went out of business several years ago. The purchase price from the mill corporation was not disclosed. The new operation is expected to employ “upwards” of 25, the lawyer said (Portsmouth Herald, May 27, 1954)].

[AUCTION! MACHINERY and EQUIPMENT of the BANKRUPT MILTONIA MILLS, MILTON MILLS, NEW HAMPSHIRE. Wednesday, June 16, 1954 at 11:00 A.M. D&F 48 in. DREADNAUGHT MIXING PICKER – Sargent Cone duster – Dodge rag picker – 5 sets D&F and CLEVELAND CARDS, 48×60 and 48×48 in. – 60×48 in. card grinders – 20 C&K 92 and 100 in. AUTOMATIC 4×1 BOX LOOMS – D&F MULES – Rodney Hunt fulling mills and cloth washers – D&F 100 in. x 14 ROLL S.A. NAPPER – GESSNER 84 and 90 IN. x 18 ROLL D.A. NAPPERS – PROCTOR & SCHWARTZ 90 IN. x 2 SECTION RAW STOCK DRYER – Roy 115 in. napper grinder – Hercules and other extractors – Walsh, Houston, Merrow and Metropolitan sewing machines – yarn tester – D&F 92 and 100 IN. BRASS PLATE DRESSING WHEELS – D&F beamer – D&F jack spoolers – jack winder – flocking system – 16 metal clad fiber box trucks 48x30x27 in.; card and jack spools; bobbins; picker sticks; canvas baskets, sewing thread; waste; blanket boxes; trucks; scales; blowers; motors; belting; stencil cutter; pipe fittings; fluorescent lights; Whitcomb iron planer; desks; chairs; letter and card files, etc. Sale to take place upon the premises, and will be sold piece by piece. Inspection day before and morning of sale. Terms cash. Catalog in detail upon application to Henry S. Anthony & Co., AUCTIONEERS, Since 1923, 210 CENTRAL ST., LOWELL, MASS. PHONE 2-4995 SuT je13 (Boston Globe, June 13, 1954)].

June 29: Fire in the mill this a.m. in the old Dye House part. Don’t know how much damage was done.

July 26: Mill whistle blew to-day – the first time for 2 or 3 years.

October 29: The Greene Tanning Co. held “Open House” this P.M. & evening. So rainy I didn’t go over. There were quite a lot of people there.

1955

Harry E. Wentworth passed away at his home with his son and daughter-in-law by his side on December 10, 1955. He was 86 years old.

[Deaths and Funerals. Harry E. Wentworth. ACTON, Maine – Harry E. Wentworth, 86, brother of Mrs. Clara Wilkins of York and a retired manager and head bookkeeper of the former Miltonia Mill, Milton Mills, N.H., died Saturday at his home. For the past 40 years Mr. Wentworth, a native of Milton Mills, has served as Sunday School superintendent of the Milton Mills-Acton Baptist Church of which was deacon and treasurer. He has served as president of the Milton Mills Cemetery Assn. Besides his sister, survivors include a son and another sister (Portsmouth Herald, December 12, 1955)].

Epilogue

Halton R. Hayes was nominated as Milton Mills postmaster in August 1956 (U.S. Senate, 1960).

Former superintendent Frank C. Gard died in Waterville, ME, February 3, 1963.

Agnes M. (Townsend) Hayes died in St. Petersburg, FL, in 1969.

Former superintendent William E. Herrick died in Barnstable, MA, April 25, 1970.

THE GREENE TANNING CORP AT PUBLIC AUCTION. TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1978, AT 10 A.M. MILTON MILLS, NH, ALL EQUIPMENT & REAL ESTATE. We have been commissioned to sell this Tannery piece by piece or as an entirety, whichever way it brings the most. This is a positive sale with NO HOLD BACKS, EVERYTHING SELLS! On this above date and time. TANNING MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT, WET CELLAR – DRY MILL ROOM – BUFFING ROOM, TACKING ROOM – SPRAYING ROOM – SHIPPING ROOM, TOGGLING ROOM – BOILER ROOM, MACHINE SHOP, TRUCKS – FORK LIFT & BOILER, OFFICE EQUIPMENT, INVENTORY OF SKINS. Anyone wishing a complete list of this sale please call Auctioneers office. TERMS ON EQUIPMENT: Cash day of sale. REAL ESTATE. Consists of a large mill with office building and approx. 8 Acres of land, more or less, with a large warehouse and boiler room. It has a Chappell purifying system self-contained waste water system. INSPECTION: On Real Estate by appointment only by calling auctioneers office. TERMS: On Real Estate $5,000 down time of sale by cash or certified check, balance within 20 days on closing. All other conditions to be announced at time of sale. POSITIVE SALE – Sale by order of Small Business Administration. Sale under the management of Barber Sales, Inc., Lebanon, N.H. Tel: 603-448-3366 or Westbrook, ME 207-8S4-8344. AUCTIONEERS: J. W. BARBER, JR. & LARRY GRAY (Boston Globe, May 14, 1978).

Ingeborg V. (Swenson) Townsend died in 1981. Halton R. Hayes died in Pinellas, FL, in October 7, 1981, aged eighty-seven years.

NEW HAMPSHIRE R.E. – MILTONIA MILL. Historic Mill Complex in Milton Mills offering approx. 54,000 s.f. of building area in 7 structures. Long river frontage, ideally situated for light industrial, residential or commercial development. Additional land available. $275,000. ERA MAINS & ROBINSON 603-539-6412, 522-3364 (Boston Globe, February 9, 1986).


Ms. Bristol contributed some supplementary research support.


See also H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27 and H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1928-34


References:

Find a Grave. (2020, April 5). John W. Bentley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/208749817/john-w.-bentley

Find a Grave. (2020, May 4). Fanny Ellen Hansen. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/209771634/fanny-ellen-hansen

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Halton R. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114892787/halton-r-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 9). Hattie E. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115185701/hattie-e-hayes

Find a Grave. (2016, July 3). William E. Herrick. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/166367295/william-edward-herrick

Find a Grave. (2013, August 2). Eugene E. Runnells. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114807003/eugene-e-runnels

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Frederick H. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612396/frederick-h.-simes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Harold Edward Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612469/harold-edward-simes

Find a Grave. (2019, August 15). George A. Stevens. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/202167636/george-a-stevens

Find a Grave. (2015, November 12). Ruth Marion Ramsey Tanner. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154917895/ruth-marion-tanner

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Ingeborg V. Swenson Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893253/ingeborg-v-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Harry E. Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938247/harry-e-wentworth

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Louis A. Young. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115328549/louis-a-young

U.S. Senate. (1960). Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate of the United States of America. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-m24R7ZvJFkC&pg=PA702

Wikipedia. (2021, June 6). Nor’easter. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nor%27easter

Celestial Seasonings – July 2021

By Heather Durham | June 30, 2021

Hi everyone! Welcome to this month’s edition of Celestial Seasonings! In keeping with my musings in the June addition, I have added a graphic and the only video I could find pertaining to the meteor showers we are expecting this month.  More time and research is needed. In the meantime, check out what’s available for your viewing pleasure this July.


July 1. The Strawberry Moon will be in its last quarter.

July 5. Mercury will be located at it’s farthest place from the Sun. Although we are in midsummer, the Earth will be located at it’s farthest point from the Sun.

July 9. Half of Mercury will be visible this morning.

July 12. The Moon and Venus will ascend to the right together.

July 13. Mercury will ascend to it’s highest location in the sky.

July 17. The first quarter of the Moon will appear.

July 23. The full Buck Moon will appear this evening. Bucks’ antlers grow this time of year.

July 24. The Moon and Saturn will ascend to the right and will be very close to one another.

July 25. The Moon and Jupiter will ascend to the right direction and will be close to each other.

July 28. The Piscis Austrinid meteor shower will peak today.

July 30. The Southern Delta-Aquariid meteor shower will peak today.  These showers are very faint. The Alpha-Capricornid meteor shower will also peak today during which time you may see up to five meteors. Most meteors are smaller than a grain of sand but usually disintegrate before reaching Earth.

Meteor Over LindisfarneJuly 31. The last quarter of the Moon is this evening.


References:

Anonymous, A.A. (2020, May 10). Meteor Shower. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteor_shower

Ford, D.F.(2021, June 28). July 2021. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/newscal.php

Now Next. (2021, May 27). July 2021 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/LmP66__L36Y

Wikipedia. (2021, January 15). Alpha-Capricornids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_Capricornids

The Impossible Nightmare

By Ian Aikens | June 4, 2021

Re-education camps for white executives of Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California? An infographic at the African-American History Museum in Washington D.C. that lists “self-reliance, objective and linear thinking, hard work, the nuclear family, planning for the future, written tradition, and politeness” as aspects of “White Culture”? A white high school student at a Las Vegas charter school forced to take a mandatory civics class for graduation that required students to reveal their race, gender, sexual orientation, and disabilities and then determine if privilege or oppression is attached to any of these identities?

What madness is going on here? It’s called Critical Race Theory (CRT), and it’s been around for decades festering in the academic world, but it is now in full bloom in the corporate world and educational system. Under the guise of equity and diversity, CRT’s alleged goal is to make this a more just society. In reality, it will only make things worse for minority members of society.

CRT’s basic premise is that American society is inherently and hopelessly racist and can only be fixed with a total restructuring. The most basic tenet of CRT is the complete absence of individualism. All of us are not individuals but rather part of socially constructed groups. Furthermore, there are two basic groups—oppressors (whites) and the oppressed (non-whites). To say that CRT proponents are obsessed with race is the understatement of our time.

So, what has all this to do with the Live Free or Die state? HB544, a bill introduced this year and now included in the budget that was sent to the governor, has been one of the most explosive and bitterly contested bills in the state house this session. The bill is entitled “Propagation of Divisive Concepts Prohibited,” and the basic goal of the bill is to outlaw advocating CRT with tax dollars. This would mainly apply to schools and government contractors.

One of the objections to HB544 has been that it is akin to censorship since it ties the hands of teachers from teaching about CRT and the country’s racial problems. That’s nonsense. According to Chapter 10-C:3 Section II,

Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to prohibit discussing, as part of a larger course of academic instruction, the divisive concepts listed in RSA 10-C:1, II in an objective manner and without endorsement.

Discussing OK—advocating not OK. It should be obvious that teachers should not be bringing their politics into the classroom anyway.

“Divisive concepts” are defined in the bill as:

  1. One race or sex is inherently superior to another race or sex.
  2. The state of New Hampshire or the United States is fundamentally racist or sexist.
  3. An individual, by virtue of his or her race or sex, is fundamentally racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously.
  4. An individual should be discriminated against or receive adverse treatment solely or partly because of his or her race or sex.
  5. Members of one race or sex cannot and should not attempt to treat others without respect to race or sex.
  6. An individual’s moral character is necessarily determined by his or her race or sex.
  7. Meritocracy or traits such as a hard work ethic are racist or sexist, or were created by a particular race to oppress another race.

While some people (who may have forgotten that a black man was elected President of the United States not once but twice) might feel the second statement above is true and should not be considered a “divisive concept,” surely all the other statements should be abhorrent to all well-meaning people of different backgrounds and affiliations. You wouldn’t think there would be a major brouhaha about outlawing the advocacy of such ideas, let alone with tax dollars.

You better think again. The pro-CRT troops are very vocal, and they showed up (virtually) at the committee hearings earlier this year in masse. The very first thing that became obvious at the hearings is that the CRT supporters all tend to sound alike after a while, which isn’t surprising since groupthink is an essential characteristic of CRT. Beware when you hear the term “lived experience”! They all use it since that’s part of the script of the oppressed. Storytelling or “counter-storytelling,” rather than science and factual information, is the preferred method for advancing knowledge, according to the gospel of CRT.

The complete lack of civility was very much on display by those opposing the bill. Rather than bringing up legitimate points of discussion supporting their objections to the bill—if they had any—the CRT mob immediately descended into personal attacks against anyone who supported the bill. Allegations of “white supremacist” and “racist” were uttered often. It is rumored that the committee chair (normally a mellow person) at one of the public hearings “lost her cool” due to the rudeness from those who profess “social justice” but couldn’t honor The Golden Rule personally themselves.

This complete lack of tolerance toward any other point of view other than their own is a familiar characteristic of CRT. According to CRT, white people don’t even have a say in the matter of racism in American society since as oppressors it is not their “lived experience.” And even if white people don’t oppress minorities consciously, they do it unconsciously through implicit bias. To top this twisted thinking off, when white people finally become anti-racist, even then they don’t get high marks because of “interest convergence.” This means that they only allowed the advancement of the oppressed to make themselves feel good, protect themselves from criticism, and avoid confronting their own inherent racism. Truly a “Dammed if you do, damned if you don’t” situation—and by design too.

The CRT crowd takes this nonsense a step further. Even a black person isn’t safe from the wrath of the CRT believers if he doesn’t subscribe to the CRT religion. When musician Kanye West donned a MAGA hat, critical race theorist Nehisi Coates suggested that West is “not really black.” The same could be said of senior associate justice of the Supreme Court Clarence Thomas due to his conservative views. On the other hand, President Biden (who rescinded President Trump’s executive order banning CRT from federal training programs) could be considered black. The difference here is “racially black” versus “politically black.” CRT theorists are really only interested in the “politically black.” If you don’t toe the CRT line, don’t bother to apply because you’re “not really black.”

CRT sees racism in every single transaction in all aspects of life. That’s the “critical” part of the movement that all devoted CRT activists are expected to perform 24/7. They see The White Supremacist Boogeyman everywhere. Even ordinary day-to-day activities become suspect.

Did you read about the cafeteria worker and campus staff at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts who were accused of being racist when they questioned a black student for eating her lunch in a building that was closed for the summer? A simple misunderstanding became a cause célèbre for the CRT crowd that went viral. A public apology by the college, threats made, lives changed forever—all despite an independent investigation that found no evidence of racial discrimination. Is it any surprise that Ibram X. Kendi, another esteemed high priest of the movement, who directs the Center for Antiracist Research at Boston University, has proposed the creation of a federal Department of Antiracism?

Another perverse trait of CRT is its rejection of science as the primary method of the gaining and transmission of knowledge. Because modern science was predominately produced by white males in Western civilization, that immediately makes it suspect to CRT scholars. Per Robin DiAngelo (who by the way was paid $12,000 plus travel expenses for a 2-hour racial justice speech at the University of Kentucky) and Ozlem Sensoy, “…a key element of social injustice involves the claim (my emphasis) that particular knowledge is objective, neutral, and universal. An approach based on critical theory calls into question the idea that objectivity is desirable or even possible.”

If this isn’t an anti-science piece of muddled thinking, I don’t know what is. Obviously, universality and objectivity are the basics of all science, with the goal of discovering truth, wherever it might be. While “following the science” is easier said than done, at least most people would agree that it serves the human race well. But CRT thinkers discourage even following the science because, by their thinking, white people’s interests are primarily served by science in order to oppress black people.

In place of science and objectivity, CRT encourages storytelling for black people as a better way to gain knowledge. Science for white people and storytelling for black people. It’s not hard to see why CRT advocates are primarily opposed to testing, grades, and mathematics in the schools. Can you imagine a doctor performing surgery on you who gained his operating skills from “storytelling” rather than what he learned in his biology classes? Or, back to the Sandia scientists who work on nuclear weapons, would you prefer they learned their trade through “counter-stories” or technical science books and lab experiments? By the CRT way of thinking, if you feel that 2 + 2 = 5, then indeed why can’t that be your reality?

In the end, CRT is a hopeless effort that can never be satisfied. Kate Slate, another revered local CRT expert at the University of New Hampshire, proclaimed this zinger of wisdom: “I am white. White people can never be anything but oppressors…I will work on my anti-racism my whole life but will continually fail. I will never get to a space where I am good enough.” As for encouraging black people to turn away from science, hard work, long-term goals, and their own individuality, and choose victimhood, how is this ever going to lift them out of poverty?

The hard, cold truth is CRT “scholars” have designed a black hole of destructive, circular thinking that thrives on constant strife that can never eliminate racism but only feed into it. If ivory-tower intellectuals want to immerse themselves in this warped view of life, they should be free to do so—but not on the taxpayers’ dime.


References:

Administrator, A Disillusioned. (2021, April 2). I Work in the Public School System. Critical Race Theory Is Everywhere. Retrieved from I Work in the Public School System. Critical Race Theory Is Everywhere. – American Thinker

Bernstein, Brittany. (2021, May 8). Disney Employee Training Claims U.S. Was Founded on ‘Systemic Racism,’ Includes ‘White Privilege Checklist’. Retrieved from Disney Employee Training Claims U.S. Was Founded on ‘Systemic Racism,’ Includes ‘White Privilege Checklist’ (yahoo.com)

Chait, Jonathan. (2020, July 16). Is the Anti-Racism Training Industry Just Peddling White Supremacy? Retrieved from Is Anti-Racism Training Just Peddling White Supremacy? (nymag.com)

Dima, Jake and Hasson, Peter. (2019, July 28). $12K A Day: How White Liberals Profit From Pushing ‘White Privilege’. Retrieved from $12K A Day: How White Liberals Profit From Pushing ‘White Privilege’ | The Daily Caller

Eden, Max. (2020, September 18). Critical Race Theory in American Classrooms. Retrieved from Critical Race Theory in American Classrooms | City Journal (city-journal.org)

Griffith, Keith and Alexander, Harriet. (2021, April 16). Smith College cafeteria worker who was smeared with false racism claim says her life has ‘never been the same’ as she files internal complaint. Retrieved from Smith College cafeteria worker who was smeared with false racism claim speaks out | Daily Mail Online

Jacobson, William A. (2021, May 11). As “Critical Race Theory” Becomes Toxic Term, New Codenames and Keywords Emerge. Retrieved from As “Critical Race Theory” Becomes Toxic Term, New Codenames and Keywords Emerge (legalinsurrection.com)

Karimi, Faith. (2021, May 10). What critical race theory is—and isn’t. Retrieved from What critical race theory is — and isn’t – CNN

Lindsay, James. (2020, June 12). Eight Big Reasons Critical Race Theory Is Terrible for Dealing with Racism. Retrieved from Eight Big Reasons Critical Race Theory Is Terrible for Dealing with Racism – New Discourses

Rufo, Christopher F. (2020, August 12). Nuclear Consequences. Retrieved from Nuclear Consequences (christopherrufo.com)

Rufo, Christopher F. (2021, February 11). In a Philadelphia elementary school, teachers are putting a premium on radicalism, not reading. Retrieved from Philadelphia 5th Graders Forced to Celebrate “Black Communism” (city-journal.org)

Safi, Marlo. (2020, December 4). ‘You Are Upholding Racist Ideas’: Teachers Reportedly Required To Attend ‘White Privilege’ Training At Public School. Retrieved from ‘You Are Upholding Racist Ideas’: Teachers Reportedly Required To Attend ‘White Privilege’ Training At Public School | The Daily Caller

Wikipedia. Critical race theory. Retrieved from Critical race theory – Wikipedia

Celestial Seasonings – June 2021

By Heather Durham | May 31, 2021

Hello there everyone!  Welcome to the month of June during which time we celebrate the summer solstice.  There’s plenty of excitement this month including two meteor showers along with a phenomenon commonly referred to as retrograde and the full strawberry moon.  This Moon is the most colorful one of the year.

Below is a meteor shower graphic along with three YouTube videos that pertain to the astronomical events this month along with a bit of last month’s activity.  I hope to add more references and graphics, photos and videos in future issues.  There’s also a link to a graphic description of the eclipse that will give you an idea of how it will appear.

So come along as we begin our adventure into the night skies of June 2021!


June 1. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to one another.

June 2. The Moon will be at its last quarter.

June 10. The Moon will pass the sun providing a 74% eclipse visible from Dover, NH The link below will give you a visual view of what this should look like. The Daytime Arietid meteor shower will peak today with the best viewing be after 2:40 am, but before sunrise.  This is one of the brightest daytime meteor showers there is.

Daytime Arietids - Per F.C. Cain
Daytime Arietids (Per F.C. Cain).

June 17. The Moon will be at first quarter.

June 20. Jupiter may be seen moving west to east.  This is called Retrograde. Today is the summer solstice and the longest day of the year. It may be referred to as midsummer.

June 24. The full Strawberry Moon will be full.

June 27. The Moon and Saturn will rise closely to one another. The June Bootid meteor shower will be at its peak today with the best viewing at twilight. The meteors are slow and are known to be unpredictable.

June 28. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to one another.


References:

Anonymous, A.A. (2020, April 20). June Bootids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_Bootids

Anonymous, A.A. (2020, December 29). Daytime Arietids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arietids

Cain, F.C. (n.d.). Daytime Arietids [Graphic]. Retrieved from www.universetoday.com/102715/june-arietids-the-invisible-meteor-shower-you-just-

Ford, D.F. (2021, January 5). June 2021. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/newscal.php?month=6&year=2021&maxdiff=1#datesel

Late Night Astronomy. (2021, April 1). What’s Up In The Night Sky – May & June 2021. Retrieved from youtu.be/tuyNLOrQi5E

NBC News. (2019, June 19). Why June’s Strawberry Moon is the most colorful of the Year. Retrieved from youtu.be/7kbMuUeqoMw

Now Next. (2021, April 24). June 2021 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/Oi4BYiq3ero

H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1928-34

By Joyce Wentworth Cunningham | May 23, 2021

Continued from H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27

Wentworth, Harry E. - Per Joyce W. Cunningham
Harry E. Wentworth (Per Joyce W. Cunningham).

The story of Miltonia Mills continues: A couple things are now clearer. First, the reason for all the negotiations being carried on at the end of 1927 was a financial crisis. Second, Henry A. Townsend is in charge, but much of the day to day operation is Grandpa’s [Harry E. Wentworth’s] responsibility.

Here is the chronology for 1928-34. You can draw your own conclusions about what it all means.


1928

January 11: Norman took Ella & me down to Rochester in P.M. I had to go on some business for Henry.

[Norman L. Wentworth (1903-1991), son of the diarist Harry E. Wentworth (1869-1955), took his father and his step-mother, Ella C. (Buck) Wentworth (1870-1947), down to Rochester, NH, on business for mill proprietor Henry A. Townsend (1898-1932)].

January 13: Mr. Griswold & Mr.  Buckley, two accountants, came this P.M. to get some figures from our books for Mr. Grant of N.Y.

[Dana H. Grant [(1894-1973)] was the head of D.H. Grant & Co. Dana H. Grant, an importer, aged thirty-six years (b. ME), headed a Pelham, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Dorothy R. [(Gross)] Grant, aged thirty-six years (b. IL), his children, Dorothy H. Grant, aged four years (b. NY), and Dana W. Grant, aged two years (b. NY), and his mother-in-law [mother], Mary H. Grant, aged seventy years (b. MA). Dana H. Grant owned their house at 218 Cliff Avenue, which was valued ay $35,000. (Nor was his the most valuable house in the neighborhood). They had a radio set].

January 21: Mr. Buckley got through at the office to-night and went home.

January 30: Henry came home from Texas. He got in Boston Friday. He will go back to Boston to-morrow, where he & Ing will stay for a few weeks. 

You will recall that he left for Texas (and elsewhere) on December 24, 1927.

February 8: Henry came home to-night.

February 13: Henry went back to Boston this morning.

February 24: Mr. Emerson was in the office this A.M. to talk about the mill.

[This visitor might have been John N. Emerson [(1875-1946)], president of the Emerson Shoe Company of Rochester, NH. His vice-president and treasurer was Seth F. Dawson of the Milton Leatherboard Company. John N. Emerson, a shoe manufacturer, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nellie [(Briody)] Emerson, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), and his son, Lloyd E. Emerson, a shoe factory helper, aged twenty-one years (b. MA). John N. Emerson rented their house at 87 Wakefield Street, for $36 per month. They had a radio set].

February 25: Henry came back this P.M. and Mr. Emerson came up again to see him.

February 27: Norman took me down to Milton after dinner to see Mr. Dawson about the mill.

[This would have been Seth F. Dawson, Jr. (1879-1955), proprietor of the Milton Leatherboard Company. After the 1933 death of Dawson’s second wife, he would marry as his third wife Ing’s sister, Mrs. Ruth H. ((Svenson) Anderson) Iovine]. 

March 17: Ralph & I finished work for Henry in the office. I have a little more to do, but no more pay. 

[Ralph Pike [(1893-1938)], a fibre mill commercial traveler, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Marian H. Pike, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), and his children, Franklin Pike, aged six years (b. NH), Roland Pike, aged five years (b. NH), and Roger L. Pike, aged three years (b. NH). Ralph Pike owned their house on Highland Street (near its intersection with Western Avenue), which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set].

March 20: Mr. Grant, Mr. Astatt & Mr.____? From N.Y. were in the office in the P.M.

March 28: When down to No. Rochester to see Mr. Spaulding in the A.M. and he came up here to see the mill in P.M.

[This might have been either Rolland H. Spaulding (1873-1942) or his elder brother, Huntley N. Spaulding (1869-1955), at this time president and vice-president respectively of the Spaulding Fibre Company of North Rochester. Both served as governors of New Hampshire, but Huntley N. Spaulding was actually governor at the time of this diary entry, which suggests on several levels that Harry E. Wentworth went down to North Rochester to see former governor Rolland H. Spaulding].

[Roland H. Spaulding, a leather-board factory president, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Vera G. Spaulding, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), his children, Virginia P. Spaulding, aged nine years (b. MA), Betty L. Spaulding, aged seven years (b. MA), his cook, Mary Wakefield, a private family cook, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), and his servant, Rachael Houle, a private family maid, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Roland H. Spaulding owned their house at 76 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $200,000 [!]. They had a radio set].

April 13: Was at the office all day. Mr. Grant was here from N.Y. and we expected to get the finances all fixed up but Mr. Dawson disappointed us and so we are no better off than we were a month ago.

April 14: Henry, Mr. Grant, and I went down to see Mr. Hall in A.M. & talked business in the office in P.M. We are going to start the mill and make some samples and see if we can’t keep it going. Henry is to put in part of the capital.

Miltonia Mills Trademark - 1921
Registration of Miltonia Mills’ Trademark “Miltonia” (U.S. Patent Office)

I wonder if these sample blankets were the white hospital blankets for which the mill became known.  I grew up covered by those blankets – seconds, samples stitched together to make a twin or full bed size – and even heated pieces used to cover my Vicks-Rubbed chest when I had a cold.  I spent a lot of time looking at those Miltonia Mills labels!

April 30: Was over in the office a little while in P.M. Fred started getting the warps in the looms for sample blankets.

[Fred H. Simes [(1868-1953)], a woolen mill superintendent, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-two years), Mary A. [(Smith)] Simes, aged sixty-one years (b. NH). Fred H. Simes rented their house on Main Street, for $8 per month. They did not have a radio set].

May 16: Was in the office in P.M. and paid off. 

I assume this means that there were at least some workers making the sample blankets. Grandpa had continued to go to the office occasionally since the March 17 shut down without pay. After this date, he was in the office fairly regularly, but no indication of whether or not he was being paid.

May 18: In the office in P.M.  New sample blankets coming along slowly.

June 1: I was in the office most of P.M. Sample blankets about all done.

June 6:  Sent a case of the new blankets to Mr. Grant.

June 27:  Mr. Harvey L. Lord from Auburn & Kennebunk was here to look over the mill proposition. He may put some money in with us.

[This might have been Harvey J. Lord [(1881-1960)]. Harvey J. Lord, a lumber mill sawyer, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. He owned his house, which was valued at $100. He did not have a radio set].

June 30: Mr. and Mrs. Grant of N.Y. were here in P.M. They are stopping at York Village for a few days.

July 2: Mr. Lord and Mr. Grant were at the office most of the day trying to reach some conclusion about the mill.

November 16: Went over to the office for Henry to give figures for the Income Tax inspector about 11:30 and was over in P.M.

Grandpa had continued to work in the office, at least half days, on a fairly regular basis over the last six months of the year, but did not record anything more about the mill’s financial situation. Was he being paid or was he still working gratis? Did they get the financing they needed?  Were the sample blankets satisfactory? Had they re-employed some/many of their laid-off workers? Perhaps his 1929 diary will continue to help demystify the situation.

1929

The year began on this less than hopeful note. On January 7, Grandpa wrote: Mill is all closed up – has been for a week. I am finishing the work on the books.  Other developments during the year are detailed below:

January 11: In the office all day. Henry went to Boston. Will go to N.Y. Sunday night to see Mr. Jenkins.

[Thomas A. Jenkins [(1867-)], a commercial blanket salesman, aged sixty-three years years (b. NY), headed a Mount Vernon, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Sarah B. Jenkins, aged sixty years (b. NY), and his son, James H. Jenkins, a bond salesman, aged twenty-six years (b. NY). Thomas A. Jenkins rented their house at 120 Grand Street, for $128 per month. They had a radio set].

February 9: Henry has closed the mill, drawn off all the water and let the fire go out.

April 2: Had some work to do for Henry in P.M. Mr. Carmichael was here and called to talk a little about the mill.

[Mrs. Helen G. (Fox) Carmichael (1881-1971) was a daughter of Milton Mills merchant Everett F. Fox (1856-1927). Her husband, George E. Carmichael (1875-1965) was headmaster at the Brunswick School, in Greenwich, CT. George E. Carmichael, a private school teacher, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Greenwich, CT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Helen F. Carmichael, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), and his children, Margaret Carmichael, aged sixteen years (b. CT), and Douglas Carmichael, aged six years (b. CT). George E. Carmichael owned their house, which was valued at $50,000. They had a radio set.

CARMICHAELS AT FARM. George E. Carmichael, headmaster of the Brunswick School, and Mrs. Carmichael are spending the week at their farm at Milton Mills, N.H. (Daily Item (Port Chester, NY), May 7, 1932)].

July 17: Went to work in the office again. Shall work half time or so.

July 25: Did not go to the office at all. Am going to work Mon, Wed & Fri for a while.

August 19: Began working in the office all the time.

September 5: Ernest Libby began working in the office during the blanket sale.

[Everett H. Goodwin, a plush mill weaver, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Florence Goodwin, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), his son, Everett H. Goodwin, aged one month (b. ME), his mother, Nellie Goodwin, aged sixty-three years (b. MA), his brother-in-law, Ernest Libbey, a plush mill weaver, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), his sister, Stella Libbey, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), and his nephews, Robert Libbey, aged five years (b. ME), and Richard Libbey, aged five months (b. ME). Everett H. Goodwin owned their house. They did not have a radio set].

Obviously the mill was operating and blankets were being made, but no explanation of how or why or how successfully. What kind of sale? Did buyers actually come to the mill to look and buy? Or had an advertised sale resulted in an abundance of orders? As usual, more questions than answers!

[Wall  Street News and Comment. Special Dispatch t0 the Globe. NEW YORK, Oct 24 – For years, ever since the Federal, Reserve System began to operate shortly after the outbreak of the World War, Wall Street has been saying with increasing confidence that there would never again be a panic. There was a panic today in the Stock Market (Boston Globe, October 25, 1929). This crash was the first of several, culminating in the Great Depression].

November 12: Went over to Sanford with Henry to see a lawyer about incorporating his business in A.M.

December 5: Everything closed up now at the mill except the office.

December 11: Let the fire go out in the boiler at the mill so I can’t work any after to-day unless we get other heat in the office.

December 12: Went over to the office and got the books and worked on them here at home about 4 hr.

He continued to work on the books at home for another five days. Thus ended another year of uncertainty.

1930

Realizing that we are now into the Great Depression years, things must have looked rather bleak for Miltonia Mills as the new year started.

January 6: Went down to Rochester & Gonic with John Horne, Mose Chamberlain & Charlie Langley in P.M. to see if we could to anything about the mill.

[John E. Horne and Charles A. Langley each appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as Milton Mills general store keepers. John E. Horne was at this time Milton Mills postmaster, i.e., the Milton Mills post office was in his store. Moses G. Chamberlain appeared as a Milton Mills lumberman].

These were all local merchants who had a vested interest in keeping the mill going and local men employed.

January 9: Worked on Income Tax for Henry most of day. 

January 10: Henry was over in P.M. and we worked on Income Tax.

January 11: Worked for Henry most of P.M.

February 5: Henry went to Boston to stay for a while. Eda [Townsend’s mother and Wentworth’s sister-in-law] is quite poorly. Henry will be up once a week probably.

Grandpa records only one visit from Henry over the next couple of weeks, but …

February 19: Worked over at the office part of P.M. putting up some blankets to ship.

And again …

February 21: Worked over in the office most of the day putting up some blankets.  Were these blankets they had in stock or was the mill back in production?

Either way, it looks as if Grandpa is not only the accountant, but also the shipping department!

February 25: Went over to the mill to show the place to a man from the Chamber of Commerce of Rochester in P.M.

[ROCHESTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, pres. Conrad E. Snow; v-pres. J. Leslie Meader; sec. William J. Warren; treas. John M. Stevens, City Hall. See p. 492 (Rochester Directory, 1930-31)].

More mystery: Why were they interested? Nothing more about working in the office or for Henry until …

April 4: Henry telephoned from Boston. He has gotten home from the South where he has been since the middle of February.

[Harry E. Wentworth, a woolen mill accountant, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census (April 22, 1930). His household included his [second] wife (of eighteen years), Ella B. Wentworth, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their house, which was valued at $5,000. They had a radio set. (His son, Norman L. Wentworth, a B&M Railway file clerk, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), lived nearby with his wife (of one year), Helen M. Wentworth, aged twenty-five years (b. ME))].

June 11: Helped Henry over at the office 2½ hours in P.M.

The next entry about the mill is surprising!

September 17: So many people in the sales room to-day we had to stay there all day – went without our dinner. Henry was away.  

Who are “we”? Who was there? What were they shopping for? Blankets? Mill machinery? Office furniture? Is the mill running? Is it getting ready to go out of business?

Grandpa customarily recorded “worked in the office” hours or A.M. or P.M, or all day.  If he had been working, it seems odd that he would not have at least mentioned it occasionally, and yet his next entry sounds as if it was the normal thing for him to be doing.

November 6: Worked in office in A.M.

November 10: Worked in the office all day.

November 11 Armistice Day, a holiday: Mill closed for the day. I worked in the office in  A.M. & part of P.M.

November 12: In the office all day as usual. 

Perhaps both the mill and he have been working all year and he just hasn’t been mentioning it.

November 26: Mill closed to-night for the rest of the week. [Thanksgiving weekend]

 December 23: Henry was sick at home all day.

December 27: Worked in office in A.M. and part of P.M.

At this point, I have come to believe that the mill was, indeed, in full operation.

1931

January 1: Henry kept the mill running to-day so I was in the office. Happy New Year!

February 17: The mill is closing down for a few weeks. The card room finished up last night and the spinning room to-night.

February 21: Finished up in the office this noon for a few weeks at least. They have the orders all filled and everything closed up to-night. Hope to get going again in a month or two.

March 13: Did a little work for Henry in P.M. 

He also did a little work for Henry on 14th and the 2oth.

May 4: I had to go over to the office and help Henry about 2½ hours in P.M. He is getting ready to start the mill.

May 8: I was over in the office a little while. Henry is getting started up

May 11: Was in the office all day. Shall probably have to work all of the time for a while.

June 12: The mill closed this noon until after the 4th.

Grandpa went back to work on June 29. I assume the mill reopened after the 4th as planned and continued in operation the rest of the year since Grandpa makes no mention of any more shut-downs. He was obviously still working on December 1 when the horn of one of his calves (he operated two farms as well as working for Henry) hit him in the eye. He went to the office, but was in too much pain to work very long. The next day Henry took him to Dover to an eye doctor. The eye felt a little better and he worked all day on the 3rd.  It eventually healed completely.

1932

January 1: Worked in office all day.

The mill was still operating, but not for long.

January 11: The last day we work in the office for the present. Henry is letting the fire go out and disconnecting the pipes.

January 21: Worked for Henry in P.M.

He also did a little work for Henry on January 27th.

February 10: Henry has put a heater in the office and I was over there 3 hrs. this P.M.

February 12: Went down to Dover with Henry in A.M. to fix up his income tax.

Grandpa continued to work in the office steadily throughout February and March. Sad news arrived in April.

April 2: Telegram came from New Orleans to-day saying Henry died of intestinal flu there to-day. They will be home with the body Monday night. He was in his early 30s.

April 4: They came home to-night with Henry’s body.

[SANBORNVILLE. This village was shocked at news of the death of J. Henry Townsend of Milton Mills, which occurred while on a return trip from Texas. His death was at New Orleans from a sudden attack of the “flu” last week. Mr. Townsend was a member of the Men’s club of this village, and was well known and liked here, both as a business man and a social friend. UNION. This community was shocked to learn of the sudden death of Henry Townsend of Milton Mills. Sympathy is extended to the bereaved family (Farmington News, April 8, 1932)].

April 6: Henry’s funeral occurred this P.M. at the house. Lots of people there from all around – some 30 or 40 Masons. Mr. Snell preached and they had the Shubert Quartette from Boston for the singing.

[Rev. Frank H. Snell was ordained at the Milton Mills Baptist Church in June 1931 and was the settled minister there until he accepted another pastorate in Melrose, MA, in 1937. At a Baptist funeral of some years earlier in Brookline, MA, “… the Schubert Quartette of Boston rendered ‘Abide With Me,’ ‘Nearer My God to Thee,’ ‘In the Garden’ and ‘Rock of Ages’.”).

April 7: Went up to Henry’s to see Ing [Henry’s widow] a few minutes in A.M. and spent ½ hour or more in the office in P.M. looking over mail and getting out Life Insurance policies.

April 8: Spent about 1½ hrs. up at Henry’s house with Edgar Varney (Insurance Agt.) and at the office.

[Edgar G. Varney [(1893-1971)], an insurance agent, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Ardys [(Shaw)] Varney, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his children, Edgar S. Varney, aged seven years (b. NH), and Sheldon Varney, aged one year (b. NH). Edgar G. Varney rented their house at 23 Charles Street, for an unspecified amount, from its owner [his mother], Edith [(Gerrish)] Varney, a widow, aged sixty years (b. NH). They had a radio set].

April 11: Went over to the mill in P.M. with Mr. Burleigh & Mr. Blaisdel of South Berwick.

[John H. Burleigh [(1883-1966)], a woolen mill accountant, aged forty-six years (b. ME), headed a South Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Helen H. [(Huntingdon)] Burleigh, aged forty years (b. VT), his children, Jean H. Burleigh, aged ten years (b. VT), Lucy D. Burleigh, aged seven years (b. VT), and John H. Burleigh, Jr., aged two years (b. VT), and his servant, Julia Moynihan, a private family servant, aged fifty-two years (b. MA). John H. Burleigh owned their house at 77 Portland Street, which was valued at $5,000. They had a radio set.

Clarence L. Blaisdell [(1897-1975)], a woolen mill paymaster, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a South Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edna R. [(Richards)] Blaisdell, aged thirty-four years, his children, Chyrma F Blaisdell, aged five years, and Clarence L Blaisdell, Jr., aged one year, and his mother-in-law, Henrietta B. Richards, aged sixty-seven years. Clarence L. Blaisdell rented their house at 15 German Street, for $2o per month. They had a radio set].

April 12: Ing called here a few minutes in A.M. on mill business and I spent about 2 hrs. at the office with Agnes & Halton in P.M. 

Agnes (“Aunt” Agnes to me) was Henry’s younger sister and Halton (“Uncle” Hal’) was her husband.

[Halton R. Hayes, a biscuits sales agent, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Agnes T. Hayes, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his son, Paul T. Hayes, aged five years (b. MA). Halton R. Hayes owned their house on 35 Fernwood Avenue, which was valued at $10,000. They had a radio set].

April 13: Was over in the office in A.M. to meet Mr. Hall. Went over to see John Horne – Gordon & Louie on business for Henry’s estate.

[John E. Horne [(1878-1953)], a dry goods retail merchant, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife (of four years), Gertrude C. [(Coombs)] Horne, aged thirty-three years (b. IA), his child, John E. Horne, Jr., aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Amy H. Coombs, aged sixty-nine years (b. Canada (English)). John E. Horne owned their house on Main Street, which was valued at $2,500. They had a radio set].

I knew John Horne, but have no idea who Gordon and Louie are.  Gordon may not even be the right name as it is squished into the center fold of this very small diary and it looked as if he had trouble writing in that awkward spot.

April 14: Worked in the office all day – taking account of stock.

April 19: Worked in the office all day. Ing & Agnes were in to talk over the mill business in P.M.

April 23: Was in the office most of the day. Mr. Hall was up in P.M. & Ing, Agnes, and Halton were there. We got some affairs pretty well settled.

May 2: Busy day in the office. Agnes takes over the mill property to-day. Mr. Hall was up and Agnes & Ing signed agreements. Mr. Eastman from Newport, NH, who is looking for the Supt. job was here in A.M.

[Lyle B. Eastman, Herman L. Eastman, and Archie S. Eastman were all Newport, NH, woolen mill workers. The more likely prospect would seem to be: Trueman L. Eastman, a woolen mill foreman, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Newport, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Hazel L. Eastman, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Trueman L. Eastman rented their house at 177 Cheney Street, for $30 per month. They had a radio set].

May 9: Mr. Smith & another man from Limerick Mills were at the office this morning to see about our making some blankets for them.

[J. Henry Smith [(1871-1948)], a woolen mill general manager, aged fifty-eight years (b. England), headed a Limerick, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Edna [(Lightoller)] Smith, aged fifty-seven years (b. England), his child, Thelma K. Smith, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), and his servant, Clara Firth, a private family servant, aged fifty-seven years (b. England). J. Henry and Edna Smith had immigrated into the U.S. in 1906, while Clara Firth had immigrated in 1905. J. Henry Smith owned their house on Washington Street (in the Upper Village), which was valued at $6,000. They had a radio set].

May 11: In the office as usual. George Stevens came to-day to begin his work as Supt.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. George Stevens has accepted a position as superintendent of the Miltonia Mill at Milton Mills, N.H., and will take up his new work at once (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), May 14, 1932). Stevens’s wife remained behind at their home in Vermont. She appeared often in newspapers as visiting him in Milton Mills (See Milton in the News – 1932, 1933, and 1934)].

May 12: We moved things from the sales room where we have been the past winter back into the office. Mr. Richardson of the Mass. Farmers and Wool Growers was here in P.M.

[This might have been Evan F. Richardson [(1867-1951)], who been a Massachusetts Department of Animal Husbandry official and, more recently, a Massachusetts State Grange officer. Evan F. Richardson, a general farm farmer, aged sixty-three years (b. MA), headed a Millis, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Geneive Richardson, aged sixty years (b. MA). Evan F. Richardson owned their farm on Exchange Street, which was valued at $9,000. They did not have a radio set].

I believe this is the first day the mill has been operative since Henry closed it in January.

May 16: Began work in the mill. Started on some Camel Hair blankets for Limerick mill.

[The Limerick Mills were struggling and would go into receivership in the following year: LIMERICK MILLS ARE SOLD FOR $150,000. SANFORD, Me, Oct 5 – Attorney Hiram Willard of Sanford, acting as receiver, sold the Limerick Mills for $150,000. Robert Braum of Portland, representing note holder., was the purchaser. A firm of Rhode Island plush manufacturers was the only bidder. The sale was subject to a lease held by George A. Connors. This lease expires Nov 30. Thirteen banks and corporations hold notes against the mills which are located 20 miles north of here (Boston Globe, October 6, 1933)].

May 17: Busy in the office all day, and had to go over at 7 P.M. to meet a man about blankets.

May 20: Had to go to Limerick in P.M. to show the blankets we finished this A.M. to Mr. Smith. Was over to the office in the evening to sell some blankets to Mr. Johnson of York Beach.

Grant, D.H. - Trademark - 270128
Registration of D.H. Grant & Co.’s Trademark “Barden Lane” (U.S. Patent Office)

June 11: Mr. Grant from N.Y. was here this A.M. and we made arrangements for him to handle our blankets.

July 25: Had to go to the office in the evening. Mr. Richardson brought a load of wool.

Mr. Richardson came with more wool on August 18.

September 13: Mr. Youst from Mr. Grant’s office in N.Y. was here all day.

[This might have been  Winfred Lester Youst [(1899-1982)]. W. Lester Youst, a clothing buyer, aged thirty-one years (b. KS), headed a White Plains, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Edith Youst, aged twenty-nine years (b. KS), and his children, Thaine A. Youst, aged twelve years (b. KS), and Yvonne Youst, aged three years (b. MO). W. Lester Youst rented their apartment in the Shapham Court Apartments, for $100 per month. Youst would eventually settle in New Hampton, NH].  

Both Mr. Grant and Mr. Youst came on October 29.

November 3: Had to go to Dover with Agnes to see an Internal Revenue Man in A.M.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George Stevens leaves Friday for Lebanon, N.H., where she will stop with friends, and go by automobile from there to Milton Mills, N.H., to spend Thanksgiving with her husband. Mr. Stevens has a position as superintendent in the Miltonia Mills at Milton Mills (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), November 18, 1932)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George Stevens returned Monday from Milton Mills, N.H., where she spent Thanksgiving with her husband. Mrs. Emma Hubbard kept house for her while she was away (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), December 8, 1932)].

December 15: Mill not running to-day. Going to run 3 days a week for a few weeks.

Grandpa was a busy man in 1932.  He was in the mill office just about every day in addition to his work on the farms and his other enterprises!

1933

January 2: It is a holiday but I worked all day in the office. 

January 9: Mill is not running this week. No orders.

January 13: Mr. Richardson came with some wool about 7:15 and I had to be over at the office in the evening. He left about 9.

January 30: Halton went home from the office this P.M. sick with a cold. We expect to get finished up in the mill this week for 2 or 3 months.  There is no business.

It would appear that Aunt Agnes’ husband was taking an active role in the mill management.

February 1: Ruth Ramsey finished up in the office with us until we get started up in the spring.

[Ruth Ramsey [(1911-2015)] married in Acton, ME, September 25, 1936, Vincent Tanner, she of Milton and he of Lebanon, ME. She was a bookkeeper, aged twenty-five years, and he was a laborer, aged twenty-three years. She was born in Berwick, ME, daughter of Frank and Sophia (Smith) Ramsey. He was born in Lebanon, ME, son of Herbert and Marie (Devaney) Tanner. Rev. Frank H. Snell performed the ceremony].

I know who Ruth was, but not her role in the office.  I can only assume that she provided secretarial help.

February 7: They finished work in the mill today. The Finishing Room getting all cleaned up.

February 9: Finished up at the office for a while – let the fire in the boiler go out, and got about all closed up.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens is at his home here in town. He has had a position as superintendent of the Miltonia mill, in Milton Mills, N.H., for ten months. The mill has shut down for a few weeks (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), February 16, 1933)].

February 17: Mr. Richardson came with a little wool and got a few blankets about 7 o’clock to-night.

February 22: Halton brought over some checks that had come in and I spent most of P.M. on office work at the office and here at home.

March 7: Worked on the office books part of the day. Went up to the old Copp place with Frank Goodrich in A.M. to measure some wood for the mill.

March 8: Worked on the office books most of the day.

March 10: Went up to the Copp place with Goodrich to measure some more wood in A.M.

No more mention of the mill until …

May 3:  Went up to the old Copp place with Clarence Willey to measure some wood for the mill in A.M.

[Clarence D. Willey [(1883-1942)], a general farm farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Charlotte G. [(Twombly)] Willey, aged forty years (b. NH), and his children, Nelson F. Willey, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. NH), Chandler C. Willey, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Stella G. Willey, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Clarence D. Willey owned their house, which was valued at $2,000. They had a radio set].

May 18: Worked in the office in P.M.

May 23: Had to go over to the office in A.M. to figure prices with Halton.

June 1:  Mr. Grant is here. He & Halton came over to the house to see me in A.M. He went back before noon.

It would seem that the mill reopened about this time.  Grandpa only mentions occasionally being in the office and one day staying out of the office all day, so he was obviously working.  Also, he noted on July 21 that Norman went to work in the mill.  Dad had been laid off by the railroad and, like many others during The Depression, was picking up work wherever he could.

August 8: Halton & I went over to Manchester to attend a meeting of the N.H. Woolen Mfrs.

August 14: Started on 40 hour code at the mill to-day. Work from 7 to 4 for 5 days per week.

[In so doing Miltonia Mills anticipated the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 by four years].

August 18: Was in the office all day as usual. I work until 5 P.M.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Sims of Milton Mills, N.H., and Mrs. Charles Rhodes of Milton, N.H., were weekend visitors at the home of Mr. and Mrs. G.A. Stevens (News & Advertiser (Northfield, VT), August 24, 1933)].

September 9 (a Saturday): Went over to the office in A.M. Fred Sims is here and wanted to see about getting some blankets made. He & Harold are selling them in California and the Western States.

[Fred H. Simes (1868-1953), the retired mill superintendent, and his son, Harold E. Simes (1888-1970), resident in California from as early as 1914. Harold E. Simes, a California bean broker, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Los Angeles, CA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife, Frances E. Simes, a general insurance secretary, aged twenty-nine years (b. OH). Harold E. Simes rented their part of a duplex dwelling at 3625 Bellevue Avenue, for $42.50 per month. They had a radio set].

September 19: Halton went to N.Y. to-day to see Mr. Grant and try to get some business.

September 30 (another Saturday): Was over at the office in A.M. Expected Mr. Richardson for a load of blankets at 8 o’clock but he didn’t get here until after 10:30.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. F.S. Hammond, Mrs. H.A. McCauIey, Mrs. G.A. Stevens, motored to Lynn, Mass., last Thursday, to take Mrs. Frances Legier to her home, after visiting several weeks with Miss Harriet Legier. Mrs. Stevens visited her sister at Nantasket Beach, and will come home by the way of Milton Mills, N.H., and spend a few days with her husband and sisters in that place before returning home (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), October 12, 1933)].

October 17: Mill didn’t run, expected to work on Roe Dam but water is too high – will have to wait until later. We worked in the office.

October 18: Mill started up again this morning.

[CALAIS. Mrs. Hay[es] and Mrs. Townsend of Milton Mills, N.H., have been guests of Mrs. Lysander Richmond (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), October 20, 1933). Lysander Richmond was a textile salesman, formerly resident in Sanford, ME].

October 23: A broken steam pipe at the mill this morning put the boiler out of commission for a few hours so no heat in the office. I didn’t go over until P.M. Harold Sims from Los Angeles called on us this A.M. He is here for a day or two only.

October 26 (a Thursday): Didn’t take my day off to-day. (Maybe that is why he works some Saturdays!) Two Mr. Marshalls from N.Y. were here at the mill to see about selling our blankets.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George Stevens has returned from a trip to Nantasket, Mass., and Milton Mills, N.H. (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), October 27, 1933).

November 8: Halton and Agnes went to N.Y. on business.

November 20: Not doing much in the mill. I am working all the time so far. The girl in the office got through last Friday for a while anyway.

November 23: Halton went to Boston to-day.  I have been alone in the office.

December 13: Halton went to N.Y. to-night by train to meet Mr. Jenkins of Mill Associates to arrange for them to sell our blankets.

December 16: Halton got back from N.Y. this morning. He closed the deal with Mill Associates to sell our blankets this coming year.

1934

January 1: Worked in the office all day as usual.

January 14: Haven’t been doing much in the mill for the last few weeks but will be doing more soon.

January 19: George Stevens hurt his back in the mill this P.M. and had to be taken home.

January 22: Geo. Stevens’ back is so bad he is still at home in bed.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George A. Stevens returned home from Milton Mills, N.H., on Monday, where she was called four weeks ago on account of the illness of her husband. He has sufficiently recovered to resume his work (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), [Saturday,] February 24, 1934)].

January 29: Feed pipe of the boiler at the mill gave out this morning early and while they got it repaired before 8 o’clock they couldn’t warm the mill so no one worked. The office also was not warm enough to work in, so I wasn’t over there much.

[Tourist Activities. Recent arrivals registered at the Chamber of Commerce tourist bureau include: … New Hampshire – Mrs. Edward A. Barney, Lydia K. Barney, Canaan; Mrs. Halton R. Hayes, Milton Mills (Fort Lauderdale News (Fort Lauderdale, FL, February 14, 1934)].

 February 18: Had to have a little job done on the boiler at the mill so couldn’t work in P.M.

February 22: Halton has been under the weather to-day, was in the office only about an hour.

February 28: Halton went to N.Y. on the night train to-night.

March 16: Agnes got home from the South where she has been for about 6 weeks.  Halton went to Lawrence last night to meet her.

March 19: Didn’t work in the office as there isn’t very much to do there just now. No body working in the mill except some of the finishers who are packing & getting ready to ship all of the Wool Blankets we have in the storehouse.

[MILTON MILLS. Mr. and Mrs. Halton Hayes went to Boston one day last week and visited the flower show (Farmington News, April 5, 1935)].

May 8: Let the fire go out under the boiler at the mill for inspections and it was too cool to stay in the office. I was there about 1½ hours.

May 25: Went over to the office a few minutes in P.M. Nothing doing there yet.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. George Stevens, who is working in Milton Mills, N.H., was at home over Memorial Day (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), June 1, 1934).

June 15: Went over to the office a short time in P.M. They are putting in a new picker to-day. The old one blew up about a week ago.

[SHUTTLE FLYING OUT. This thing rarely occurs on a well-kept loom unless it is by accident, such as a broken picker stick, or picker strap, or a thread getting entangled in the shed in such a way as to hinder it from opening properly. In some cases the shuttle stops once in a while with the tip an inch or two sticking out of the box and the result is the box does not go down and it flies out. This is caused generally by an uneven pick or a badly shaped binder, probably both. The shuttle sticking in the picker is another cause, the remedy for which you will find in Chap. IX. A hard pick in combination with a shaky lay and a poorly shaped binder will often cause the shuttle to fly out  (Ainley, 1900)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George A. Stevens went to Milton Mills. N.H., on Monday to visit for a time with her husband and sister in that place. Mrs. Nellie Greenwood is keeping house for her (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), July 7, 1934)].

[APPOINTED AS FACTOR. NEW YORK, July 14 (Special). – James Talcott, Inc., has been appointed factor for the following: Miltonia Mills, Milton Mills, N.H.; Holden A. Bergida, Inc., New York City; Mayfair Mills, Inc., Philadelphia; Mount Alto Bedspread Co., Calhoun, Ga.; Union Fabrics Corporation, Scranton, Pa.; Hillerson Silk Co., Paterson, N.J.; York Silk Mills, Inc., and for Methuen Shoe Co., Methuen. Mass.(Evening Star (Washington, DC), July 15, 1934)].

July 17: Worked in the office all day. They are starting up the mill in a small way. Blew the whistle. I shall work 2 or 3 days per week for a while. 

How well I remember that whistle that announced for miles around that it was 7:00 a.m. and time for the day’s work to begin (or, in my case, time to get ready for school).

Grandpa records going to the office on a fairly regular basis through the summer and into the fall.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. George A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens, of Milton Mills, N.H., were in town over the week-end. Mrs. Stevens, who has been visiting in Milton Mills for the past month, returned home with them (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), August 2, 1934)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. Mrs. George A. Stevens was called to Milton Mills, N.H., Tuesday to attend the funeral of her sister’s husband, Charles Rhodes (News & Advertiser (Northfield, VT), August 9, 1934)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin, and Scott Bumford of Milton Mills, N.H., were in town Saturday, returning home Sunday. They brought Mrs. Stevens home from attending the funeral of a relative (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), August 16, 1934)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens, spent the weekend and holiday in town. They both have employment in Milton Mills, N.H. Elwin Stevens was involved in an automobile accident on Saturday night, in company with Harold Moody, and his car was wrecked beyond repair. The occupants of the car were unhurt (News & Advertiser (Northfield, VT), September 6. 1934)].

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens of Milton Mills, N.H., were at home over the week-end and holiday (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), September 7, 1934).

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens, who have employment in Milton Mills, N.H., were at their home over the week-end (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), October 5, 1934).

October 6: The mill ran to-day to make up for Wednesday. I worked in the office.

[LOCALS. Owing to the rain, the attendance from this [Farmington] town at the Acton fair Wednesday was rather small (Farmington News, [Friday,] October 7, 1934)].

It was a tradition for the mill to close for one day of Acton Fair and another one for Rochester Fair.

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens and grandson, Elwin Stevens, and Scott Bumford, of Milton Mills, N.H., were weekend visitors in town (News & Advertiser (Northfield, VT), October 18, 1934)].

November 1: Halton is out electioneering every P.M. this week so I am in the office all the time. 

Halton was running for state representative, but he lost the election.

November 8: Worked in the office. Have so many government reports to make out, it keeps me busy.

[NORTFIELD FALLS. Elwin Stevens is at home for ten days from his work at Milton Mills, N.H., the mill there being closed for repairs (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), November 8, 1934)].

November 14: Not doing much in the mill this week – making some changes in colors.

[MILTON MILLS. Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Wentworth had their Thanksgiving dinner at home. Mr. Wentworth has been having a very severe cold, but is reported some better (Farmington News, December 7, 1934)].

December 7: In the office all day. Mill not running this week waiting to see if samples are O.K.

December 12: Not much of anything doing in the mill. Colors not right. Mr. Lalley the dye man is here again.

[Harry E. Wentworth’s dye man might have been Gerald V. Lally of Boston, MA. Thomas P. Lally, aged eighty-three years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-eight years), Honora Lally, aged eighty years (b. ME), and his [twin] sons, Gerald V. Lally, a dyestuff chemist, aged forty-two years (b. MA), and Jerome A. Lally, a real estate agent, aged forty-two years (b. MA). Thomas P. Lally owned their house at 73 Fletcher Street, which was valued at $4,600. They had a radio set].

[UNION. At the regular meeting of Unity Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, on Tuesday evening, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Worthy matron, Thelma Tibbetts; Worthy patron, Louis Tibbetts; associate matron, Isabelle Fox; associate patron, Arthur Fox; secretary, Ruth Plummer; treasurer, Maud Moulton; conductress, Pauline Moulton; associate conductress, Louise Paul; representative, Louise Paul; associate representative, Ingeborg Townsend. A chicken pie supper was served in the banquet hall at 6:30, with Mr. and Mrs. Howard Beecham, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Kennett and others on the committee (Farmington News, December 14, 1934).

[NORTHFIELD FALLS. G.A. Stevens was home over the week-end from his work in Milton Mills, N.H. He and his grandson, Elwin Stevens, returned to Milton Mills Christmas day (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), December 28, 1934)].

December 31: In the office all day although there was nothing doing in the mill. Halton went away over the holiday.


Ms. Bristol contributed some supplementary research support.


Concluded in H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1935-54


References:

Ainley, Albert. (1900). Woolen and Worsted Loomfixing: A Book for Loomfixers and All Who Are Interested in the Production of Plain and Fancy Worsteds and Woolens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=631RAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA49

Find a Grave. (2016,June 22). Clarence L. Blaisdell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/165885448/clarence-l.-blaisdell

Find a Grave. (2017, June 15). John H. Burleigh, Sr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/180378969/john-h.-burleigh

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). George Edgar Carmichael. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114887435/george-edgar-carmichael

Find a Grave. (2013, August 13). Moses G. Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115370002/moses-g-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2010, November 28). John N. Emerson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/62247325/john-n-emerson

Find a Grave. (2016, October 2). Dana Hamilton Grant. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170786870/dana-hamilton-grant

Find a Grave. (2013, November 10). Dwight Hall. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/120133929/dwight-hall

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Halton R. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114892787/halton-r-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 2). John Everard Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114788057/john-everard-horne

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Ralph Wentworth Pike. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114912838/ralph-wentworth-pike

Find a Grave. (2014, May 25). Evan Fusell Richardson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130333966/evan-fusell-richardson

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Frederick H. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612396/frederick-h.-simes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Harold Edward Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612469/harold-edward-simes

Find a Grave. (2015, November 13). John Henry Smith. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154953698/john-henry-smith

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H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27

By Joyce Wentworth Cunningham | May 9, 2021

Notes from Harry Eugene Wentworth’s Diaries

Wentworth, Harry E. - Per Joyce W. Cunningham
Harry E. Wentworth (Per Joyce W. Cunningham).

Harry E. Wentworth (1869-1955) was John E. Townsend’s brother-in-law. His first wife, Hattie M. Lowd (1873-1908), was a sister to John’s wife Eda (1870-1932). Harry had completed a course in business at Shaw’s Business College in Portland, Maine. He worked first for Miltonia Mills as bookkeeper. He became administrator and trustee of John’s estate upon his untimely death before John’s son, Henry A. Townsend (1898-1932), became of age.

Harry was my paternal grandfather and his diaries have languished in my storeroom for the last nine years since I retrieved them from my mother’s house upon her death. A positive benefit of COVID-19 has been much more free time to pursue “projects” I have postponed over the years. I was determined to learn more about my grandfather’s and father’s lives by reading the diaries. I soon realized what I was learning needed to be shared with succeeding generations in a more abbreviated form, so I began summarizing what I read.

The following entries and summaries of entries about Miltonia Mills are from the diaries I have completed to date. Keep in mind that I wrote these for my family’s information so they are casually and informally written and include my editorializing.

In many ways I am more frustrated by fragmented information that ever. The diaries are short on detail! If only I had read them earlier and asked Grandpa and my dad more questions!

As I worked my way through the early 1920s, I kept wondering exactly what was Grandpa’s role in the management of the Miltonia Mills. I knew that he had worked there both as bookkeeper and as manager, but which was he in the early 1920s? All his diary entries consisted of “I worked in the office all day.” “I worked in the office until noon,” “I didn’t go to the office today,” etc.

I knew that Miltonia Mills was owned by John Townsend, Grandpa’s brother-in-law. I also knew that John had died young, that he left a son too young to assume management of the mill, and that it was the wish of John to have Grandpa manage the mill until his son, Henry, was old enough to assume the role. Henry was mentioned occasionally in the early 1920s diaries, but only in terms of his comings and goings. He appears to have traveled quite a bit.

I kept moving ahead hoping for some clarification. When his position was not clearer by the end of his 1927 diary, I decided that maybe I needed to go back to earlier diaries to look for answers.

1910

The mill was owned and operated by John E. Townsend, who was married to Eda B. Lowd (Hattie M. (Lowd) Wentworth’s sister). John and Eda and family (Henry and Agnes) left for California on January 11.

Hollenbeck Hotel[PERSONAL. A party of tourist guests registered at the Hollenbeck is made up of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Townsend, Harry and Hynes [Agnes] Townsend, all of Milton Mills. N.H. (Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA), January 20, 1910)].

[Harry E. Wentworth, a woolen mill bookkeeper, aged forty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census (April 22, 1910). His household included his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged six years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Melissa Lowd, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear].

Grandpa (Hattie had died), Dad, and Mother (as Grandpa called his mother-in-law) moved into John’s house in the village (Milton Mills) while they were away. No reason for the move was given, but it may be that it was more convenient for Grandpa to get to the mill in winter weather. He appears to be in charge while John was away. John and Eda returned on April 23 and Grandpa, Dad, and Mother returned to the house on the Ridge.

John had a lengthy illness after he returned from California and was out of the office for six weeks. He went to Portland to see a doctor, but Grandpa gives no indication of a diagnosis. [John E. Townsend would eventually die of Bright’s Disease].

1911

Other than “went to the office” there is very little about the mill in this diary.

[Harry E. Wentworth married (2nd) in Acton, ME, November 29, 1911, Ella Buck, both of Acton. He was a widowed bookkeeper, aged forty-two years, and she was a music teacher, aged forty-one years. Rev. James W. Williams performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, circa 1870, daughter of John C. and Hannah (Brackett) Buck].

1912 and 1913 – no diaries

[COTTON MILL NEWS FROM THE NORTH. … A set of 60-inch cards has been added to the equipment of the Miltonia mill, Milton, N.H., operated by John E. Townsend. The plant has received increased business since Jan. 1, and is being operated on a full-time schedule (Evening Herald (Fall River, MA), May 18, 1912)].

[PRIMARY REGISTRATIONS. Large Number Have Already Filed Their Candidacy. … Those who have filed today include: … John E. Townsend, Milton, Republican, representative (Portsmouth Herald, July 27, 1912)].

1914

On February 16 Grandpa reported that John was not feeling well and was in the office for a little while in the afternoon. The next day he did not go to the office at all, and on the 18th Grandpa wrote that he was very sick with some kind of kidney trouble. Over the next two months, John’s health was constantly up and down – he would seem to be getting better and then have a relapse. He would have a good day and then a bad one. He got out of the house for a short ride for the first time in nine weeks.

On May 6 John began coming in to the office for short periods of time on days when he felt well enough. By June 6 he was back in bed and unable to get out. On August 6 he was taken to Boston. For doctor? To a hospital? Grandpa first reports he seemed better, then he was worse and the family was sent for. Finally, on August 31 he was brought back to Milton Mills where he passed away on September 8. His funeral was on September 12.

[DEATHS. TOWNSEND -In Milton Mills, N.H., Sept. 8, John E. Townsend, in his 43d year. Funeral Saturday, Sept. 12, at 2 p.m. (Boston Globe, September 10, 1914)].

Following is Grandpa’s account of the estate settlement.

September 9: According to John’s will the N.E. Trust Co. and myself are executors and trustees. He left me the sum of $2500.

[The New England Trust Co. appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1918, as having its offices at 135 Devonshire street (corner of Milk and Devonshire streets) and a telephone number of Main 4806].

[The New England Trust Company of Boston, the pioneer trust company of Massachusetts and the second oldest institution of its kind in New England, will soon celebrate the fiftieth anniversary since the Company began business. Just fifty years ago the New England Trust Company received its charter – the first trust company charter to be issued by the Massachusetts legislature – but business was commenced not until 1871. During all these years the Company has continued faithful to the best traditions of trust company business and in the administration of estates and execution of trusts it has acquired a reputation for fidelity and efficient management extending throughout the New England section (Trust Publications, 1919)]. 

September 15: N.E. Trust Co. refuses to accept trust under John’s will.

September 16: Went to Boston for business on John’s estate.

September 17: John C. [Townsend] wants to be appointed trustee. Eda doesn’t want him.

John C. Townsend (1871-1916) was a cousin of John E. Townsend, husband of John E. Townsend’s sister, Grace M. Townsend (1873-1953), and one of three witnesses to the last will.

[John C. Townsend, a general farm farmer, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Grace Townsend, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), his son, Frank Townsend, aged twelve years (b. MA), and his servant, Lucy Lilley, a private family servant, aged twenty years (b. NH). John C. Townsend owned their farm, free-and-clear].

September 18: Went to Dover in p.m. with Henry and Eda and secured Dwight Hall as Administrator and Trustee of John’s estate.

[Dwight Hall, a lawyer and county solicitor, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Frances S. Hall, aged thirty-eight years (b. New Brunswick, Canada), and his servant, Margaret Cassidy, a private family servant, aged thirty-five years (b. Canada (Irish)). Dwight Hall owned their house at 119 Silver Street, free-and-clear].

September 19 (a Saturday!): In office all day. Mr. Hall was up from Dover in P.M. on business of John’s estate.

Mr. Hall was still coming to see Grandpa at the mill three or four times a year in the 1920s!

September 21: Went to Dover and Somersworth in A.M. Wilbur Miller took us down. Everett Fox went with me. Got our appointments as Administrators and Trustees.

[Judge Christopher H. Wells (1853-1930) appointed Dwight Hall and Harry E. Townsend as joint administrators, with will annexed. Everett Fox appeared as one of the three witnesses to the will].

[Wilbur Gilman Miller, who gave them a ride, was a dairy farmer. He was born in Maine, November 25, 1872. He was married to Myrtle Winchell. He was living in North Lebanon, ME, but farming in Acton, ME, when he registered for the WWI military draft in September 1918. He was 5’8″ tall, with a medium build, blue eyes and light brown hair. At that time he was said to be confined to crutches. Perhaps recovering from injury?]

September 26 (a Saturday – this was still the era of six-day work weeks): Worked in office all day. Appraiser began taking inventory of John’s estate.

September 28: Went to Rochester in A.M. to meet Mr. Hall and get securities from vault. Came back with him and worked on inventories the rest of the day.

Mr. Hall made several more trips to Milton Mills before the end of the year. A Mr. James was with him on one of those trips. Grandpa made three more trips to Boston, two of them overnight. When he came home on December 10, he stopped in Somersworth to see Judge Wells.

[Christopher H. Wells, a probate court judge, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census, His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Oriana Wells, aged fifty years (b. NH). Christopher H. Wells owned their house at 19 Mt. Vernon Street, with a mortgage. (See also (Scales, 1914))].

1915

WOOL. TOWNSEND, JOHN E. Milton Mills, N.H., Miltonia Mill. Production and Equipment: Blankets, 4 sets cards, 29 broad looms, 960 spindles, dye, finish, 1 boiler, 2 water wheels, electric power. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co., New York and Boston, selling agents (American Wool and Cotton Reporter, July 29, 1915). 

1916

Unfortunately, his 1915 diary did not survive (or he may not have kept one), so we have a gap in the story of Miltonia Mills. We know that Grandpa and the lawyer Dwight Hall (whom Grandpa always called Mr. Hall) were co-administrators and trustees of John Townsend’s estate which included Miltonia Mills. That status continued to be borne out in 1916. Mr. Hall made short (sometimes as short as 20 minutes) visits to the mill almost every week, usually on a Wednesday afternoon. Grandpa made regular trips to Boston – once a month, at least, sometimes staying overnight, usually with Raish and Alice in Marblehead. On one trip, in addition to doing business, he attended a textile show.

[Raish and Alice would have been Horatio Brackett “Raish” Buck (1873-1941) and his wife, Alice H. Chandler (1868-1944). They then lived in Marblehead, MA. He was a grandson of Milton Mills’ Dr. Reuben Buck and had an uncle of the same name, Dr. Horation B. Buck].

Three entries cause me to wonder: “Why?”

May 12: Mr. Hall, Judge Wells, & Ex. Gov. Felker gave us a call [visit] in P.M. at the office.

[Former NH Governor Samuel D. Felker’s 1912 election was an unusual one. Neither candidate attained a majority in the election and Democrat Felker (1859-1932) was selected instead by the NH legislature. He served a single two-year term, and became thereafter a judge].

[Samuel D. Felker, a general lawyer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary D. Felker, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Samuel D. Felker rented their house at 19 Wakefield Street].

June 1: Mr. Hall was up in P.M. Mr. Southworth of Pacific Mills was with him.

[Irving Southworth was at this time an assistant agent of the Pacific Mills Co., with his house at Dover, NH. By 1920, Irving Southworth, mill agent of a cotton mill, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Columbia, SC, household. (His wife was a Southern woman, and Pacific Mills had also branches in Columbia, SC, and Dover, NH, as well as its home base in Lawrence, MA). He would return within a few years to Massachusetts].

Pacific Mills had textile mills along the Merrimack River in Lawrence, now upscale lofts which can be seen from I-495.

July 6: Mr. Peck of North Star Mills was here.

[Park W. Peck [(1869-1953)] appeared in the Minneapolis, MN, directory of 1916, as vice president of North Star Woolen Mill Co., boarding at 2613 Humboldt av., South. He was a bachelor, who seemed usually to favor boarding houses and hotels].

The North Star Mills were in Minneapolis, Minnesota. They dated back to the 1800s and by 1920 were the largest blanket manufacturers in the United States. A Mr. Park W. Peck is listed as a vice president. Those mills are now lofts, also!

Why were these people visiting Miltonia Mills? Were there talks of selling the mill? Were they planning a merger? Were other mills planning a take-over? Were the visitors interested in the superior blankets the mill was noted for? Was there any connection between the visit of Mr. Hall, Judge Wells, and Felker (a lawyer) – or were they there on other family estate business? We will probably never know!

The only other bit of mill news was that in February Eda signed off her rights to the mill. I assume she assigned them to Henry.

1917

Grandpa’s 1917 diary does not offer much more enlightenment about the mill’s operation and management. Mr. Hall continued to make frequent brief visits and Grandpa continued to make at least monthly visits to Boston.

[MILTON MILLS. Strafford Co. (SE) Pop. 1600. Stage, Union (4m.). RR47. Townsend, John E., Estate, Miltonia Mill. Harry E. Wentworth, Agt.; F.H. Simes, Supt. Blankets, 4 Sets Cards, 29 Broad Looms, 960 Sp. Dye. Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 WW. Electric. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co., New York and Boston, selling agents (Dawson’s Textile Blue Book, 1917)].

Here are the most significant entries pertaining to the mill:

February 11: Henry came home last night and telephoned up that he wanted to see me so I went down about 2 o’clock. Got back about 4.

When did Henry leave? Where had he been? Why did he request Grandpa to meet him at home and not at the office? Was it mill business or personal?

May 22: Mr. Hall was up and brought Mr. Allen of the Amoskeag Mfg. Co. to look into our power problem.

The Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. was one of the largest textile mills in the world. It was located in Manchester, New Hampshire, where it took advantage of the abundant water power provided by the Merrimack River.

[Henry W. Allen, a cotton mill civil engineer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Manchester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Georgia A. Lund, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his son-in-law, Bernard H. Lund, a cigar factory cigar maker, aged thirty-five years (b. MN). Henry W. Allen rented their house at 72 Market Street].

May 28: New looms for the mill have come. Got four of them over today.

I assume the looms had been delivered to the railroad station in Union.

May 31: They finished getting over the looms – all twelve of them are here now.

June 8: Fred & Henry started for California this morning to be gone 4 or 5 weeks.

[Frederick H. Simes, a woolen mill superintendent, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary A. [(Smith)] Simes, aged fifty years (b. NH). Frederick H. Simes rented their house on Main Street].

Remembering that Eda had relinquished her claim on the mill, was Henry now in charge of the mill?

[MILL NEWS. Cotton. MILTON MILLS, N.H. Six new automatic looms have arrived and will soon be set up in the plant of the estate of John E. Townsend, manufacturer of woolen blankets. It is possible that a small addition will have to be built to the weave room in order to accommodate the new equipment. At present 29 broad looms and 4 sets of cards are installed in the mill (Textile World Journal, June 16, 1917)].

June 27: Miss Jenness from Mr. Hall’s office was up in P.M. to figure out Agnes’ acct. I suppose this had to do with her inheritance.

[Miss Almie M. Jenness [(1886-1960)] appeared in the Dover directory of 1917 as a stenographer for Dwight Hall in his office at 349 Central av., corner of Washington street, with her home at 6 Richmond street. Emma F. Jenness, widow of George I. Jenness, had her house there also. Almie M. Jenness would marry Dwight Hall in 1950, after the death of his first wife (in 1948)].

[MILL NEWS. Cotton. MILTON MILLS, N.H. The management of the Estate of John E. Townsend gives out the following to supersede the item which was published last week regarding the installation of 6 new automatic looms. Twelve new automatic looms have arrived and will soon be set up in the plant of the Estate of John E. Townsend, manufacturers of blankets. Eight of the looms now in use will be taken out to make room for the new machines. The mill will then be equipped with 33 broad looms (24 of which are automatics) and complementary machinery (Textile World Journal, June 30, 1917)].

July 5: Went down to Dover with Mr. Northrop & Mr. Russell of the North Star Woolen Co. to have conference with Mr. Hall on the subject of this Co. handling our blankets.

“Handling” the blankets seems to imply that North Star would market them. Under their own label? Under the Miltonia Mills label?

[William G. Northrup, Jr., registered for the WW I military draft in Wayzata, MN, June 5, 1917. He was thirty years of age (b. June 13, 1886), and was employed as treasurer of the North Star Woolen Mill Co. of Minneapolis, MN. He was then single, but claimed an exemption as being engaged in government work. He was tall, with a medium build, brown eyes, and black hair].

August 28: Some of the help at the mill have demanded more pay and because we could not tell them to-day just what we will do they walked out this P.M.

August 29: Mr. Hall was up in P.M. to help straighten out the help question. Are going to give the help what they asked for. Mill did not run today.

August 30: Mill help all went to work this morning at 10% increase in pay.

September 5: Bargained for the shoe shop property for the Townsend Est. Mr. Timson is going away.

[Charles O. Timson, who was “going away” in September 1917, ran a shoe factory in the former Brierly mill at Milton Mills in 1915-18].

Modern Hospital - August 1921October 8: Went to Dover and finished Agnes’ acct. and filed it in court.

October 30: Went to Boston to see Mr. Hennesey in regard to a change in selling blankets.

[John J. Hennessey, James M. Morrison, and Frank F. Rogers, Jr., appeared in the Boston Chamber of Commerce’s annual report for 1915, as working for Thomas Kelley & Co. blanket manufacturers, of Boston. There was a lawsuit concerning this firm and these men, and Thomas A. Jenkins, in November 1918 (MA Supreme Judicial Court, 1919)].

November 20: Could not run the mill to-day. Had no water and the last can of coal is so poor it will not make steam.

November 22: Boiler at mill not working well. Couldn’t keep up steam enough to run. No water.

November 26: Couldn’t get steam enough to warm the mill with the coal we have, and no wood, so couldn’t run.

December 13: Went to Dover in morning to meet Mr. Rogers & Mr. Jenkins who came back with me at noon and were here in P.M.

[T.A. Jenkins, a blanket co. president, aged fifty years (b. NY), headed a Mount Vernon, NY, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah B. Jenkins, aged forty years (b. NY), his children, James H. Jenkins, aged fifteen years (b. NY), and Dorothy J. Whitney, aged twenty-four years (b. NY), his grandson, Harold Whitney, Jr., aged two years (b. MA), his mother-in-law, Susie L. Bennett, aged sixty-six years (b. NY), and his servants, Susie Speidell, a private family servant, aged thirty-one years (b. Ireland), and Anna M. Bennett, a private family servant, aged fifty-seven years (b. Ireland). T.A. Jenkins owned their house at 37 N. Fulton Street, with a mortgage].

December 15: Mr. James of T. Kelly & Co was at the office in P.M.

December 21: Went to Boston to meet Mr. Ransdell. [Ramsdell?]

December 26: Mr. James was here in P.M.

As usual, lots of questions, no answers! Who are all these people he mentions and why have they come to the mill or why has he gone to meet them? Where/what was the shoe shop property? Why did they want it? Did they get it? How did they resolve the boiler problem?

No diaries in 1918 or 1919 and nothing very helpful in the 1920s diaries!

[Henry A. Townsend married in Meredith, NH, March 29, 1918, Ingeborg V. “Ing” Svenson, both of Boston, MA. He was a student, aged twenty-one years, and she was at home aged twenty-three years. Edwin C. Mansfield, justice of the peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Sweden, circa 1895, daughter of Rev. Svante and Hilda C. (Lundgren) Svenson. (Her younger sister, Ruth H. Svenson, would marry (3rd), Seth F. Dawson, Jr., manager of the Milton Leatherboard Mill)].

ES191105 - Lanesburgh[Henry Albert Townsend of Milton Mills registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 18, 1918. He was twenty years of age (b. January 2, 1898) and employed as a blanket manufacturer for the John E. Townsend Estate in Milton Mills. His nearest relative was Eda B. Townsend of Milton Mills. He was of a medium height, and medium build, with brown eyes, and dark brown hair].

[MILL NEWS. Wool. MILTON MILLS, N.H. The Estate of John E. Townsend is now operating a branch mill in the same town under the name of the Antin Blanket Co. This plant has 1 set of cards, 220 spindles and 9 looms. The stock is picked and the blankets are finished at the main mills. The number of machines at the main mill has been increased to 32. Rogers, Hennessey & Jenkins, Boston, are the selling agents. H.A. Townsend is the agent in charge of this new branch (Textile World Journal, April 5, 1919)]. 

[New Hampshire. Milton Mills – The estate of John E. Townsend is now operating a branch mill company under the name of the Antin Blanket Company. This plant has 1 set of cards, 220 spindles and 9 looms. The number of machines at the main mill has been increased to 32 (American Wool and Cotton Reporter, July 31, 1919)].

[MILTON MILLS. Strafford Co. (SE) Pop. 1600. Stage, Union (4m.). RR47. Townsend, John E., Estate. Miltonia Mill. Harry E. Wentworth, Agt.; F.H. Simes , Supt . Blankets. 4 Sets Cards. 32 Broad Looms. 960 Sp. Dye. Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 W W. Electric. Employ 65. Rogers, Hennessey & Jenkins, N.Y., S. Agts. (Dawson’s Textile Blue Book, 1919)].

[Mrs. Ingeborg V. Townsend was a member (No. 8833) of the American Library Association in 1919 and 1920. The library she patronized was the Milton Mills Library (ALA, 1919)].

1920

At the time of this diary, 1920, Grandpa was working as bookkeeper and office manager for Miltonia Mills blanket factory. The mill had belonged to John Townsend, Grandpa’s brother-in-law. He began as bookkeeper and office manager. It was a small mill, but made very high quality wool blankets. Admiral Perry and Admiral Byrd carried Miltonia Mills blankets to the North and South Poles, respectively, and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge is reputed to have come to Milton Mills to purchase blankets personally.

[MILTON MILLS. Strafford Co. (SE) Pop. 1600. Stage, Union (4m.). RR47. Townsend, John E., Estate. Miltonia Mill. Henry A. Townsend, Prop.; F.H. Simes , Supt . Bed Blankets. 4 Sets Cards. 32 Broad Looms. 960 Sp. 2 Pickers. 3 Sew . Dye. Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 W W. Electric. Employ 65. Buy 14 and 18 C. Warp. Rogers, Hennessey & Jenkins, N.Y., S. Agts. (Dawson’s Textile Blue Book, 1920)].

[Harry E. Wentworth, a blanket mill manager, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella B. Wentworth, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), and his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged sixteen years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm on the Lebanon Road, free-and-clear].

John Townsend had died in 1914, a young man, leaving his widow (Eda, Grandpa’s first wife’s sister) and two teen-age children. His will named Grandpa Executor and Trustee, the court appointed him Administrator, and for the next few years, Grandpa managed the mill as well as continuing to do all the accounting.

[Agnes M. Townsend married in Milton Mills, April 24, 1920, Halton R. Hayes, she of Milton and he of Rochester, NH. He was a salesman, aged twenty-six years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. Lester E. Alexander performed the ceremony. Hayes was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1894, son of Edwin F. and Hattie (Pinkham) Hayes].

1921

Has only a few notes in the beginning of the year and nothing about the mill.

[SOUTH WOLFEBORO. Fred Sims and Henry Townsend of Milton Mills were visitors in this village Monday (Farmington News, September 2, 1921)].

[Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Spinney entertained as guests over the week-end Mr. and Mrs. H.R. Hayes and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Townsend of Milton Mills, N.H. (North Adams Transcript (North Adams, MA), October 10, 1921)].

[OXNARD AND VICINITY. Mr. and Mrs. Richard Stoehrer had as their house guests this week Mr. and Mrs. Henry Townsend of New Hampshire. Mr. Townsend, who is a blanket manufacturer in that state, has come with his wife to spend the winter in California and will reside in Los Angeles. They left here the first of the week intending to go to San Diego to witness the Centre-Arizona football game but owing to the flood conditions were unable to do so. They are expected to return to Oxnard to visit at the Stroehrer home until Saturday (Press-Courier (Oxnard, CA), December 28, 1921)].

1922

Bates Metallic Tooth Breast - TW220114The situation at the mill seems to have been the same. Although Henry Townsend is mentioned a couple of times, it is never in connection with the mill. Grandpa made business trips to both Boston and Dover on behalf of the mill. As was customary at the time, these trips were made by train. In February he mentioned that Ralph [W. Pike] was out of the office sick.

[Robert S. Pike, a retail butcher, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fannie [(Roberts)] Pike, aged sixty years (b. NH), and his children, Ralph W. Pike, a woolen mill bookkeeper, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Robert Pike, aged twenty-two years (b. NH)].

This is Grandpa’s first mention of anyone else in the office.

MILTON MILLS. Antin Blunhed [Blanket] Co. H.A. Townsend, agent. 1 set, 220 spindles, 9 looms. Townsend, John E., Est. of, Miltonia Mill. Harry E. Wentworth, agent; Fred H. Simes, superintendent. Production and Equipment: Blankets, 4 sets cards, 29 broad looms, 960 spindles, dye, finish, 1 boiler, 2 water wheels, electric power. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co., New York and Boston, selling agents (Cotton, 1922).

The Internal Revenue Service was alive and well in 1922 as witnessed by these entries.

March 1: Mr. Robbins, revenue man, came to the office to check up our Income Tax returns for the last four years.

[Carl C. Robbins, an Internal Revenue inspector, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), headed a Medford, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included Lottie L. Robbins, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and his children, Louise M. Robbins, aged two years, seven months (b. MA), and Dorothy C. Robbins, aged one year, five months (b. DC). Carl C. Robbins owned their house at 36 Tyler Street, with a mortgage].

March 4: Worked in P.M. at office with Mr. Robbins on Income returns.

No more mention is made of Mr. Robbins so the income tax returns must have been okay!

1923

Once again there are lots of empty pages in this diary and nothing about the mill.

[Milton Mills experienced an influenza epidemic in February 1923 (See Milton in the News – 1923)].

1924

There is still no mention of Henry’s role at the mill. Grandpa went regularly, but never mentions what he does, except once or twice a reference to his accounts. He seems to pretty much make his own hours, sometimes working all day, sometimes just a morning or an afternoon, sometimes not going in for several days at a time.

[The John E. Townsend Estate of Milton Mills, manufacturers of woolen blankets, had 40 male and 25 female employees, for a total of 65 employees, in 1924 (NH Bureau of Labor, 1924)].

[Milton Mills suffered a serious fire in the early hours of Thursday, November 20. The Townsend mill firemen and those of Rochester, NH, responded to the fire (See Milton in the News – 1924)].

[SANBORNVILLE. Some of the out of town visitors in the village last Thursday were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Spencer and Miss Doris Marsh of Milton Mills, Henry Townsend, Mr. and Mrs. Tom McAbby of East Wakefield, and Mrs. Jennie Spiller of Brookfield (Farmington News, November 28, 1924)].

1925

I am still unclear as to his status at the mill. There are only three mentions of Henry Townsend in this year’s diary. On Wednesday, January 26 he wrote that Henry had begun running the mill at night. On February 11 he reported, Henry took George Fox and went up to his camp at Bear Island [in Lake Winnipesaukee] to do some work on his wharf. Expects to be gone the rest of the week.

[George E. Fox, a general farm farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucia C. Fox, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and his son, Chandler P. Fox, aged twelve years (b. ME). George E. Fox owned their farm on the Fox Ridge Road].

Was Henry in charge or was Grandpa still in charge? Did Henry run the manufacturing part and Grandpa the business part? If they were both working there, one would think there would be some interaction and that there would, at least, be occasional references to Henry in Grandpa’s diary. In April, he and Henry went to Dover to meet with Mr. Hall, an annual occurrence.

I believe Mr. Hall had something to do with John Townsend’s will because in an earlier (before 1920) diary, Grandpa tells about Mr. Hall coming to Milton Mills and meeting with him after John died. Grandpa was to run the mill until Henry was of age and could take over. Henry would have been a little older than Dad and we know from a previous diary that he was married. He would, of course, have inherited enough to live on from his father’s estate plus the income from the mill. Perhaps, he preferred to travel (to California each year) and let Grandpa handle the business of the mill. Who knows?!? (I seem to be doing a lot of speculating here!!)

1926

Grandpa continued to work at the mill. Apparently, Henry was around, too, since Grandpa mentions that he was “at home” sick three days. Like Grandpa, Henry seemed to have multiple interests. He must have owned quite a bit of real estate since he hired George Marsh and George Fox to shingle the roofs of several buildings including some at the mill. George M. and Dad also did other maintenance jobs at the mill on occasion.

[George W. Marsh, a farm laborer (working out), aged forty years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eva M. Marsh, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Ithiel E. Marsh, aged ten years (b. ME), and Lester E. Marsh, aged nine years (b. ME). George W. Marsh owned their farm on the Lebanon Road, free-and-clear].

1927

My curiosity about Henry and Miltonia Mills has been piqued even further with a series of vague entries in this year’s diary.

[MILTON MILLS. Miltonia Mills. Agents: Covert & Workman, New York. Proprietor: Henry A. Townsend. Superintendent: F.H. Simes. Woollen Spinners and Manufacturers, Dyers and Finishers. Cards: 4 sets. Spindles: 1,680. Looms: 40. Fabric: Bed Blankets (Skinner, 1927)].

March 7: Henry came home this noon – has been gone 5 weeks. [California? Texas?]

May 18: Geo. [Marsh] worked for Henry 9 hours at the old counting room building. [Carpentry]

June 23: Geo. [Marsh] & Geo. Fox worked . . . and at the mill for Henry in the P.M.

October 7: Was in the office all day. Talked with Mr. D.H. Grant about our taking over the mill on a lease and running it. Went over to the office in the evening to talk with Mr. Grant again.

[D.H. Grant & Co., formerly Grant & Bullwinkel, have been appointed sole selling agents in the United States for J.H. Kippax, Manchester, England, manufacturers of fine ginghams, crepes and voiles. The concern, which is located at 225 Fourth Ave., is also engaged in the importation of high grade cotton from other countries, notably Switzerland (Textile World Journal, 1923)].

October 27: Mr. Grant from N.Y. to see about selling blankets for the mill if we take it over. Who are “we”?!

[Dana H. Grant, a manufacturer of dress goods, aged thirty years (b. U.S.), headed a Pelham, NY, household at the time of the NY State Census of 1925. His household included his wife, Dorothy R. Grant, aged thirty-one years (b. U.S.), and his mother, Mary H. Grant, a houseworker, aged sixty-nine years (b. U.S.). They resided at 128 Reed Avenue]. 

October 29: Went over to the office at 5:30 to meet with Chas. Wentworth of Rochester & a Mr. Bartlett who thought of coming into the mill business with us.

[Charles L. Wentworth appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1926, as secretary-treasurer of the Rochester Building and Loan Association and a teller at the Rochester Trust Co., with his residence at 12 Glen street].

November 2: I am in the office nearly all the time now trying to make arrangements for taking over the mill and running it.

November 7: I went to Rochester to see Mr. Bond about incorporating the business in the P.M. Went down with Henry and Ing. [Ing was Henry’s wife.]

[Bernard Q. Bond appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1926, as vice president-treasurer of the Rochester Trust Co., with his residence at 86 Wakefield street].

November 17: Grandpa explained that he had not attended prayer meeting because he had to attend the Board of Trade meeting at the hotel in the interests of mill business.

December 1: Norman [his son] took me over to Springvale in P.M. to see Judge Goodwin about incorporating the mill business.

[George Goodwin, a general practice lawyer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), headed a Sanford (“Springvale”), ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-six years), Etta Goodwin, aged sixty-three years (b. ME). George Goodwin owned their house at 24 Main Street, which was valued at $5,500. They had a radio set].

December 6: Norman and I went to Dover and Rochester on the mill business. Didn’t amount to much.

December 9: Got a letter from Mr. Grant [of] New York and it looks as if we might get the mill started.

December 15: Mill is now all shut down. No one working.

December 24: Henry & I went down to Dover to see Mr. Hall about making a lease for the mill. Henry started for Texas to-night. Will spend Christmas with Agnes and he and Joe Plummer start from there Tues. morning.

[Henry’s sister, Agnes M. (Townsend) Hayes, then lived with her husband in Bradford, MA. Halton R. (Agnes T.) Hayes appeared in the Haverhill. MA, directory of 1928, as manager of the Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co., with his house at 35 Fernwood av., Br. [Bradford]. Henry A. Townsend and Joe Plummer would have started for Texas from Bradford, after spending Christmas there (The Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co. of Kansas City, MO, made the Sunshine brand of biscuits and cookies. Hayes would have been the local sales manager)].


Ms. Bristol contributed some supplementary research support.


Continued in H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1928-34


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