Celestial Seasonings – June 2022

By Heather Durham | May 31, 2022

Good day, everyone! Welcome to the month containing our summer solstice. There will be two meteor showers along with a rare arrangement of five planets possibly visible with the naked eye, but even more spectacular with binoculars or access to a larger telescope.

Between the 18th to the 27th or the last two weeks of June, early risers will be able to view a five-planet line passing by a sliver of the final phase of our Strawberry Super-moon. This planet line will consist of Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus and Mercury.

Another more frequent occurrence happens when planets appear to reverse their orbits. They normally appear to head east, but due to the rotation of the earth around our Sun, it only appears as though a given planet may look as though it’s headed west as seen in the diagram below.

Let’s delve in for a deeper look …

Prograde MotionJune 4. Saturn appears as though it’s going backwards because of the rotation of the Earth around the Sun.

June 7. The Strawberry Moon will be at first quarter.

June 10. The Daytime Arietid Meteor Shower will put on a display today. Coming from the Constellation Aries, the best viewing will be just before dawn.

June 14. The Strawberry Super Moon will be full today. A super moon occurs when the Moon passes closer to the Earth.

June 16. Mercury will be as far away from the Sun as it ever orbits.

June 18. The Moon and Saturn will rise and closely approach one another.

June 20. The Moon will be in its final quarter.

June 21. The first day of summer-midsummer will be today in the Northern Hemisphere. The Moon and Jupiter will rise to the right and closely approach one another.

June 22. Mercury will be at its highest point in the sky. Our Moon and Mars will rise and travel close to each other.

June 23. Mercury will be at its highest place in the sky.

June 26. The Moon and Venus will rise and closely approach one another.

June 27. Today is the day of the June Bootid Meteor Shower. Best viewing times will be just before dawn and dusk. This shower is known as being slow and unpredictable.


References:

Ford, D.F. (2022). Astronomy. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (February 2022). Planet Parade 2022! Must Watch June 2022 Astronomy Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/jERJa4GKTIE

Celestial Seasonings – May 2022

By Heather Durham | April 30, 2022

Welcome to the astronomical event of the year … a full lunar eclipse!  This will create a Blood Moon. Hopefully, our weather will cooperate. Below is a snippet from Wikipedia about this event.

This occurs when the moon falls entirely within the earth’s umbra. Just prior to complete entry, the brightness of the lunar limb – the curved edge of the moon still being hit by direct sunlight – will cause the rest of the moon to appear comparatively dim. The moment the moon enters a complete eclipse, the entire surface will become more or less uniformly bright. Later, as the moon’s opposite limb is struck by sunlight, the overall disk will again become obscured. This is because as viewed from the Earth, the brightness of a lunar limb is generally greater than that of the rest of the surface due to reflections from the many surface irregularities within the limb: sunlight striking these irregularities is always reflected back in greater quantities than that striking more central parts, and is why the edges of full moons generally appear brighter than the rest of the lunar surface. This is similar to the effect of velvet fabric over a convex curved surface which to an observer will appear darkest at the center of the curve. It will be true of any planetary body with little or no atmosphere and an irregular cratered surface (e.g., Mercury) when viewed opposite the Sun. (Wikipedia, 2021, Total Lunar Eclipse).

Lunar Eclipse of May 16, 2022 - Dominic Ford


May 1. New Moon

May 3&4. Earthshine viewing a.k.a the Da Vinci Glow. Earthshine is caused by Sun reflecting off the surface of the Earth and back to the Moon.

May 6. N-Aquariid meteor shower. Our view of this shower, from the Constellation Aquarius may be best viewed just before dawn. These showers originate from Haley’s Comet.

May 8. There will be a n-Lyrid meteor shower today with best viewing, once again, is just prior to dawn. However, the Flower Moon will be at first quarter today and may interfere with shower viewing.

May 16. Today will bring a full Moon and a total lunar eclipse. It will begin at 10:28 pm through 1.55 am.  The total eclipse will be between 11:30 pm until 12.54 am. The Sun, Earth and Moon must be aligned for this to occur. As well, it can only occur with a full Moon and creates a reddish color – a Blood Moon.

May 22. The Moon and Saturn will rise to the right and closely approach one another.  The Moon will be in its final quarter.

May 24. The Moon and Jupiter will closely approach one another while rising to the right. The Moon, along with Mars will do the same on this date.

May 26. The Moon and Venus will rise to the right and orbit close to each other.

May 28. Mars and Jupiter will rise to the right together.

May 29. Mars and Jupiter will orbit close to each other.


References:

Ford, D. F. (2022). Astronomy. Retrieved from https://in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (February 2022). May 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/w1BR7UI3SAA.

Now Next. (March 2022). 15-16 May 2022 Total Lunar Eclipse. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/a93ckEDOm00

Celestial Seasonings – April 2022

By Heather Durham | March 31, 2022

Hi everyone! Welcome to our April 2022 edition including the first meteor shower of the year, two occurrences of the black Moon, a partial eclipse that will not be visible to us along with Aprils Pink Moon which is said to have been named after the colors of flowers that bloom this time of year.

There are also two videos that enhance the events of this month including those that cannot be seen with the naked eye. The videos do contain interesting graphic depictions of a variety of events for your viewing pleasure.

Now let us look down this page to read about this month’s astronomical events!


April 1. New or black Moon.

April 4. Mars and Saturn will rise and come close to one another.

April 9. The new Moon will be at first quarter.

April 16. The full Pink Moon will be on display tonight.

April 22. Today, we will have the Lyrid Meteor Shower from the Constellation Hercules. This will be visible beginning just past 10:00 pm until a few minutes after 5:00 am during which time you may see around 17 meteors per hour. However, the last quarter of the Moon may interfere with early morning viewing.

April 23. The Moon will be in its final quarter.

April 24. The Moon and Saturn will rise closely together and towards the right.

April 26. The Moon and Venus will travel in close proximity to each other.

April 27. The Moon and Venus will rise to the right together. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to the right.

April 28. Mercury will travel to its highest point in the evening sky.

April 29. Mercury will be located at its furthest point from the Sun.

April 30. Venus and Jupiter will rise to the right together. There will also be a partial eclipse of the Sun but it will only be visible from South America or Antarctica. There will also be another black moon tonight.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (2022, January 17). April 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/RMl8bNI86q0

Secrets of Space. (2022, March). Astronomy Events April 2022. Retrieved from youtu.be/_HmU3jFcQYA

Celestial Seasonings – March 2022

By Heather Durham | February 28, 2022

Hi there one and all! The month of March has much to offer skywatchers. We have the first day of spring occurring on the 20th. Meteorologists declare March 1st to be the first day of spring, but the day of the equinox brings approximately 12 hours of daylight and nighttime.

The 28th will have the most activity with three planets in view and moving around until they form somewhat of a linear line in the night sky.

Last month, I wrote about Artemis One which had to be postponed and rescheduled for the 20th of this month. Let’s hope this time it will be successful.

The YouTube videos speak of additional activity sometimes referring to astrophotography. There are astronomical phenomena, referred to in the videos that cannot be seen with the naked eye, but that are depicted visually therein.

Let’s now delve into the month ahead.


March 10. Our Moon will be at first quarter.

March 12. Venus and Mars will rise to the right during which time Venus will be passing Mars.

March 15. Venus and Mars will be close to one another and pass each other as well.

March 18. The Worm Moon will be full. It is named as the earth worms begin their activity.

March 20. This is the first day of spring also known as the March equinox. Venus will travel to its farthest distance from our Sun.

March 21. Venus may be seen at its half phase.

March 25. Our Moon will reach its final quarter.

March 27. The Moon and Mars will rise right and travel as close as they ever get.

March 28. The Moon and Mars will travel close to one another again. The Moon and Venus will rise and closely approach one another. The Moon and Saturn will do the same. Our Moon with Venus and Saturn will travel together and pass one another. Our Moon and Saturn will closely approach one another too as well as Venus and Saturn.

March 29. Venus and Saturn will rise and travel closely to each other.


References:

Ford, D.F. (2021, January 5). June 2021. In-the-Sky.Org. Retrieved from https://in-the-sky.org

Insane Curiosity (2021, December). Artemis Project 1, The New Mission to Return to the Moon. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/agyd88M5YE8

Now Next. (2022, February). March 2022 Astronomy Events. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/nBqqETLQyzA

Sky of Stars (2022, February 21). Upcoming Astronomical Events, March 2022. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/hs1-bo7-br8

Celestial Seasonings – February 2022

By Heather Durham | January 31, 2022.

Greetings fellow skywatchers! Welcome to this month’s edition of Celestial Seasonings including two important and fascinating manifestations of manmade industriousness.

In the interest of clarity, I have included two quotes. The first one on Artemis comes from Wikipedia.

The Artemis program is a United States-led international human spaceflight program. Its primary goal is to return humans to the Moon, specifically the lunar south pole, by 2025. If successful, it will include the first crewed lunar landing mission since Apollo 17 in 1972, the last lunar flight of the Apollo program.
The Artemis program began in December 2017 as the reorganization and continuation of successive efforts to revitalize the U.S. space program since 2009. Its stated short-term goal is landing the first woman on the Moon; mid-term objectives include establishing an international expedition team and a sustainable human presence on the Moon. Long-term objectives are laying the foundations for the extraction of lunar resources, and eventually, make crewed missions to Mars and beyond feasible (Wikipedia, 2021).

And the other on Axiom from a website called Inverse.com. I have also included a YouTube video for your viewing pleasure that will provide you with visual depictions of February 2022 celestial events.

AXIOM SPACE COULD create the successor to humanity’s most iconic space station. The Houston-based firm plans to fly civilians on a series of private missions to the International Space Station. These missions would act as a steppingstone to a fully-fledged, private, independent space station.
It’s a fascinating twist in the new space race, which includes private companies alongside national agencies. While most attention has gone to rocket launch companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin, Axiom Space is an example of a company in another area that’s also crafting an exciting vision of humanity’s future in space.
Comments from Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos in May 2019 demonstrate why this is valuable. He explained that a company like Amazon could only emerge after the previous infrastructure was established, like the postal service and credit cards. Blue Origin, he said, would help develop the infrastructure to reach space so an imaginative entrepreneur could venture further in the future.
With Axiom Space, which depends on rocket launch companies to power its space station, that vision could take a big step forward.
The end goal is to use the private space station for commercial purposes. It could offer such amenities as a luxury hotel, a factory floor, or even a media production facility. The company’s website argues that “microgravity is the most promising environment for innovation and problem-solving since the Internet.
As NASA has only cleared the ISS for operations until 2030, it might even be a successor (Brown, 2022).

So, let’s now delve into the evening skies of February- the month of the full Snow Moon.

February 8. Today is the first quarter of the Moon.

February 9. Venus will reach its brightest as the morning or evening star. At times such as this, Venus can stand out so brightly that it may appear to shine along with our Sun and Moon. Mercury will locate to its highest point in the sky making it much more visible than it is normally.

February 11. Mercury will be at half phase. It only is visible in twilight so it might be difficult to view without equipment.

February 12. Venus reaches its highest point in the evening sky. Venus and Mars will rise to the right. This date will bring Artemis One, the first of three space flights planned for this program.

February 16. February is supposed to be the snowiest month, thus the name Snow Moon which will be full today. Mercury will be at its furthest distance from our Sun.

February 23. Today brings the last quarter of the Moon.

February 27. Today brings the right ascension of the Moon and Mars as well as the Moon and Venus. The Moon and Mars will closely approach one another.

February 28. Axiom in conjunction with Spacex will send people to space after they have completed ten days of training and paid fifty-five million dollars.


References:

Brown, M. (2022, January 10). Axiom Space Details. Retrieved from www.inverse.com/innovation/axiom-space-details

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (2022, January 17). February 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/pVhWvgGmmok

Wikipedia. (2022, January 17). Artemis. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemis

Celestial Seasonings – January 2022

By Muriel Bristol | December 30, 2022

Happy New Year one and all! I hope you had a wonderful holiday season in 2021. This month brings a super meteor shower as well as a super moon. Our Sun will be as close to the Earth as it ever gets.

Providing you have the proper equipment, check out the recommended YouTube videos for more in-depth events.


January 3. The Quadrantid meteor shower from Bootes, the Constellation will be present in this evening’s sky. This is the major shower of this month and there will be a black moon and the showers will be prolific rendering this the finest time of this month for sky watching.

January 4. Our planet makes a complete orbit in one year. The orbit is not purely circular but slightly ovular. Once in every orbit the Earth makes its closest approach to the Sun. This year, that close approach will occur today and the Sun may look bigger than usual.

January 5. The Moon and Jupiter will ascend to the right as well as rise together in this evening’s sky.

January 7. Mercury will be as far away from the Sun, but might not be visible with the naked eye.

January 9. Mercury will be half visible, but again, hard to see without an amplification tool. The Moon will be at first quarter today.

January 10. Mercury will be at its highest point in tonight’s sky.

January 17. The full Wolf super moon will display tonight. It was named the Wolf moon because wolves were thought to cry more in January than at any other point in time.

January 19. The y-Ursae Minorid meteor shower from the Constellation Ursa Minor will put on a show this evening.

January 25. This will show the final quarter of the full Wolf super moon.

January 29. The Moon and Mars will travel with one another as well as ascend to the right.

References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). 2021. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (2021, December 17). January 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/U2XoY6bLwgU

Secrets of Space. (2021, December 28). Top Astronomy Events in January 2022. Retrieved from youtu.be/0Cs8Neu5sy8

Wikipedia. (2021, December 21). Quadrantids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadrantids

Celestial Seasonings – December 2021

By Heather Durham | November 30, 2021

Happy holidays folks and welcome to our final edition of Celestial Seasonings for the year 2021! 

This month brings us 7 meteor showers visible without a telescope, as well as an opportunity to view 3 planets between the 8th and 9th if you have a telescope. There is a link below about this event below from inverse.com along with several videos that will give you a deeper and wider explanation of the night skies and astronomical events this month. The first day of winter begins on the solstice.

Let our journey begin…..


December 4. There will be a new Moon today will be on the same side of the Sun.  This means that this will be a perfect day for viewing the night sky.

December 6. Today, the  December Cassiopeid Meteor Shower will put on an evening light show which may be easily visible due to the new Moon. This shower occurs in the Constellation Andromeda. As well, the Moon and Venus will make a close approach to each other and rise towards the right.

December 7. Venus will be at its brightness this evening. The Moon and Saturn will closely approach each other as they rise towards the right.

December 8-9. The Moon along with Jupiter and Saturn and Venus will be visible.

December 9. The Monocerotid meteor shower will produce this evening. It will begin around 6:30 pm and conclude near dawn the following morning. It originates from the Constellation Monocerotid.

December 10. There will be the first quarter of the moon today.

December 12. The Hydrid meteor shower from the Constellation Hydra will be active today. It will reach peak production at 10:00 pm during which time you may see 2 meteors per hour.

December 14. Tonight we have the Geminid meteor shower from the Constellation Gemini which could locally produce an average of 118 meteors at peak times. The Geminid shower has become brighter these past few years and it’s sometimes referred to as the meteor shower king! Additionally, the meteors cascade in a variety of colors.

December 16. We will have another meteor shower tonight, Comae Berenicid from the Constellation Leo. This may produce some long-lived meteors that may travel widely across the evening sky.

December 18. This evening, the Moon will be full.  This is referred to as the Cold Moon or Long Night Moon.

December 19. Tonight should bring another fine meteor shower for we will have the December Leonis Minorid shower from the Constellation Leo Minor. Expect to see its peak at 7:00 pm.

December 21. Winter Solstice Day, also referred to as the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter.

December 22. Tonight we’ll have another light show brought to us by the Constellation Ursa named Ursid. Peak can be expected around 11:00 pm.  As well, there will be additional displays may be seen just before dawn and after dusk today.

December 26.  Today brings us the final quarter of the Cold Moon.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). December 2021.  Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Inverse. (2021). December 2021 Celestial Events: How to See 3 Planets in the Evening Twilight. Retrieved from inverse.com/science/december-2021-celestial-events-jupiter-saturn-venus

Sea and Sky. (2021). Astronomy Calendar of Celestial Events
for Calendar Year 2021. Retrieved from www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2021.html

YouTube .(15 November 2021). Astronomy Events December 2021. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/4yVADOZx9-U.

YouTube. (13 November 2021). December 2021 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/7kGx2HJWciA

YouTube. (14 November 2021). Astronomy Events December 2021. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/wiHaA7XwjWs

YouTube. (17 November 2021). Upcoming Astronomical Events in December 2021. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/OpQ2ZGqgLMs

YouTube. (14 November 2021). December 2021 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/c8KprEGGK84

Celestial Seasonings – November 2021

By Heather Durham | October 31, 2021

Welcome to November’s edition!  This should be an exciting month for sky watchers!  Again this month, we have Halloween Fireballs, two splendid meteor showers and a partial lunar eclipse-the final one for this calendar year, that will also produce a blood moon. 

Once again, I have added videos.  The video contents contain more information than I have written about.  I left them out because either they are not visible to the naked eye or they present themselves for viewing from other parts of the world. There is one for the lunar eclipse by itself. 

View what and as you prefer.  I’m open to any suggestions you may have. Most importantly, however, enjoy the evening skies in the month ahead!


November 8. The Moon and Venus will orbit close to one another and rise to the right.

November 10. The Moon and Saturn will rise to the right in close proximity to one another.

November 11. The Moon will reach first quarter. The Moon and Jupiter will pass by close to each other and orbit towards the right.

November 12. The Northern Taurid meteor shower from Taurus will put on a display this evening. This display is also known as Halloween Fireballs. According to Wikipedia, “Since the meteor stream is rather spread out in space, Earth takes several weeks to pass through it, compared with the much smaller periods of activity in other showers.”

November 17. The Leonid meteor shower from Leo should be prolific this evening. At its prime, it could produce nearly 13 streaks per hour.

Beaver Moon - 1November 19. The Beaver Moon will be full today. There will also be a partial lunar eclipse. The terms penumbra and umbra refer to distinct shadow parts generated by light reflecting on an opaque object. According to In-the-sky.org, viewing time is as follows:

Local Time UTC
01:03 06:03 Moon begins to enter the Earth’s penumbra
02:20 07:20 Moon begins to enters the Earth’s umbra. Partial eclipse begins.
04:04 09:04 Greatest eclipse
05:48 10:48 Moon fully outside the Earth’s umbra. Partial eclipse ends.
07:04 12:04 Moon leaves the Earth’s penumbra

November 21. Tonight, the a-monocerotid meteor shower will put on a display. This is from the Constellation Canis Minor. The speed of this shower is almost as fast as the maximum meteor shower speed.

November 27. The Moon will be in its final quarter.

November 28. The November Orionid meteor shower for this month will be active this evening from the Constellation Orion. As long as the weather is good, there should be minimal interference from the upcoming new moon.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). November 2021.  Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Wikipedia, (2021, July 4). Northern Taurids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/Northern

YouTube. (2021, October 8), 19 November 2021 Lunar Eclipse. Retrieved from youtu.be/ppgOYkFGXQQ

YouTube. (2021, September 15). November 2021 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/XEzDZAOU2mA

YouTube. (2021, September 15). November 2021 Astronomical Events Coming in November 2021. Retrieved from youtu.be/lfwa0M1FKmA

Celestial Seasonings – October 2021

By Heather Durham | September 30, 2021

Greetings everyone and welcome to the latest edition of Celestial Seasonings! This month, we have a plethora of meteor showers along with a new YouTube video for this month that I highly recommend you start with before planning your sky watching shows. Included as well, is a link to meteor showers created and maintained by NASA. You can put a meteor shower date on this NASA page and view prior showers. 

Our autumn equinox began in the afternoon of September 22. It’s pumpkin spice and apple picking season. Warm days and cool nights produce the changing color of the leaves on our trees. Then we are able to feast our senses on all that nature has to offer this time of year along with our journeys into the night skies. 

Have a pleasant month, enjoy yourselves and look forward to your astronomical offerings.


October 5. The Camelopardalis meteor shower will put on a fine display this evening. This comes from the Constellation Draco and should produce overnight with its finest show just before dawn. According to Wikipedia, this “is a large but faint Constellation in the northern sky representing a giraffe.”

October 8. On this date, we will enjoy another meteor shower from the Constellation Draco – the Draconids. Dusk will be ideal time for viewing. In 1933 and 1946, the Draconids were “among the most impressive meteor storms of the 21st century.”

October 9. The Moon and Venus will rise closely to one another while rising to the right.

October 10. The Southern Taurid meteor shower in the Constellation Cetus will display for approximately 12 hours from 7 pm until 7 am the next morning. Because of their occurrence in late October and early November, they are also called Halloween Fireballs.” Saturn will begin moving towards the east again.

October 11. The δ-Auridid [Delta-Auridid] meteor shower in the Constellation Auriga will bring a display tonight. The comet Kiess (C/1911_N1) is the source of this shower.

October 12. Tonight, our Moon will be at first quarter.

October 14. The Moon and Saturn will come close to each other and ascend right.

October 15. The Moon and Jupiter will come close to one another and rise to the right.

October 18. Jupiter will begin moving east again. The ε-Geminid [Epsilon-Geminid] meteor shower from the Constellation Gemini should be visible most of the evening. This is one of two meteor showers that do not stem from comets, but from object 3200 Phaethon, an asteroid.

October 20. The full Hunter’s Moon is tonight.

October 21. The Orionids meteor shower from the Constellation Orion will display tonight. According to Wikipedia, this “is the most prolific meteor shower associated with Halley’s Comet.” A dwarf planet known as 136108 Haumea, will travel close by the Sun. The Moon and Uranus will closely approach one another in the evening sky.

October 23. Mercury will move towards half phase and will be visible just before dawn.

October 24. Tonight, the Leonis Minorid meteor shower will put on a display but is faint. This comes from the Constellation Leo Minor. The Moon will move as far away from the Earth in its orbit. Mercury will travel to its farther distance from the Sun.

October 26. The open star cluster, NGC869 in Perseus will be in the evening sky, but difficult to see without equipment.

October 27. NGC884 also from Perseus will be on display but difficult to see with a naked eye.

This and NGC869 may be referred to as a Double Cluster.

October 28. Mercury will reach its highest location in the sky on this date. Venus will move towards half phase. The Moon will be at its last quarter.

October 29. Venus will move to its furthest distance from the Sun.

References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). October 2021. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org.

Jenniskens. P. (n.d.). NASA Meteor Shower Portal. Retrieved from cams.seti.org/FDL/index.html

Wikipedia, (2020, April 2). Aurigids. Retrieved from en.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurigids.

Wikipedia. (2021, July 28). Camelopardalis. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camelopardalis.

Wikipedia. (2021, April 27). Draconids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draconids.

Wikipedia, (2021, August 13). Geminids. Retrieved from en.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Geminids.

Wikipedia, (2021, July 4). Taurids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taurids.

YouTube. (2021, September 15). October 2021 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from youtu.be/rCr6y2RIFsY

Celestial Seasonings – September 2021

By Heather Durham | August 31, 2021

This month brings a great deal of activity for sky watchers. We have three meteor showers, the Harvest Moon and also the autumnal equinox along with other sites. I’ve included a Youtube video in the References, which should be viewed first for a close up visual effect. Enjoy folks and feel free to write or comment please. Thank you so much and I hope you have an opportunity to enjoy what’s ahead!


September 1. The Aurigid meteor shower should reach its peak today. From the eastern horizon, this will become visible after 10 pm and remain active until dawn. This shower comes from the constellation Auriga. You may be able to see about 5 showers per hour providing the weather cooperates. The Aurigid does not appear every year according to Wikipedia. The last time it peaked was in 2007.

September 9. The September e-Perseid meteor shower will peak today and will be most vibrant. This is from the Constellation Perseus. The Moon and Venus will rise and head towards the right together. According to Wikipedia, “the constellation gives its name to the Perseid cluster, a massive galaxy cluster located 250 million miles from Earth.

September 10. The Moon and Venus will travel closely to one another.

September 13. The first quarter of the Moon will appear in the shy tonight. Mercury will travel to its further distance from the Sun heading east.

September 15. The Moon and Saturn will rise together and pass each other as closely as ever.

2021-09 - PlanetsSeptember 18. The Moon and Jupiter will rise to the right in close proximity to one another this evening.

September 20. The full Harvest Moon will brighten up the night sky. This is the Harvest Moon for it is the closest one to the autumnal equinox.

September 22. The autumn equinox arrives today in the northern hemisphere and spring in the Southern Hemisphere. An equinox date brings us almost 12 hours or daylight and nightlight.

2021-09 - EarthThis is the second of two equinoxes each year where the center of the Sun lies directly over the Equator.

September 27. The Daytime Sextanid meteor shower from the Constellation Sextans will peak today and might be visible from New Hampshire from around 4:23 pm in the evening until dawn comes just past 6:00 am. According to Wikipedia,” the Constellation is the location of the field studied by the COSMOS Project, under taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.”

September 28. The Harvest Moon will show its last quarter.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). September 2021. Retrieved from In-the-Sky.Org/Newscal.Php?Month=9&year=2021&maxdiff=1#datesel.

Wikipedia. (2020, April 22). Aurigid. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurigids

Wikipedia. (2021, July 13). September e-Perseids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseus_(constellation)

Wikipedia. (2021, July 13). Sextans. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sextans

Youtube. (2021, August 14). September 2021 Astronomical Calendar. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDDAXcbbkKg

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