Celestial Seasonings – November 2020

By Heather Durham | October 31, 2020

“The turkey. The sweet potatoes. The stuffing. The pumpkin pie. Is there anything else we all can agree so vehemently about? I don’t think so.” – Nora Ephron.


November 8. Today brings the last quarter of the Moon. Mercury will rise to half phase and will be shining brightly.

November 9. Mercury continues to rise to it’s highest point.

November 10. Mercury will be far away from the sun in its orbit.

November 12. The northern Taurid meteor shower should put on a prolific display. This is from the Constellation Taurus. The Moon and Venus will rise closely to one another this evening.

November 17. The Leonid meteor shower will be prolific this evening. This shower is from the Constellation Leo. The Pleiades open star cluster from the Constellation Taurus will rise to it’s highest point in the sky.

November 19. The Moon and Jupiter will rise close to each other as will the Moon and Saturn.

November 21. The Monocerotid meteor shower from the Constellation Canis Minor will put on an eventful display this evening. The Moon will be at first quarter.

November 25. The Moon and Mars will rise closely to one another.

November 28. The Orionid meteor shower from the Constellation Orion should produce a dazzling display.

November 30. The third full Moon of autumn known as the Oak Moon will shine brightly this evening. There will be a lunar eclipse as the Moon orbits the Earth’s shadow.


References:

Country Living. (2020, October 12). 73 Best Thanksgiving Quotes to Share With Loved Ones Near and Far. Retrieved from www.countryliving.com/food-drinks/g2059/thanksgiving-quotes/

In the Sky. (2020, October 28). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/data/data.php

Wikipedia. (2020, April 21). Alpha Monocerotids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_Monocerotids

Wikipedia. (2020, October 13). Leonids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonids

Wikipedia. (2020, October 1). Orionids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orionids

Wikipedia. (2020, October 10). Taurids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taurids

Celestial Seasonings – October 2020

By Heather Durham | September 30, 2020

Hi everyone! This month we will have a blue moon on Halloween. A blue moon is named as such for it means the second occurrence of a full moon within any given month. Blue moons are relatively rare. The first moon following the autumnal equinox is called the Harvest moon. This year’s blue moon is referred to as the Hunter’s moon.

As well, this month we will be able to enjoy several meteor showers which are always a treat for our star gazers.

Now let’s delve into the details of astronomical events during October of this very strange and stressful year of 2020!


October 1. Mercury will orbit far away from the sun. Today, we will have a Full Moon known as the Harvest Moon for it is the first Full Moon to rise since the beginning of autumn.

October 2. The Moon and Mars will rise close to each other with the Moon passing just below Mars.

October 3. The Moon and Mars will make a close approach.

October 5. The October Cameloparalid meteor shower from the Constellation Draco will peak. (See 209P/LINEAR below).

October 6. Half of Mercury can be seen.

October 8. The Draconid meteor shower from the Constellation Draco will be at peak.

October 9. Today will bring the last quarter of the Harvest Moon.

October 10. The Southern Taurid meteor shower will peak today from the Constellation Cetus.

October 11. The Aurigid meteor shower from the Constellation Auriga will peak today.

October 13. Mars can be viewed from the Constellation Pisces. The Moon and Venus will rise and travel close to each other.

October 18. The Geminid meteor shower from the Constellation Gemini will peak today.

October 21. The Orionid meteor shower from the Constellation Orion will peak today.

October 22. The Moon and Jupiter will rise close to each other. The Moon and Saturn will rise.

October 23. The Moon and Saturn will rise in conjunction. The first quarter of the Blue Hunter’s Moon will be visible.

October 24. The Leonis Minorid meteor shower from the Constellation Leo Minor will peak today.

October 29. The Moon and Mars will rise and travel close to each other.

October 31 (Halloween). The Blue Hunter’s Moon will be full today. Splendid for Trick-or-Treat outings.


References:

In-the-Sky.org. (2020, September 27). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/

Marcels. (1961). Blue Moon. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0fy1HeJv80

Wikipedia. (2020, July 4). 209P/LINEAR. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/209P/LINEAR#Associated_meteor_showers

Wikipedia. (2020, April 22). Aurigids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurigids

Wikipedia. (2020, June 19). Draconids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draconids

Wikipedia. (2019, December 25). Geminids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geminids

Wikipedia. (2020, September 14). Harvest and Hunter’s Moons. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_moon#Harvest_and_hunter’s_moons

Wikipedia. (2020, April 21). Leonis Minorids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonis_Minorids

Wikipedia. (2020, August 13). Orionids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orionids

Wikipedia. (2020, August 17). Taurids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taurids

Celestial Seasonings – September 2020

By Heather Durham | August 31, 2020

Autumn Fires, by Robert Louis Stevenson

In the other garden.
And all up in the vale,
From the autumn bonfires
See the smoke trail!

Pleasant summer over,
And all the summer flowers,
The red fire blazes,
The grey smoke towers.

Sing a song of seasons!
Something bright in all!
Flowers in the summer,
Fires in the fall!

September 3. The Fruit Moon will be full. (Fruit Moon is a whimsical name for the Full Moon phase known also as the Corn Moon, or Barley Moon).

September 6. The Moon and Mars will rise closely to one another.

September 7. Venus will travel to it’s highest point in the sky.

September 9. The Perseid meteor shower will be prolific today when the celestial focal point shines above the horizon.

September 10. This brings us to the last quarter of the Fruit Moon.

September 14. The Moon and Venus will rise and travel close to each other.

September 21. Mercury will reach its highest point in the sky.

September 22. This is the first day of Autumn 2020 (the September Equinox). The Sun will rise due East and set due West.

September 23. This day will bring the first quarter of the Harvest Moon. It will be full on October 1. (The Full Moon following the Harvest Moon will be the Hunter’s Moon).

September 25. The Moon and Jupiter will ascend close to each other. The Moon and Saturn will do the same.

September 27. This will be the prime day for viewing the Daytime Sextantid meteor shower. These can be difficult to see as they appear on the eastern horizon near the rising Sun. (Do not look directly at the Sun). Just before sunrise might be best.

References:

In-the-Sky.org. (2020). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/newscal.php?year=2020&month=9

Pan McMillan. (2020, August 18). Ten Autumn Poems. Retrieved from www.panmacmillan.com/blogs/literary/poems-poetry-about-for-autumn-keats-frost-classic

Universe Guide. (2020). Daytime Sextantids Meteor Shower. Retrieved from www.universeguide.com/meteorshower/daytimesextantids

Wikipedia. (2020, August 26). Full Moon. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_moon

Wikipedia. (2020, August 12). Perseids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseids

Wikipedia. (2020, August 21). September Equinox. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_equinox

Celestial Seasonings – August 2020

By Heather Durham | July 30, 2020

Most Jupiter-sized planets orbit the mother star in a highly elliptical orbit. This means they will often cross the orbit of any Earth-like planet and fling it into outer space, making life impossible. But our Jupiter travels in a near-perfect circular orbit preventing a collision with any Earth-like planet, making life possible. – Michio Kaku


August 1. The Moon and Jupiter will rise and appear to travel close to one another.

August 2. The Moon and Saturn will rise and appear to travel close to one another.

August 3. Today, there will be a full Moon.

August 9. The moon and Mars will rise and appear travel close to each other.

August 11. This date, we will have the last quarter of the Moon.

August 12. This will be the best day for viewing the Perseid meteor shower. Venus will be shining brightly.

August 13. Venus will be far away from the sun allowing it to shine brightly in the sky.

August 15. The Moon and Venus will rise and appear to travel close to each other.

August 17. The k-Cygnid meteor shower will be prolific.

August 25. The Moon will be at first quarter.

August 28. The Moon and Jupiter will rise and appear to travel close to each other.

August 29. The Moon and Saturn will rise and appear to travel close to each other.

August 31. The Aurigid meteor shower will put on a display.


References:

BrainyQuote. (2001). Outer Space Quotes. Retrieved from www.brainyquote.com/quotes/michio_kaku_818170?src=t_outer_space

in-the-sky.org. (2020, July 29). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Wikipedia. (2020, April 22). Aurigids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurigids

Wikipedia. (2020, April 22). Kappa Cygnids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kappa_Cygnids

Wikipedia. (2020, July 1). Perseids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseids

Celestial Seasonings – July 2020

By Heather Durham | June 30, 2020

Summer Stars by Carl Sandburg

Bend low again, night of summer stars.
So near you are, sky of summer stars.
So near, a long arm man can pick off stars,
Pick off what he wants in the sky bowl,
So near you are, summer stars,
So near, strumming, strumming,
So lazy hum-strumming.

July 1. An open star cluster from Serpens (IC4756) may be viewable near midnight but may require binoculars.

July 3. Asteroid Herculina in Sagittarius may be viewable most of the night.

July 4. The Earth will be at its farthest point from the sun.

July 5. There will be an eclipse of the full Moon this evening between 23:08 and 1:53 am. The Moon will also be at its farthest point from the sun. The Moon will be closely passed by Jupiter.

July 6. The Moon and Saturn will rise and be close to each other.

July 8. Venus will be as bright as it ever gets in the sky this evening.

July 10. Venus will be at its farthest point from the sun.

July 11. The Moon and Mars will both rise and closely approach one another.

July 12. This date will bring the last quarter of the moon which will also appear smaller than normal.

July 14. Jupiter, in Sagittarius will be viewable most of the night.

July 15. Asteroid 2 Pallas from Sagitta will be viewable much of the night. 134430 Pluto, in Sagittarius will be viewable much of the night.

July 17. The Moon and Venus will rise and closely approach one another.

July 20. There will be a new Moon today which will pass close to the Sun. Saturn, in Sagittarius will be viewable much of the night.

July 22. Mercury will be at its farthest point from the Sun.

July 25. The Moon will be at its closest proximity to the Earth and will appear larger than usual.

July 26. Mercury will be at its highest point in the sky.

July 27. The Moon will be at first quarter.

July 28. The Piscis Austrinid meteor shower can be best viewed at 3:00 am.

July 29. The Southern Aquariid meteor shower will be best for viewing at 5:00 am … yes, just before dawn. The Capricornid meteor shower will be viewable most of the night.


References:

In-the-Sky.org. (2020, June 29). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Sandburg, Carl. (1920). Summer Stars. Retrieved from www.yourdailypoem.com/listpoem.jsp?poem_id=425

Wikipedia. (2020, June 20). 2 Pallas. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_Pallas

Wikipedia. (2020, March 22). 532 Herculina. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/532_Herculina

Wikipedia. (2020, April 22). Alpha Capricornids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_Capricornids

Wikipedia. (2020, June 4). Piscis Austrinus. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piscis_Austrinus

Wikipedia. (2020, April 18). Serpens. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpens

Wikipedia. (2019, February 23). Southern Delta Aquariids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Delta_Aquariids

Celestial Seasonings – June 2020

By Heather Durham | May 30, 2020

SpaceX demo-2 mission in its the first attempt at sending NASA astronauts to the International Space Station, was postponed due to weather. This mission is the first attempt, using a U.S.-built commercial vehicle to continue this endeavor from America, since 2011.

The mission is scheduled to launch from the historic Kennedy Space Center’s 39A Launch Pad. Two seasoned astronauts are scheduled to travel 19 hours and are scheduled to arrive at the Space Station where they will be living and working for up to 4 months. Below is the link to the NASA YouTube channel where the launch may be watched.

And now let’s see what’s available for sky watching in June.


June 1. M13, Hercules Global Cluster will be high in the sky around midnight. Viewing will be easier with binoculars.

June 2. Mercury will rise to its highest point in the night sky. The Moon will show and appear larger than normal.

June 3. Venus will be in close proximity to the Sun. M12, the globular cluster from Ochiuchus will rise high up in the sky.

June 4. Mercury will be very distant.

June 5. There will be a full Moon out tonight. The globular cluster, M10 – another one from Ochiuchus will rise high in the sky.

June 6. Another globular cluster from Ochiuchus, M62 will ascend very high in the sky around midnight. The Moon will appear distant.

June 8. Both Jupiter and Saturn will rise and closely approach the Moon tonight.

June 10. The Daytime Arietid meteor shower from Aries is expected to show just before dawn. Yet another globular cluster from Hercules, M92 will be high in the sky.

June 12. Mars and Neptune will rise high in the sky together. The Moon and Mars will rise in close proximity to one another.

June 13. This date brings us the last quarter of the Moon.

June 14. The Moon will be orbiting far away from the earth and will appear smaller.

June 15. NGC6388 from Scorpius will be high in the evening sky.

June 16. Again from Scorpius, a butterfly open star cluster will rise high in the evening sky. NGC6397 from Ara, another globular cluster will rise.

June 18. Passing closest to the sun will be Comet C/2019 U6. Yet another Comet A/2019 U6 will closely approach the sun. From Ochiuchus – very prolific this month – comes IC4665, an open star cluster.

June 19. The Moon and Venus will rise together and be in close proximity to one another.

June 20. The longest midsummer day of 2020 … the Solstice. The Ptolemy cluster, M7 from Scorpius will rise and be at its highest point around midnight.

June 21. Today will bring us a new Moon.

June 22. The Moon and Mercury will rise together. The above mentioned comets will shine brightly. NGC6530 from Sagittarius will reach up high in the sky. Mercury will be as far away from the sun as it usually goes.

June 23. NGC6541, a globular cluster from Corona Australis will be at it’s highest point in the sky around midnight.

June 25. Jupiter and Pluto will rise together.

June 27. The June Bootid meteor shower will be prolific.

June 28. This date will bring the first quarter of the Moon. Asteroid 7 Iris from Sagittarius will display on the horizon, but most brightly, near midnight. Once more from Ochiuchus, an open star cluster will shine. This one is known as NGC6633.

June 29. The Moon should appear particularly big and bright this date.

June 30. M22 from Sagittarius will be bright. Mercury will orbit close to the sun.


References:

In-the-Sky.org. (2020, May 30). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

WKMG. (2020, May 30). SpaceX Rocket Launches 2 NASA Astronauts into Space. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFocqVe3NuM

Wikipedia. (2020, May 24). Ophiuchus. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ophiuchus

 

Celestial Seasonings – May 2020

By Heather Durham | April 30, 2020

So here we sit in our hours of darkness waiting for a light. We may very well have to become accustomed to a New Normal. I heard some wise words today … If you can’t see the light, then BE the light.

Let’s begin by reviewing and watching what the Cosmos has in store for May.


May 4. C/2017 K2 PANSTARRS, known as a comet or an interstellar object will be making its closest approach to the Sun. It will be well placed for viewing. Mercury will orbit very closely to the Sun. (Wikipedia, 2017).

May 5. The n-Aquariid meteor shower, from the Constellation Aquarius will be most prolific on this date. The Moon will appear closer than normal as it passes at its closest point to the Earth.

May 7. The Moon will be full as well as very high in the sky.

May 8. The n-Lyrid meteor shower from the Constellation Lyra will be at peak today.

May 9. Today, the Moon will orbit to it’s farthest point from the sun.

May 10. Mercury will orbit closely to the sun.

May 11. A moon-shaped cluster M4 from Serpens will be visible, but small so you may have to use a device for maximum viewing.

May 12. The moon and Jupiter as well as Saturn will rise closely.

May 14. The last quarter of the moon will rise today. The moon and Mars will rise closely to one another.

May 15. Our interstellar object or comet C/2017 K2 mentioned above, will be at its brightest.

May 18. Jupiter and Saturn will pass closely. The moon will appear somewhat smaller for its orbit will traverse at its farthest point away from the Earth.

May 20. The moon will pass closely to the sun.

May 22. Venus and Mercury will pass in close proximity. There will be a new moon today.

May 23. The moon and Venus will rise closely.

May 24. The moon and Mercury will rise close to each other.

May 28. Our M4 cluster mentioned above will orbit to its highest point in the sky.

May 29. Mercury will be at half phase. We will also be able to enjoy the first quarter of the moon.

May 30. The comet C/2019 Y4 (Atlas) will closely approach the sun.

May 31. The moon and Ceres will rise closely.


Previous in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – April 2020; next in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – June 2020


References:

In-the-Sky.org. (2020, April 29). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Wikipedia. (2020, April 26). Aquarius (Constellation). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquarius_(constellation)#Meteor_showers

Wikipedia. (2020, April 9). C/2017 K2. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C/2017_K2

Wikipedia. (2020, April 29). C/2019 Y2 (ATLAS). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C/2019_Y4_(ATLAS)

Wikipedia. (2020, April 21). Lyra. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyra

Wikipedia. (2020, April 18). Serpens. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpens

Celestial Seasonings – April 2020

By Heather Durham | March 31, 2020

Before we review this month’s activities, I want to unpack one term which has arisen during our recent situation. I am speaking about distancing … but physical distancing rather than the perhaps misused social distancing. I am fortunate enough to be able to be remain physically distant from others because I reside in my own home and am able to function from there.

Socially, on the other hand, I connect often with others, whether it be by phone, email, FaceTime, or online audio, and/or video conferencing. I recommend strongly that you think along the same lines. We all need to keep in touch and look after one another.

Having said that, let’s now proceed to see what the skies have in store for us during April of 2020.


April 1 – First quarter of the moon. The Sombrero Galaxy from Virgo May be viewable with binoculars or a telescope.

April 2 – Asteroid 3 Juno from the Constellation Virgo should be viewable this evening.

April 3 – Mercury and Neptune will be rising. Pleiades, also known as the Seven Sisters from the Constellation Taurus will be viewable with Venus.

April 4 – A spiral galaxy, M94, from the Constellation Canes Venatici will be on display but not for the naked eye. A jewel box open star cluster known as NGC 4755 will be visible.

April 7 – Today we will have a full moon. Because it will be at its closest point to the Earth, it may appear a bit larger than usual.

April 9 – Jupiter and Pluto, both from the Constellation Sagittarius will be rising in the same direction.

April 10 – The Moon will be as far from the Earth as possible this evening.

April 13 – Eris, or dwarf planet 136199 is the most massive and second largest known dwarf planet in the Solar System, according to Wikipedia, will pass very close to the Sun. (Wikipedia,2019). Centaurus A or NGC 5128 will be visible but not with the naked eye. Omega Centauri, a bright globular cluster should be visible to the naked eye providing your view point is very dark.

April 14 – This will be the final quarter of the Moon this month. The Moon and Jupiter will rise together. The Moon, Jupiter and Pluto will be on display together. The whirlpool galaxy or M51 will be visible.

April 15 – The Moon and Saturn will rise and closely approach one another. M83 from the galaxy Hydra will be visible, but not with the naked eye.

April 16 – The Moon and Mars will rise and closely approach one another. 136108 Haumea from the Constellation Bootes will be viewable.

April 17 – Once again this month we have another visit from the Canes Venatici, M3, a globular cluster.

April 19 – The Moon will orbit to its closest point to the Sun.

April 20 – The Moon will appear slightly smaller on this date as it orbits to the farthest point to the Earth.

April 21 – The Moon and Mercury will rise together.

April 22 – The Lyrid meteor shower from the Constellation Hercules will be at its peak. The pinwheel galaxy, M101 from the Constellation Ursa Major may be viewable, but not with the naked eye. There will be a new moon tonight.

April 23 – The n-puppid meteor shower will be at it’s peak today.

April 26 – Uranus will pass very close to the Sun today. The Moon and Venus will rise together.

April 28 – Venus will be at it’s brightest today.

April 30 – The Moon will be at its first quarter today.


Previous in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – March 2020; next in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – May 2020


References:

In-the-Sky. (2020, March 30). Calendar of Astronomical Events. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/newscal.php?month=4&year=2020&maxdiff=7#datesel

Wikipedia. (2020, March 31). Eris (Dwarf Planet). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eris_(dwarf_planet)

Celestial Seasonings – March 2020

By Heather Durham | February 29, 2020

Hi there everyone and welcome to the March Edition of Celestial Seasonings 2020! March is the month during which we transition from winter into spring. We will change the time on March 8, and spring will begin on March 19. As I sit here writing this today in late February, the Sun is shining brightly and my thermometer says 55 degrees. Time to put down my tech gadgets and go outside for a Sunday afternoon stroll.

Happy reading my friends and I hope you find the many delights offered to us well worth the wait and astronomical show. Now let’s begin our journey into the night skies of March 2020 …


March 2. LC2602, an open star cluster from the Constellation Carina will display. The Moon phase will be the first quarter.

March 6. M44, our prolific Beehive Cluster will closely approach the Moon.

March 8. Clocks are to Spring forward at 2 AM (or before you go to bed Saturday, March 7, or after you wake up Sunday, March 8). Neptune may be seen at the opposite side of the Sun from the Earth in the evening (Wikipedia, 2019).

March 10. NGC3532, from the Constellation Carina is also referred to as the Pincushion, Football, or Wishing Well open cluster will be visible (Wikipedia, 2019).

March 11. The Moon will orbit its furthest point from the sun.

March 14. y-Normid meteor shower from the Constellation Norma will be visible.

March 15. Asteroid 27 Euterpe, a minor planet designation will reach its highest point in the sky close to midnight.

March 16. This date will bring the last quarter of the Moon.

March 18. The Moon, along with Mars, Jupiter and Saturn will rise closely to one another.

March 22. Half of Mercury will be visible.

March 23. Mars and Pluto will rise together and be close to each other.

March 24. Venus will go to its furthest point from the sun. There will be a new moon which may appear smaller then normal for it will be at it’s farthest point from the Earth.

March 26. Venus will reach its highest point in the evening sky. 136472 Makemake, a minor planet designation will be visible most notably near midnight. Half of Venus will be visible. (in-the-sky.org, 2020).

March 27. Mercury will be as far away from the Sun as it ever goes.

March 28. The Moon and Venus will rise close to each other.


Previous in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – February – 2020; next in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – April 2020


References:

in-the-sky.org. (2020) Makemake. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/news.php?id=20200210_11_101

Wikipedia. (2020, February 24). Daylight Saving Time in the United States. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time_in_the_United_States

Wikipedia. (2019, December). NGC3532. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NGC3532

Wikipedia. (2019, October). Solar Conjunction. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/solar.conjunction

 

Celestial Seasonings – February 2020

By Heather Durham | January 31, 2020

Hi everybody and welcome to the February 2020 issue of Celestial Seasonings!

This month brings with it another visit from our Beehive Cluster, M44, as well as an increasing amount of daylight. Additionally, we are having an extra day this month for 2020 is a leap year. Now let’s see what the skies will provide for our viewing pleasure.


February 1: The first quarter of the Moon will appear.

February 8: The Open Beehive Cluster commonly referred to as M44 will closely approach the Moon. M44 is from the Constellation Cancer. The Moon will be 15 days old on this date. The a-Centaurid meteor shower coming from the Centaurus Constellation will occur. As part of the Milky Way, the globe-shaped cluster, NGC2808 from the Constellation Carina will be displayed (Wikipedia, 2019).

February 9: The Moon will be full.

February 10: Mercury will be far away from the Sun. This is also referred to as Mercury being at it’s greatest elongation East (in-the-sky.org,2019). The Moon will be at it’s farthest point from the Sun and the Moon will travel by it’s closest point to Earth.

February 12: Mercury has an 88-day orbit around the Sun and will be at it’s closest position near the Sun. As well, Mercury will be at it’s highest point in the sky.

February 15: This date will bring the last quarter of the Moon.

February 18: The open cluster from the Constellation Sagittarius, NGC6530, will closely approach Mars. The Moon and Mars will rise closely together in the same direction.

February 19: The Moon and Jupiter will rise up in the same direction. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to one another. Bode’s Galaxy or NGC3031 from Ursa Major will be great for observation.

February 20: The Moon and Saturn will rise in the same direction with the two of them passing close to each other.

February 21: The Moon will orbit towards it’s closest place to the Sun. NGC3114 also known as a sparse open star cluster from the Constellation Carina should be visible with binoculars.

February 23: This date will bring us a new moon.

February 25: Mercury will pass closely by the Sun.

February 26: The Moon will appear somewhat smaller as it orbits towards it’s farthest point from Earth.

February 27: The Moon and Venus will rise in the same direction.

February 28: M22, also known as NGC6656, an elliptical globe-shaped cluster from the Constellation Sagittarius and Mars will be making a close approach of one another (Wikipedia, 2019).

February 29: This year is a leap year, so there is a February 29. In Irish and English tradition, women were allowed on this day to initiate dances and propose marriage. If refused, the bachelor had to pay a forfeit.


Previous in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – January 2020; next in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – March 2020


References:

in-the-sky.org. (2020). Mercury. Retrieved from  https://in-the-sky.org/news.php?id=20200210_11_101

Wikipedia. (2019, December 9). Bachelor’s Day (Tradition). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor%27s_Day_(tradition)

Wikipedia. (2019, December). Beehive Cluster. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beehive_Cluster

Wikipedia. (2019, October). Messier 22. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messier_22