West Milton’s In-As-Much Society – 1903-57

By Muriel Bristol | June 7, 2021

The In-As-Much Society was a West Milton women’s club. The term inasmuch generally introduces a phrase thatNute Chapel - Nute Chapel explains the extent to which a prior statement is true. Societies of this sort were usually affiliated with a church parish. It would seem from the articles extracted here that this one was affiliated with West Milton’s Nute Chapel.

One supposes that there were similar women’s societies centered on churches in other parts of Milton. These In-as-Much Society articles appeared in the Farmington News, while those of other such societies appeared less frequently or did not appear at all, largely because West Milton abuts Farmington, NH.

It is difficult to say exactly when the In-As-Much Society might have been established, but its first newspaper notices began in 1903, i.e., during the pastorate of Nute Chapel’s Rev. Robert M. Peacock.


WEST MILTON. Mrs. John Horne and Mrs. Agnes Bean entertained the In as much society Wednesday of last week (Farmington News, September 18, 1903).

Mrs. Agnes G. (Horne) Bean was then a Farmington, NH, schoolteacher, daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth M. (Wiggin) Horne and her husband John W. Horne.

WEST MILTON. The ladies of the In as much society will give a harvest supper at the Nute chapel Friday, Oct. 9 (Farmington News, October 2, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. J.I. Cook and her daughter, Mrs. T.F. Langley, gave a tea to the Inasmuch society last week (Farmington News, October 23, 1903).

Thomas F. Langley married (2nd) in Milton, September 4, 1900, Mary J. Cook, he of Boston, MA, and she of Milton. He was a widowed painter, aged sixty years, and she was a shoe stitcher, aged thirty-four years. Rev. R.M. Peacock [of the Nute Chapel] performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, circa 1866, daughter of John I. and Mary A. (Davis) Cook.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. William Swinerton entertained the Inasmuch society last week, in honor of Miss Jessie Russell of Boston who has been spending the summer with her (Farmington News, October 30, 1903).

Marie Debeau married in Cambridge, MA, in 1894, William M. Swinerton. They were recent arrivals from Cambridge, MA, where he had been a stationary engineer.

WEST MILTON. The In as much society met this week Wednesday in the library at the chapel. Further preparations were made for the entertainment and sale which is to be held December 2. There will be domestic, fancy, and candy tables, also ice cream, cake and cocoa (Farmington News, November 20, 1903).

WEST MILTON. At the last meeting of the Inasmuch society, arrangements were made for the Christmas tree and a Christmas tea for all the children of the parish (Farmington News, December 25, 1903).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Nellie Hayes Tuesday afternoon. … The Inasmuch society entertained the children Thursday afternoon and evening at the chapel. Games were played until 5.30, when the children marched to the dining room where tables laden with many dainties met the eager eyes of the children. A Christmas cake with the words “Merry Christmas” was on a table in the centre of the room, surrounded by burning candles of all colors. As the children left the dining room they were given a piece of the Christmas cake. In the evening a short program and Christmas tree were very much enjoyed by all (Farmington News, January 1, 1904).

Nellie M. Parmenter married in Farmington, NH, May 8, 1877, Charles H. Hayes, both of Farmington. She was aged twenty years, and he was a widowed [shoe] cutter, aged thirty-two years. Rev. D.H. Adams performed the ceremony. Charles H. Hayes died of pneumonia in Milton, April 22, 1892,aged forty-seven years. [His death certificate gave the year as 1893, incorrectly]. (See Milton’s Nute Chapel Ministers of 1890-21, regarding Hayes’ friendship with Nute pastor Rev. William A. Bacon).

WEST MILTON. The last meeting of the In as much Society was held with Mrs. L.D. Garland. Quite a number were present and work was resumed as usual (Farmington News, January 29, 1904).

Cora B. Goodall married in Rochester, NH, January 6, 1877, Llewelyn D. Garland, he of Milton, and she of Farmington, NH. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years, and she was aged eighteen years. In 1904, Mr. and Mrs. L.D. Garland lived next door to the Hare Road school.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. John Nute Wednesday of last week (Farmington News, February 19, 1904).

Ellen F. Foss married, circa 1884, John A. Nute. She died of cancer in West Milton, November 10, 1908, aged fifty-three years, five months, and fifteen days.

WEST MILTON. The severe cold and bad traveling of late have interfered somewhat with the meetings of the Inasmuch society. The interest, however, has been kept up. Will meet with Mrs. Nellie Hayes this week, if the weather is favorable (Farmington News, February 26, 1904).

WEST MILTON. A well-attended meeting of the Inasmuch society was held last week with Mrs. J.I. Cooke and her daughter, Mrs. T.F. Langley. There were two guests, Miss Annie Horne and Miss E. Maude Garland. The music by Miss Horne was very much enjoyed (Farmington News, March 25, 1904).

Hare Road schoolteacher Annie J. Horne was a daughter of Frank and Mary C. (Weeks) Horne. Milton Grammar schoolteacher Ethelyn Maude Garland was a daughter of Llewellyn D. and Cora B. (Goodall) Garland.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. John Nute last week with a large attendance (Farmington News, April 1, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet with Mrs. Nellie Hayes this week (Farmington News, April 8, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet with Mrs. Nellie Hayes this week, Wednesday (Farmington News, April 8, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet with Mrs. Annie Cooke Wednesday (Farmington News, April 15, 1904).

Annie E. Davis married in Rochester, NH, January 14, 1874, Ira A. Cook, she of Rochester and he of Milton. He was a shoemaker, aged thirty-one years, and she was aged twenty-four years. He died of heart failure in Milton, April 3, 1898, aged fifty-four years, four months, and twenty-one days. In 1900, she lived on the Nute Ridge Road, close to the Nute Chapel.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet with Mrs. Annie Cook, Wednesday. It is hoped there will be a good attendance as there is much work on hand (Farmington News, April 22, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The In as much society will meet again this week with the chairman of work committee, Mrs. Annie Cooke (Farmington News, April 29, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The In as much society will meet at the Nute Library, this week Wednesday. Arbor Day will also be observed by planting trees on the chapel grounds (Farmington News, May 6, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The In as much society met last week Wednesday, at the Nute library; there was a good attendance. Arbor day being observed, three trees were planted on the chapel grounds, Cake and cocoa were served by the ladies (Farmington News, May 13, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at Nute library this week Wednesday (Farmington News, May 20, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch Society will meet at the Nute Chapel Wednesday if pleasant, if not Thursday (Farmington News, May 27, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Martin Wentworth last week, Wednesday. There was a good attendance. The reading by one of the members was very much enjoyed. Cake and Cocoa was served (Farmington News, November 11, 1904).

Georgianna Gerrish married in Rochester, NH, November 20, 1886, Martin G. Wentworth, she of Lebanon, ME, and he of Farmington, NH. She was a teacher, aged twenty-one years, and he was a laster, aged twenty-three years. (See Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47).

WEST MILTON. The ladies of the society are busily engaged in preparing barrels of clothing to be sent to Mrs. Elizabeth Barker at Toccoa, Georgia, for distribution in the mission school of which Mrs. Barker is matron. Many thanks are due Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Brown for their generous hospitality, which was enjoyed by the ladies of the Inasmuch society, Dec. 1. A bounteous dinner was partaken of, after which a reading by one of the members was listened to with much pleasure. Later in the afternoon ice cream was served by Miss Nellie Brown, who so ably assisted in entertaining (Farmington News, December 9, 1904).

Augusta D. Dorr married in Milton, July 3, 1892, John W. Brown, she of Milton and he of Farmington, NH. She was a shoe stitcher, aged twenty-five years, and he was a shoemaker, aged thirty-three years. Miss Nellie Brown was his younger sister.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society was very pleasantly entertained at the home of Mrs. Annie Cook, last week Wednesday. There was a good attendance and all were busily engaged in finishing articles for the sale. Refreshments were served by the hostess. The ladies will hold their annual Christmas sale Dec. 20 if pleasant; if not, the first fair evening. It will open with an entertainment at 7.30, after which all will be invited to the dining room where you will find what you want for Christmas, and something good to eat (Farmington News, December 16, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The roads this winter have made it possible for the In As Much society to hold their meetings each week at the chapel, which they will continue to do indefinitely (Farmington News, January 19, 1906).

WEST MILTON. The In As Much society met at Nute chapel last Wednesday afternoon with the largest attendance of the summer. It is with great pleasure that we mention the fact that five ladies from Brookline joined the circle. The lawn party at Mrs. L.D. Garland’s was a very enjoyable occasion. As the evening was rather cool, the phonograph selections were listened to with much pleasure in the house. Cocoa, candy and fancy articles were sold, thereby making it a financial success for the In As Much society (Farmington News, September 19, 1909).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at Nute chapel in the library now on during the summer every Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock (Farmington News, April 22, 1910).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met last week with Mrs. Sam Gale. It was a roll call. It being the first meeting of the new year there was a special program. Instrumental and vocal music, and a reading by Mrs. Gale. The president, Mrs. Longley, read a very interesting letter from the former pastor’s wife, Mrs. R.M. Peacock (Farmington News, January 13, 1911).

Annie B. Varney married in Lynn, MA, June 12, 1894, Samuel Gale, 3rd, both of Lynn, MA. She was an operative, aged twenty-three years, and he was a printer, aged thirty-three years. In 1912, their house was on the Hare Road, third from the Farmington Road.

WEST MILTON. The ladies of the Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Peirce last Wednesday. An unusually large number was present and a most enjoyable afternoon was spent in sewing and sociability. Mr. Hayes entertained the company with choice selections on the phonograph. Cake, cocoa, and fruit were served by the hostess, assisted by Mrs. Nellie Hayes. A novel and very pleasing feature of the occasion was the sled ride given the ladies by Mr. I.W. Hayes. It was a kindly act and thoroughly appreciated by them. They wish through this medium to extend their thanks to him (Farmington News, March 31, 1911).

Clara N. “Nettie” Giles married in Northwood, NH, October 30, 1888, Charles S. Pierce, she of Epsom, NH, and he of Des Moines, IA. She was aged twenty-seven years, and he was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years. She resided in 1910 in the Nute Ridge home of her nephew, Henry B. Hayes. Sleigh driver Ira W. Hayes had a farm on the Hare Road.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. L. [S.] Gale last week. It was roll call and all responded with a reading or quotation very fitting to the Easter season. lee cream and cake were served by the hostess, assisted by Miss Nellie Hayes (Farmington News, April 21, 1911).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Annie Cook last week. Sandwiches, cake and lemonade were served by the hostess, assisted by Mrs. Longley (Farmington News, May 19, 1911).

Mrs. Longley and her husband lived with her parents, John I. and Mary A. (Davis) Cook, on the Hare Road, sixth from the Farmington Road, in 1912.

West Milton. The Inasmuch society will meet at the chapel, in the library, during the summer (Farmington News, June 23, 1911).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. G.H. Hurd this week Wednesday. The hostess served delicious refreshments. Organ selections by Mesdames Gale and Longley were listened to with much pleasure (February 2, 1912).

Cora E. (Whitten) Brown married in Farmington, NH, April 7, 1887, George H. Hurd, both of Farmington, NH. She was a shoe-fitter, aged twenty-eight years, and he was a shoemaker, aged fifty-five years.

West Milton. A Valentine social, under the auspices of the Inasmuch society, was held at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland, Wednesday, Feb. 14. A very pleasing program, consisting of readings, recitations and music was rendered by ladies of the society under the direction of Miss Nellie Hayes. The rooms were very tastefully decorated with emblems suggestive of St. Valentine. Home-made food and candy found ready sale and netted a goodly sum for, the treasury. An expression of regret in not being able to attend the social was received from Miss Florence Colbath of Haverhill, Mass., a former resident. The company dispersed at a late hour after spending an enjoyable evening (Farmington News, February 23, 1912).

Florence A. Colbath was born in Farmington, NH, May 10, 1856, daughter of Richmond E. and Hannah (Parker) Colbath. She boarded with farmer Demeritt Goodall in the Downingville part of West Milton in 1900, where her occupation was given as “invalid.”

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Gale last Wednesday afternoon. There was a good attendance and the work committee kept all busy. Refreshments were served by the hostess. Piano selections were listened to with much pleasure (Farmington News, April 19, 1912).

West Milton. There is to be a lawn party given by the Inasmuch society next Tuesday evening at the home of Miss E.D. Lindsay. In connection with this there will be aprons, ice cream and cake for sale. A general good time is looked forward to. Auto parties will receive special attention (Farmington News, July 12, 1912).

Miss Elizabeth D. Lindsay purchased a summer home on the Hare Road, near Nute Ridge Road, in West Milton in 1905. (See Milton and the Rusticators). She was born in Scotland, circa 1869, and lodged in Boston, MA, during the winters, working there as a dressmaker.

West Milton. The Inasmuch society, had a very interesting meeting at the library last Wednesday afternoon. There was a large attendance which was pleasing to the work committee as there is a large number of orders to fill for our summer guests (Farmington News, September 27, 1912).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met at the home of Mrs. Edwin Tripp last Wednesday afternoon. The work of tacking comforters was resumed and good progress was made. At the close of the work the hostess, assisted by Miss Abbie Howe, served bountiful and dainty refreshments to all present and a delightful social hour followed. A large attendance of members was on hand (Farmington News, October 24, 1913).

After the March 1899 death of his first wife, Edwin Tripp married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, April 30, 1901, Mattie G. “Geneva” Berry, he of Milton, and she of Rochester, NH. He was a shoecutter, aged twenty-eight years, and she was at home, aged twenty-nine years. In 1912, Miss Mary A. “Abbie” Howe had a house with her father on the Middleton road in West Milton; the Tripps lived with them.

West Milton. The I.A.M. society met at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland last Wednesday afternoon. A large attendance of members and the fine entertainment and refreshments furnished by the hostess were special features of the session. … The Inasmuch society has arranged for an elderly people’s meeting to be held at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland this Friday afternoon from 2 until 4. The purpose of the affair is to afford an opportunity to all those who are ordinarily confined at home, by reason of infirmities or otherwise, of enjoying the social intercourse of their neighbors and friends. An appropriate program has been prepared, consisting of music, social entertainment, remarks by Rev. D.A. Gammon, pastor of Nute chapel, and refreshments under the auspices of the Aid. Everything will be absolutely gratis and in addition an automobile will be furnished for safe conveyance to and from the destination. An urgent invitation is extended to the elderly residents of the parish and to all those who do not have a frequent opportunity of joining their neighbors and friends. In case the weather is unfavorable the meeting will be postponed (Farmington News, August 21, 1914).

West Milton. In consequence of the small attendance occasioned by the unfavorable weather which prevailed during the afternoon set for the elderly people’s at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland a few weeks ago, another meeting was called last Monday afternoon at the dame hour and place. An automobile was furnished by the Inasmuch society for conveyance and the elderly people of the community were well represented Able remarks appropriate to the occasion were made by the pastor of Nute chapel, Rev. D.A. Gammon, and the remainder of the afternoon was occupied with a social session, singing and refreshments, consisting of ice cream and assorted cake, after which the members of the society choir were conveyed to the home of Mrs. Hannaniah Thurston where several hymns were rendered and prayer offered by Mr. Gammon. The guests were transported to their homes shortly before six o’clock, all having enjoyed a very pleasant afternoon (Farmington News, September 14, 1914).

Hananiah is, as we might guess, a Biblical name. Hananiah Thurston appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a farmer, with his house on the Cross road from the Middleton ridge road to Hare road. (That is to say, on what is now Thurston Road).

West Milton. The I.A.M. society met with Mrs. D.A. Gammon Wednesday afternoon. … The I.A.M. society met with Mrs. Cora Hurd last Wednesday afternoon, the occasion being saddened from the fact that in all probability this was the last time Mrs. Hurd would entertain the members in her home. The roll call was held and each member responded with an appropriate quotation. At the close the session refreshments were served by the hostess to the large number of guests which were present. … Mrs. Cora Hurd has been selling out her household effects the past two weeks, preparatory to breaking up and selling her home on the Hare road. Mrs. Hurd has been a resident of the community for many years and a host of friends must regret the condition of her health, which has necessitated the contemplated change of residence. Wherever Mrs. Hurd may go, the good wishes and hope of old friends and neighbors for her immediate improvement will abide with her (Farmington News, June 11, 1915).

Mrs. Hurd died of uteric sarcoma in Rochester, NH, January 9, 1916, aged fifty-seven years, and twenty-six days.

West Milton. The third annual summer sale under the auspices of the I.A.M. society was held in the barn at the home of Miss E.D. Lindsay on Tuesday evening. The stable, which has been fitted up especially for social purposes, presented a pretty spectacle in the light of Jap lanterns which dimly illuminated the decorations of bunting and boughs. A large table, upon which were displayed aprons, mystery boxes and home-made candy, found ready and busy patronage, the sale of its wares netting the society a substantial sum. After the sale a graphophone concert was given, followed by games and indoor amusements, in which old and young participated until a late hour. Upwards of fifty were present and enjoyed the festivities (Farmington News, September 3, 1915).

West Milton. The social and annual Christmas sale, held under the auspices of the I.A.M. society at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland recently, met with its usual popular success and the heavy patronage cleaned up the entire stock of articles for sale. In connection with the sale, a short program, consisting of vocal and instrumental music, was presented. Delicious refreshments were served by the hostess (Farmington News, December 31, 1915).

West Milton. The regular meeting of the I.A.M. society was held with Mrs. J.I. Cook last Wednesday afternoon, with a large attendance and an interesting program (Farmington News, June 23, 1916).

Local. The West Milton Inasmuch society will hold its midsummer sale at Nute chapel, Wednesday afternoon and evening, July 4th. A fine assortment of aprons and mystery boxes prepared by the ladies, cake, home-made candies, lemonade and ice cream will be sold. In the evening an illustrated lecture on the beautiful scenery of the White mountains will be given by Rev. D.A. Gammon. Everyone is cordially invited (June 29, 1917).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met on Wednesday of last week with Mrs. Gammon at the parsonage. There was a good attendance and progress was made on a puff. Mrs. Gammon served some most delicious sweet apples (Farmington News, December 14, 1917).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met this week with Mrs. Nellie Hayes. Owing to the severe weather the past winter, it has been impossible to meet (Farmington News, April 12, 1918).

WEST MILTON. The first meeting of the season of the In-as-much Circle was held at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland on Wednesday afternoon of last week when a pleasant hour was enjoyed by those present. This Wednesday the ladies were invited to meet with Mrs. Marie Swinerton (Farmington News, October 3, 1919).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much Circle met at the home of Mrs. Annie E. Cooke, Wednesday afternoon of this week (Farmington News, October 17, 1919).

WEST MILTON. Last week the In-as-much circle held a meeting at the home of Mrs. Fannie Pinkham. This Wednesday the ladies met with Mrs. Nellie Hayes (Farmington News, December 12, 1919).

Fannie Isabelle Hayes married in Milton, June 29, 1909, Harry Wilbur Pinkham, both of Milton. She was a teacher, aged twenty-seven years, and he a farmer, was aged thirty-six years. (She was a daughter of Charles H. and Nellie M. (Parmenter) Hayes (See Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47)). Rev. Robert M. Peacock performed the ceremony.

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much circle held its meeting on Wednesday afternoon of last week at the home of Mrs. Hannah Thurston. The room occupied by the “shut in,” where the guests were cordially welcomed, was very attractive with new paint and paper in cool and restful tints, while bouquets of cut flowers added fragrance and cheer, and the feeling was shared by all that, these material things, combined with the sunny presence of the invalid went far toward “brightening her corner.” A short devotional service was held, after which the report of the last meeting was read and it being the usual roll, those present responded with quotations. The circle presented Mrs. Thurston with a box of dainty articles. for which she returned hearty thanks. Delicious refreshments of fancy wafers, assorted cake and lemonade were served by Mrs. Thurston’s granddaughter, Mrs. Blanche Walker, and the little gathering broke up at the close of the afternoon, thus pleasantly spent (Farmington News, August 20, 1920).

Mrs. Blanche W. (Thurston) Walker was a daughter of Charles H. and Urania (Beal) Thurston and granddaughter of Hananiah B. and Caroline A. (Stockbridge) Thurston. Mrs. “Hannah” Thurston was an error for Mrs. Hananiah B. Thurston, i.e., Mrs. Caroline A. (Stockbridge) Thurston. Hananiah B. Thurston died of angina pectoris in Milton’s “West Side,” October 27, 1922, aged eighty-six years, eleven months, and sixteen days; and his wife, Caroline A. (Stockbridge) Thurston, died of arthritic rheumatism there, July 24, 1926, aged eighty-six years, seven months, and seven days. (Dr. M.A.H. Hart attended upon their final illnesses).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Lola Hyland at the home of Henry Hayes last Wednesday afternoon. Work and a social program were the order of the session (Farmington News, February 11, 1921).

Lola Montez Hill married in Manchester, NH, November 23, 1898, Nelson Stevens Hyland, both of Manchester, NH. She was aged thirty years, and he was an engineer, aged thirty-three years.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society held at Nute chapel Tuesday of last week, Washington’s birthday, was a success in all directions. About 45 gathered there in the fore part of the day. At noon a fine collation, with hot coffee, was served to the men, of whom quite a number had been invited. A pile of unfitted wood back of the chapel was attacked by the men present, sawed and put under cover. Each seemed eager to outdo the other in the amount of work done. A business meeting was held indoors by the ladies and selections in accordance with the day observed were rendered. An original poem by our pastor’s wife was read which all pronounced first-class. It was voted to give the sum of five dollars to the Hoover Relief association. On the whole, it was a very profitable meeting (Farmington News, March 4, 1921).

The pastor’s wife was Mrs. Abbie V. (Hartland) Bennett. The pastor, Rev. George A. Bennett, died in Milton, NH, October 12, 1921, aged sixty-eight years and one day.

The Hoover Relief association was the American Relief Association, of which future president Herbert Hoover was director. It provided food and other relief to twenty-three countries suffering from the aftereffects of WW I and the Russian Revolution. (Due to monetary inflation over the intervening years, the same $5 donation, if then in the form of a $5 half-eagle coin, would have today a spot value of nearly $500 in inflated Federal Reserve notes).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at the home of Mrs. E. Kelley Friday afternoon of this week. All members are requested to be present as there is work of importance in making preparations tor the coming sale, the date of which will be given in our items next week (Farmington News, December 1, 1922).

WEST MILTON. The ladies of the Inasmuch society will hold a social and sale at Nute chapel Thursday evening, Aug. 23. Aprons, fancywork, home-cooked food and ice cream will be on sale. See and patronize the white elephant table. A good program of entertainment will be given. No admission; you are welcome (August 17, 1923).

WEST MILTON. A social held in place of the Inasmuch society, and also in honor of several birthdays which occur about this time, was held at the home of E. Kelley on Tuesday evening (Farmington News, September 23, 1923).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met at the home of Mrs. E. Kelley on Wednesday of last week, with eight members and one guest present. The matter relative to a sale was discussed and was left in the hands of the president to make arrangements. It will be a sale of fancy work, aprons and home-cooked food, which seems to be in demand nowadays. The date will be announced later (Farmington News, October 19, 1923).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met this Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Esther Swinerton in Farmington. The ladies are preparing for a sale of articles on hand, made by their industry during the last few months. The sale will be held at Nute chapel the date to be announced later (Farmington News, June 27, 1924).

Esther M. Blaisdell married in Milton, December 24, 1899, Herbert B. Swinerton, she of Farmington, NH, and he of Milton. She was a lady, aged nineteen years, and he was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years. They resided in Mt. Vernon Street in Farmington, NH, in 1920.

WEST MILTON. On the evening of July eighth the Inasmuch society will hold at Nute Chapel an ice cream and strawberry social, in connection with a sale of aprons and many other useful articles made by the ladies of the society. An entertainment will be prepared by the committee on music, and pains will be made to have all in first-class order. The proceeds are to be used in carrying on the benevolent work of the society (Farmington News, July 4, 1924).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met at the home of Mrs. Teresa Tibbetts this Wednesday (Farmington News, August 1, 1924).

Theresa Victoria Stevens married in Somerville, MA, November 12, 1910, Chris Henry Tibbetts, she of Somerville, MA, and he of Milton. She was a schoolteacher, aged twenty years, and he was a farmer, aged twenty-two years. In 1930, they lived on the King’s Highway in Milton.

WEST MILTON. A meeting of the Inasmuch society was held at the home of Nellie Hayes this Wednesday (Farmington News, April 3, 1925).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society held its sale last Thursday evening, with a fair attendance and a good sale. Owing to the shower of Wednesday, it was postponed (Farmington News, July 31, 1925).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met this Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Annie Cook (Farmington News, September 25, 1925).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society held a meeting this week at the home of Mrs. Teresa Tibbets (Farmington News, October 22, 1926).

LOCAL. Annual harvest supper will be held at Nute chapel, Nute Ridge, auspices Inasmuch society Thursday, Nov. 3, at 6.30 p.m. Supper followed by entertainment. Admission to all 35c (Farmington News, October 28, 1927).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met with Mrs. E.H. Kelley, Wednesday afternoon. The program included the making of dust caps (Farmington News, January 4, 1929).

Elvah M. Hayes married in Wakefield, MA, in 1916, Edward H. Kelley. She was born in Farmington, NH, December 22, 1878, daughter of Charles H. and Nellie M. (Parmenter) Hayes.

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society will meet all day next Wednesday at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland (Farmington News, January 11, 1929).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at the Nute chapel parsonage next Wednesday afternoon (Farmington News, February 8, 1929).

WEST MILTON. A lawn social sale and entertainment will be held at the Nute chapel Wednesday afternoon and evening, August 21, under the auspices of the In-as-much society (Farmington News, August 16, 1929).

WEST MILTON. The last meeting of the Inasmuch society was held Wednesday afternoon, with Mrs. T.J. Poelman at the parsonage (Farmington News, February 7, 1930).

Mrs. Helen F. (Guptill) Poelman was the wife of Rev. T.J. Poelman of the Nute Chapel (See Milton’s Nute Chapel Ministers of 1922-53).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Mary Varney, March 26 (Farmington News, March 28, 1930).

Mary J. Moore married in Lowell, MA, November 7, 1900, William J. Varney, both of Lowell, MA. Both were mill operatives, aged twenty-one years.

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met with Mrs. E.H. Kelley May 23. Mr. and Mrs. E.H. Kelley and Mrs. Nellie Hayes motored to Rye Thursday, May 22, and visited Mrs. Kelley’s aunt, Mrs. Laura A. Locke. Mrs. Locke returned with them and is visiting Mrs. Hayes for a few days (Farmington News, May 30, 1930).

Laura Anne Hayes married, Match 6, 1879, John Elvin Locke. She and Nellie M. (Parmenter) Hayes’s husband, Charles H. Hayes, were children of Ichabod and Hannah R. (Jenkins) Hayes.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Doria Nute Wednesday, June 11 (Farmington News, June 13, 1930).

Deloria “Doria” Ferland married in Milton, December 23, 1922, Ray H. Nute, she of Farmington, NH, and he of Milton. She was a shoeworker, aged twenty-two years, and he was a shoemaker, aged twenty-four years. Rev. Newell W. Whitman performed the ceremony. In 1930, they lived on the Hare Road in West Milton.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Esther Swinerton, Wednesday, July 16 (Farmington News, July 18, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met last week with Mrs. Curtis (Farmington News, August 22, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet this week at the home of Mrs. Geneva Tripp (Farmington News, September 19, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Theresa Tibbets this Wednesday (Farmington News, October 3, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society held a pie social at Nute chapel Wednesday evening (Farmington News, November 7, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The pie social held at Nute chapel last Wednesday evening under the auspices of the Inasmuch society was quite largely attended in spite of the stormy night. Games were enjoyed by all and pie and coffee were served for refreshments (Farmington News, November 14, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met this Wednesday with Mrs. Hayes (Farmington News, January 2, 1931).

WEST MILTON. On Monday evening the In-as-much society sponsored a social and sale of fancy articles at Nute chapel. There was a good attendance and a most delightful evening was recorded (Farmington News, July 3, 1931).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met with Mrs. Nellie Hayes, Wednesday afternoon (Farmington News, May 19, 1933).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met last Wednesday for an all-day session at Nute chapel and repaired the hymn books (Farmington News, July 21, 1933).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met on Tuesday at the chapel (Farmington News, August 30, 1935).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met at the chapel Wednesday and cleaned the dining hall and kitchen (Farmington News, September 20, 1935).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society recently met at Nute chapel and made a decided improvement in the appearance of the paint work and chairs in the dining ball by applying paint and varnish (Farmington News, October 25, 1935).

WEST MILTON. As is its custom, the In-as-much society presented Christmas tokens to all the shut-ins of the community (Farmington News, January 3, 1936).

WEST MILTON. Since our last newsletter a hard wood floor has been laid in Nute chapel, the same having been financed by Nute Ridge Grange. In addition to improvements made in the dining hall, the In-as-much society is improving the condition of the pew cushions, and a meeting was held Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Elvah H. Kelley in connection with the project (Farmington News, April 17, 1936).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society staged the leading event of the week when members gathered at the home of Mrs. Cora B. Garland, Thursday, September 15, and sprung a surprise party in honor of her eightieth birthday, to which relatives and friends participated. Among the relatives were representatives of four generations, which included Mrs. Garland, her daughter, Mrs. John Gilman, Sr., of Laconia, a grandson, John Gilman, 2nd, of West Milton, and a great grandson, John Gilman, Jr., also of West Milton. Prominent among the friends and neighbors was Mrs. Ellen Haynes of West Milton who is in her eighty sixth year.  Mrs. Garland has been a resident of our community for many years, and has taken a leading part, (which she continues to do at the present time) in all of the organized activities. She is a veteran member of the the In-as-Much society, Nute Ridge Grange and Community Fair association, and has stood ready at all times to lend a helping hand in trying to make our community a better place in which to live (Farmington News, September 23, 1938).

WEST MILTON. The weekly meeting of the In-as-Much society was held Tuesday at the home of Mrs. Alfred Langfell (Farmington News, November 29, 1938).

WEST MILTON. The meeting of the In-As-Much society was held Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Alfred Langfell (Farmington News, February 24, 1939).

There does not seem have been any news items regarding the In-as-Much Society during the 1940s. (At least none in the surviving issues of the Farmington News).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at the home of Mrs. Esther Swinerton on Friday, December 22, at 1.30, to fill Sunshine baskets and candy boxes for the tree. Also at this time they will have a Christmas party (Farmington News, December 22, 1950).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met at the home of Mrs. Esther Swinerton for a Christmas party and to fill sunshine baskets and candy boxes for the children. After exchanging gifts, delicious refreshments of ice cream, cookies and tea were served by the hostess (Farmington News, December 29, 1950).

MILTON. Milton – The late Mrs. Esther Swinerton was memorialized in the June meeting of the West Milton In-As-Much club, Meeting was held in the home of Marion Bruce (Farmington News, June 28, 1956).

Mrs. Esther (Blaisdell) Swinerton of Milton died of a pulmonary embolism (following a ruptured appendix) in Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NH, May 16, 1956, aged seventy-five years. “She was active in church, and community and grange affairs” (Farmington News, May 17, 1956).

Marion Agnes Cole married in Milton, July 10, 1947, Kenneth Raymond Bruce, she of East Rochester, NH, and he of Milton. She was a mill worker, aged twenty-two years, and he was a carpenter, aged thirty years. Rev. Ralph V. Townsend performed the ceremony.

MILTON. Greta Walsh will be hostess to the In-As-Much club on Aug 13 at West Milton (Farmington News, August 9, 1956).

Greta M. Benjamin married Adelbert Walsh. He appeared in the Cambridge, MA, directory of 1954, as a carpenter in Dedham, MA, with his house at 7 Hancock place in Cambridge.

Thereafter the In-As-Much Society appeared in the Farmington News in church notices.

NUTE CHAPEL. West Milton. Walter H. Dryer, Pastor. Sunday school at 9:45. Sunday services at 11. Youth Fellowship, 5:45 p.m. Evening services at 7. Prayer meeting, Wednesdays, at 7:30. First monthly Fellowship supper this Friday at 6:30; Hymnsing follows supper. Tuesday, Inasmuch society (Farmington News, September 5, 1957).

The last mention of West Milton’s In-As-Much Society in the Farmington News dates from April 1965.

NUTE CHAPEL. Tuesday, April 13th: 7:00 PM – In As Much Society meets at the chapel (Farmington News, April 8, 1965).


References:

Find a Grave. (2014, September 25). Agnes Gertrude Horne Bean. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/136414516/agnes-gertrude-bean

Find a Grave. (2015, May 31). Florence A. Colbath. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147227967/florence-a.-colbath

Find a Grave. (2016, September 19). Annie E. Davis Cook. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170190957/annie-e-cook

Find a Grave. (2013, September 7). John I. Cooke. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/116670032/john-i-cooke

Find a Grave. (2015, August 24). Fanny Isabel Hayes Downing. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/151180169/fannie-isabel-downing

Find a Grave. (2014, September 14). Cora Belle Goodall Garland. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/135905561/cora-belle-garland

Find a Grave. (2016, September 14). Ira Wesley Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169917279/ira-wesley-hayes

Find a Grave. (2015, May 30). Nellie M. Parmenter Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147186219/nellie-m.-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, September 25). Elizabeth M. Wiggin Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/136413931/elizabeth-m.-horne

Find a Grave. (2019, November 20). Lola M. Hill Hyland. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/204868673/lola-m-hyland

Find a Grave. (2010, June 6). Elvah Hayes Kelley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/53324509/elvah-kelley

Find a Grave. (2016, February 16). Laura Ann Hayes Locke. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/158247440/laura-ann-locke

Find a Grave. (2020, March 21). Blanche W. [((Thurston) Walker)] Myers. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/208569843/blanche-w-myers

Find a Grave. (2015, July 9). Doria Ferland Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/148952357/doria-nute

Find a Grave. (2016, October 1). Ellen Foss Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170750147/ellen-nute

Find a Grave. (2012, February 15). Clara Nettie Giles Pierce. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/85027080/clara-nettie-pierce

Find a Grave. (2020, February 24). Caroline A. Stockbridge Thurston. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/207382001/carolyn-a-thurston

Find a Grave. (2015, June 5). Mattie Geneva Tripp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147491064/mattie-geneva-tripp

Wikipedia. (2021, April 4). American Relief Association. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Relief_Administration

Spaulding Fibre Company, 1925-57

By Muriel Bristol | June 6, 2021

Continued from J. Spaulding & Sons Co., 1894-24.


Huntley N. Spaulding appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1925, as president of International Leather Company, at 89 Beach street, Room 203B, with his house at both the Hotel Somerset and at Rochester, NH. (The Hotel Somerset was at Commonwealth Avenue and Charlesgate in Boston, MA). Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre boards, with addresses at 89 Beach Street, Room 203B [in Boston, MA], and 15 Elkins Street in South Boston.Hotel Somerset

Huntley N. Spaulding appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1926, as treasurer of Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., at 89 Beach Street, Room 203B, and president of International Leather Co., same address, with his house at Rochester, NH. Rolland H. Spaulding appeared as president of Spaulding Fibre Co., same address, with his house at Rochester, NH. Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre board, with addresses at 89 Beach Street, Room 203B [in Boston, MA], 15 Elkins Street in South Boston, and in New Hampshire. – See p 391. International Leather Company dealt in leatherboard at the same Beach Street address.

Spaulding Ad - BD1926Huntley N. Spaulding ran for and won the office of Governor of New Hampshire for the 1927-28 biennium.

Odd Items From Everywhere. Wakefield st., Rochester, N.H., might be called Governors’ Row, for on it live Rolland H. Spaulding, Governor in 1915 and 1916, Ex-Gov Samuel D. Felker, and Huntley N. Spaulding, just elected. (Boston Globe, November 27, 1926).

Huntley N. Spaulding and his younger brother, Rolland H. Spaulding were both characterized as being “Progressive” Republicans.

Archilles G. [“Archie”] Marcoux, a millwright at the Spaulding plant in Milton, died in the Rochester Hospital, May 29, 1927, aged fifty-six years, six months, and twenty-three days. He had sustained severe burns “from boiler live steam” over 98% of his body three hours before his death (and he died one hour after being admitted to the hospital).

MARCOUX DEAD OF BURNS RECEIVED IN MILL BOILER. ROCHESTER, N.H., May 3 – Archie Marcoux, 60, employed in the Spaulding mill at South Milton, died this afternoon at the Rochester Hospital from severe burns sustained today, while inspecting a boiler at the plant. The three boilers had just been inspected, and Mr. Marcoux opened the manhole and entered one of the boilers, unbeknown to other employes. Fireman George Chalmers started a fire in the boiler and soon heard Marcoux shouting, whom he released and sent to the hospital. Mr. Marcoux was a native of Canada and had worked at the plant for several years. A wife and several children survive him (Boston Globe, May 31, 1927).

Huntley N. (Harriet) Spaulding appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1929, as president of Spaulding Fibre Co., with his house at 78 Wakefield street. Rolland H. (Vera G.) Spaulding appeared as treasurer of Spaulding Fibre Co., and vice president of the Rochester Trust Co., with his house at 76 Wakefield street. Spaulding Fibre Co. (Inc.) appeared as manufacturers of fibre products, president Huntly N. Spaulding and vice president-treasurer Rolland H. Spaulding, with addresses at 100 N. Main street [in Rochester], and Spaulding avenue in North Rochester.

Spaulding Fibre Company appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as being based in North Rochester, NH.

Spaulding, Huntley N
Huntley Nowell Spaulding (1869-1955)

Huntley N. Spaulding, a fibre manufacturer, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet M. Spaulding, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), his sister-in-law, Nannie G. Mason, aged forty-five years (b. KS), and his lodger, Mabel A. Futes, aged forty-one years (b. New Brunswick (American citizen)). Roland H. Spaulding owned their house on Wakefield Street (corner of Union Street), which was valued at $40,000. They had a radio set.

Spaulding, Rolland H
Rolland Harty Spaulding (1873-1942)

Roland H. Spaulding, president of a leatherboard factory, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eleven years), Vera G. Spaulding, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), his children, Virginia P. Spaulding, aged nine years (b. MA), and Betty L. Spaulding, aged seven years (b. MA), and his servants, Mary Wakefield, a private family cook, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), and Rachael Houle, a private family maid, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Roland H. Spaulding owned their house at 76 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $200,000. They had a radio set.

Walter A. Potter, aged sixty-five years (b. RI), headed a Greenwich, CT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Marion S. Potter, aged forty years (b. NY), and his servants, Stewart Walker, a private family butler, aged thirty-one years (b. PA), and Ethel Walker, a private family cook, aged thirty-one years (b. PA). Walter A. Potter owned their house, which was valued at $70,000. They had a radio set.

Walter A. Potter died of heart disease in Greenwich, CT, January 4, 1932, aged sixty-six years.

Townsend Center. The body of Walter A. Potter, aged 66 years, who died of heart trouble at his home in Greenwich, Conn., was brought here today for burial in the Jonas Spaulding family lot at Hillside cemetery. Mr. Potter is survived by his wife, Mrs. Marion (Spaulding) Potter. Mrs. Spaulding [Mrs. Potter] is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Spaulding, late of Townsend Harbor (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), January 7, 1932).

The Spaulding family donated a new school building to the town of Townsend, MA, in June 1932.

1750 Visitors at Townsend School … The families of Huntley N. and Rolland H. Spaulding attended the banquet at 6 o’clock in the playroom the new school at which 425 townspeople and former residents were present. A brief speaking program was presented at the close of dinner by Mr. Flarity, toastmaster. The speakers included Senator Charles A. Stevens of Lowell, Rep. James E. Kendall of Dunstable and Rev. Dr. Leo A. Nies of New London, Conn., whose first child was born in Townsend where he began his service in the ministry. Among those at the banquet Mrs. Rolland H. Spaulding and daughters, Virginia P. and Betty L., and their guest, Miss Cynthia Bond; Mrs. Huntley N. Spaulding, Mrs. Marion S. Potter, Greenwich, Conn., sister of the Spaulding brothers; and Mrs. C. Wesley Going and children Reginald, Mildred and Dorothy of Amherst, N.H. Mrs. Dorothy Spaulding of East Sebago, Me, widow of Leon C. Spaulding, was unable to attend because of a death in the family. Huntley N. Spaulding was born Oct 30, 1868, and served as governor of New Hampshire in 1927 [1927-28] and Rolland H. Spaulding was born March 13, 1873, and was governor of New Hampshire in 1914-15 [1915-16]. They are the sons of the late Jonas and Emeline (Cummings) Spaulding, the father being the founder of a leather-board industry in this town (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), June 30, 1932).

TOWNSEND CENTER. Given Trees For Cemetery. Hillside cemetery on Highland street, has been beautified recently by a gift of 27 trees from Mrs. Marion Spaulding Potter, of New York city. Mrs. Potter is a native of Townsend, the daughter of the late Jonas and Emeline (Cummings) Spaulding and sister of Huntley and Roland Spaulding, former governors of New Hampshire, donors of the new Spaulding memorial school in Townsend. Twenty of the trees, which are maple and linden, have been set out bordering both sides of the fifth avenue in the cemetery, where the Spaulding family lot is located. The remaining seven trees have been get out on the sixth avenue. Two of the seven, which are willow trees, have been placed at the sixth avenue entrance of the cemetery. The trees were planted under the direction of a landscape gardener, sent by Mrs. Potter, with Fredrick J. Piper, local cemetery commissioner, and Turner Goodwin, assisting. Azalea and other shrubs have been placed on the Spaulding lot, groups of dwarf evergreen have been planted in the triangular plots at the four corners of the lot, and running vines at the base of the Spaulding monument (Fitchburg Sentinel  (Fitchburg, MA), October 29, 1932).

New York. Mrs. Marion S. Potter, of Greenwich has taken an apartment at Ten Park Avenue (Hartford Courant (Hartford, CT), January 7, 1934).

SPAULDING FIBRE COMPANY ENTERTAINS EMPLOYES. More than 250 employes of the counter department of the Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., operated by Ex Governors Rolland and Huntley Spaulding, were given a banquet last Saturday for operating the factory six months without a lost time accident. The Spaulding Company hired a theatre and all employes enjoyed the program until noon when the banquet was served in Masonic hall by women of the Christian church. Ex Governor Rolland H. Spaulding spoke and the employes furnished a program. Later at the Wolfeboro Casino there was a program of sports (Farmington News, October 12, 1934).

MILTON. The Salem Shoe Co. of Salem, Mass., have definitely decided to locate in Milton, the building formerly occupied by the Kennebunk Mfg. Co., is being made ready for occupancy. Walls are being white-washed, floors repaired and new benches erected. The new concern expects to start cutting and stitching operations in about two weeks and attain full production in about a month. A few experienced men will be brought to Milton, but the greatest number of workers will be recruited locally. Officers of the company state that they will train a large number of local inexperienced men to meet their own requirements. The Spaulding Fibre Co., which has occupied the building, has aided the new concern materially by contributing several costly improvements recently made, among which Is a new dust laying system Repairs will be ma do on Charles street which will make access to the factory easier, while Steve Dixon has given the field near the factory as a parking space for cars (Farmington News, January 18, 1935).

New England in general, including the Salmon Falls River running through Milton and Rochester, experienced severe flooding from snow and ice melt and a sequence of four severe rain storms in March 1936. It was said to have been the worst floods since those of 1896. The flood waters crested here March 19, 1936.

N.H. DROWNING VICTIM’S BODY IS RECOVERED. MILTON, N.H., March 16 (IP). A searching party recovered today the body of [Aldrige] Edward Custeau, 60, who drowned in the Salmon Falls river Friday while removing flashboards from a dam. The body was caught on a plank of an old dam a quarter mile below the spot Custeau fell from a rowboat. He leaves a widow and three children (Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, VT), [Tuesday,] March 17, 1936).

The unfortunate millhand, Aldridge E. Custeau, was father of Emma P. (Custeau) Ramsey (for whom the “Emma Ramsey Center” is named). At the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census, Custeau had lived in Lebanon, ME, right next door to Spaulding’s hydraulic engineer Ira W. Jones.

U.S. Geological Survey reports of the 1936 floods placed the two Milton Leatherboard Company dams at between 34.9 and 34.8 miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua River, and the two Twin State Gas & Electric Company Milton dams at between 34.7 and 34.6 miles above. The J. Spaulding & Sons Co.’s two Milton “Upper” dams were between 34.5 and 34.4 miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua River, and their Milton “Lower” mill dam was at 34.1 miles above the river mouth. Their five North Rochester mill dams were 32.6, 32.5, and 32.0 miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua River (U.S. Geological Survey, 1937).

Spauldings Offer Rochester $360,000 Toward School. TOWNSEND, Nov. 11 – The Spaulding brothers, donors of the Spaulding Memorial high school in this town, have offered Rochester, N.H., $360,000 for the construction of a new high school in that city. While Huntley N. Spaulding was governor of New Hampshire he built at his own expense a $150,000 gymnasium for the Keene (N.H.) normal school. Roland H. Spaulding, a brother and also a former governor, has made several gifts for educational causes. The Rochester city council voted yesterday to accept the Spaulding offer, in which Mrs. Marion (Spaulding) Potter of Greenwich, Conn., joins with her brothers and her sister-in-law, Mrs. Dorothy H. Spaulding, widow of Leon Spaulding (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), November 11, 1936).

Napoleon E. “Paul” Marcoux, a [Spaulding] fibre mill operative, died of a fractured skull in an auto accident on the road from Milton to Rochester, NH, April 2, 1937, aged thirty-eight years, eleven months, and eighteen days.

FATHER OF NINE DIES IN AUTO CRASH. MILTON, N.H., April 2 (AP). Paul Marcoux, 39, mill worker and father of nine children, was instantly killed late today when his auto and a heavy truck collided during a snow storm (Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, VT), April 3, 1937).

Rolland H. Spaulding had his right kidney removed at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA, in 1937.

R.H. SPAULDING BACK AT WORK. Rochester, Sept. 24 – Ex-Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, who has been confined to the Phillips House of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and later to his home on Wakefield street with a severe illness, is able to be out again and has returned to his desk in the office of the Spaulding Fibre Company (Portsmouth Herald, September 24, 1937).

MILTON NEIGHBORS AID WIDOW. Milton, Nov. 13. – This little community has once again demonstrated the remarkable spirit of charity and cooperation for which it has been noted in the past, and, as a result, Mrs. Hazel [(Downs)] Marcoux, mother of nine children, who was widowed last April when her husband was killed in an automobile accident, is happy. The woman’s modest home, badly in need of repairs, has been completely renovated as a community project. With material furnished by the Spaulding Fibre company, by which her husband was employed for 15 years, 44 Milton men recently pooled their efforts to shingle the roof and walls, attach 11 storm windows with frames and install a new door. This done, they then cut nine cords of wood – enough for the entire winter – and piled it neatly in the shed (Portsmouth Herald, November 13, 1937).

Here and There. Because they have worked six months without a “lost time” accident, employes of the South Rochester and North Rochester plants of the Spaulding Fibre Co., will be given a safety outing Saturday at Wolfeboro. The program include baseball, swimming, bowling, billiards, boat riding, other athletic events and a turkey dinner (Portsmouth Herald, August 4, 1939).

New Rochester School Dedicated. Rochester, Sept. 11.-The city of Rochester’s new $1,000,000 Spaulding High School was dedicated Saturday afternoon in the presence of educators and representatives of the state and city Governments. Ex-Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding represented the Spaulding families, whose donations of nearly a half-million dollars made the building possible. The invocation was by the Rev. Dr. Marion E. Hall. Commissioner James M. Pringle brought greetings from the State Department of Education. The building was accepted for the city by Mayor John F. Conrad. Supt. of Schools Arthur S. Rollins expressed appreciation of the School Committee. The principal speaker was Dr. Nicholas L. Engelhardt of Teachers’ College, Columbia University. Rev. Joseph H. Cormier, pastor of Holy Rosary Church, gave the benediction. Flags for the auditorium and outside the building were presented by the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion. Besides ex-Gov. and Mrs. Huntley L. Spaulding other donors of the family were: Ex-Gov. and Mrs. Rolland L. [H.] Spaulding, Mrs. Marion Spaulding Potter, a sister, Mrs. Leon G. [C.] Spaulding, widow of the brother to whom the building dedicated (Portsmouth Herald, September 12, 1939).

Spaulding Fibre Company gave its employees a Christmas bonus in December 1939.

Police Hunt Clues After Series Of Burglaries. Dover, May 27 – Police today were continuing to press their hunt for clues that might lead to the capture of thieves responsible for a series of breaks and thefts here and in Milton. At Milton, where an $187 payroll was stolen sometime Thursday night from the Spaulding Fibre Co.’s office, another break was discovered Saturday at the garage of Charles R. Whitehouse, trucker. Meanwhile Atty. Clyde Keefe of Dover, Democratic candidate for governor of New Hampshire, and operators of My Lady beauty salon discovered their offices had been entered and sums of money were taken. Mr. Whitehouse estimated about $150 worth of tools, dies, gasoline, oil and a truck battery were stolen sometime early Saturday morning. Breaking the lock on the door, thieves worked quickly and in their haste they had to hacksaw a cable to remove the battery from the truck. At Dover, Mrs. Retta C. Bowles estimated the sum of $17 was from her office after the door to the salon had been forced. The money had been hidden in a cupboard where Mrs. Bowles, believed it was safe (Portsmouth Herald, May 27, 1940).

Huntley Spaulding, a fibre manufacturer, aged seventy years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet Spaulding, aged sixty-three years (b. MA), and his servants, Iva Wood, a a private family cook, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and Wendall Wood, a a private family chauffeur, aged forty-five years (b. MA). Huntley Spaulding owned their house at 78 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $35,000. He had resided in the same house in 1935.

Spaulding - 76 and 78 Wakefield Street
Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding’s Wakefield Street house (left) and Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding’s neighboring house (right) are both now owned by The Governor’s Inn in Rochester, NH

Rolland Spaulding, a fibre manufacturer, aged sixty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Vera G. Spaulding, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), his children, Virginia Spaulding, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and Betty Spaulding, aged seventeen years (b. MA), and his servants, Alice Beckingham, a private family maid, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Eleanor Higgins, a private family cook, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH). Rolland Spaulding owned their house at 76 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $45,000. He had resided in the same house in 1935.

Marion S. Potter, a widow, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Greenwich, CT, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her servant, Lillie Mae Allison, a housemaid, aged thirty-eight years. Marion S. Potter owned their house at Alden Park (no valuation recorded); she had resided in the same house in 1935.

Rolland H. (Vera G.) Spaulding appeared in the Rochester directory of 1941, as president of the Spaulding Fibre Co., president of the Rochester Trust Co., and vice-president of the First National Bank of Rochester, with his house at 76 Wakefield street. Bette Spaulding appeared as a student, with her residence at 76 Wakefield street. Huntley N. (Harriet) Spaulding appeared as treasurer of the Spaulding Fibre Co., with his house at 78 Wakefield street. The Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., appeared with R.H. Spaulding as president, Huntley N. Spaulding as treasurer, and Cecil M. Pike as secretary and assistant treasurer (and a co-proprietor of [Spaulding-owned] Three Line Counter Co.), with offices at 100 N. Main street, in Rochester, and Spaulding avenue, in North Rochester.

Virginia P. Spaulding married at 76 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, June 10, 1941, William H. Champlin, Jr., she of 76 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, and he of Rochester Hill Road, Rochester, NH. She was a student, aged twenty years, and he was a flying school manager, aged twenty-four years. Rev. George E. Gilcrest of Quincy, MA, performed the ceremony. Champlin was born in Boston, MA, September 7, 1916, son of William H. and Helen M. (Hussey) Champlin.

Champlin-Spaulding. Virginia Pauline Spaulding, oldest daughter of former Governor and Mrs. Rolland H. Spaulding and prominent member of Manchester’s younger set, was married to William Hilton Champlin, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Champlin, Sr., of Rochester Hill road, Manchester [Rochester], on Tuesday afternoon at 4 o’clock. In the garden at the home of bride, the ceremony was performed by the Rev. George W. Gilchrist, pastor of the Bethany Congregational church, Quincy, Mass. Wearing an heirloom rosepoint lace gown, combined with net, and a six-yard train of net, ivory illusion and a Juliet cap with clusters of orange blossoms, the bride was escorted to the altar by her father. She carried a spray of white and orange blossoms. Betty Spaulding, sister of the bride, served as maid of honor, the Misses Natalie Foss, Madelyn Mitchell, Lucille Marchand,, Mrs. Robert Feineman and Mrs. Richard Cooper, all of Rochester, and Mrs. Francis Maquire of Stonington, Me., serving as bridesmaids. John B. Nichols of Rochester best man and the ushers were Wallace H. Hussey, Charles Clark, James Nixon, Richard Cooper and Harold Dawson. Music was furnished by Mrs. Dorothy Dean Monroe, organist of the First church (Congregational). Following the ceremony, a reception for the 300 guests was held in the garden (Portsmouth Herald, June 11, 1941).

Rolland H. Spaulding of 76 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, a fibre manufacturer, died of acute uremia in Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NH, March 14, 1942, at 3:13 AM, aged sixty-eight years, eleven months, and twenty-seven days.

Ex-Gov. R.H. Spaulding Succumbs in Rochester. Former Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, public benefactor and president of the Spaulding Fibre company, died early this morning from heart trouble, after several days’ illness in the $300,000 Frisbee Memorial hospital which his family gave to the city. Had he lived until tomorrow he would have been 69 years old. He was born in Townsend, Mass., son of Jonas and Emeline (Cummings) Spaulding. He attended the Townsend Grammar schools and was graduated from Phillips Exeter academy in 1893. Then he started working in his father’s fibre mill in Rochester so that he might learn the business of the international concern which he eventually headed. He came to Rochester in the late 1890’s and had made his home here ever since. At the time of death he was living at 76 Wakefield street. Mr. Spaulding was president and director of the First National Bank of Rochester, director of the Rochester Chamber of Commerce, a past officer of the Rochester Kiwanis and director of the United Life and Accident association. In 1912 he served as a delegate to the Republican national convention. In 1916 to 1917 he was governor of New Hampshire. He was also vice chairman of the executive committee of the New Hampshire Committee of Safety and chairman of the New Hampshire Defense League in the same period. Several years ago he was appointed by the governors of the New England states to act as general chairman of the New England Railway commission. He was a member of the Congregational church. He was donor of the Spaulding Memorial swimming pool at Dartmouth College. He and his brother, former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding, built a high school in their home of Townsend, Mass. in memory of their parents and had given more than one-half a million dollars towards the building of the Rochester High school. In 1915 Dartmouth college awarded him with an MA degree and in 1916, the University of New Hampshire honored him with an LLD. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Vera Spaulding, [and] two daughters, Mrs. William H. Champlin of Rochester and Miss Betty Spaulding, student at Harcum Junior college, Bryn Mawr (Portsmouth Herald, March 14, 1942).

Death Notices. SPAULDING – Rolland Harty Spaulding died March 14 in Rochester, NH. Born March 15, 1873, at Townsend, Mass., son of Jonas and Emeline (Cumming) Spaulding. Services Tuesday, March 17, at 2 p.m. at the First Church, Congregational, Rochester, N.H. Interment in Townsend (Boston Globe, March 17, 1942).

LOCAL. Robert Bickford, who has just completed his duties with the Farmington Motor Car Co., has accepted employment as chauffeur for Mrs. Rolland H. Spaulding in Rochester and will commence his duties next Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Bickford will live in Rochester (Farmington News, April 3, 1942).

The late Rolland H. Spaulding’s younger daughter, Bette L. Spaulding, became engaged to Wilson E. Haas in January 1943.

New Hampshire Heiress to Live in California. New York, Jan. 18 – Just as soon as the wedding bells sound off for Bette Louise Spaulding and Wilson Edwin Haas, he will take his heiress-bride out to live in California. Although this sounds simple enough it will be a complicated enough move, for Bette hails from the hills of New Hampshire. As the daughter of the late Governor Rolland Spaulding of New Hampshire, Bette inherited a nice big nest-egg and has been one of the country’s most sought-after post-debs. She attended the House in the Pines, Beaver School and was graduated from Harcum Junior College last June. Bette was the belle of her schools and extremely popular with the brothers of her classmates. After the death of her grandfather, Jonas Spaulding, Bette’s father became president of Spaulding Fibre Company of Rochester, N.H., and Tonawanda. Later, he was made director of Spaulding, Ltd., of London, director of the United Life and Accident Insurance Company, New England Public Service Corporation, St. Maurice Paper Company of Canada, and the Public Service Corporation of New Hampshire. The future bride’s uncle, Hartley [Huntley] N. Spaulding, was one-time governor of New Hampshire. Bette’s only sister is married to William H. Champlin, Jr. Wilson hails from Glendale, Cal. After being graduated from the University of California, he enrolled in the Harvard Business School (Buffalo Courier (Buffalo, NY), January 19, 1943).

Bette Louise Spaulding married at Camp Robinson, in Pulaski County, AK, June 13, 1943, Wilson E. Haas, she of Rochester, NH, and he of Glendale, CA. She was aged twenty years, and he was a soldier in Co. B, 62nd Battalion, 13th Regiment, aged twenty-seven years. He was born in Silverton, CO, May 19, 1916, son of Edwin C. and Minnie A. (Wilson) Haas.

Spaulding Ad - FN430820
Spaulding Fibre Advertisement (August 1943)

Daughter of Late N.H. Governor, Bride. ROCHESTER, N.H., June 17 -Announcement was made today of the marriage of Bette L. Spaulding, daughter of Mrs. Vera G. Spaulding and the late Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, of Rochester, and private Wilson E. Haas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin C. Haas of Glendale, Calif. The ceremony was performed last Sunday morning in the chapel at Camp Robinson, Ark., by Army Chaplain John D. Clyde. Mary Lyons of Brighton, Mass., was maid of honor and Capt. Lassie McMann of Magnolia, Ark., was best man. Private and Mrs. Haas are on a honey moon trip to Hot Springs, Ark., and will reside at 2620 East Washington av., Little Rock, Ark. Private Haas was graduated from the University of California and the Harvard School of Business Administration. Before entering the service he was employed in Washington (Boston Globe, June 18, 1943).

Spaulding Fibre Company’s North Rochester mill burned in the early hours of Wednesday, October 4, 1944. One Spaulding employee, Earle O. Wheeler, died “of some form of heart disease and overexertion” during the fire (about 1 AM), aged fifty-four years, eleven months, and fourteen days.

$750,000 Fire Razes Mill In Rochester. A fire, believed to have started in a dryer room, destroyed the Spaulding Fibre company mill yesterday, causing the death of one man and damage estimated at $750,000. Earle O. Wheeler of Rochester, was found dead near a steam pump in the boiler room. Mr. Wheeler, night fireman of the plant, is believed to have died of heart attack while operating the plant fire control system after discovering the fire at about 1 am. Mr. Wheeler and six other night employes of the mill called the Rochester and Milton fire departments and manned the plant apparatus, but the wooden frame structure gave way before the flames, and the main building with thousands of dollars worth of machinery and stock, was destroyed. The company records and office equipment were saved and the power plant received only slight damage to machinery. Approximately 180 persons are out of work due to the loss of the mill, which manufactured shoe counters and other fiber equipment for military use. Supt. Elmer Waitt of Milton was one of the few executives present, as most of the others, including the owner, former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding, production manager Cecil M. Pike and treasurer S. Ellsworth Clow, were at their Tonawanda, N.Y., plant (Portsmouth Herald, October 5, 1944).

Plan to Rebuild Razed Fiber Mill In Rochester. The Spaulding Fiber Company plant at North Rochester, destroyed Wednesday morning in a $750,000 fire will be rebuilt as soon as priorities for materials needed to construct a modern fireproof building can be secured, Maj. Ernest C. Blackwell, general manager of the company, said last night. The decision was announced after a telephone conversation with former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding, who is at the Tonawanda, N.Y., plant with other executives of the concern. Since the Spaulding plant was engaged in war work, it is expected that the necessary construction materials for the rebuilding will be secured with a minimum of difficulty. Some of the employes left jobless by Wednesday’s fire have been given work at the company’s South Milton plant, and others are expected to be used by a plant in Dover (Portsmouth Herald, October 6, 1944).

Bonus Checks. Twenty-five employes of the Spaulding Fibre Board plant at Townsend Harbor received Christmas bonus checks of S50 each Monday and other employes received lesser amounts in accordance with their length of service with the company. The 25 who received the $50 checks have been with company for terms of one year longer. Ernest J. Hamel is the superintendent (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), December 21, 1944).

Strikers Will Picket Homes of Executives. TONAWANDA, N.Y., July 18 (AP) – About 300 striking employes of the Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., have voted unanimously to picket homes of company executives, including that of Huntley N. Spaulding, former Governor of New Hampshire at North Rochester, N.H. A statement released yesterday by Herman Stadler, president of Local 306. United Radio, Electrical and Machine Workers, Congress of Industrial Organizations,’ and Sheridan Creekmore, chairman of the local’s strike committee, said the action was taken last night after weeks of unsuccessful negotiation with the company (Patterson News, Patterson, NJ), July 18, 1946).

An Ill Wind. ROCHESTER, April 6 (API) – The Spaulding Fibre company obtained permission to burn tall grass to prevent possible accidental destruction of one of its buildings by sparks from passing trains. The wind shifted during the operation and the storage bay the company was protecting caught fire. It burned to the ground (Portsmouth Herald, April 6, 1949).

Lumber Company To Sell Twelve Houses. Rochester, N.H., Aug. 12. Twelve six-room homes, owned the Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., on the Lebanon, Me., side of North Rochester, are for sale. Two have been purchased. Elmer F. Waitt, Milton, executive of the firm, said the houses are being sold for $2,200. They have running water and electricity but no baths (Portland Press Herald, August 13, 1949).

Huntley N. (Harriet) Spaulding appeared in the Rochester directory of 1950, as treasurer of Spaulding Fibre Co., with his house at 78 Wakefield street. Vera G. Spaulding appeared as the widow of Rolland H. Spaulding, with her house at 76 Wakefield street. Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre products, with their plant at Spaulding avenue in North Rochester. Its chairman was Huntley N. Spaulding; president C.C. Steck, of Tonawanda, NY; vice-president and secretary, Cecil M. Pike; and treasurer Stephen E. Clow.

Rochester Fire Threatens Woods. State police were asked to help combat a fire in a stock shed at the Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., plant in North Rochester this afternoon. Rochester fire officials asked the state police to alert town fire departments in the area because they feared a high wind might create forest fire. The main mill, according to Rochester sources, was not in the immediate path of the flames (Portsmouth Herald, May 2, 1951).

Harriet M. (Mason) Spaulding of 78 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, died of a coronary occlusion in North Hampton, NH, July 30, 1954, aged seventy-seven years.

Deaths and Funerals. Mrs. Huntley Spaulding. NORTH HAMPTON – Funeral services are being planned for Mrs. Harriet M. Spaulding, wife of former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding of Rochester, who died Saturday at her summer home on Boar’s Head. A native of Boston, Mass., Mrs. Spaulding was the daughter of the late James and Lillian Mason, and was about 80. Death attributed to a heart attack (Portsmouth Herald, August 2, 1954).

Huntley N. Spaulding of 78 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, , a fibre products manufacturer, died of prostate carcinoma in Rochester, NH, November 14, 1955, at 10 AM, aged eighty-six years. (His sister, Mrs. Marion S. Potter, supplied information for the death certificate).

Huntley Spaulding, Ex-N.H. Governor, Native of Townsend. ROCHESTER, N.H., Nov. 14 (UP). Former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding died at his home here today. He was 86. Spaulding, the grand old patriarch of the G.O.P. in New Hampshire, served as Governor in 1927 and 1928. A brother, Rolland H., was Governor from 1915 to 1917. Huntley Spaulding was a wealthy leather manufacturer and philanthropist. In 1941 he gave the city of Rochester a $1,000,000 high school which bore his name. A native of Townsend, Mass., he was a leader in civic and state affairs here for more than half a century. He was president of the International Leather Company and the Atlas Leather Company. He was treasurer of the Spaulding Fiber Company, which has plants at Rochester, Dover and Tonawanda, N.Y. Spaulding was past chairman of the New Hampshire Board of Education and State Food Administrator and trustee of Lawrence Academy in Groton, Mass. He leaves a sister, Mrs. Marion Potter of Rochester (Boston Globe, November 14, 1955).

Vera G. Spaulding appeared in the Rochester directory of 1956, as the widow of Rolland H. Spaulding, with her house at 76 Wakefield street. Mrs. Marion Potter appeared as having her house at 78 Wakefield Street (i.e., the former Huntley N. Spaulding residence). Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre products, with their plant at Spaulding avenue in North Rochester. Its chairman and president was Charles C. Steck, of Tonawanda, NY; vice-president and secretary, Cecil M. Pike; vice-president and  treasurer Stephen E. Clow; and vice-president Ellis C. Knoblock.

At this time the Spaulding Fibre Company became part of a charitable trust Huntley and his only sister Marion S. Potter had set up to disperse their remaining wealth within 15 years of the last to die (Snyder, 2008).

Marion S. (Spaulding) Potter, last of the Spaulding siblings, died in Greenwich, CT, September 27, 1957, aged seventy-nine years.

Boston Woman Leaves $1 Million to U.S. Charities. Mrs. Marion S. Potter, Beacon Hill widow, left more than $1,000,000 to charity, according to a will filed in Suffolk Probate Court yesterday. Mrs. Potter, sister of two New Hampshire Governors (the Spauldings), died last Sept. 27 at the age of 79. The will, disposing of an estate estimated at several million dollars, included outright bequests of $745,000 to charities, and an additional $90,000 to relatives and the remainder will be held in to benefit United States organizations established exclusively for charitable, scientific, literary and educational purposes, according to the will. Largest single bequest was $250,000 to the Frisbie Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.H. (Boston Globe, October 4, 1957).

Spaulding Fibre Company outlived the Spauldings and continued under the management of their charitable trust.


References:

Anderson, Kendall (2021). Spaulding Fibre [Photographs]. Retrieved from www.invisiblethreads.com/galleries/spaulding-fibre/

Cusano, Tom. (2011, October 8). Spaulding Ave. Hydro Project, 2011. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTvpIDWcTtY

Find a Grave. (2017, January 2). Aldridge Custeau. Retrieved from https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/174776130/aldridge-custeau

Find a Grave. (2018, August 23). Marion Lucy Spaulding Potter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192498207/marion-lucy-potter

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Huntley Nowell Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42230637/huntley-nowell-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Rolland Harty Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42231184/rolland-harty-spaulding

Governor’s Inn. (2021). The Governor’s Inn. Retrieved from www.governorsinn.com//History.cfm

Harvard University. (2021). Remick v. J. Spaulding & Sons Co., 82 N.H. 182 (1926). Retrieved from cite.case.law/nh/82/182/

Smithsonian Institution. (2006). J. Spaulding & Sons Co. Retrieved from americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_1344802

Snyder, James M. (2016, April 23). Spaulding’s Fibre Counters (1915). Retrieved from www.paperboardpro.com/files/Spaulding_Fibre_Counters_Booklet.pdf

Snyder, James M. (2016, April 23). Spaulding Products for Industry (1953). Retrieved from www.paperboardpro.com/files/SpauldingProductsforIndustrycirca1953.pdf

U.S. Geological Survey. (1937). The Floods of March 1936: Part 1. New England Rivers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=YDiShfgiuP8C&pg=PA390

Wikipedia. (2020, June 13). Huntley N. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntley_N._Spaulding

Wikipedia. (2021, April 23). North Rochester, New Hampshire. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Rochester,_New_Hampshire

Wikipedia. (2021, March 3). Rolland H. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolland_H._Spaulding

Wikipedia. (2020, December 2). Spaulding High School (New Hampshire). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaulding_High_School_(New_Hampshire)

The Impossible Nightmare

By Ian Aikens | June 4, 2021

Re-education camps for white executives of Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California? An infographic at the African-American History Museum in Washington D.C. that lists “self-reliance, objective and linear thinking, hard work, the nuclear family, planning for the future, written tradition, and politeness” as aspects of “White Culture”? A white high school student at a Las Vegas charter school forced to take a mandatory civics class for graduation that required students to reveal their race, gender, sexual orientation, and disabilities and then determine if privilege or oppression is attached to any of these identities?

What madness is going on here? It’s called Critical Race Theory (CRT), and it’s been around for decades festering in the academic world, but it is now in full bloom in the corporate world and educational system. Under the guise of equity and diversity, CRT’s alleged goal is to make this a more just society. In reality, it will only make things worse for minority members of society.

CRT’s basic premise is that American society is inherently and hopelessly racist and can only be fixed with a total restructuring. The most basic tenet of CRT is the complete absence of individualism. All of us are not individuals but rather part of socially constructed groups. Furthermore, there are two basic groups—oppressors (whites) and the oppressed (non-whites). To say that CRT proponents are obsessed with race is the understatement of our time.

So, what has all this to do with the Live Free or Die state? HB544, a bill introduced this year and now included in the budget that was sent to the governor, has been one of the most explosive and bitterly contested bills in the state house this session. The bill is entitled “Propagation of Divisive Concepts Prohibited,” and the basic goal of the bill is to outlaw advocating CRT with tax dollars. This would mainly apply to schools and government contractors.

One of the objections to HB544 has been that it is akin to censorship since it ties the hands of teachers from teaching about CRT and the country’s racial problems. That’s nonsense. According to Chapter 10-C:3 Section II,

Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to prohibit discussing, as part of a larger course of academic instruction, the divisive concepts listed in RSA 10-C:1, II in an objective manner and without endorsement.

Discussing OK—advocating not OK. It should be obvious that teachers should not be bringing their politics into the classroom anyway.

“Divisive concepts” are defined in the bill as:

  1. One race or sex is inherently superior to another race or sex.
  2. The state of New Hampshire or the United States is fundamentally racist or sexist.
  3. An individual, by virtue of his or her race or sex, is fundamentally racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously.
  4. An individual should be discriminated against or receive adverse treatment solely or partly because of his or her race or sex.
  5. Members of one race or sex cannot and should not attempt to treat others without respect to race or sex.
  6. An individual’s moral character is necessarily determined by his or her race or sex.
  7. Meritocracy or traits such as a hard work ethic are racist or sexist, or were created by a particular race to oppress another race.

While some people (who may have forgotten that a black man was elected President of the United States not once but twice) might feel the second statement above is true and should not be considered a “divisive concept,” surely all the other statements should be abhorrent to all well-meaning people of different backgrounds and affiliations. You wouldn’t think there would be a major brouhaha about outlawing the advocacy of such ideas, let alone with tax dollars.

You better think again. The pro-CRT troops are very vocal, and they showed up (virtually) at the committee hearings earlier this year in masse. The very first thing that became obvious at the hearings is that the CRT supporters all tend to sound alike after a while, which isn’t surprising since groupthink is an essential characteristic of CRT. Beware when you hear the term “lived experience”! They all use it since that’s part of the script of the oppressed. Storytelling or “counter-storytelling,” rather than science and factual information, is the preferred method for advancing knowledge, according to the gospel of CRT.

The complete lack of civility was very much on display by those opposing the bill. Rather than bringing up legitimate points of discussion supporting their objections to the bill—if they had any—the CRT mob immediately descended into personal attacks against anyone who supported the bill. Allegations of “white supremacist” and “racist” were uttered often. It is rumored that the committee chair (normally a mellow person) at one of the public hearings “lost her cool” due to the rudeness from those who profess “social justice” but couldn’t honor The Golden Rule personally themselves.

This complete lack of tolerance toward any other point of view other than their own is a familiar characteristic of CRT. According to CRT, white people don’t even have a say in the matter of racism in American society since as oppressors it is not their “lived experience.” And even if white people don’t oppress minorities consciously, they do it unconsciously through implicit bias. To top this twisted thinking off, when white people finally become anti-racist, even then they don’t get high marks because of “interest convergence.” This means that they only allowed the advancement of the oppressed to make themselves feel good, protect themselves from criticism, and avoid confronting their own inherent racism. Truly a “Dammed if you do, damned if you don’t” situation—and by design too.

The CRT crowd takes this nonsense a step further. Even a black person isn’t safe from the wrath of the CRT believers if he doesn’t subscribe to the CRT religion. When musician Kanye West donned a MAGA hat, critical race theorist Nehisi Coates suggested that West is “not really black.” The same could be said of senior associate justice of the Supreme Court Clarence Thomas due to his conservative views. On the other hand, President Biden (who rescinded President Trump’s executive order banning CRT from federal training programs) could be considered black. The difference here is “racially black” versus “politically black.” CRT theorists are really only interested in the “politically black.” If you don’t toe the CRT line, don’t bother to apply because you’re “not really black.”

CRT sees racism in every single transaction in all aspects of life. That’s the “critical” part of the movement that all devoted CRT activists are expected to perform 24/7. They see The White Supremacist Boogeyman everywhere. Even ordinary day-to-day activities become suspect.

Did you read about the cafeteria worker and campus staff at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts who were accused of being racist when they questioned a black student for eating her lunch in a building that was closed for the summer? A simple misunderstanding became a cause célèbre for the CRT crowd that went viral. A public apology by the college, threats made, lives changed forever—all despite an independent investigation that found no evidence of racial discrimination. Is it any surprise that Ibram X. Kendi, another esteemed high priest of the movement, who directs the Center for Antiracist Research at Boston University, has proposed the creation of a federal Department of Antiracism?

Another perverse trait of CRT is its rejection of science as the primary method of the gaining and transmission of knowledge. Because modern science was predominately produced by white males in Western civilization, that immediately makes it suspect to CRT scholars. Per Robin DiAngelo (who by the way was paid $12,000 plus travel expenses for a 2-hour racial justice speech at the University of Kentucky) and Ozlem Sensoy, “…a key element of social injustice involves the claim (my emphasis) that particular knowledge is objective, neutral, and universal. An approach based on critical theory calls into question the idea that objectivity is desirable or even possible.”

If this isn’t an anti-science piece of muddled thinking, I don’t know what is. Obviously, universality and objectivity are the basics of all science, with the goal of discovering truth, wherever it might be. While “following the science” is easier said than done, at least most people would agree that it serves the human race well. But CRT thinkers discourage even following the science because, by their thinking, white people’s interests are primarily served by science in order to oppress black people.

In place of science and objectivity, CRT encourages storytelling for black people as a better way to gain knowledge. Science for white people and storytelling for black people. It’s not hard to see why CRT advocates are primarily opposed to testing, grades, and mathematics in the schools. Can you imagine a doctor performing surgery on you who gained his operating skills from “storytelling” rather than what he learned in his biology classes? Or, back to the Sandia scientists who work on nuclear weapons, would you prefer they learned their trade through “counter-stories” or technical science books and lab experiments? By the CRT way of thinking, if you feel that 2 + 2 = 5, then indeed why can’t that be your reality?

In the end, CRT is a hopeless effort that can never be satisfied. Kate Slate, another revered local CRT expert at the University of New Hampshire, proclaimed this zinger of wisdom: “I am white. White people can never be anything but oppressors…I will work on my anti-racism my whole life but will continually fail. I will never get to a space where I am good enough.” As for encouraging black people to turn away from science, hard work, long-term goals, and their own individuality, and choose victimhood, how is this ever going to lift them out of poverty?

The hard, cold truth is CRT “scholars” have designed a black hole of destructive, circular thinking that thrives on constant strife that can never eliminate racism but only feed into it. If ivory-tower intellectuals want to immerse themselves in this warped view of life, they should be free to do so—but not on the taxpayers’ dime.


References:

Administrator, A Disillusioned. (2021, April 2). I Work in the Public School System. Critical Race Theory Is Everywhere. Retrieved from I Work in the Public School System. Critical Race Theory Is Everywhere. – American Thinker

Bernstein, Brittany. (2021, May 8). Disney Employee Training Claims U.S. Was Founded on ‘Systemic Racism,’ Includes ‘White Privilege Checklist’. Retrieved from Disney Employee Training Claims U.S. Was Founded on ‘Systemic Racism,’ Includes ‘White Privilege Checklist’ (yahoo.com)

Chait, Jonathan. (2020, July 16). Is the Anti-Racism Training Industry Just Peddling White Supremacy? Retrieved from Is Anti-Racism Training Just Peddling White Supremacy? (nymag.com)

Dima, Jake and Hasson, Peter. (2019, July 28). $12K A Day: How White Liberals Profit From Pushing ‘White Privilege’. Retrieved from $12K A Day: How White Liberals Profit From Pushing ‘White Privilege’ | The Daily Caller

Eden, Max. (2020, September 18). Critical Race Theory in American Classrooms. Retrieved from Critical Race Theory in American Classrooms | City Journal (city-journal.org)

Griffith, Keith and Alexander, Harriet. (2021, April 16). Smith College cafeteria worker who was smeared with false racism claim says her life has ‘never been the same’ as she files internal complaint. Retrieved from Smith College cafeteria worker who was smeared with false racism claim speaks out | Daily Mail Online

Jacobson, William A. (2021, May 11). As “Critical Race Theory” Becomes Toxic Term, New Codenames and Keywords Emerge. Retrieved from As “Critical Race Theory” Becomes Toxic Term, New Codenames and Keywords Emerge (legalinsurrection.com)

Karimi, Faith. (2021, May 10). What critical race theory is—and isn’t. Retrieved from What critical race theory is — and isn’t – CNN

Lindsay, James. (2020, June 12). Eight Big Reasons Critical Race Theory Is Terrible for Dealing with Racism. Retrieved from Eight Big Reasons Critical Race Theory Is Terrible for Dealing with Racism – New Discourses

Rufo, Christopher F. (2020, August 12). Nuclear Consequences. Retrieved from Nuclear Consequences (christopherrufo.com)

Rufo, Christopher F. (2021, February 11). In a Philadelphia elementary school, teachers are putting a premium on radicalism, not reading. Retrieved from Philadelphia 5th Graders Forced to Celebrate “Black Communism” (city-journal.org)

Safi, Marlo. (2020, December 4). ‘You Are Upholding Racist Ideas’: Teachers Reportedly Required To Attend ‘White Privilege’ Training At Public School. Retrieved from ‘You Are Upholding Racist Ideas’: Teachers Reportedly Required To Attend ‘White Privilege’ Training At Public School | The Daily Caller

Wikipedia. Critical race theory. Retrieved from Critical race theory – Wikipedia