Milton’s Collector Charles H. Looney (1849-1902)

By Muriel Bristol | June 20, 2021

Charles H. Looney was born in Milton, July 11, 1849, son of Francis E. and Rhoda A. (Leighton) Looney. (His father, an English immigrant, was naturalized in Dover, NH, May 25, 1842).

The father was a native of Manchester, England, where he learned the cotton manufacturing business. In 1820 came to this country, and for some time acted as agent of the satine mills in Dover, N.H. He finally settled in Milton, where he was engaged in manufacturing cotton warp for a number of years (Biographical Review, 1897).

Francis Looney, a manufacturer, aged forty-eight years (b. England), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Rhoda A. Looney, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Edwin F. Looney, aged two years (b. NH), Charles H. Looney, aged one year (b. NH), Margaret F. Looney, aged twenty-three years (b. RI), and Ann F. Looney, aged sixty years (b. England). Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Cyrus K. Leighton, a farmer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Isaac Worster, a hoe & tool manufacturer, aged forty-eight years (b. NH). (Their neighbor, Isaac Worster, was an ardent abolitionist).

Charles H. Looney’s father, Francis Looney, died of laryngitis in Milton, January 24, 1854, aged fifty-one years, and six months. D.E. Palmer, M.D., signed the death certificate. (Charles was then but four years of age).

Rhoda A. [(Leighton)] Looney, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included Edwin F. Looney, aged twelve years (b. NH), Charley H. Looney, aged ten years (b. NH), David J. Corson, a shoemaker, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Jane [(Warren)] Corson, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), Charles M. Corson, aged eight years (b. NH), and Samuel Corson, aged six months (b. NH). Rhoda A. Looney had personal estate valued at $200. Their household was enumerated between those of Oliver Pierce, a shoemaker, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), and Jacob P. Whitehouse, a shoemaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH).

Charles H. Looney’s elder brother, Edwin F. “Ned” Looney, died in 1865, aged seventeen years.

Charles H. Looney was educated in the common schools and at the Classical Institute of Milton, N.H. When his studies were completed he entered Twombly’s grocery store as a clerk; and two years later he was employed in the same capacity in Farmington, N.H., by Captain Herring, with whom he remained a year (Biographical Review, 1897).

Charles H. Looney worked first for two years in the Milton store and post-office of John E. Twombly (1836-1888), and then for one year in Captain Herring’s dry goods and grocery store in neighboring Farmington, NH.

In some respects the life of “Captain” George M. Herring (1812-1875) had many interesting parallels with that of Looney. Herring kept a dry goods and grocery store, and was for some years Farmington postmaster. He was president of the Farmington Savings Bank and the Farmington M.F.I. (a shoe factory), became a NH state senator and even worked for the U.S. Customs department. He had been the assessor for the wartime U.S. excise taxes. At the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census, when he was Looney’s employer, he was a trader, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA).

Farmington Bank Two-Dollar BillRhoda A. [(Leighton)] Looney, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included Charles H. Looney, works for shoe factory, aged twenty years (b. NH), and Ann F. Looney, aged sixty [74] years (b. England). Rhoda A. Looney had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $200. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Oliver Pierce, a shoe finisher, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), and Thomas P. French, works in shoe factory, aged forty-five years (b. NH).

In 1871 he engaged in the grocery business upon his own account in Milton, there conducted a flourishing trade until 1889, when he was appointed Deputy Collector of Customs for the Portsmouth district (Biographical Review, 1897). 

Charles H. Luney married in Rochester, NH, September 28, 1871, Emily E. Miller, both of Milton. He was a clerk, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged seventeen years. Rev. H.M. Stone performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, September 28, 1854, daughter of Robert and Sarah M. (Hodgdon) Miller.

Emily E. Looney was reared at Milton and attended school here and at Lebanon, [ME,] where she had academic advantages. For a short time prior to her marriage she taught school (Scales, 1914).

Charles H. Looney replaced Ezra H. Twombly, as Milton postmaster, January 17, 1872. (Ezra H. Twombly was brother to Looney’s former employer, John E. Twombly).

He was appointed Postmaster in Milton by President Grant in 1871 and held the office with general satisfaction for thirteen years (Biographical Review, 1897).

Looney had received $110 in salary for being Milton postmaster as of September 30, 1873.

Looney & Avery appeared in the Milton directories of 1874, and 1875, as Milton merchants. There were several Averys in town at the time, and little evidence with which to identify Looney’s partner. (As we shall see, he might have been best acquainted with Brackett F. Avery (1828-1911)).

Charles H. Looney served as Milton town clerk at this time. One source said he was clerk for a period of twelve years, while, elsewhere, he was said to have replaced Joseph Mathes (1815-1882) in that office between 1875 and 1884 (a period of only nine to ten years) (Biographical Review, 1897; Scales, 1914). An examination of town vital records reveals that he made entries dated between April 1874 and November 1887, a period of thirteen years. One particularly poignant one concerned young Annie E. Mather. She had been “taken from the orphan home in Boston, Ms. [MA],” only to die of diphtheria in Milton, at the age of only eleven years.

From the following we learn that Brackett Avery, Charles Ricker, and Charles H. Looney were engineers for the the Milton Three-Ponds precinct’s volunteer fire department in 1880.

MILTON. Precinct meeting was held in the Institute, Saturday the 20[th]. The following officers were elected: Charles Ricker, Moderator; George Tasker, Clerk; Brackett Avery, Charles Ricker, Charles Looney, Engineers. They also voted to raise a sum of money not exceeding $60.00 to be expended for hose & c. The last year’s report was read and accepted; they then repaired to the Post-office where a treat was awaiting them (Farmington News, March 26, 1880).

Charles H. Looney, postmaster, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma E. Looney, keeping house, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), his children, Ned F. Looney, aged seven years (b. NH), and Walter E. Looney, aged two years (b. NH), his mother, Rhoda A. Looney, keeping house, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), his aunt, Ann F. Looney, at home, aged eighty-four years (b. England), and his help, Eliza A. Galnagh, a housekeeper, aged sixty-two years (b. ME). Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Eliza A. Fernald, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and Frank Leighton, works on shoes, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). (Housekeeper Eliza A. Galnagh was the mother of the little girl whose pet dog had killed her other pet, a pet chicken, in 1869).

Looney & Downes appeared in the Milton directories of 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, and 1889, as Milton merchants.

Charles H. Looney and Hazen W. “Wesley” Downs became partners in a grocery store on Main Street in Milton in April 1881. (Joseph Willey, a competing merchant, decided to expand his line of goods a bit).

MILTON. Mr. Charles Looney has moved his goods and post office into Wentworth’s Block on Main St., with Mr. Wesley Downs, formerly of this [Farmington] place, and has put in a large lot of groceries and crockery ware, and is now ready to do business on the square. Joseph Willey is about to put in a stock of boots and shoes in connection with groceries and dry goods (Farmington News, April 29, 1881).

MILTON. W. Jones has opened a Watch and Jewelry Store on Main Street, formerly occupied by Charles Looney as Post-office (Farmington News, May 20, 1881).

[Charles Looney] … was elected to the legislature in 1885 and to the State Senate in 1887 (Biographical Review, 1897).

Charles H. Looney ran for the District 12 seat in the NH State Senate in November 1886. John F. Hall (D) of Farmington, NH, received 1,743 votes (49.9%), Charles H. Looney (R) of Milton received 1,686 votes (48.3%), and Nathaniel Burnham (P) received 65 votes (1.9%). The result in this District 12 election and those in two other districts were not considered sufficiently conclusive (nobody achieving 50% or over), so the final decision was given over to a joint session of the NH House and Senate.

NEW HAMPSHIRE LEGISLATURE. Organization Perfected and Republicans Elected to Fill Vacancies. Concord, N.H., June 1. The fifth biennial session of the Legislature began at the State House this forenoon. Both branches met at 11 o’clock and the oath of office was administered to the members by Governor Currier. The Senate organized by choosing Frank D. Currier, president; Ira A. Chase, clerk; Charles J. Hamblet, assistant clerk; Edward H. Wasson, sergeant-at-arms, and James M. Adams, messenger. Notice was sent the House that vacancies existed in senatorial districts 9, 12 and 17. In the House the roll call showed all the members present but three. John J. Bell of Exeter was chosen temporary Speaker. An organization was then effected by choosing Alvin Burleigh of Plymouth, Speaker; G.A. Dickey, clerk; Stephen S. Jewett, assistant clerk; Lewis Jenkins, sergeant-at-arms; Hiram E. Currier, George W. Varnum, Horace L. Ingalls, doorkeepers. The hours of meeting were fixed at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. The rules of the last session were adopted. The officers of both branches are all Republicans. Both branches of the Legislature met in joint convention this afternoon and filled vacancies in the senatorial districts by electing Edmund E. Truesdell of Pembroke in district No. 9, Charles H. Looney of Milton in No. 12 and Edward O. Blunt of Nashua in No. 17. All those are Republicans. The ballot for Governor resulted as follows: Thomas Cogswell of Gilmanton, Democrat, 146; Charles H. Sawyer of Dover, Republican, 178. Mr. Sawyer was declared elected. A committee of one Senator and two Representatives was appointed to inform him of his election and to say that the Legislature awaited any communication he desired to make. Tuesday was designated as the day for drawing seats in the House. The sergeant-at-arms was directed to allow General Gilman Marston of Exeter and the Hon. Samuel B. Page of Haverhill to draw seats prior to that date. The Legislature then adjourned. Governor-elect Sawyer will be inaugurated tomorrow forenoon. There will be a procession of the entire State militia, with several independent military companies, and a large number of distinguished invited guests in carnages, should the weather be pleasant the parade will be one of the finest ever seen here (Boston Post, June 2, 1887).

One of the two losing candidates, John F. Hall (D) of Farmington, NH, petitioned for a recount of the original election. His petition was considered in July 1887 and rejected, leaving Senator Charles H. Looney (R) still in the District 12 senate seat.

New Hampshire Legislature. Concord, N.H., July 28. In the Senate this forenoon two reports were presented on petition of John F. Hall of Farmington, stating his belief that he had been chosen senator, and asking for a recount of the votes cast in the twelfth or Somersworth senatorial district at the last election. Senators Bailey, Stearns and Gilman reported that the vote of the district, as returned in the office of the secretary of state, was follows: Nathaniel Burnham (Prohibition) 65; Charles A. Looney (Republican) 1688; John F. Hall (Democrat) 1743. There being no choice, Mr. Looney was elected by the Legislature in joint convention. They reported recount unnecessary, and inexpedient, and they recommended, petitioners have leave to withdraw. Minority, Senators Rollins and Paine, recommended that the elections committee be instructed to immediately obtain and count the ballots cast in the district, now in custody of the secretary of state. On motion to substitute the minority for the majority report the first political debate of the session occurred, Senators Rollins, Pittman, Jameson, Paine and George advocating, and Senators Stearns, French Hersey opposing it. The motion was lost on a strict party vote, the Democrats voting affirmative and the Republicans in the negative. The report of the majority was than adopted and Mr. Hall given leave to withdraw, Senator Jameson said the minority desired to enter their protest against the action of the Senate in depriving Mr. Hall of his constitutional rights. Leave was granted and the formal protest of Democratic senators will be spread upon the records. In the House bills taking action against tenants and for the better enforcement of the pauper law were killed. An animated discussion occurred on the bill proposing to abolish highway districts and the office of highway surveyor, pending which the House adjourned. (Boston Evening Transcript, July 29, 1887).

Both Hall and Looney had been state representatives, from Farmington and Milton respectively, in the 1885-86 biennium.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. E.E. and C.H. Looney, to J.F. Spinney, Milton, $100 (Farmington News, November 2, 1888).

Amos M. Roberts purchased the Looney & Downs grocery store in April 1889. Roberts appeared in the Milton directories of 1892, and 1894, as a Milton grocer or merchant.

LOCALS. Amos Roberts, of Milton, who formerly worked in [Farmington] town, has, with a Mr. Barrows, purchased the grocery business of Looney & Downs, and will attempt to scale the giddy heights of fortune from behind a counter (Farmington News, April 12, 1889).

Charles H. Looney was appointed an inspector of customs for the U.S. Customs House in Portsmouth, NH, in 1890. (He presumably commuted via Milton’s Railroad Line). He appeared in the Portsmouth directory of 1890, as an inspector at the Customs House. He was promoted to Deputy Collector there in March 1891. He held that office until November 1894.

NEW HAMPSHIRE NOTES. Hon. Charles H. Looney of Milton, N.H., an ex-member of the New Hampshire Senate, has been appointed Deputy Collector of the port of Portsmouth, N.H. (Springfield Reporter (Springfield, VT), March 27, 1891). 

MILTON. At the republican caucus Saturday afternoon the following delegates were chosen to the different conventions: State – E.W. Fox and Frank Horner. Congressional – R.M. Kimball and C.D. Fox. Senatorial – Luther Hayes and B.B. Plummer. Councillor – Chas. A. Jones and S.W. Wallingford. County – Fred B. Roberts and C.W. Gross. Town Committee – Chas. H. Looney, president; B.B. Plummer, secretary; Luther Hayes, C.A. Jones, J.H. Avery, W.H.H. Pinkham, Fred B. Roberts, S.W. Wallingford, Charles D. Fox and Charles W. Gross (Farmington News, 1892).

Prior to leaving his Deputy Collector post at the U.S. Customs House in 1894, Charles H. Looney had entered into a grocery partnership with Amos M. Roberts (the same grocer who had bought out Looney & Downs in April 1889) in 1893.

MILTON. Repairs are being made on the house lately purchased by Looney & Avery [Looney & Roberts] of Albert Downes (Farmington News, September 15, 1893).

MILTON. C.H. Looney of the firm Looney & Roberts, was confined to the house with an attack of the grip last week, and this week his partner A.M. Roberts is taking his turn (Farmington News, February 15, 1895).

Charles H. Looney’s mother, Rhoda A. (Leighton) Looney, died of apoplexy in Milton, June 23, 1896, aged seventy-nine years, three months, and twenty-eight days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

HERE AND THERE. The funeral of Mrs. Rhoda Leighton Looney of Milton, the widow of the late Francis Looney formerly of England, took place at the home of her son, the Hon. C.H. Looney, on Wednesday. Among relations present were Mr. J.F. Hussey and his daughter, Mrs. Ned I. Parker of this [Farmington] town (Farmington News, June 26, 1896).

MILTON NEWS LETTER. C.H. Looney and family are at Oak Island cottage, York Beach, for two weeks (Farmington News, August 6, 1897).

Looney & Roberts appeared in the Milton directory of 1898, as Milton merchants. They appeared in both the grocer and general store categories.

Portsmouth Customs House - Per LOC
US Customs House, Portsmouth, NH

At this time Looney accepted, after a gap of several years, a second appointment as Deputy Collector for the U.S. Customs office in Portsmouth, NH. He held this position for the remainder of his life.

Appointment for Charles Looney of Milton. PORTSMOUTH, N.H., March 12 – Collector of Customs Rufus N. Elwell has appointed Charles H. Looney of Milton deputy collector of customs, to succeed Nathaniel Winn, deceased. Mr. Looney is well known here, and served under Collector James E. Dodge from 1891 to 1895. His nomination has been forwarded to Washington (Boston Globe, March 12, 1898).

Charles H Looney, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-nine years), Emily E. Looney, aged forty-five years (b. NH), his children, Ned F. Looney, a fair stitcher (shoes), aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Walter E. Looney, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Robert N. Looney, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Harry H. Looney, at school, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and his daughter-in-law (Ned F. Looney’s wife; married within the year), Adelaide C. [(Sloan)] Looney, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). Emily E. Looney was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Elvira V. Pierce, a housekeeper, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), and Sophia Leighton, a housekeeper, aged seventy-six years (b. NH).

The NH General Court authorized incorporation of the Milton Water Works Company, March 21, 1901, with initial board members Malcom A.H. Hart, Charles H. Looney, S. Lyman Hayes, Charles D. Jones, Fred B. RobertsHarry Avery, George E. Wentworth, Joseph H. Avery, Ira W. Jones, Arthur W. Dudley, Everett F. Fox, Henry F. Townsend, Freeman H. Lowd, William T. Wallace, Frank G. Horne, Charles A. Jones, and Nathaniel G. Pinkham. It established itself July 19, 1899, with Harry L. Avery as its treasurer (NH Secretary of State, 1901).

Hon. Charles H. Looney appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as working at the Customs House in Portsmouth, NH, with his house at 54 South Main street, near Tappan street. Two of his sons, Walter E. Looney and Robert M. Looney, boarded with him; son Edward F. Looney had removed to Roxbury, MA.

Charles H. Looney died of apoplexy, i.e., a stroke, in Milton, April 23, 1902, aged fifty-two years. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

HON. CHARLES H. LOONEY. Deputy Collector of This Port Dies at His Home in Milton. Word was received here at 10:30 o’clock this Wednesday morning of death at his home in Milton early in the morning hours of Hon. Charles H. Looney, deputy collector of customs of this port. Deceased suffered an apoplectic stroke Tuesday afternoon and from the first there was no hope for the sufferer. He lingered until 12:30 this Wednesday morning when he breathed his last. Hon. Charles H. Looney was born in Milton in 1849. He was educated in the public schools of his own town and at Berwick academy. After graduation he entered into business and was successful for a number of years. He drifted into politics and after holding all town offices of trust was made postmaster. In the years 1885-86 he represented his town in the legislature and the two following years he put in as state senator. He was appointed inspector of customs in 1890 and in 1892 was promoted to Deputy Collector which office he held until November, 1894. Again in 1898 he was appointed Deputy Collector and held the same at the time of his death. Deceased leaves a wife and four grown up sons on whom the sudden blow falls with an almost crushing force. He was a man of essentially home qualities and was bound up in the sons in whom he took great pride. He was a member of the Congregational church and also a Free Mason. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at two o’clock in Milton and the collector’s office in this city will undoubtedly be closed that afternoon in order that the collector and inspectors may attend the obsequies (Portsmouth Herald, April 23, 1902).

DECEASE OF HON. C.H. LOONEY. The many readers of the News who have enjoyed acquaintance with Charles H. Looney of Milton, for some time in his youth, of this town, will mourn deeply his sudden decease, early Wednesday morning. He had remained at home from Portsmouth, Tuesday, to attend the funeral of Charles Downs, and was taken ill in the cemetery, becoming unconscious immediately. Dr. M.A.H. Hart was called instantly to the side of his friend and neighbor, and superintended his removal to his home, while everything possible was done to restore him to consciousness. But nothing availed, and he passed away at about half-past twelve o’clock of the morning referred to, April 23. Mr. Looney has been always active in all good works, having at heart the welfare of the town, and having been a man of genuine public spirit. In 1887,88 he was a member of the state senate. He had been for two terms the deputy collector of customs at Portsmouth, and was in office at the time of his decease. He was a trustee of the Nute high school and a note received from Farmington friends, from one of the younger people in Milton, says that “the whole town was sad, for everyone loved Mr. Looney, and sympathized with the intense grief of of his wife and children.” And with deep sorrow for the loss of so good a friend there is prevalent in Milton the natural grief consequent upon the taking away of so generous and helpful a citizen. Mr. Looney was the son of the late Francis Looney of Manchester, England, and of Mrs. Rhoda Leighton Looney of Milton, and was in the fifty-third year of his age. He is survived by his wife, formerly Miss Emma Miller, and by their four sons, the eldest of whom is married. The younger two sons were with their father at the time of his death, and the others, with his daughter-in-law, arrived as soon as possible after learning of his illness. As a husband and father, Mr. Looney was most tender and indulgent, and liked to have his children ever with him. Words can not console the family thus bereaved of one so beloved, but sympathy for them who are so afflicted is warm and deep. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock (Farmington News, April 25, 1902).

Emma E Looney, a widow, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Walter Looney, a customs house clerk, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Robert M. Looney, a grammar school teacher, aged thirty years (b. NH), Harry N. Looney, a shoe factory cutter, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and John H. Looney, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). Emma E. Looney owned their house, free-and-clear. Emily E. Looney was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Seth F. Dawson, Jr., a leather-board manufacturer, aged thirty years years (b. MA), and Martha E. Bean, a widow, aged forty-five years (b. NH).

Local. At the regular meeting of Mary Torr Chapter, D.A.R., of Rochester, last Tuesday, Mrs. Emily Looney of Milton was elected regent (Farmington News, May 5, 1916).

Mrs. Charles H. Looney was president of the Milton Women’s Club on 1916 (Winslow, 1916).

Local. Many local friends were saddened to learn of the death of Ned Francis Looney, who died at the Haverhill hospital last Friday after a long illness of tuberculosis. He was 45 years of age and a native of Milton, the oldest son of Hon. Charles H. and Emma (Miller) Looney. He was married to the only daughter of John Waldron and the late Adelaide Cilley Waldron of this [Farmington] village in 1897. He is survived by his wife, his mother and three brothers, for whom much sympathy is felt. Funeral was held from the home of his mother at Milton last Sunday afternoon. Remains were placed in the family lot in the cemetery at Lebanon, Me. (Farmington News, April 26, 1918).

Emily E. Looney, a widow, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Walter E. Looney, a deputy collector, aged forty-one years (b. NH), Robert M. Looney, a broker, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and Harry H. Looney, a shoe shop cutter, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Arthur F. Remick, a house carpenter, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and S. Frank Dawson, a manufacturer (owner), aged forty years years (b. MA).

Emily Ellen (Miller) Looney died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Milton, April 22, 1921, aged sixty-six years, six months, and twenty-four days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate

NEW HAMPSHIRE. Milton Church Presented Flag. On Sunday evening, April 15, Milton Rev. N.W. Whitman, pastor, held a special service to receive a silk flag which has been placed in the church. The flag was presented to the town of Milton by the State Relief Corps in memory of Mrs. Emily E. Looney. At the desire of her sons it was placed in the church of which she was for many years a member and the faithful clerk (The Congregationalist, May 10, 1923).

References:

Biographical Review. (1897). Biographical Review: Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Merrimack and Sullivan Counties, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=C2sjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA102

Find a Grave. (2018, August 7). George M. Herring. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192045434/george-m.-herring

Find a Grave. (2017, September 17). John E. Twombly. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/183480194/john-e-twombly

NH General Court. (1885). Journals of the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=U-Y3AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA291

NH General Court. (1888). Journal of the Honorable Senate of the State of New Hampshire, June Session, 1887. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=7jwtAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA10

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA874

Winslow, Helen M. (1916). Register of Women’s Clubs. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=cXwfAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA137

West Milton’s In-As-Much Society – 1903-57

By Muriel Bristol | June 7, 2021

The In-As-Much Society was a West Milton women’s club. The term inasmuch generally introduces a phrase thatNute Chapel - Nute Chapel explains the extent to which a prior statement is true. Societies of this sort were usually affiliated with a church parish. It would seem from the articles extracted here that this one was affiliated with West Milton’s Nute Chapel.

One supposes that there were similar women’s societies centered on churches in other parts of Milton. These In-as-Much Society articles appeared in the Farmington News, while those of other such societies appeared less frequently or did not appear at all, largely because West Milton abuts Farmington, NH.

It is difficult to say exactly when the In-As-Much Society might have been established, but its first newspaper notices began in 1903, i.e., during the pastorate of Nute Chapel’s Rev. Robert M. Peacock.


WEST MILTON. Mrs. John Horne and Mrs. Agnes Bean entertained the In as much society Wednesday of last week (Farmington News, September 18, 1903).

Mrs. Agnes G. (Horne) Bean was then a Farmington, NH, schoolteacher, daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth M. (Wiggin) Horne and her husband John W. Horne.

WEST MILTON. The ladies of the In as much society will give a harvest supper at the Nute chapel Friday, Oct. 9 (Farmington News, October 2, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. J.I. Cook and her daughter, Mrs. T.F. Langley, gave a tea to the Inasmuch society last week (Farmington News, October 23, 1903).

Thomas F. Langley married (2nd) in Milton, September 4, 1900, Mary J. Cook, he of Boston, MA, and she of Milton. He was a widowed painter, aged sixty years, and she was a shoe stitcher, aged thirty-four years. Rev. R.M. Peacock [of the Nute Chapel] performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, circa 1866, daughter of John I. and Mary A. (Davis) Cook.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. William Swinerton entertained the Inasmuch society last week, in honor of Miss Jessie Russell of Boston who has been spending the summer with her (Farmington News, October 30, 1903).

Marie Debeau married in Cambridge, MA, in 1894, William M. Swinerton. They were recent arrivals from Cambridge, MA, where he had been a stationary engineer.

WEST MILTON. The In as much society met this week Wednesday in the library at the chapel. Further preparations were made for the entertainment and sale which is to be held December 2. There will be domestic, fancy, and candy tables, also ice cream, cake and cocoa (Farmington News, November 20, 1903).

WEST MILTON. At the last meeting of the Inasmuch society, arrangements were made for the Christmas tree and a Christmas tea for all the children of the parish (Farmington News, December 25, 1903).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Nellie Hayes Tuesday afternoon. … The Inasmuch society entertained the children Thursday afternoon and evening at the chapel. Games were played until 5.30, when the children marched to the dining room where tables laden with many dainties met the eager eyes of the children. A Christmas cake with the words “Merry Christmas” was on a table in the centre of the room, surrounded by burning candles of all colors. As the children left the dining room they were given a piece of the Christmas cake. In the evening a short program and Christmas tree were very much enjoyed by all (Farmington News, January 1, 1904).

Nellie M. Parmenter married in Farmington, NH, May 8, 1877, Charles H. Hayes, both of Farmington. She was aged twenty years, and he was a widowed [shoe] cutter, aged thirty-two years. Rev. D.H. Adams performed the ceremony. Charles H. Hayes died of pneumonia in Milton, April 22, 1892,aged forty-seven years. [His death certificate gave the year as 1893, incorrectly]. (See Milton’s Nute Chapel Ministers of 1890-21, regarding Hayes’ friendship with Nute pastor Rev. William A. Bacon).

WEST MILTON. The last meeting of the In as much Society was held with Mrs. L.D. Garland. Quite a number were present and work was resumed as usual (Farmington News, January 29, 1904).

Cora B. Goodall married in Rochester, NH, January 6, 1877, Llewelyn D. Garland, he of Milton, and she of Farmington, NH. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years, and she was aged eighteen years. In 1904, Mr. and Mrs. L.D. Garland lived next door to the Hare Road school.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. John Nute Wednesday of last week (Farmington News, February 19, 1904).

Ellen F. Foss married, circa 1884, John A. Nute. She died of cancer in West Milton, November 10, 1908, aged fifty-three years, five months, and fifteen days.

WEST MILTON. The severe cold and bad traveling of late have interfered somewhat with the meetings of the Inasmuch society. The interest, however, has been kept up. Will meet with Mrs. Nellie Hayes this week, if the weather is favorable (Farmington News, February 26, 1904).

WEST MILTON. A well-attended meeting of the Inasmuch society was held last week with Mrs. J.I. Cooke and her daughter, Mrs. T.F. Langley. There were two guests, Miss Annie Horne and Miss E. Maude Garland. The music by Miss Horne was very much enjoyed (Farmington News, March 25, 1904).

Hare Road schoolteacher Annie J. Horne was a daughter of Frank and Mary C. (Weeks) Horne. Milton Grammar schoolteacher Ethelyn Maude Garland was a daughter of Llewellyn D. and Cora B. (Goodall) Garland.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. John Nute last week with a large attendance (Farmington News, April 1, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet with Mrs. Nellie Hayes this week (Farmington News, April 8, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet with Mrs. Nellie Hayes this week, Wednesday (Farmington News, April 8, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet with Mrs. Annie Cooke Wednesday (Farmington News, April 15, 1904).

Annie E. Davis married in Rochester, NH, January 14, 1874, Ira A. Cook, she of Rochester and he of Milton. He was a shoemaker, aged thirty-one years, and she was aged twenty-four years. He died of heart failure in Milton, April 3, 1898, aged fifty-four years, four months, and twenty-one days. In 1900, she lived on the Nute Ridge Road, close to the Nute Chapel.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet with Mrs. Annie Cook, Wednesday. It is hoped there will be a good attendance as there is much work on hand (Farmington News, April 22, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The In as much society will meet again this week with the chairman of work committee, Mrs. Annie Cooke (Farmington News, April 29, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The In as much society will meet at the Nute Library, this week Wednesday. Arbor Day will also be observed by planting trees on the chapel grounds (Farmington News, May 6, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The In as much society met last week Wednesday, at the Nute library; there was a good attendance. Arbor day being observed, three trees were planted on the chapel grounds, Cake and cocoa were served by the ladies (Farmington News, May 13, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at Nute library this week Wednesday (Farmington News, May 20, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch Society will meet at the Nute Chapel Wednesday if pleasant, if not Thursday (Farmington News, May 27, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Martin Wentworth last week, Wednesday. There was a good attendance. The reading by one of the members was very much enjoyed. Cake and Cocoa was served (Farmington News, November 11, 1904).

Georgianna Gerrish married in Rochester, NH, November 20, 1886, Martin G. Wentworth, she of Lebanon, ME, and he of Farmington, NH. She was a teacher, aged twenty-one years, and he was a laster, aged twenty-three years. (See Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47).

WEST MILTON. The ladies of the society are busily engaged in preparing barrels of clothing to be sent to Mrs. Elizabeth Barker at Toccoa, Georgia, for distribution in the mission school of which Mrs. Barker is matron. Many thanks are due Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Brown for their generous hospitality, which was enjoyed by the ladies of the Inasmuch society, Dec. 1. A bounteous dinner was partaken of, after which a reading by one of the members was listened to with much pleasure. Later in the afternoon ice cream was served by Miss Nellie Brown, who so ably assisted in entertaining (Farmington News, December 9, 1904).

Augusta D. Dorr married in Milton, July 3, 1892, John W. Brown, she of Milton and he of Farmington, NH. She was a shoe stitcher, aged twenty-five years, and he was a shoemaker, aged thirty-three years. Miss Nellie Brown was his younger sister.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society was very pleasantly entertained at the home of Mrs. Annie Cook, last week Wednesday. There was a good attendance and all were busily engaged in finishing articles for the sale. Refreshments were served by the hostess. The ladies will hold their annual Christmas sale Dec. 20 if pleasant; if not, the first fair evening. It will open with an entertainment at 7.30, after which all will be invited to the dining room where you will find what you want for Christmas, and something good to eat (Farmington News, December 16, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The roads this winter have made it possible for the In As Much society to hold their meetings each week at the chapel, which they will continue to do indefinitely (Farmington News, January 19, 1906).

WEST MILTON. The In As Much society met at Nute chapel last Wednesday afternoon with the largest attendance of the summer. It is with great pleasure that we mention the fact that five ladies from Brookline joined the circle. The lawn party at Mrs. L.D. Garland’s was a very enjoyable occasion. As the evening was rather cool, the phonograph selections were listened to with much pleasure in the house. Cocoa, candy and fancy articles were sold, thereby making it a financial success for the In As Much society (Farmington News, September 19, 1909).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at Nute chapel in the library now on during the summer every Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock (Farmington News, April 22, 1910).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met last week with Mrs. Sam Gale. It was a roll call. It being the first meeting of the new year there was a special program. Instrumental and vocal music, and a reading by Mrs. Gale. The president, Mrs. Longley, read a very interesting letter from the former pastor’s wife, Mrs. R.M. Peacock (Farmington News, January 13, 1911).

Annie B. Varney married in Lynn, MA, June 12, 1894, Samuel Gale, 3rd, both of Lynn, MA. She was an operative, aged twenty-three years, and he was a printer, aged thirty-three years. In 1912, their house was on the Hare Road, third from the Farmington Road.

WEST MILTON. The ladies of the Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Peirce last Wednesday. An unusually large number was present and a most enjoyable afternoon was spent in sewing and sociability. Mr. Hayes entertained the company with choice selections on the phonograph. Cake, cocoa, and fruit were served by the hostess, assisted by Mrs. Nellie Hayes. A novel and very pleasing feature of the occasion was the sled ride given the ladies by Mr. I.W. Hayes. It was a kindly act and thoroughly appreciated by them. They wish through this medium to extend their thanks to him (Farmington News, March 31, 1911).

Clara N. “Nettie” Giles married in Northwood, NH, October 30, 1888, Charles S. Pierce, she of Epsom, NH, and he of Des Moines, IA. She was aged twenty-seven years, and he was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years. She resided in 1910 in the Nute Ridge home of her nephew, Henry B. Hayes. Sleigh driver Ira W. Hayes had a farm on the Hare Road.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. L. [S.] Gale last week. It was roll call and all responded with a reading or quotation very fitting to the Easter season. lee cream and cake were served by the hostess, assisted by Miss Nellie Hayes (Farmington News, April 21, 1911).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Annie Cook last week. Sandwiches, cake and lemonade were served by the hostess, assisted by Mrs. Longley (Farmington News, May 19, 1911).

Mrs. Longley and her husband lived with her parents, John I. and Mary A. (Davis) Cook, on the Hare Road, sixth from the Farmington Road, in 1912.

West Milton. The Inasmuch society will meet at the chapel, in the library, during the summer (Farmington News, June 23, 1911).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. G.H. Hurd this week Wednesday. The hostess served delicious refreshments. Organ selections by Mesdames Gale and Longley were listened to with much pleasure (February 2, 1912).

Cora E. (Whitten) Brown married in Farmington, NH, April 7, 1887, George H. Hurd, both of Farmington, NH. She was a shoe-fitter, aged twenty-eight years, and he was a shoemaker, aged fifty-five years.

West Milton. A Valentine social, under the auspices of the Inasmuch society, was held at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland, Wednesday, Feb. 14. A very pleasing program, consisting of readings, recitations and music was rendered by ladies of the society under the direction of Miss Nellie Hayes. The rooms were very tastefully decorated with emblems suggestive of St. Valentine. Home-made food and candy found ready sale and netted a goodly sum for, the treasury. An expression of regret in not being able to attend the social was received from Miss Florence Colbath of Haverhill, Mass., a former resident. The company dispersed at a late hour after spending an enjoyable evening (Farmington News, February 23, 1912).

Florence A. Colbath was born in Farmington, NH, May 10, 1856, daughter of Richmond E. and Hannah (Parker) Colbath. She boarded with farmer Demeritt Goodall in the Downingville part of West Milton in 1900, where her occupation was given as “invalid.”

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Gale last Wednesday afternoon. There was a good attendance and the work committee kept all busy. Refreshments were served by the hostess. Piano selections were listened to with much pleasure (Farmington News, April 19, 1912).

West Milton. There is to be a lawn party given by the Inasmuch society next Tuesday evening at the home of Miss E.D. Lindsay. In connection with this there will be aprons, ice cream and cake for sale. A general good time is looked forward to. Auto parties will receive special attention (Farmington News, July 12, 1912).

Miss Elizabeth D. Lindsay purchased a summer home on the Hare Road, near Nute Ridge Road, in West Milton in 1905. (See Milton and the Rusticators). She was born in Scotland, circa 1869, and lodged in Boston, MA, during the winters, working there as a dressmaker.

West Milton. The Inasmuch society, had a very interesting meeting at the library last Wednesday afternoon. There was a large attendance which was pleasing to the work committee as there is a large number of orders to fill for our summer guests (Farmington News, September 27, 1912).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met at the home of Mrs. Edwin Tripp last Wednesday afternoon. The work of tacking comforters was resumed and good progress was made. At the close of the work the hostess, assisted by Miss Abbie Howe, served bountiful and dainty refreshments to all present and a delightful social hour followed. A large attendance of members was on hand (Farmington News, October 24, 1913).

After the March 1899 death of his first wife, Edwin Tripp married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, April 30, 1901, Mattie G. “Geneva” Berry, he of Milton, and she of Rochester, NH. He was a shoecutter, aged twenty-eight years, and she was at home, aged twenty-nine years. In 1912, Miss Mary A. “Abbie” Howe had a house with her father on the Middleton road in West Milton; the Tripps lived with them.

West Milton. The I.A.M. society met at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland last Wednesday afternoon. A large attendance of members and the fine entertainment and refreshments furnished by the hostess were special features of the session. … The Inasmuch society has arranged for an elderly people’s meeting to be held at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland this Friday afternoon from 2 until 4. The purpose of the affair is to afford an opportunity to all those who are ordinarily confined at home, by reason of infirmities or otherwise, of enjoying the social intercourse of their neighbors and friends. An appropriate program has been prepared, consisting of music, social entertainment, remarks by Rev. D.A. Gammon, pastor of Nute chapel, and refreshments under the auspices of the Aid. Everything will be absolutely gratis and in addition an automobile will be furnished for safe conveyance to and from the destination. An urgent invitation is extended to the elderly residents of the parish and to all those who do not have a frequent opportunity of joining their neighbors and friends. In case the weather is unfavorable the meeting will be postponed (Farmington News, August 21, 1914).

West Milton. In consequence of the small attendance occasioned by the unfavorable weather which prevailed during the afternoon set for the elderly people’s at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland a few weeks ago, another meeting was called last Monday afternoon at the dame hour and place. An automobile was furnished by the Inasmuch society for conveyance and the elderly people of the community were well represented Able remarks appropriate to the occasion were made by the pastor of Nute chapel, Rev. D.A. Gammon, and the remainder of the afternoon was occupied with a social session, singing and refreshments, consisting of ice cream and assorted cake, after which the members of the society choir were conveyed to the home of Mrs. Hannaniah Thurston where several hymns were rendered and prayer offered by Mr. Gammon. The guests were transported to their homes shortly before six o’clock, all having enjoyed a very pleasant afternoon (Farmington News, September 14, 1914).

Hananiah is, as we might guess, a Biblical name. Hananiah Thurston appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a farmer, with his house on the Cross road from the Middleton ridge road to Hare road. (That is to say, on what is now Thurston Road).

West Milton. The I.A.M. society met with Mrs. D.A. Gammon Wednesday afternoon. … The I.A.M. society met with Mrs. Cora Hurd last Wednesday afternoon, the occasion being saddened from the fact that in all probability this was the last time Mrs. Hurd would entertain the members in her home. The roll call was held and each member responded with an appropriate quotation. At the close the session refreshments were served by the hostess to the large number of guests which were present. … Mrs. Cora Hurd has been selling out her household effects the past two weeks, preparatory to breaking up and selling her home on the Hare road. Mrs. Hurd has been a resident of the community for many years and a host of friends must regret the condition of her health, which has necessitated the contemplated change of residence. Wherever Mrs. Hurd may go, the good wishes and hope of old friends and neighbors for her immediate improvement will abide with her (Farmington News, June 11, 1915).

Mrs. Hurd died of uteric sarcoma in Rochester, NH, January 9, 1916, aged fifty-seven years, and twenty-six days.

West Milton. The third annual summer sale under the auspices of the I.A.M. society was held in the barn at the home of Miss E.D. Lindsay on Tuesday evening. The stable, which has been fitted up especially for social purposes, presented a pretty spectacle in the light of Jap lanterns which dimly illuminated the decorations of bunting and boughs. A large table, upon which were displayed aprons, mystery boxes and home-made candy, found ready and busy patronage, the sale of its wares netting the society a substantial sum. After the sale a graphophone concert was given, followed by games and indoor amusements, in which old and young participated until a late hour. Upwards of fifty were present and enjoyed the festivities (Farmington News, September 3, 1915).

West Milton. The social and annual Christmas sale, held under the auspices of the I.A.M. society at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland recently, met with its usual popular success and the heavy patronage cleaned up the entire stock of articles for sale. In connection with the sale, a short program, consisting of vocal and instrumental music, was presented. Delicious refreshments were served by the hostess (Farmington News, December 31, 1915).

West Milton. The regular meeting of the I.A.M. society was held with Mrs. J.I. Cook last Wednesday afternoon, with a large attendance and an interesting program (Farmington News, June 23, 1916).

Local. The West Milton Inasmuch society will hold its midsummer sale at Nute chapel, Wednesday afternoon and evening, July 4th. A fine assortment of aprons and mystery boxes prepared by the ladies, cake, home-made candies, lemonade and ice cream will be sold. In the evening an illustrated lecture on the beautiful scenery of the White mountains will be given by Rev. D.A. Gammon. Everyone is cordially invited (June 29, 1917).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met on Wednesday of last week with Mrs. Gammon at the parsonage. There was a good attendance and progress was made on a puff. Mrs. Gammon served some most delicious sweet apples (Farmington News, December 14, 1917).

West Milton. The Inasmuch society met this week with Mrs. Nellie Hayes. Owing to the severe weather the past winter, it has been impossible to meet (Farmington News, April 12, 1918).

WEST MILTON. The first meeting of the season of the In-as-much Circle was held at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland on Wednesday afternoon of last week when a pleasant hour was enjoyed by those present. This Wednesday the ladies were invited to meet with Mrs. Marie Swinerton (Farmington News, October 3, 1919).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much Circle met at the home of Mrs. Annie E. Cooke, Wednesday afternoon of this week (Farmington News, October 17, 1919).

WEST MILTON. Last week the In-as-much circle held a meeting at the home of Mrs. Fannie Pinkham. This Wednesday the ladies met with Mrs. Nellie Hayes (Farmington News, December 12, 1919).

Fannie Isabelle Hayes married in Milton, June 29, 1909, Harry Wilbur Pinkham, both of Milton. She was a teacher, aged twenty-seven years, and he a farmer, was aged thirty-six years. (She was a daughter of Charles H. and Nellie M. (Parmenter) Hayes (See Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47)). Rev. Robert M. Peacock performed the ceremony.

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much circle held its meeting on Wednesday afternoon of last week at the home of Mrs. Hannah Thurston. The room occupied by the “shut in,” where the guests were cordially welcomed, was very attractive with new paint and paper in cool and restful tints, while bouquets of cut flowers added fragrance and cheer, and the feeling was shared by all that, these material things, combined with the sunny presence of the invalid went far toward “brightening her corner.” A short devotional service was held, after which the report of the last meeting was read and it being the usual roll, those present responded with quotations. The circle presented Mrs. Thurston with a box of dainty articles. for which she returned hearty thanks. Delicious refreshments of fancy wafers, assorted cake and lemonade were served by Mrs. Thurston’s granddaughter, Mrs. Blanche Walker, and the little gathering broke up at the close of the afternoon, thus pleasantly spent (Farmington News, August 20, 1920).

Mrs. Blanche W. (Thurston) Walker was a daughter of Charles H. and Urania (Beal) Thurston and granddaughter of Hananiah B. and Caroline A. (Stockbridge) Thurston. Mrs. “Hannah” Thurston was an error for Mrs. Hananiah B. Thurston, i.e., Mrs. Caroline A. (Stockbridge) Thurston. Hananiah B. Thurston died of angina pectoris in Milton’s “West Side,” October 27, 1922, aged eighty-six years, eleven months, and sixteen days; and his wife, Caroline A. (Stockbridge) Thurston, died of arthritic rheumatism there, July 24, 1926, aged eighty-six years, seven months, and seven days. (Dr. M.A.H. Hart attended upon their final illnesses).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Lola Hyland at the home of Henry Hayes last Wednesday afternoon. Work and a social program were the order of the session (Farmington News, February 11, 1921).

Lola Montez Hill married in Manchester, NH, November 23, 1898, Nelson Stevens Hyland, both of Manchester, NH. She was aged thirty years, and he was an engineer, aged thirty-three years.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society held at Nute chapel Tuesday of last week, Washington’s birthday, was a success in all directions. About 45 gathered there in the fore part of the day. At noon a fine collation, with hot coffee, was served to the men, of whom quite a number had been invited. A pile of unfitted wood back of the chapel was attacked by the men present, sawed and put under cover. Each seemed eager to outdo the other in the amount of work done. A business meeting was held indoors by the ladies and selections in accordance with the day observed were rendered. An original poem by our pastor’s wife was read which all pronounced first-class. It was voted to give the sum of five dollars to the Hoover Relief association. On the whole, it was a very profitable meeting (Farmington News, March 4, 1921).

The pastor’s wife was Mrs. Abbie V. (Hartland) Bennett. The pastor, Rev. George A. Bennett, died in Milton, NH, October 12, 1921, aged sixty-eight years and one day.

The Hoover Relief association was the American Relief Association, of which future president Herbert Hoover was director. It provided food and other relief to twenty-three countries suffering from the aftereffects of WW I and the Russian Revolution. (Due to monetary inflation over the intervening years, the same $5 donation, if then in the form of a $5 half-eagle coin, would have today a spot value of nearly $500 in inflated Federal Reserve notes).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at the home of Mrs. E. Kelley Friday afternoon of this week. All members are requested to be present as there is work of importance in making preparations tor the coming sale, the date of which will be given in our items next week (Farmington News, December 1, 1922).

WEST MILTON. The ladies of the Inasmuch society will hold a social and sale at Nute chapel Thursday evening, Aug. 23. Aprons, fancywork, home-cooked food and ice cream will be on sale. See and patronize the white elephant table. A good program of entertainment will be given. No admission; you are welcome (August 17, 1923).

WEST MILTON. A social held in place of the Inasmuch society, and also in honor of several birthdays which occur about this time, was held at the home of E. Kelley on Tuesday evening (Farmington News, September 23, 1923).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met at the home of Mrs. E. Kelley on Wednesday of last week, with eight members and one guest present. The matter relative to a sale was discussed and was left in the hands of the president to make arrangements. It will be a sale of fancy work, aprons and home-cooked food, which seems to be in demand nowadays. The date will be announced later (Farmington News, October 19, 1923).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met this Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Esther Swinerton in Farmington. The ladies are preparing for a sale of articles on hand, made by their industry during the last few months. The sale will be held at Nute chapel the date to be announced later (Farmington News, June 27, 1924).

Esther M. Blaisdell married in Milton, December 24, 1899, Herbert B. Swinerton, she of Farmington, NH, and he of Milton. She was a lady, aged nineteen years, and he was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years. They resided in Mt. Vernon Street in Farmington, NH, in 1920.

WEST MILTON. On the evening of July eighth the Inasmuch society will hold at Nute Chapel an ice cream and strawberry social, in connection with a sale of aprons and many other useful articles made by the ladies of the society. An entertainment will be prepared by the committee on music, and pains will be made to have all in first-class order. The proceeds are to be used in carrying on the benevolent work of the society (Farmington News, July 4, 1924).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met at the home of Mrs. Teresa Tibbetts this Wednesday (Farmington News, August 1, 1924).

Theresa Victoria Stevens married in Somerville, MA, November 12, 1910, Chris Henry Tibbetts, she of Somerville, MA, and he of Milton. She was a schoolteacher, aged twenty years, and he was a farmer, aged twenty-two years. In 1930, they lived on the King’s Highway in Milton.

WEST MILTON. A meeting of the Inasmuch society was held at the home of Nellie Hayes this Wednesday (Farmington News, April 3, 1925).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society held its sale last Thursday evening, with a fair attendance and a good sale. Owing to the shower of Wednesday, it was postponed (Farmington News, July 31, 1925).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met this Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Annie Cook (Farmington News, September 25, 1925).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society held a meeting this week at the home of Mrs. Teresa Tibbets (Farmington News, October 22, 1926).

LOCAL. Annual harvest supper will be held at Nute chapel, Nute Ridge, auspices Inasmuch society Thursday, Nov. 3, at 6.30 p.m. Supper followed by entertainment. Admission to all 35c (Farmington News, October 28, 1927).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met with Mrs. E.H. Kelley, Wednesday afternoon. The program included the making of dust caps (Farmington News, January 4, 1929).

Elvah M. Hayes married in Wakefield, MA, in 1916, Edward H. Kelley. She was born in Farmington, NH, December 22, 1878, daughter of Charles H. and Nellie M. (Parmenter) Hayes.

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society will meet all day next Wednesday at the home of Mrs. L.D. Garland (Farmington News, January 11, 1929).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at the Nute chapel parsonage next Wednesday afternoon (Farmington News, February 8, 1929).

WEST MILTON. A lawn social sale and entertainment will be held at the Nute chapel Wednesday afternoon and evening, August 21, under the auspices of the In-as-much society (Farmington News, August 16, 1929).

WEST MILTON. The last meeting of the Inasmuch society was held Wednesday afternoon, with Mrs. T.J. Poelman at the parsonage (Farmington News, February 7, 1930).

Mrs. Helen F. (Guptill) Poelman was the wife of Rev. T.J. Poelman of the Nute Chapel (See Milton’s Nute Chapel Ministers of 1922-53).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Mary Varney, March 26 (Farmington News, March 28, 1930).

Mary J. Moore married in Lowell, MA, November 7, 1900, William J. Varney, both of Lowell, MA. Both were mill operatives, aged twenty-one years.

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met with Mrs. E.H. Kelley May 23. Mr. and Mrs. E.H. Kelley and Mrs. Nellie Hayes motored to Rye Thursday, May 22, and visited Mrs. Kelley’s aunt, Mrs. Laura A. Locke. Mrs. Locke returned with them and is visiting Mrs. Hayes for a few days (Farmington News, May 30, 1930).

Laura Anne Hayes married, Match 6, 1879, John Elvin Locke. She and Nellie M. (Parmenter) Hayes’s husband, Charles H. Hayes, were children of Ichabod and Hannah R. (Jenkins) Hayes.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Doria Nute Wednesday, June 11 (Farmington News, June 13, 1930).

Deloria “Doria” Ferland married in Milton, December 23, 1922, Ray H. Nute, she of Farmington, NH, and he of Milton. She was a shoeworker, aged twenty-two years, and he was a shoemaker, aged twenty-four years. Rev. Newell W. Whitman performed the ceremony. In 1930, they lived on the Hare Road in West Milton.

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Esther Swinerton, Wednesday, July 16 (Farmington News, July 18, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met last week with Mrs. Curtis (Farmington News, August 22, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet this week at the home of Mrs. Geneva Tripp (Farmington News, September 19, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met with Mrs. Theresa Tibbets this Wednesday (Farmington News, October 3, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society held a pie social at Nute chapel Wednesday evening (Farmington News, November 7, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The pie social held at Nute chapel last Wednesday evening under the auspices of the Inasmuch society was quite largely attended in spite of the stormy night. Games were enjoyed by all and pie and coffee were served for refreshments (Farmington News, November 14, 1930).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met this Wednesday with Mrs. Hayes (Farmington News, January 2, 1931).

WEST MILTON. On Monday evening the In-as-much society sponsored a social and sale of fancy articles at Nute chapel. There was a good attendance and a most delightful evening was recorded (Farmington News, July 3, 1931).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met with Mrs. Nellie Hayes, Wednesday afternoon (Farmington News, May 19, 1933).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met last Wednesday for an all-day session at Nute chapel and repaired the hymn books (Farmington News, July 21, 1933).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met on Tuesday at the chapel (Farmington News, August 30, 1935).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society met at the chapel Wednesday and cleaned the dining hall and kitchen (Farmington News, September 20, 1935).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society recently met at Nute chapel and made a decided improvement in the appearance of the paint work and chairs in the dining ball by applying paint and varnish (Farmington News, October 25, 1935).

WEST MILTON. As is its custom, the In-as-much society presented Christmas tokens to all the shut-ins of the community (Farmington News, January 3, 1936).

WEST MILTON. Since our last newsletter a hard wood floor has been laid in Nute chapel, the same having been financed by Nute Ridge Grange. In addition to improvements made in the dining hall, the In-as-much society is improving the condition of the pew cushions, and a meeting was held Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Elvah H. Kelley in connection with the project (Farmington News, April 17, 1936).

WEST MILTON. The In-as-much society staged the leading event of the week when members gathered at the home of Mrs. Cora B. Garland, Thursday, September 15, and sprung a surprise party in honor of her eightieth birthday, to which relatives and friends participated. Among the relatives were representatives of four generations, which included Mrs. Garland, her daughter, Mrs. John Gilman, Sr., of Laconia, a grandson, John Gilman, 2nd, of West Milton, and a great grandson, John Gilman, Jr., also of West Milton. Prominent among the friends and neighbors was Mrs. Ellen Haynes of West Milton who is in her eighty sixth year.  Mrs. Garland has been a resident of our community for many years, and has taken a leading part, (which she continues to do at the present time) in all of the organized activities. She is a veteran member of the the In-as-Much society, Nute Ridge Grange and Community Fair association, and has stood ready at all times to lend a helping hand in trying to make our community a better place in which to live (Farmington News, September 23, 1938).

WEST MILTON. The weekly meeting of the In-as-Much society was held Tuesday at the home of Mrs. Alfred Langfell (Farmington News, November 29, 1938).

WEST MILTON. The meeting of the In-As-Much society was held Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Alfred Langfell (Farmington News, February 24, 1939).

There does not seem have been any news items regarding the In-as-Much Society during the 1940s. (At least none in the surviving issues of the Farmington News).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society will meet at the home of Mrs. Esther Swinerton on Friday, December 22, at 1.30, to fill Sunshine baskets and candy boxes for the tree. Also at this time they will have a Christmas party (Farmington News, December 22, 1950).

WEST MILTON. The Inasmuch society met at the home of Mrs. Esther Swinerton for a Christmas party and to fill sunshine baskets and candy boxes for the children. After exchanging gifts, delicious refreshments of ice cream, cookies and tea were served by the hostess (Farmington News, December 29, 1950).

MILTON. Milton – The late Mrs. Esther Swinerton was memorialized in the June meeting of the West Milton In-As-Much club, Meeting was held in the home of Marion Bruce (Farmington News, June 28, 1956).

Mrs. Esther (Blaisdell) Swinerton of Milton died of a pulmonary embolism (following a ruptured appendix) in Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NH, May 16, 1956, aged seventy-five years. “She was active in church, and community and grange affairs” (Farmington News, May 17, 1956).

Marion Agnes Cole married in Milton, July 10, 1947, Kenneth Raymond Bruce, she of East Rochester, NH, and he of Milton. She was a mill worker, aged twenty-two years, and he was a carpenter, aged thirty years. Rev. Ralph V. Townsend performed the ceremony.

MILTON. Greta Walsh will be hostess to the In-As-Much club on Aug 13 at West Milton (Farmington News, August 9, 1956).

Greta M. Benjamin married Adelbert Walsh. He appeared in the Cambridge, MA, directory of 1954, as a carpenter in Dedham, MA, with his house at 7 Hancock place in Cambridge.

Thereafter the In-As-Much Society appeared in the Farmington News in church notices.

NUTE CHAPEL. West Milton. Walter H. Dryer, Pastor. Sunday school at 9:45. Sunday services at 11. Youth Fellowship, 5:45 p.m. Evening services at 7. Prayer meeting, Wednesdays, at 7:30. First monthly Fellowship supper this Friday at 6:30; Hymnsing follows supper. Tuesday, Inasmuch society (Farmington News, September 5, 1957).

The last mention of West Milton’s In-As-Much Society in the Farmington News dates from April 1965.

NUTE CHAPEL. Tuesday, April 13th: 7:00 PM – In As Much Society meets at the chapel (Farmington News, April 8, 1965).


References:

Find a Grave. (2014, September 25). Agnes Gertrude Horne Bean. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/136414516/agnes-gertrude-bean

Find a Grave. (2015, May 31). Florence A. Colbath. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147227967/florence-a.-colbath

Find a Grave. (2016, September 19). Annie E. Davis Cook. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170190957/annie-e-cook

Find a Grave. (2013, September 7). John I. Cooke. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/116670032/john-i-cooke

Find a Grave. (2015, August 24). Fanny Isabel Hayes Downing. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/151180169/fannie-isabel-downing

Find a Grave. (2014, September 14). Cora Belle Goodall Garland. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/135905561/cora-belle-garland

Find a Grave. (2016, September 14). Ira Wesley Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169917279/ira-wesley-hayes

Find a Grave. (2015, May 30). Nellie M. Parmenter Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147186219/nellie-m.-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, September 25). Elizabeth M. Wiggin Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/136413931/elizabeth-m.-horne

Find a Grave. (2019, November 20). Lola M. Hill Hyland. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/204868673/lola-m-hyland

Find a Grave. (2010, June 6). Elvah Hayes Kelley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/53324509/elvah-kelley

Find a Grave. (2016, February 16). Laura Ann Hayes Locke. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/158247440/laura-ann-locke

Find a Grave. (2020, March 21). Blanche W. [((Thurston) Walker)] Myers. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/208569843/blanche-w-myers

Find a Grave. (2015, July 9). Doria Ferland Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/148952357/doria-nute

Find a Grave. (2016, October 1). Ellen Foss Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170750147/ellen-nute

Find a Grave. (2012, February 15). Clara Nettie Giles Pierce. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/85027080/clara-nettie-pierce

Find a Grave. (2020, February 24). Caroline A. Stockbridge Thurston. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/207382001/carolyn-a-thurston

Find a Grave. (2015, June 5). Mattie Geneva Tripp. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147491064/mattie-geneva-tripp

Wikipedia. (2021, April 4). American Relief Association. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Relief_Administration

Spaulding Fibre Company, 1925-57

By Muriel Bristol | June 6, 2021

Continued from J. Spaulding & Sons Co., 1894-24.


Huntley N. Spaulding appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1925, as president of International Leather Company, at 89 Beach street, Room 203B, with his house at both the Hotel Somerset and at Rochester, NH. (The Hotel Somerset was at Commonwealth Avenue and Charlesgate in Boston, MA). Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre boards, with addresses at 89 Beach Street, Room 203B [in Boston, MA], and 15 Elkins Street in South Boston.Hotel Somerset

Huntley N. Spaulding appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1926, as treasurer of Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., at 89 Beach Street, Room 203B, and president of International Leather Co., same address, with his house at Rochester, NH. Rolland H. Spaulding appeared as president of Spaulding Fibre Co., same address, with his house at Rochester, NH. Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre board, with addresses at 89 Beach Street, Room 203B [in Boston, MA], 15 Elkins Street in South Boston, and in New Hampshire. – See p 391. International Leather Company dealt in leatherboard at the same Beach Street address.

Spaulding Ad - BD1926Huntley N. Spaulding ran for and won the office of Governor of New Hampshire for the 1927-28 biennium.

Odd Items From Everywhere. Wakefield st., Rochester, N.H., might be called Governors’ Row, for on it live Rolland H. Spaulding, Governor in 1915 and 1916, Ex-Gov Samuel D. Felker, and Huntley N. Spaulding, just elected. (Boston Globe, November 27, 1926).

Huntley N. Spaulding and his younger brother, Rolland H. Spaulding were both characterized as being “Progressive” Republicans.

Archilles G. [“Archie”] Marcoux, a millwright at the Spaulding plant in Milton, died in the Rochester Hospital, May 29, 1927, aged fifty-six years, six months, and twenty-three days. He had sustained severe burns “from boiler live steam” over 98% of his body three hours before his death (and he died one hour after being admitted to the hospital).

MARCOUX DEAD OF BURNS RECEIVED IN MILL BOILER. ROCHESTER, N.H., May 3 – Archie Marcoux, 60, employed in the Spaulding mill at South Milton, died this afternoon at the Rochester Hospital from severe burns sustained today, while inspecting a boiler at the plant. The three boilers had just been inspected, and Mr. Marcoux opened the manhole and entered one of the boilers, unbeknown to other employes. Fireman George Chalmers started a fire in the boiler and soon heard Marcoux shouting, whom he released and sent to the hospital. Mr. Marcoux was a native of Canada and had worked at the plant for several years. A wife and several children survive him (Boston Globe, May 31, 1927).

Huntley N. (Harriet) Spaulding appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1929, as president of Spaulding Fibre Co., with his house at 78 Wakefield street. Rolland H. (Vera G.) Spaulding appeared as treasurer of Spaulding Fibre Co., and vice president of the Rochester Trust Co., with his house at 76 Wakefield street. Spaulding Fibre Co. (Inc.) appeared as manufacturers of fibre products, president Huntly N. Spaulding and vice president-treasurer Rolland H. Spaulding, with addresses at 100 N. Main street [in Rochester], and Spaulding avenue in North Rochester.

Spaulding Fibre Company appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as being based in North Rochester, NH.

Spaulding, Huntley N
Huntley Nowell Spaulding (1869-1955)

Huntley N. Spaulding, a fibre manufacturer, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet M. Spaulding, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), his sister-in-law, Nannie G. Mason, aged forty-five years (b. KS), and his lodger, Mabel A. Futes, aged forty-one years (b. New Brunswick (American citizen)). Roland H. Spaulding owned their house on Wakefield Street (corner of Union Street), which was valued at $40,000. They had a radio set.

Spaulding, Rolland H
Rolland Harty Spaulding (1873-1942)

Roland H. Spaulding, president of a leatherboard factory, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eleven years), Vera G. Spaulding, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), his children, Virginia P. Spaulding, aged nine years (b. MA), and Betty L. Spaulding, aged seven years (b. MA), and his servants, Mary Wakefield, a private family cook, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), and Rachael Houle, a private family maid, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Roland H. Spaulding owned their house at 76 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $200,000. They had a radio set.

Walter A. Potter, aged sixty-five years (b. RI), headed a Greenwich, CT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Marion S. Potter, aged forty years (b. NY), and his servants, Stewart Walker, a private family butler, aged thirty-one years (b. PA), and Ethel Walker, a private family cook, aged thirty-one years (b. PA). Walter A. Potter owned their house, which was valued at $70,000. They had a radio set.

Walter A. Potter died of heart disease in Greenwich, CT, January 4, 1932, aged sixty-six years.

Townsend Center. The body of Walter A. Potter, aged 66 years, who died of heart trouble at his home in Greenwich, Conn., was brought here today for burial in the Jonas Spaulding family lot at Hillside cemetery. Mr. Potter is survived by his wife, Mrs. Marion (Spaulding) Potter. Mrs. Spaulding [Mrs. Potter] is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Spaulding, late of Townsend Harbor (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), January 7, 1932).

The Spaulding family donated a new school building to the town of Townsend, MA, in June 1932.

1750 Visitors at Townsend School … The families of Huntley N. and Rolland H. Spaulding attended the banquet at 6 o’clock in the playroom the new school at which 425 townspeople and former residents were present. A brief speaking program was presented at the close of dinner by Mr. Flarity, toastmaster. The speakers included Senator Charles A. Stevens of Lowell, Rep. James E. Kendall of Dunstable and Rev. Dr. Leo A. Nies of New London, Conn., whose first child was born in Townsend where he began his service in the ministry. Among those at the banquet Mrs. Rolland H. Spaulding and daughters, Virginia P. and Betty L., and their guest, Miss Cynthia Bond; Mrs. Huntley N. Spaulding, Mrs. Marion S. Potter, Greenwich, Conn., sister of the Spaulding brothers; and Mrs. C. Wesley Going and children Reginald, Mildred and Dorothy of Amherst, N.H. Mrs. Dorothy Spaulding of East Sebago, Me, widow of Leon C. Spaulding, was unable to attend because of a death in the family. Huntley N. Spaulding was born Oct 30, 1868, and served as governor of New Hampshire in 1927 [1927-28] and Rolland H. Spaulding was born March 13, 1873, and was governor of New Hampshire in 1914-15 [1915-16]. They are the sons of the late Jonas and Emeline (Cummings) Spaulding, the father being the founder of a leather-board industry in this town (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), June 30, 1932).

TOWNSEND CENTER. Given Trees For Cemetery. Hillside cemetery on Highland street, has been beautified recently by a gift of 27 trees from Mrs. Marion Spaulding Potter, of New York city. Mrs. Potter is a native of Townsend, the daughter of the late Jonas and Emeline (Cummings) Spaulding and sister of Huntley and Roland Spaulding, former governors of New Hampshire, donors of the new Spaulding memorial school in Townsend. Twenty of the trees, which are maple and linden, have been set out bordering both sides of the fifth avenue in the cemetery, where the Spaulding family lot is located. The remaining seven trees have been get out on the sixth avenue. Two of the seven, which are willow trees, have been placed at the sixth avenue entrance of the cemetery. The trees were planted under the direction of a landscape gardener, sent by Mrs. Potter, with Fredrick J. Piper, local cemetery commissioner, and Turner Goodwin, assisting. Azalea and other shrubs have been placed on the Spaulding lot, groups of dwarf evergreen have been planted in the triangular plots at the four corners of the lot, and running vines at the base of the Spaulding monument (Fitchburg Sentinel  (Fitchburg, MA), October 29, 1932).

New York. Mrs. Marion S. Potter, of Greenwich has taken an apartment at Ten Park Avenue (Hartford Courant (Hartford, CT), January 7, 1934).

SPAULDING FIBRE COMPANY ENTERTAINS EMPLOYES. More than 250 employes of the counter department of the Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., operated by Ex Governors Rolland and Huntley Spaulding, were given a banquet last Saturday for operating the factory six months without a lost time accident. The Spaulding Company hired a theatre and all employes enjoyed the program until noon when the banquet was served in Masonic hall by women of the Christian church. Ex Governor Rolland H. Spaulding spoke and the employes furnished a program. Later at the Wolfeboro Casino there was a program of sports (Farmington News, October 12, 1934).

MILTON. The Salem Shoe Co. of Salem, Mass., have definitely decided to locate in Milton, the building formerly occupied by the Kennebunk Mfg. Co., is being made ready for occupancy. Walls are being white-washed, floors repaired and new benches erected. The new concern expects to start cutting and stitching operations in about two weeks and attain full production in about a month. A few experienced men will be brought to Milton, but the greatest number of workers will be recruited locally. Officers of the company state that they will train a large number of local inexperienced men to meet their own requirements. The Spaulding Fibre Co., which has occupied the building, has aided the new concern materially by contributing several costly improvements recently made, among which Is a new dust laying system Repairs will be ma do on Charles street which will make access to the factory easier, while Steve Dixon has given the field near the factory as a parking space for cars (Farmington News, January 18, 1935).

New England in general, including the Salmon Falls River running through Milton and Rochester, experienced severe flooding from snow and ice melt and a sequence of four severe rain storms in March 1936. It was said to have been the worst floods since those of 1896. The flood waters crested here March 19, 1936.

N.H. DROWNING VICTIM’S BODY IS RECOVERED. MILTON, N.H., March 16 (IP). A searching party recovered today the body of [Aldrige] Edward Custeau, 60, who drowned in the Salmon Falls river Friday while removing flashboards from a dam. The body was caught on a plank of an old dam a quarter mile below the spot Custeau fell from a rowboat. He leaves a widow and three children (Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, VT), [Tuesday,] March 17, 1936).

The unfortunate millhand, Aldridge E. Custeau, was father of Emma P. (Custeau) Ramsey (for whom the “Emma Ramsey Center” is named). At the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census, Custeau had lived in Lebanon, ME, right next door to Spaulding’s hydraulic engineer Ira W. Jones.

U.S. Geological Survey reports of the 1936 floods placed the two Milton Leatherboard Company dams at between 34.9 and 34.8 miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua River, and the two Twin State Gas & Electric Company Milton dams at between 34.7 and 34.6 miles above. The J. Spaulding & Sons Co.’s two Milton “Upper” dams were between 34.5 and 34.4 miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua River, and their Milton “Lower” mill dam was at 34.1 miles above the river mouth. Their five North Rochester mill dams were 32.6, 32.5, and 32.0 miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua River (U.S. Geological Survey, 1937).

Spauldings Offer Rochester $360,000 Toward School. TOWNSEND, Nov. 11 – The Spaulding brothers, donors of the Spaulding Memorial high school in this town, have offered Rochester, N.H., $360,000 for the construction of a new high school in that city. While Huntley N. Spaulding was governor of New Hampshire he built at his own expense a $150,000 gymnasium for the Keene (N.H.) normal school. Roland H. Spaulding, a brother and also a former governor, has made several gifts for educational causes. The Rochester city council voted yesterday to accept the Spaulding offer, in which Mrs. Marion (Spaulding) Potter of Greenwich, Conn., joins with her brothers and her sister-in-law, Mrs. Dorothy H. Spaulding, widow of Leon Spaulding (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), November 11, 1936).

Napoleon E. “Paul” Marcoux, a [Spaulding] fibre mill operative, died of a fractured skull in an auto accident on the road from Milton to Rochester, NH, April 2, 1937, aged thirty-eight years, eleven months, and eighteen days.

FATHER OF NINE DIES IN AUTO CRASH. MILTON, N.H., April 2 (AP). Paul Marcoux, 39, mill worker and father of nine children, was instantly killed late today when his auto and a heavy truck collided during a snow storm (Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, VT), April 3, 1937).

Rolland H. Spaulding had his right kidney removed at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA, in 1937.

R.H. SPAULDING BACK AT WORK. Rochester, Sept. 24 – Ex-Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, who has been confined to the Phillips House of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and later to his home on Wakefield street with a severe illness, is able to be out again and has returned to his desk in the office of the Spaulding Fibre Company (Portsmouth Herald, September 24, 1937).

MILTON NEIGHBORS AID WIDOW. Milton, Nov. 13. – This little community has once again demonstrated the remarkable spirit of charity and cooperation for which it has been noted in the past, and, as a result, Mrs. Hazel [(Downs)] Marcoux, mother of nine children, who was widowed last April when her husband was killed in an automobile accident, is happy. The woman’s modest home, badly in need of repairs, has been completely renovated as a community project. With material furnished by the Spaulding Fibre company, by which her husband was employed for 15 years, 44 Milton men recently pooled their efforts to shingle the roof and walls, attach 11 storm windows with frames and install a new door. This done, they then cut nine cords of wood – enough for the entire winter – and piled it neatly in the shed (Portsmouth Herald, November 13, 1937).

Here and There. Because they have worked six months without a “lost time” accident, employes of the South Rochester and North Rochester plants of the Spaulding Fibre Co., will be given a safety outing Saturday at Wolfeboro. The program include baseball, swimming, bowling, billiards, boat riding, other athletic events and a turkey dinner (Portsmouth Herald, August 4, 1939).

New Rochester School Dedicated. Rochester, Sept. 11.-The city of Rochester’s new $1,000,000 Spaulding High School was dedicated Saturday afternoon in the presence of educators and representatives of the state and city Governments. Ex-Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding represented the Spaulding families, whose donations of nearly a half-million dollars made the building possible. The invocation was by the Rev. Dr. Marion E. Hall. Commissioner James M. Pringle brought greetings from the State Department of Education. The building was accepted for the city by Mayor John F. Conrad. Supt. of Schools Arthur S. Rollins expressed appreciation of the School Committee. The principal speaker was Dr. Nicholas L. Engelhardt of Teachers’ College, Columbia University. Rev. Joseph H. Cormier, pastor of Holy Rosary Church, gave the benediction. Flags for the auditorium and outside the building were presented by the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion. Besides ex-Gov. and Mrs. Huntley L. Spaulding other donors of the family were: Ex-Gov. and Mrs. Rolland L. [H.] Spaulding, Mrs. Marion Spaulding Potter, a sister, Mrs. Leon G. [C.] Spaulding, widow of the brother to whom the building dedicated (Portsmouth Herald, September 12, 1939).

Spaulding Fibre Company gave its employees a Christmas bonus in December 1939.

Police Hunt Clues After Series Of Burglaries. Dover, May 27 – Police today were continuing to press their hunt for clues that might lead to the capture of thieves responsible for a series of breaks and thefts here and in Milton. At Milton, where an $187 payroll was stolen sometime Thursday night from the Spaulding Fibre Co.’s office, another break was discovered Saturday at the garage of Charles R. Whitehouse, trucker. Meanwhile Atty. Clyde Keefe of Dover, Democratic candidate for governor of New Hampshire, and operators of My Lady beauty salon discovered their offices had been entered and sums of money were taken. Mr. Whitehouse estimated about $150 worth of tools, dies, gasoline, oil and a truck battery were stolen sometime early Saturday morning. Breaking the lock on the door, thieves worked quickly and in their haste they had to hacksaw a cable to remove the battery from the truck. At Dover, Mrs. Retta C. Bowles estimated the sum of $17 was from her office after the door to the salon had been forced. The money had been hidden in a cupboard where Mrs. Bowles, believed it was safe (Portsmouth Herald, May 27, 1940).

Huntley Spaulding, a fibre manufacturer, aged seventy years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet Spaulding, aged sixty-three years (b. MA), and his servants, Iva Wood, a a private family cook, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and Wendall Wood, a a private family chauffeur, aged forty-five years (b. MA). Huntley Spaulding owned their house at 78 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $35,000. He had resided in the same house in 1935.

Spaulding - 76 and 78 Wakefield Street
Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding’s Wakefield Street house (left) and Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding’s neighboring house (right) are both now owned by The Governor’s Inn in Rochester, NH

Rolland Spaulding, a fibre manufacturer, aged sixty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Vera G. Spaulding, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), his children, Virginia Spaulding, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and Betty Spaulding, aged seventeen years (b. MA), and his servants, Alice Beckingham, a private family maid, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Eleanor Higgins, a private family cook, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH). Rolland Spaulding owned their house at 76 Wakefield Street, which was valued at $45,000. He had resided in the same house in 1935.

Marion S. Potter, a widow, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Greenwich, CT, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her servant, Lillie Mae Allison, a housemaid, aged thirty-eight years. Marion S. Potter owned their house at Alden Park (no valuation recorded); she had resided in the same house in 1935.

Rolland H. (Vera G.) Spaulding appeared in the Rochester directory of 1941, as president of the Spaulding Fibre Co., president of the Rochester Trust Co., and vice-president of the First National Bank of Rochester, with his house at 76 Wakefield street. Bette Spaulding appeared as a student, with her residence at 76 Wakefield street. Huntley N. (Harriet) Spaulding appeared as treasurer of the Spaulding Fibre Co., with his house at 78 Wakefield street. The Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., appeared with R.H. Spaulding as president, Huntley N. Spaulding as treasurer, and Cecil M. Pike as secretary and assistant treasurer (and a co-proprietor of [Spaulding-owned] Three Line Counter Co.), with offices at 100 N. Main street, in Rochester, and Spaulding avenue, in North Rochester.

Virginia P. Spaulding married at 76 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, June 10, 1941, William H. Champlin, Jr., she of 76 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, and he of Rochester Hill Road, Rochester, NH. She was a student, aged twenty years, and he was a flying school manager, aged twenty-four years. Rev. George E. Gilcrest of Quincy, MA, performed the ceremony. Champlin was born in Boston, MA, September 7, 1916, son of William H. and Helen M. (Hussey) Champlin.

Champlin-Spaulding. Virginia Pauline Spaulding, oldest daughter of former Governor and Mrs. Rolland H. Spaulding and prominent member of Manchester’s younger set, was married to William Hilton Champlin, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Champlin, Sr., of Rochester Hill road, Manchester [Rochester], on Tuesday afternoon at 4 o’clock. In the garden at the home of bride, the ceremony was performed by the Rev. George W. Gilchrist, pastor of the Bethany Congregational church, Quincy, Mass. Wearing an heirloom rosepoint lace gown, combined with net, and a six-yard train of net, ivory illusion and a Juliet cap with clusters of orange blossoms, the bride was escorted to the altar by her father. She carried a spray of white and orange blossoms. Betty Spaulding, sister of the bride, served as maid of honor, the Misses Natalie Foss, Madelyn Mitchell, Lucille Marchand,, Mrs. Robert Feineman and Mrs. Richard Cooper, all of Rochester, and Mrs. Francis Maquire of Stonington, Me., serving as bridesmaids. John B. Nichols of Rochester best man and the ushers were Wallace H. Hussey, Charles Clark, James Nixon, Richard Cooper and Harold Dawson. Music was furnished by Mrs. Dorothy Dean Monroe, organist of the First church (Congregational). Following the ceremony, a reception for the 300 guests was held in the garden (Portsmouth Herald, June 11, 1941).

Rolland H. Spaulding of 76 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, a fibre manufacturer, died of acute uremia in Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NH, March 14, 1942, at 3:13 AM, aged sixty-eight years, eleven months, and twenty-seven days.

Ex-Gov. R.H. Spaulding Succumbs in Rochester. Former Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, public benefactor and president of the Spaulding Fibre company, died early this morning from heart trouble, after several days’ illness in the $300,000 Frisbee Memorial hospital which his family gave to the city. Had he lived until tomorrow he would have been 69 years old. He was born in Townsend, Mass., son of Jonas and Emeline (Cummings) Spaulding. He attended the Townsend Grammar schools and was graduated from Phillips Exeter academy in 1893. Then he started working in his father’s fibre mill in Rochester so that he might learn the business of the international concern which he eventually headed. He came to Rochester in the late 1890’s and had made his home here ever since. At the time of death he was living at 76 Wakefield street. Mr. Spaulding was president and director of the First National Bank of Rochester, director of the Rochester Chamber of Commerce, a past officer of the Rochester Kiwanis and director of the United Life and Accident association. In 1912 he served as a delegate to the Republican national convention. In 1916 to 1917 he was governor of New Hampshire. He was also vice chairman of the executive committee of the New Hampshire Committee of Safety and chairman of the New Hampshire Defense League in the same period. Several years ago he was appointed by the governors of the New England states to act as general chairman of the New England Railway commission. He was a member of the Congregational church. He was donor of the Spaulding Memorial swimming pool at Dartmouth College. He and his brother, former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding, built a high school in their home of Townsend, Mass. in memory of their parents and had given more than one-half a million dollars towards the building of the Rochester High school. In 1915 Dartmouth college awarded him with an MA degree and in 1916, the University of New Hampshire honored him with an LLD. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Vera Spaulding, [and] two daughters, Mrs. William H. Champlin of Rochester and Miss Betty Spaulding, student at Harcum Junior college, Bryn Mawr (Portsmouth Herald, March 14, 1942).

Death Notices. SPAULDING – Rolland Harty Spaulding died March 14 in Rochester, NH. Born March 15, 1873, at Townsend, Mass., son of Jonas and Emeline (Cumming) Spaulding. Services Tuesday, March 17, at 2 p.m. at the First Church, Congregational, Rochester, N.H. Interment in Townsend (Boston Globe, March 17, 1942).

LOCAL. Robert Bickford, who has just completed his duties with the Farmington Motor Car Co., has accepted employment as chauffeur for Mrs. Rolland H. Spaulding in Rochester and will commence his duties next Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Bickford will live in Rochester (Farmington News, April 3, 1942).

The late Rolland H. Spaulding’s younger daughter, Bette L. Spaulding, became engaged to Wilson E. Haas in January 1943.

New Hampshire Heiress to Live in California. New York, Jan. 18 – Just as soon as the wedding bells sound off for Bette Louise Spaulding and Wilson Edwin Haas, he will take his heiress-bride out to live in California. Although this sounds simple enough it will be a complicated enough move, for Bette hails from the hills of New Hampshire. As the daughter of the late Governor Rolland Spaulding of New Hampshire, Bette inherited a nice big nest-egg and has been one of the country’s most sought-after post-debs. She attended the House in the Pines, Beaver School and was graduated from Harcum Junior College last June. Bette was the belle of her schools and extremely popular with the brothers of her classmates. After the death of her grandfather, Jonas Spaulding, Bette’s father became president of Spaulding Fibre Company of Rochester, N.H., and Tonawanda. Later, he was made director of Spaulding, Ltd., of London, director of the United Life and Accident Insurance Company, New England Public Service Corporation, St. Maurice Paper Company of Canada, and the Public Service Corporation of New Hampshire. The future bride’s uncle, Hartley [Huntley] N. Spaulding, was one-time governor of New Hampshire. Bette’s only sister is married to William H. Champlin, Jr. Wilson hails from Glendale, Cal. After being graduated from the University of California, he enrolled in the Harvard Business School (Buffalo Courier (Buffalo, NY), January 19, 1943).

Bette Louise Spaulding married at Camp Robinson, in Pulaski County, AK, June 13, 1943, Wilson E. Haas, she of Rochester, NH, and he of Glendale, CA. She was aged twenty years, and he was a soldier in Co. B, 62nd Battalion, 13th Regiment, aged twenty-seven years. He was born in Silverton, CO, May 19, 1916, son of Edwin C. and Minnie A. (Wilson) Haas.

Spaulding Ad - FN430820
Spaulding Fibre Advertisement (August 1943)

Daughter of Late N.H. Governor, Bride. ROCHESTER, N.H., June 17 -Announcement was made today of the marriage of Bette L. Spaulding, daughter of Mrs. Vera G. Spaulding and the late Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, of Rochester, and private Wilson E. Haas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin C. Haas of Glendale, Calif. The ceremony was performed last Sunday morning in the chapel at Camp Robinson, Ark., by Army Chaplain John D. Clyde. Mary Lyons of Brighton, Mass., was maid of honor and Capt. Lassie McMann of Magnolia, Ark., was best man. Private and Mrs. Haas are on a honey moon trip to Hot Springs, Ark., and will reside at 2620 East Washington av., Little Rock, Ark. Private Haas was graduated from the University of California and the Harvard School of Business Administration. Before entering the service he was employed in Washington (Boston Globe, June 18, 1943).

Spaulding Fibre Company’s North Rochester mill burned in the early hours of Wednesday, October 4, 1944. One Spaulding employee, Earle O. Wheeler, died “of some form of heart disease and overexertion” during the fire (about 1 AM), aged fifty-four years, eleven months, and fourteen days.

$750,000 Fire Razes Mill In Rochester. A fire, believed to have started in a dryer room, destroyed the Spaulding Fibre company mill yesterday, causing the death of one man and damage estimated at $750,000. Earle O. Wheeler of Rochester, was found dead near a steam pump in the boiler room. Mr. Wheeler, night fireman of the plant, is believed to have died of heart attack while operating the plant fire control system after discovering the fire at about 1 am. Mr. Wheeler and six other night employes of the mill called the Rochester and Milton fire departments and manned the plant apparatus, but the wooden frame structure gave way before the flames, and the main building with thousands of dollars worth of machinery and stock, was destroyed. The company records and office equipment were saved and the power plant received only slight damage to machinery. Approximately 180 persons are out of work due to the loss of the mill, which manufactured shoe counters and other fiber equipment for military use. Supt. Elmer Waitt of Milton was one of the few executives present, as most of the others, including the owner, former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding, production manager Cecil M. Pike and treasurer S. Ellsworth Clow, were at their Tonawanda, N.Y., plant (Portsmouth Herald, October 5, 1944).

Plan to Rebuild Razed Fiber Mill In Rochester. The Spaulding Fiber Company plant at North Rochester, destroyed Wednesday morning in a $750,000 fire will be rebuilt as soon as priorities for materials needed to construct a modern fireproof building can be secured, Maj. Ernest C. Blackwell, general manager of the company, said last night. The decision was announced after a telephone conversation with former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding, who is at the Tonawanda, N.Y., plant with other executives of the concern. Since the Spaulding plant was engaged in war work, it is expected that the necessary construction materials for the rebuilding will be secured with a minimum of difficulty. Some of the employes left jobless by Wednesday’s fire have been given work at the company’s South Milton plant, and others are expected to be used by a plant in Dover (Portsmouth Herald, October 6, 1944).

Bonus Checks. Twenty-five employes of the Spaulding Fibre Board plant at Townsend Harbor received Christmas bonus checks of S50 each Monday and other employes received lesser amounts in accordance with their length of service with the company. The 25 who received the $50 checks have been with company for terms of one year longer. Ernest J. Hamel is the superintendent (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), December 21, 1944).

Strikers Will Picket Homes of Executives. TONAWANDA, N.Y., July 18 (AP) – About 300 striking employes of the Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., have voted unanimously to picket homes of company executives, including that of Huntley N. Spaulding, former Governor of New Hampshire at North Rochester, N.H. A statement released yesterday by Herman Stadler, president of Local 306. United Radio, Electrical and Machine Workers, Congress of Industrial Organizations,’ and Sheridan Creekmore, chairman of the local’s strike committee, said the action was taken last night after weeks of unsuccessful negotiation with the company (Patterson News, Patterson, NJ), July 18, 1946).

An Ill Wind. ROCHESTER, April 6 (API) – The Spaulding Fibre company obtained permission to burn tall grass to prevent possible accidental destruction of one of its buildings by sparks from passing trains. The wind shifted during the operation and the storage bay the company was protecting caught fire. It burned to the ground (Portsmouth Herald, April 6, 1949).

Lumber Company To Sell Twelve Houses. Rochester, N.H., Aug. 12. Twelve six-room homes, owned the Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., on the Lebanon, Me., side of North Rochester, are for sale. Two have been purchased. Elmer F. Waitt, Milton, executive of the firm, said the houses are being sold for $2,200. They have running water and electricity but no baths (Portland Press Herald, August 13, 1949).

Huntley N. (Harriet) Spaulding appeared in the Rochester directory of 1950, as treasurer of Spaulding Fibre Co., with his house at 78 Wakefield street. Vera G. Spaulding appeared as the widow of Rolland H. Spaulding, with her house at 76 Wakefield street. Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre products, with their plant at Spaulding avenue in North Rochester. Its chairman was Huntley N. Spaulding; president C.C. Steck, of Tonawanda, NY; vice-president and secretary, Cecil M. Pike; and treasurer Stephen E. Clow.

Rochester Fire Threatens Woods. State police were asked to help combat a fire in a stock shed at the Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., plant in North Rochester this afternoon. Rochester fire officials asked the state police to alert town fire departments in the area because they feared a high wind might create forest fire. The main mill, according to Rochester sources, was not in the immediate path of the flames (Portsmouth Herald, May 2, 1951).

Harriet M. (Mason) Spaulding of 78 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, died of a coronary occlusion in North Hampton, NH, July 30, 1954, aged seventy-seven years.

Deaths and Funerals. Mrs. Huntley Spaulding. NORTH HAMPTON – Funeral services are being planned for Mrs. Harriet M. Spaulding, wife of former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding of Rochester, who died Saturday at her summer home on Boar’s Head. A native of Boston, Mass., Mrs. Spaulding was the daughter of the late James and Lillian Mason, and was about 80. Death attributed to a heart attack (Portsmouth Herald, August 2, 1954).

Huntley N. Spaulding of 78 Wakefield Street, Rochester, NH, , a fibre products manufacturer, died of prostate carcinoma in Rochester, NH, November 14, 1955, at 10 AM, aged eighty-six years. (His sister, Mrs. Marion S. Potter, supplied information for the death certificate).

Huntley Spaulding, Ex-N.H. Governor, Native of Townsend. ROCHESTER, N.H., Nov. 14 (UP). Former Gov. Huntley N. Spaulding died at his home here today. He was 86. Spaulding, the grand old patriarch of the G.O.P. in New Hampshire, served as Governor in 1927 and 1928. A brother, Rolland H., was Governor from 1915 to 1917. Huntley Spaulding was a wealthy leather manufacturer and philanthropist. In 1941 he gave the city of Rochester a $1,000,000 high school which bore his name. A native of Townsend, Mass., he was a leader in civic and state affairs here for more than half a century. He was president of the International Leather Company and the Atlas Leather Company. He was treasurer of the Spaulding Fiber Company, which has plants at Rochester, Dover and Tonawanda, N.Y. Spaulding was past chairman of the New Hampshire Board of Education and State Food Administrator and trustee of Lawrence Academy in Groton, Mass. He leaves a sister, Mrs. Marion Potter of Rochester (Boston Globe, November 14, 1955).

Vera G. Spaulding appeared in the Rochester directory of 1956, as the widow of Rolland H. Spaulding, with her house at 76 Wakefield street. Mrs. Marion Potter appeared as having her house at 78 Wakefield Street (i.e., the former Huntley N. Spaulding residence). Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., appeared as manufacturers of fibre products, with their plant at Spaulding avenue in North Rochester. Its chairman and president was Charles C. Steck, of Tonawanda, NY; vice-president and secretary, Cecil M. Pike; vice-president and  treasurer Stephen E. Clow; and vice-president Ellis C. Knoblock.

At this time the Spaulding Fibre Company became part of a charitable trust Huntley and his only sister Marion S. Potter had set up to disperse their remaining wealth within 15 years of the last to die (Snyder, 2008).

Marion S. (Spaulding) Potter, last of the Spaulding siblings, died in Greenwich, CT, September 27, 1957, aged seventy-nine years.

Boston Woman Leaves $1 Million to U.S. Charities. Mrs. Marion S. Potter, Beacon Hill widow, left more than $1,000,000 to charity, according to a will filed in Suffolk Probate Court yesterday. Mrs. Potter, sister of two New Hampshire Governors (the Spauldings), died last Sept. 27 at the age of 79. The will, disposing of an estate estimated at several million dollars, included outright bequests of $745,000 to charities, and an additional $90,000 to relatives and the remainder will be held in to benefit United States organizations established exclusively for charitable, scientific, literary and educational purposes, according to the will. Largest single bequest was $250,000 to the Frisbie Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.H. (Boston Globe, October 4, 1957).

Spaulding Fibre Company outlived the Spauldings and continued under the management of their charitable trust.


References:

Anderson, Kendall (2021). Spaulding Fibre [Photographs]. Retrieved from www.invisiblethreads.com/galleries/spaulding-fibre/

Cusano, Tom. (2011, October 8). Spaulding Ave. Hydro Project, 2011. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTvpIDWcTtY

Find a Grave. (2017, January 2). Aldridge Custeau. Retrieved from https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/174776130/aldridge-custeau

Find a Grave. (2018, August 23). Marion Lucy Spaulding Potter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192498207/marion-lucy-potter

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Huntley Nowell Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42230637/huntley-nowell-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Rolland Harty Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42231184/rolland-harty-spaulding

Governor’s Inn. (2021). The Governor’s Inn. Retrieved from www.governorsinn.com//History.cfm

Harvard University. (2021). Remick v. J. Spaulding & Sons Co., 82 N.H. 182 (1926). Retrieved from cite.case.law/nh/82/182/

Smithsonian Institution. (2006). J. Spaulding & Sons Co. Retrieved from americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_1344802

Snyder, James M. (2016, April 23). Spaulding’s Fibre Counters (1915). Retrieved from www.paperboardpro.com/files/Spaulding_Fibre_Counters_Booklet.pdf

Snyder, James M. (2016, April 23). Spaulding Products for Industry (1953). Retrieved from www.paperboardpro.com/files/SpauldingProductsforIndustrycirca1953.pdf

U.S. Geological Survey. (1937). The Floods of March 1936: Part 1. New England Rivers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=YDiShfgiuP8C&pg=PA390

Wikipedia. (2020, June 13). Huntley N. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntley_N._Spaulding

Wikipedia. (2021, April 23). North Rochester, New Hampshire. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Rochester,_New_Hampshire

Wikipedia. (2021, March 3). Rolland H. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolland_H._Spaulding

Wikipedia. (2020, December 2). Spaulding High School (New Hampshire). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaulding_High_School_(New_Hampshire)

J. Spaulding & Sons Co., 1894-24

By Muriel Bristol | May 30, 2021

Jonas Spaulding, Jr. (1833-1900), and his younger brother, Isaac W. “Waldo” Spaulding (1845-1927), formed a leather-board company under the name Spaulding Brothers, in Townsend (Townsend Harbor or East Townsend), MA, in 1873. (Prior to that they had been coopers and barrel manufacturers).

Spaulding-Frost CooperageJonas Spaulding, Jr., a manufacturer of leather board & coopering, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Townsend, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma [(Cummings)] Spaulding, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. NH), his children, Leon C. Spaulding, at school, aged twelve years (b. MA), Huntley N. Spaulding, at school, aged ten years (b. MA), Rolland H. Spaulding, at school, aged seven years (b. MA), and Marian Spaulding, aged one year (b. MA), and his servant, Jennie Fitch, a servant, aged twenty-two years (b. MA).

On the next page appeared his brother and business partner: Waldo Spaulding, a manufacturer of leather board, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), headed a Townsend, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta B. [(Haynes)] Spaulding, keeping house, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), and his nephew, Charles Spaulding, at school, aged thirteen years (b. MA).

TOWNSEND HARBOR. The leather board mills here and at West Townsend have been run for some time by Jonas and Waldo Spaulding, but Jonas Spaulding has now purchased Waldo Spaulding’s interest in the mills. Huntley S., son of Jonas Spaulding, will have a general oversight of both mills, buying and selling stock and goods, and proposes to enlarge the business. They have made extensive repairs of the mill here, this summer, and now the carpenters are repairing the mill at West Townsend. Leon, another son of Jonas, has taken a contract to do all the work at the Harbor mill by the job. They employ about 20 hands and it is expected that the brothers will make a success of their business (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), November 14, 1890).

Jonas Spaulding, Jr., constructed (or refurbished) a second leather-board mill in Milton in 1894 – under the separate corporate name of J. Spaulding & Sons – with his three sons, Leon C. Spaulding (1868-1924), Huntley N. Spaulding (1869-1955), and Rolland H. Spaulding (1873-1942). (Daughter Marion L. Spaulding (1878-1957) does not seem to have been involved).

Spaulding Mill in Milton (Previously Tuttle Shingle Mill)
J. Spaulding & Sons Co. Mill at Milton, NH

TOWNSEND. Jonas Spaulding is building a new leather board factory at Milton, N.H., to be completed ready for use during next Fall.  It will be about two and one-half times the capacity of the factory at the [Townsend] Harbor. His water privilege is estimated to be about 275-horse power (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), May 24, 1894).

(See also Milton Water Power in 1901).

TOWNSEND HARBOR. Mrs. Jonas Spaulding and daughter are spending a few days here. Rolland has also returned from Andover and is again cautiously at work in the leatherboard mill (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), January 3, 1896).

The Spaulding homestead in Townsend Harbor flooded in early March 1896.

Jonas Spaulding appeared in the Milton directory of 1898, as a Milton leatherboard mill manufacturer.

TOWNSEND HARBOR. Business at the leatherboard mill is flourishing, and its proprietors believe in territorial expansion. They have recently shipped lunch boxes to England and Australia (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), November 18, 1898).

TOWNSEND HARBOR. Arthur Patch has gone to Milton, N.H., to work in Jonas Spaulding’s mill there. That cannon, manufactured in the machine shop of the leatherboard mill, did its duty well on the Fourth furnishing the necessary noise. The day passed without accident, winning with the usual fireworks in the evening (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, MA), July 7, 1899).

J. Spaulding & Sons constructed their third leather-board mill in North Rochester, NH, in 1899. Milton’s well-known hydraulic engineer, Ira W. Jones, placed his name, and the date 1899-1900, on a bronze plaque set in the mill wheel masonry at this plant. This location would become the company headquarters.

Jones, IW - 1899-00FOR A NEW PLANT. Contracts to Be Let Friday at North Rochester, N.H. NORTH ROCHESTER, N.H., Aug 10 – The contracts for the construction of a big leatherboard manufacturing plant for the firm of J. Spaulding & Sons, now doing business at Milton, N.H., and Townsend, Mass., are to be let Friday. The contracts call for the construction of a mammoth dam, a canal 5oo feet in length, a three-story factory 250 feet long and 50 feet wide, to contain 50,000 feet of floor space, a boiler house to contain two boilers, and a bleachery 150 feet long and 40 feet wide. Also a raceway from the proposed factory 200 feet in length. The total expense of the under taking has been estimated at $75,000, and the city of Rochester has given favorable consideration to the proposition to exempt the concern from taxation for a period of 10 years. The plant will employ 300 hands when running at its fullest capacity. Dwellings for the accommodation of the operatives are to be erected, and it is expected that before the 1st of February, 1900, a thriving village will be established where now there is nothing but a broad expanse of field and forest. The preliminary surveys have been made and the plans drafted (Boston Globe, August 10, 1899).

Spaulding & Sons at North Rochester say that their mill at the above place will be completed about the last of this month. The great wheel is ready for operation, and the water could now be turned on. When business is good they expect to employ 200 hands (Farmington News, May 25, 1900).

Agnes Going, a housekeeper, aged forty-five years (b. Canada), headed a Townsend, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Vera A. Going, aged seventeen years (b. MA), Charles W. Going, at school, aged sixteen years (b. MA), and William B. Going, at school, aged thirteen years (b. MA), and her boarders, Jonas Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged sixty-seven years (b. MA), Leon C. Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), Huntley N. Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Rowland H. Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA). Huntley N. Spaulding rented their house. Agnes Going was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Meanwhile, Huntley Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Rolland Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), were enumerated also among the seven boarders in the Rochester, NH, household of Simon Wentworth, a farmer, aged seventy-six years (b. NH). Seth A. Moulton, a draughtsman [for Milton’s Ira W. Jones], aged twenty-four years (b. MA) was another of the seven boarders.

LOCALS. Huntley Spaulding has purchased the old homestead of the late Charles F. Hayes at North Rochester and will improve the place at an outlay of several thousand dollars, and occupy the house as a family residence The late owner of the place was the father of James B. Hayes of this village (Farmington News, May 25, 1900).

Spaulding, J and Sons - 1900William A. Dickson (1874-1952), his father, and brother were operatives in the leatherboard factory in 1900. (His wife and daughter lived still in Groton, MA). By 1910, Dickson had become the Spauldings’ Milton mill superintendent. (See also Milton in the News – 1915, and 1916).

MILTON. Spaulding Bros. Co. are putting in the foundation for a stockhouse, 120 feet long by 50 feet wide (Farmington News, July 20, 1900).

Spaulding, Jonas, JrJonas Spaulding, Jr., was said to have been saddened when the last piece of countermaking machinery was moved from the original Townsend Harbor, MA, plant to the Milton plant in or around July 1900. Leatherboard counters were a component of shoemaking. The Spauldings diversified to fabricate also a leatherboard “fiber” material, with which they made storage boxes, suitcases, lunchboxes, record players (and their “horns”), etc.

Huntley N. Spaulding married in St. Paul, MN, August 11, 1900, Harriet G. Mason. She was born in Boston, MA, November 13, 1876, daughter of James D. and Lillie F. (Manley) Mason.

VITAL STATISTICS. MARRIAGE LICENSES. Huntley M. Spaulding, Harriet G. Mason (St. Paul Globe (St. Paul, MN), August 11, 1900).

Notes and Personal Mention. Cards were received in Topeka Wednesday afternoon announcing the marriage of Miss Harriet Mason of St. Paul, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Duncan Mason, formerly of Topeka, to Mr. Huntley Nowel Spaulding, which took place Saturday. August 11. This marriage will be a great surprise to Miss Mason’s friends in Topeka (Topeka State Journal (Topeka, KS), August 16, 1900).

GOSSIP OF SOCIETY FOLKS. Mr. and Mrs. James Duncan Mason have sent out announcements of the marriage of their daughter, Harriet Gardiner, to Mr. Huntley Nowel Spaulding on Saturday, August 11, at St. Paul. The bride is a former Topeka girl, who lived here most of her life. The Mason home was on Sixth and Tyler streets. She was graduated two years ago with high honors, from the Boston conservatory (Topeka Daily Capitol (Topeka, KS), August 16, 1900).

News of the State. Huntley Nome [Nowell] Spaulding, of the firm of Spaulding Bros. Co., of the mills in North Rochester, was united in marriage August 11, with Miss Helen Gardner Mason, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Duncan Mason, of St. Paul, Minn. Mr. and Mrs. Spaulding sailed August 15, for Europe, where they will remain until the first of October (Farmington News, September 7, 1900).

Jonas Spaulding, Jr., a pulp manufacturer – the “J. Spaulding” of J. Spaulding & Sons Co. – died of mitral & aortic regurgitation in Andover, MA, November 10, 1900, aged sixty-seven years, nine months, and four days.

DEATHS. SPAULDING – In Andover, Nov. 10, Jonas Spaulding, 67 yrs. 9 mo. Funeral from the church at Townsend Harbor, Mass., Tuesday, Nov. 13, at 2 p.m. (Boston Globe, November 11, 1900).

Spaulding & Sons Co. appeared in the Milton directories of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as Milton leatherboard mill manufacturers.

Townsend [MA] (Feb.) [1902]. Spaulding Bros. Co., leather board, sold to J. Spaulding & Sons, Co., of Milton, N.H., and moved thereto (MA Bureau of Statistics of Labor, 1902).

MILTON. Spaulding Bros. are laying the foundation for another stockhouse at their lower mill (Farmington News, January 15, 1904).

MILTON. Spaulding Bros. have commenced on a new store house at the lower mill (Farmington News, February 12, 1904).

MILTON. Spaulding Bros. are to erect six dwelling houses at North Rochester in the spring (Farmington News, March 4, 1904).

MILTON. M.K. Breckenridge, of the Atlantic Works of Boston, was at Spaulding Bros. mill last week to make some special repairs. He has been engaged to repair the engine in the steamer Mt. Washington (Farmington News, March 25, 1904).

Notes and Personal Mention. Mrs. Huntley N. Spaulding of Boston, formerly Miss Harriet Mason, is visiting Miss Kate D. Putnam (Topeka State Journal (Topeka, KS), November 4, 1904).

NEWS OF THE STATE. The J. Spaulding and Sons Co., of North Rochester, well known manufacturers of leather board and shoe findings, are about to remove their Kennebunk, Me., branch to Rochester, where it will occupy the upper mill of the Norway Plains Woollen plant, owned by C.E. Clark (Farmington News, March 24, 1905).

J. Spaulding & Sons (Huntley, Rollins and Leon) appeared in the Townsend, MA directory of 1907, as leatherboard (heeling) manufacturers, on Main street in Townsend Harbor. Huntley Spaulding appeared as general manager and president, with his house at Marblehead, MA.

Milton hydraulic engineer Ira W. Jones had a partnership for a time with the Spaulding Brothers, under the name Spaulding-Jones Company, which company sought in 1907 to build a “huge” hydroelectric dam on the Merrimac River.

Special from Concord. … There was a hearing on the famous “Spaulding-Jones” bill, which it is claimed will grant enormous water privileges on the Merrimack below Manchester. It is thought that the Spaulding-Jones company will turn the charter over to a wealthy syndicate who will exercise a great monopoly in the state; but this is denied by one of the Spauldings (Farmington News, February 15, 1907).

The wounded victim of Milton’s murderous lover of June 1907 crawled to Spaulding’s Milton mill, where workers brought her inside and summoned medical assistance.

MEANS A NEW MILL. Clash is Averted Between Two Big Companies. Great Falls and Spauldings Settle Water Privileges. MILTON. N.H., Aug. 9 – The threatened legal clash between the Great Falls manufacturing company of Somersworth and the J. Spaulding & Sons Co. of North Rochester, over the water privilege at the old flume, just below where the mill of the Salmon river paper company was burned last May, has been averted by the leasing of the water privilege by the Spauldings from their upper mill to the site of the burned mill. As a result the Great Falls company this morning called off its crew that was set at work last month to build a dam for a proposed electric power station. On this site the Spauldings will erect a leather board, mill that will employ 500 hands. They are also negotiating for the water privileges held by the United boxboard and paper company under a lease from the Great Falls manufacturing company that runs until 1923. These rights include the site of the burned paper mill. As the paper company has no further use for the privilege it is understood that it will shortly sublet it to the Spaulding company. This will mean another mill for Milton. The Great Falls company owns the entire water privileges of the river from its mills at Somersworth to the Milton ponds (Boston Globe, August 10, 1909).

J. Spaulding & Sons Co. built an updated replacement for their Milton mill in 1910. (See Milton in the News – 1910).

Roland H. Spaulding, a leatherboard manufacturer, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his housekeepers, Bessie T. Dore, a housekeeper, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Agnes Going, a housekeeper, aged fifty-four years (b. Canada), and his boarder, Vera A. Going, a leatherboard mill stenographer, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA). Roland H. Spaulding owned their farm, free-and-clear. Agnes Going was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. (See also Milton and the Immigrants – 1910).

J. Spaulding & Sons constructed their fourth leather-board mill in Tonawanda, NY, in 1911. Besides being overall company president, Leon C. Spaulding was general manager of the Tonawanda mill.

MALE HELP WANTED. COUNTER MOULDERS wanted – Good moulders can earn from $2.50 to $3 per day. Apply to J. SPAULDING & SONS CO., Postoffice, North Rochester, N.H.; railroad station, Hayes, N.H. dSutf au21 (Boston Globe, August 21, 1911).

Spaulding & Sons Co. appeared in the Milton directories of 1912, and 1917, as Milton leatherboard mill manufacturers.

Leon C. Spaulding appeared in the Buffalo, NY, directory of 1912, as residing at 15 Manchester place.

Leon C. Spaulding married, June 21, 1912, Dorothy Hummel. She was born in Turner’s Falls, MA, April 14, 1884, daughter of Oscar and Bertha (Koerbel) Hummel.

J. Spaulding & Sons (Huntley, Rollins and Leon) appeared in the Townsend, MA directory of 1913, as leatherboard (heeling) manufacturers, on Main street in Townsend. Huntley Spaulding appeared as general manager and president, with his house at Boston, MA. Rollins Spaulding appeared as treasurer, with his house at North Rochester, NH, and Leon Spaulding appeared as having his house at North Rochester.

J. Spaulding & Sons constructed their fifth mill (which was their second one in Milton) in 1913.

Interesting Items. The firm of J. Spaulding & Sons Co. is erecting a new mill at South Milton near the old plant and it is to be 200 feet long, 100 feet wide and four stories, of concrete and fireproof. It will be used for the manufacture of fibre specialties and will furnish employment to about 50 hands. It is expected that it will be in running order by the first of January (Farmington News, June 27, 1913).

HELP WANTED. WANTED – Millwrights and pipers. J. Spaulding & Sons Co., Milton, N.H. William A. Dixon, Supt. (Portsmouth Herald, December 9, 1913).

Rolland H. Spaulding ran for and won the office of Governor of New Hampshire for the 1915-17 biennium.

Groton Locals. Rolland H. Spaulding of Rochester, N.H., a native of Townsend and well-known here, has announced his candidacy for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in his adopted state. Mr. Spaulding’s brothers, Huntley N. and Leon C. Spaulding of Townsend, were both students at Lawrence academy, although Mr. Spaulding never attended the local school (Hollis Times (Hollis, NH), May 15, 1914).

Industrial Information. New Enterprises and Changes in the Trade. MILTON, N.H. The construction of the new concrete mill for SPAULDING BROS. has been completed and a part of the mill put in operation in the manufacture of one grade of leatherboard. The whole plant will soon be in operation (American Shoemaking, June 20, 1914).

Leon C. Spaulding appeared in the Rochester, NY, directory of 1915, as boarding at the Hotel Rochester. (The Hotel Rochester was situated at 95 Main street West (corner of Plymouth Ave.).

Emma (Cummings) Spaulding, widow of Jonas, Jr., and mother of Leon C. Spaulding, Huntley N. Spaulding, Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, and Marion L. Spaulding died in Boston, MA, October 19, 1915, aged seventy-nine years.

DEATHS. SPAULDING – In this city, Oct. 19, Emma C., wife of the late Jonas Spaulding, in her 80th year. Funeral services private. Interment at Townsend, Mass. (Boston Globe, October 19, 1915).

The citizens of New Hampshire, the press, and all those in official circles lament with Governor Spaulding the death of his mother, Mrs. Emma (Cummings) Spaulding, who passed away at Hotel Brunswick, Boston, Tuesday (Farmington News, October 22, 1915).

WANTED. Twenty-five men and ten girls. Steady work. Apply in person at office of J. Spaulding & Sons Co., North Rochester, N.H. tf (Farmington News, May 5, 1916).

GIFT OF GOV SPAULDING. His Employes in Rochester Mill Given 5 Percent of Their Yearly Earnings. ROCHESTER, N.H., Dec. 21 – More than 400 employes in the leather board mills of J. Spaulding & Sons in this city, owned by Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding, were surprised this afternoon on receiving 5 percent of their years earnings, in addition to their regular pay, as a Christmas present from the Governor. The total amount of the gift was more than $5000. In some of the departments of the mill at Milton, those on piece work were given a raise in addition to the gift (Boston Globe, December 22, 1916).

After the 1914 death of his first wife, Spaulding’s Milton mill superintendent William A. Dickson married (2nd) in East Rochester, NH, May 21, 1918, Grace E. Harwood, a teacher at the Milton Grammar school. (One of his daughters, Marion I. Dickson (1895-1969), taught in the Hare Road school, as well as in the Milton Grammar school).

Huntley N. Spaulding appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1917, as the NH Food Administrator, with his house at Rochester, NH.

Hayes Station
Hayes Railroad Station

Huntley N. Spaulding, Leon C. Spaulding, and Rolland H. Spaulding all appeared in the Rochester directory of 1917, as employed by J.S. & Sons, with their house at Main Street, near Hayes [Hayes R.R. Station], in North Rochester. Huntley N. Spaulding had also a house at Brookline, MA, and Leon C. Spaulding has also a house at Buffalo, NY.

Spaulding, J and Sons - 1917J. Spaulding & Sons Co. appeared in the same 1917 directory as manufacturers of leatherboard, hard fibre, tube, chair seats, boxes and cans, dress suitcases, heeling, etc., with factories at Hayes, No. Rochester, and Milton, NH, at 100 No. Main, Rochester; at Tonawanda, NY, and Townsend Harbor, MA. Their Main office was at North Rochester, Hayes Depot, and their Boston office was at 203 Albany bldg., 89 Beach Street.

In the February 10th issue of the “Paper Mill and Wood Pulp News,” one of the most widely read publications in connection with the textile industry, there appears an article complimentary to the retiring governor of New Hampshire, Rolland H. Spaulding, who, now returned to private life, is devoting his well known business ability to the interests of J. Spaulding & Sons at North Rochester. The article identifies Mr. Spaulding as one of the prominent figures in the textile world and recognizes his administrative capacity in business affairs. It also mentions him as the possible choice of New Hampshire for the United States senate in 1918 (Farmington News, February 23, 1917).

Rolland H. Spaulding married in Brookline, MA, December 18, 1918, Vera A. Going. She was born in Townsend, MA, September 5, 1882, daughter of Charles W. and Agnes (Gilcrest) Going.

ARE MARRIED IN BROOKLINE, MASS. Ex-Gov. Spaulding and Miss Vera Adelaid Going Wedded. Rochester, Dec. 20. – Announcement of the marriage of ex-Governor Rolland H. Spaulding and Miss Vera Adelaid Going at Brookline, Mass., on Wednesday, has been received in this city. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Agnes Going, housekeeper of the Spaulding residence, North Rochester. The officiating clergyman was Rev. J.R. Dinsmore, pastor of the North and East M.E. church. Mr. and Mrs. Spaulding will reside at North Rochester (Portsmouth Herald, December 20, 1918).

Rolland H. Spaulding, aged forty-six years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Vira G. Spaulding, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), and his housekeeper, Susan C. Rodger, a private family housekeeper, aged twenty years (b. Scotland). Rolland H. Spaulding owned their farm in the North Rochester District.

J. Spaulding & Sons Co., Inc., appeared in the Milton directories of 1922, and 1927, as North Rochester, NH, leatherboard mill manufacturers. Kennebunk Manufacturing Co. appeared also in the Milton directory of 1922, as a Milton manufacturer of Fiber Goods.

Milton – Strafford Co. Pop. 1,128. On B&M R.R. M.O. and Tel. office; nearest bank, Rochester, 8 miles. SPAULDING, J., & SONS, CO., INC. New York Office, 484 Broome Street; Chicago Office, 659-661 West Lake Street; Boston Office, 203 Albany Bldg.; Philadelphia Office, 141 North 4th Street. (L.C. Spaulding, Pres.; R.H. Spaulding, Vice Pres.; H.N. Spaulding, Treas. A.W. Gray, Supt.) Address, North Rochester, N.H. Four Mills, North Rochester and Milton, N.H., and Townsend Harbor, Mass. Fibre Boards. (For equipment, see Townsend Harbor, Mass.) (Lockwood, 1922).

Sister Marion L. Spaulding’s fiancé crashed her new Lincoln touring car in North Adams, MA, in June 1922.

Ford and Lincoln In Head On Meeting. Two automobiles were damaged about 5 o’clock yesterday afternoon in a collision on West Main street at the easterly end of the bridge over little tunnel, where the narrowness of the roadway has resulted in agitation for widening it to lessen the danger of accidents. The cars figuring in the collision were a new Lincoln touring car, owned by Marran [Marion] L. Spaulding of 435 Beacon street, Boston, and operated by Walter A. Potter of 284 Dartmouth street Boston, and a Ford runabout, owned by F.A. Pulsifer of 80 Hathaway street and operated by Howard E. Richmond of 65 Hathaway street. The Boston car was proceeding towards Williamstown and the local car was approaching from the opposite direction when they came together. The damage to the Boston car consisted of a broken hub cap, a broken mudguard and a broken running board. The front end of the Ford car was stoved in (North Adams Transcript (North Adams, MA), June 5, 1922).

Marion L. Spaulding married in Providence, RI, September 26, 1922, Walter A. Potter, both of Boston, MA. He was born in Cranston, RI, April 8, 1865, son of Pardon K. and Ann E. (Davis) Potter.

BOSTON PAIR GET LICENSE TO WED IN PROVIDENCE. PROVIDENCE, Aug. 23 – Walter Armington Potter, furniture manufacturer, and Marion Lucy Spaulding. both of Boston, took out a marriage license here today (Boston Globe, August 24, 1922).

J. Spaulding & Sons Co., Inc., changed their name to Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc., in 1923.

Spaulding Fibre Co., Inc. A new name for your convenience. IN changing our name from J. Spaulding & Sons Company, Inc., to Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc., we accomplished a dual objective at one stroke: we have united the name Spaulding with the word fibre to more clearly indicate the character of our business. And, through that natural union we have made our name more easily remembered. Strangely enough, the public has for a long time past displayed peculiar insistence upon addressing us as the Spaulding Fibre Company thus, we have adopted a name entirely in accord with that inclination. The same organization – the same policies – the same service. One thing we wish particularly to express is that there is to be no change in personnel or policies. The same experienced organization and the same untiring service which have always been identified with J. Spaulding & Sons Co., Inc., remain unaltered. Let us register the name once more – Spaulding Fibre Company, Inc.: it stands for prompt, unstinted service to you in your fibre needs. And, if you are experimenting in the use of hard fibre in your products, we will gladly give you the benefit of our experience of you will write us. SPAULDING FIBRE Co., Inc. 316 Wheeler Street, Tonawanda, N.Y. BRANCH OFFICES AND WAREHOUSES. 484 Broome St., New York City. 659-661 West Lake St., Chicago. 15 Elkins St., Boston, 37, Mass.; 141 N. 4th Street, Philadelphia. Clapp & Lamoree. San Francisco. Los Angeles. Spaulding HARD FIBRE (Automotive Industries, June 7, 1923).

Spaulding president Leon C. Spaulding died at his summer home in Sebago, ME, September 11, 1924. (He would be succeeded as president by his younger brother, Huntley N. Spaulding).

Spaulding, Leon CL.C. SPAULDING DEAD. Tonawanda, Sept 12. Word was received yesterday of the death of Leon C. Spaulding, president of the Spaulding Fiber company of Tonawanda, at his summer home in East Sebago, Me., that morning. Mr. Spaulding. had been in failing health for the past five months. Besides being president of the Spaulding company, which has several branch factories in different sections of the country. Mr. Spaulding was general manager of the Tonawanda factory, the company’s principal mill. During the many years that the company has been operating here Mr. Spaulding had made his home at the Statler hotel in Buffalo during the winter, and living at East Sebago during the summer Buffalo Enquirer (Buffalo, NY), September 12, 1924).

L.C. SPAULDING DIES AT SEBAGO. Portland, Sept. 12 – Leon C. Spaulding, 56, died yesterday at his cottage at East Sebago. He was a shoe manufacturer with shops in Rochester, N.H. Mr. Spaulding’s cottage was one the first built at East Sebago, where is now a large colony.
Rochester, Sept. 12 – Leon C. Spaulding was born at Townsend Harbor and was the son of Jonas and Emma (Cummings) Spaulding. He received his education in the public schools of his native place, at Lawrence Academy at Groton, Mass., and at Phillips Andover Academy. For 35 years he has been a member of the leather-board firm of E. [J.] Spaulding Sons company, the first 10 of which he was located at North Rochester.. When the firm opened a new plant at Tonawanda, N.Y., for the manufacture of vulcanized fibre he was placed in charge as president the Spaulding Fibre company. Mr. Spaulding is survived by a wife and two brothers, ex-Gov. Rolland H. Spaulding and Huntley N. Spaulding, both of this city. He also leaves a sister, Mrs. Marion Potter, of New York (Portsmouth Herald, September 12, 1924).


Continued in Spaulding Fibre Company, 1925-57


References:

American Textile Reporter. (1920, May 6). American Textile Reporter. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=BvBYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA6-PA43

Bassett, Lynne Z. (2009). Massachusetts Quilts: Our Common Wealth [Spaulding Family Quilt]. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=quNEcnPiM1cC&pg=PA21

Facebook. (2020). Spaulding Fibre – 310 Wheeler Street – Tonawanda. Retrieved from www.facebook.com/Spaulding-Fibre-310-Wheeler-Street-Tonawanda-153561917990611/

Find a Grave. (2018, August 23). Marion Lucy Spaulding Potter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192498207/marion-lucy-potter

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Huntley Nowell Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42230637/huntley-nowell-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2009, November 3). Jonas Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/43897371/jonas-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2013, October 17). Leon Cumming Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/118847337/leon-cumming-spaulding

Find a Grave. (2009, September 21). Rolland Harty Spaulding. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/42231184/rolland-harty-spaulding

MA Bureau of Statistics of Labor (1902). Public Documents of Massachusetts: Being the Annual Reports of Various Public Officers and Institutions. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=9mRBAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA3-PA19

U.S. Geological Survey. (1937). The Floods of March 1936: Part 1. New England Rivers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=YDiShfgiuP8C&pg=PA390

Wikipedia. (2020, June 13). Huntley N. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntley_N._Spaulding

Wikipedia. (2021, April 23). North Rochester, New Hampshire. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Rochester,_New_Hampshire

Wikipedia. (2021, March 3). Rolland H. Spaulding. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolland_H._Spaulding

Last Will of John E. Townsend (1871-1914)

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | May 16, 2021

John Edward Townsend (1871-1914) was the son of Henry H. and Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend. His father had founded the Miltonia Mill in Milton Mills in 1872, to which John had succeeded upon his father’s death in 1904. (His two grandfathers (and namesakes), John Townsend and Edward Brierley, had run earlier the Milton Mills Mfg. Co. and the Brierley Mill respectively).

We learn from Ms. Cunningham’s recent interesting article regarding selected excerpts from the diary of Miltonia Mills executive Harry E. Wentworth, that John E. Townsend’s health began to fail him as early as April 1910.

John E. Townsend, a woolen blankets manufacturer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Eda B. Townsend, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), and his children, Henry A. Townsend, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Agnes M. Townsend, aged ten years (b. NH). John E. Townsend owned their house, free-and-clear.

John E. Townsend died of Bright’s Disease (a kidney ailment) in Milton Mills on September 8, 1914, aged forty-two years, eleven months, and thirty days. He left a widow, Eda B. (Lowd) Townsend, and two children, Henry A. Townsend, and Grace M. Townsend.


Will of John E. Townsend

Know All Men by These Presents that I, John E. Townsend of Milton Mills, Strafford County, New Hampshire, do make this my last Will and Testament, revoking all other Wills by me at any time heretofore made.

After the payment of my just debts and funeral expenses I give, devise and bequeath as follows:

First: I constitute and appoint Harry E. Wentworth, for many years my secretary and confidential clerk, and the New England Trust Company of Boston, Massachusetts, the executors and trustees under this my last will, and exempt all executors of and trustees under this last will, whether original or substituted, from giving a surety or sureties upon the bonds required of them as said executors and trustees. By “substituted executors” are meant, of course, administrators with the will annexed.

Brother-in-law Harry E. Wentworth, a woolen mill bookkeeper, aged forty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census (April 22, 1910). His household included his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged six years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Melissa Lowd, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear.

The New England Trust Company of Boston, MA, declined their appointment as joint executor and trustee. Harry E. Wentworth traveled instead to Dover, NH, September 18, 1914, and secured Strafford County Solicitor Dwight Hall as a substitute for the trust company. (This substitution of Hall for the N.E. Trust Company altered their status somewhat. They became administrators, with will annexed, i.e., administrators guided or advised by the contents of a will, rather than its executors).

Dwight Hall, a lawyer and county solicitor, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Frances S. Hall, aged thirty-eight years (b. New Brunswick, Canada), and his servant, Margaret Cassidy, a private family servant, aged thirty-five years (b. Canada (Irish)). Dwight Hall owned their house at 119 Silver Street, free-and-clear.

I authorize my said executors to sell all real and personal estate not hereinafter  specifically devised or bequeathed by private sale or public auction for the payment of debts and for the purpose of investing the trust estates hereinafter created, and to execute and deliver such deeds of conveyance or other instruments of transfer as may be necessary to pass a proper title to the same.

I authorize my said Trustees from time to time to invest and reinvest the various trust estates hereinafter bequeathed to them, if in their judgment they deem it advisable, always purchasing sound securities or other reliable property real or personal; and to this end I empower them to sell real and personal estate at any time being a part of any trust estate in their hands, either by public auction or private sale, and to execute such instruments as may be necessary to transfer the title thereto; but no purchaser from my said executors or trustees shall see to the application of the purchase money, and the receipts of my said executors and trustees for all moneys and effects paid or delivered to others by virtue of this will shall exonerate the persons taking the same from all liability to see to the application or disposition of the money or effects therein mentioned.

I direct my said trustees to keep the funds of the several trust estates created by this will separate and distinct, and I enjoin upon them a similar caution in regard to keeping their accounts.

I declare that the number of my executors and of my trustees for each trust created under this will shall remain two so long as there are any duties to be discharged by said executors and trustees, and I also declare that the words “my said executors,” and “my trustees” and “my said trustees,” wherever occurring, shall be construed and taken to mean the executors or trustees for the time being, whether original or substituted.

I authorize my said trustees to take over from my said executors any or all funds, shares of stock and other securities belonging to me at the time of my decease, and retain the same as a part of the trust estates, even though such bonds, shares and other securities may not be of the nature and character permissible for trustees to invest in by the general rules of law or by statutory provisions, and my said trustees are not to be held answerable for loss or depreciation occasioned by holding such bonds, shares or other securities, or any other securities or investments, which may form part of the trust estates, provided they act in good faith.

Townsend MillSecond: I give and devise unto my trustees, but In Trust nevertheless, for the purposes hereinafter named, all my real estate situated in Milton Mills, and all buildings therein, water privileges, and all other rights appurtenant thereto, constituting the mill property, where I have for many years conducted the business of blanket manufacturing; and I give and bequest unto my said trustees all of said business carried on by me upon said property, including the plant, machinery, fixtures, utensils, stock in trade, book debts, and good-will and effects of every nature and description connected therewith.

My said trustees shall hold and manage said property for the benefit and to the use of my son, Henry A. Townsend, and to that end I authorize and empower them to carry on as trustees, in the name of my estate, my manufacturing business until my said son shall reach the age of twenty-five years, and for the purpose of carrying on said business my said trustees are authorized to risk as capital such part of the residue of my estate hereinafter bequeathed to them for the benefit of my said son, being one-third of the residue of my estate, as they may deem advisable so to do.

Townsend, JE Estate - 1917My said trustees shall pay over the net income derived from said business quarterly or oftener if in their discretion they deem it advisable so to do, to any duly appointed guardian for my said son during his minority, for his maintenance, education and bringing up, or to my wife should she survive me, for said purposes during said period, but if my said wife should fail to maintain, educate and bring up my said son to the satisfaction of my said trustees, I authorize them in their discretion to retain and appropriate for such purposes so much of said net income as they shall think expedient and to add in their discretion any part of the net income of said trust estate to the principal thereof, and the amount so added shall thereupon become as much a part of the principal as if originally a part thereof.

If in the opinion of my said trustees my said son shall prior to his attaining the age of twenty-five years be deemed competent and able to assume the management and control of said business and the property connected therewith forming said trust estate, I authorize my said trustees, in their sole discretion, to transfer, deliver and convey to my said son all of said business and property, and the same shall thereupon become his, solely and absolutely, free and discharged from all trust. In any event this trust shall terminate and said business and property be conveyed, delivered and transferred to my said son upon his attaining the age of twenty-five years, to be his sole and absolute property, free and discharged of all trust.

Trustees Wentworth and Hall set up Henry A. Townsend as manager of a branch factory (the Acton (or Actin) Blanket Company) in the Timson shoe factory building (formerly the Brierley Mill), after he reached the age of twenty-one years (January 2, 1919). (See H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27).

An industry directory of 1920 identified Henry A. Townsend as being then proprietor of the Miltonia Mill. He would then have been twenty-two years of age. (See H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27).

Henry A. Townsend, a blanket mill manufacturer, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ingeborg V. Townsend, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), and his nephew-in-law, Robert R. Anderson, aged eleven years (b. MA). Henry A. Townsend rented their house on the Springvale Road. (Robert R. Anderson would become principal of Nute High School in 1939-42).

Townsend House - Per JW CunninghamThird: I give, devise and bequeath to my wife, Eda B. Townsend, her heirs and assigns forever, the homestead estate on which I know reside in said Milton Mills, together with the household furniture and household effects, including all articles both of use and ornament, silverware, pictures, horses, carriages, sleighs, and stable furniture and equipment generally, and other personal property used in conjunction with the occupation of my said estate at the time of my decease. In case my said wife should not survive me, I give, devise and bequeath my said homestead estate and other property used in conjunction therewith in equal shares to my son and daughter, or the whole thereof to the survivor, to their heirs and assigns forever.

Eda B. Townsend, a widow, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census (January 2, 1920). Her household included her daughter, Agnes M. Townsend, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Eda B. Townsend owned their house on Church Street in Milton Mills, free-and-clear.

Fourth: I give and bequeath unto my executor Harry E. Wentworth in recognition of his faithful service to me the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars.

Harry E. Wentworth, a blanket mill manager, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife, Ella B. Wentworth, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), and his son, Norman L. Wentworth, aged sixteen years (b. ME). Harry E. Wentworth owned their farm on the Lebanon Road, free-and-clear.

Milton Mills CemeteryFifth: I give and bequeath to the Milton Mills Cemetery Fund or the trustees thereof the sum of one thousand dollars.

Sixth: I give and bequeath unto Oscar F. Marsh of Milton Mills, an old and close friend of my father, Henry H. Townsend, the sum of one thousand dollars.

Oscar F. Marsh [(1846-1928)] appeared in the census over the years as a woolen mill finisher (1870), a felt mill worker (1880), and a blanket finisher (1900). He appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as being retired, with his house at 30 Main street, M. Mills. His son, Forrest L. Marsh, appeared in that same 1912 directory as a lawyer, insurance [agent] and notary public, with his office at 37 Main street, with his house also at 30 Main street, M. Mills. Forrest L. Marsh’s wife, Mrs. Mildred T. [(Tebbetts)] Marsh, appeared as keeping a dry and fancy goods store at 40 Main street, corner of Church street, with her house also at 30 Main street, M. Mills.

Townsend, HH - GraveSeventh: I direct my executors to expend a reasonable sum for the proper care of the burial lot where my father’s remains are, and there my body shall be interred, and I authorize them to devote for the perpetual care of said lot or lots such sum as may be found necessary or expedient.

Eighth: All the rest, residue and remainder of my estate of every nature and description, both real and personal, of which I may be entitled at the time of my decease, I direct shall be divided into three equal parts or shares. I give, devise and bequeath one of said shares or parts being one-third of said rest and residue to my said wife Eda and to her heirs and assigns forever. Should my said wife not survive me said one-third share shall be equally divided among my son and my daughter and added to their respective shares in the residue of my said estate as hereinafter set forth, or the whole of said one third shall go to the survivor if but one survives me, and become part of his or her trust estate as the case may be.

I give, devise and bequeath to my said trustees In Trust nevertheless for the purpose hereinafter set forth two-thirds of the residue of my estate, one-third of which is to be held by said trustees in trust for the benefit of my said son, and the other third for the benefit of my said daughter, upon separate and distinct trusts for their benefit. My trustees shall collect and receive all income thereof and after paying therefrom the necessary expenses of administering said trusts shall apply such part of the balance or net income as they may deem best for the maintenance, support and education of my said daughter, Agnes M. and of my said son, paying said income to any appointed guardian for them, quarterly or oftener in their discretion, while they are under age, or to their mother, to be expended by her for said purposes, but if my said wife (their mother) should fail to properly maintain, support and educate my said daughter and son in the opinion of my said trustees, I authorize them in their discretion to retain and appropriate for said purposes so much of said net income as they shall think expedient for said purposes and to personally expend such part of said net income as may be necessary for said purposes, and to add any part of the net income of said trust estates to the principal thereof, and the amount so added shall thereupon become as much a part of the principal as if originally a part thereof.

When my said daughter shall arrive at the age of thirty years then the trust above stated shall terminate and I direct my said trustees to convey, transfer and pay over the entire principal and accumulated income then constituting the trust estate discharged of all trust to my said daughter, to be hers absolutely. If my said daughter shall die before arriving at the age of thirty years then the trust shall terminate and I direct my said trustees to convey, transfer and pay over in equal share the entire principal and a [any] accumulated income then constituting the trust estate to the issue then living if any of my said daughter, and if she leave no issue then to any person or persons she may name or appoint in and by her last will and testament, or failing such appointment to my son if living or any issue of his in equal shares.

We may note that Agnes M. Townsend (1900-1970) was not scheduled to come into her own until she was aged thirty years, i.e., not until May 25, 1930. Her older brother would have to be no older than twenty-five years (and under certain conditions even younger, as actually happened).

Agnes M. Townsend married in Milton Mills, April 24, 1920, Halton R. Hayes, she of Milton and he of Rochester, NH. He was a salesman, aged twenty-six years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. Lester E. Alexander performed the ceremony. Hayes was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1894, son of Edwin F. and Hattie (Pinkham) Hayes.

Halton R. Hayes, a biscuit sales agent, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Agnes T. Hayes, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his son, Paul T. Hayes, aged five years (b. MA). Halton R. Hayes owned their house at 35 Fernwood Avenue, which was valued at $10,ooo. They had a radio set. (This was just seven weeks short of her thirtieth birthday).

When my said son shall arrive at the age of twenty-five years then the trust for his benefit above stated shall terminate, and I direct my said trustees to convey, transfer and pay over the entire principal and accumulated income then constituting said trust estate free and discharged of all trust to him. Should my son not survive me or surviving me die before reaching the age of twenty-five years or before the mill property and business described in article Second hereof shall have been conveyed and turned over to him by my said trustees in accordance with said article Second, then and in that event his one-third share in said residue and all the property and business constituting the trust estate described in said article Second shall be added to and become a part of the trust established by this article for the benefit of my said daughter and said business and property shall be controlled and carried on by my said trustees for the benefit of my said daughter under the same terms and conditions as the trust of one-third of the residue for her benefit in the article set forth.

Should my said daughter not survive me I direct that her one-third share in the residue of my estate shall be added to that one-third herein given to my trustees for the benefit of my said son, to be held for his benefit upon like trusts and subject to the same conditions as hereabove stated.

No beneficiary under said will except my said wife shall so alienate, dispose of, anticipate, or in any way encumber or create a charge upon the income to which he or she is entitled under the above provisions of this will, nor shall the same be subject to attachment, diversion or seizure by any creditor by any legal process whatsoever; and if any beneficiary except my said wife shall alienate, dispose of, anticipate or create a charge upon the income to which he or she is entitled, or if he or she shall become a bankrupt or make any assignment for the benefit of creditors, or if said income shall become in any way attached, diverted or seized by any legal process, then my said trustees and their successors shall immediately cease to pay such income to said beneficiary and shall thereafter apply the same for his or her support, maintenance and education as they may in their discretion and judgment deem best.

In Testimony Whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 30th day of July, A.D. nineteen hundred and fourteen. John E. Townsend (seal)

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the testator as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us, Who, at his request and in his presence and the presence of one another have hereunto set our names as witnesses.

John C. Townsend, Everett F. Fox, Harper Luper.

Witness John C. Townsend (1871-1916) was both the testator’s cousin and his brother-in-law (he was married to John E. Townsend’s sister, Grace (Townsend) Townsend (1873-1953)).

Everett F. Fox (1856-1927) was a son of Elbridge W. and Sarah E. (Buck) Fox, and grandson of Asa and Harriet (Plummer) Fox. (See Milton Mills’ Asa Fox & Son General Store). Oddly enough, he had been also a witness to Henry H. Townsend’s 1904 will.

Although his name might seem to be readily distinguishable, Harper Luper remains a bit of a mystery. There were men of that name living in Louisiana and Pennsylvania in later years, but with no way to identify them as the erstwhile witness to the Townsend will.

The State of New Hampshire. STRAFFORD, SS. At a special Court of Probate holden at Somersworth in said County on the 21st Tuesday of September A.D. 1914.
The foregoing instrument purporting to be the last Will in writing of John E. Townsend, late of Milton Mills in said County, deceased, having been presented for Probate in common form by Harry E. Wentworth and Dwight Hall, the Execut_ therein named administrators with the will annexed, and Everett F. Fox, one of the subscribing witnesses thereto, having made oath before said Court that he saw the said testator sign and seal said instrument; that of the time of so doing the said testator was of the age of twenty-one years and of sound mind; and that the said Everett F. Fox, with John C. Townsend and Harper Luper (all credible witnesses,) attested and subscribed said instrument together in the presence and at the request of said testator. I do hereby approve and allow the same; and do DECREE that said instrument is duly proved and allowed in this Court in common form; as the last Will in writing of said John E. Townsend, deceased. Christopher H. Wells, JUDGE OF PROBATE.
Recorded agreeably to the original. Examined by William W. Martin, REGISTER (Strafford County Probate, 140:300).

Christopher H. Wells, a probate court judge, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census, His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Oriana Wells, aged fifty years (b. NH). Christopher H. Wells owned their house at 19 Mt. Vernon Street, with a mortgage.


See also Milton Mills’ Miltonia Mill – 1872-14 and H.E. Wentworth’s Diary Entries, Miltonia Mills – 1910-27


References:

Dover Public Library. (1999). 1999 Heritage Walking Tour [117 Silver Street]. Retrieved from www.dover.nh.gov/government/city-operations/library/history/Heritage-Walking-Tours/1999-heritage-walking-tour.html

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Everett Fremont Fox. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114891790/everett-fremont-fox

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Agnes Townsend Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893159/agnes-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Forrest L. Marsh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115493759/forrest-l-marsh

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Oscar F. Marsh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115493700/oscar-f-marsh

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Eda B. Lowd Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893198/eda-b-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Henry A. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114893218/henry-a-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Henry H. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352239/henry-h-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). John C. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352317/john-c-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). John E. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352496/john-e-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Harry E. Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938247/harry-e-wentworth

U.S. Patent Office. (1922, April 11). Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=IJ2PAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA381

Milton Policemen – 1940-52

By Muriel Bristol | May 2, 2021

Continued from Milton Policemen – 1927-39

The Milton policemen identified in the Milton Town Reports of 1940-52 were: Oliver J. Diack, John P. Kimball, John P. Butler, Clemence C. Dixon, Roy Burroughs, John Reardon, Edwin H. Hutchins, and Howard J. Jedrey.

Oliver J. Diack – 1940

Oliver James Diack was born in Quincy, MA, September 22, 1909, son of Alfred O. and Jeannie (Wilson) Diack. (His father died in 1918).

Jeannie Diack, a widow, aged sixty-two years (b. Scotland), headed a Quincy, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Eva O. Diack, a school teacher, aged thirty years (b. MA), Mildred M. Diack, a gas co. secretary, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), Ethel B. Diack, an automobile secretary, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Oliver J. Diack, a gas co. clerk, aged twenty years (b. MA). Jeannie Diack owned their house at 47 Independence Ave., which was valued at $9,000. They had a radio set. Jeannie Diack was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1903.

BRAINTREE. The annual outing the Old Colony Gas Company of this town will be held tomorrow afternoon and evening at Pemberton. The general committee has arranged for the best time ever, end on the various committees are William Sullivan, chairman; Oliver Diack, secretary; John Swain, Joseph Shay, Miss Mildred Diack, transportation; Mrs. Margaret Jolicoeur, Miss Mary Walsh, Miss Anna Cassese, Mrs. Hazel Cassese, entertainment; David Condrick, William Webb, Joseph Shay, publicity; Oliver Diack, Joseph Shay, David Condrick, men’s sports; Miss Mildred Diack, Miss Mary Walsh, Miss Anna Cassese, Mrs. Margaret Jolicoeur, Miss Mary Tardlff, sports for the women. There will be indoor sports in case of rain. A number of local and out-of-town officials of the company have been invited to attend. (Boston Globe, August 22, 1930).

Oliver James Diack married in Braintree, MA, in 1935, Ruth Power. She was born in Milton, October 10, 1911, daughter of Lewis R. and Georgia W. (Quint) Power,

Oliver J. Diack, a farm laborer, aged thirty years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ruth Diack, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and his son, Oliver J. Diack, Jr., aged ten months (b. MA). Oliver J. Diack owned their house in the Milton Community, which was valued at $2,200. Oliver J. and Ruth Diack had resided in the same house in 1935.

Oliver James Diack of Union R.F.D., Milton, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, October 16, 1940. He was aged thirty-one years (b. Quincy, MA, September 22, 1909), and was employed by the State of New Hampshire. His telephone number was 41-12. His nearest relation was his wife, Ruth Power Diack of Union R.F.D. Milton. He was 6′ tall, weighed 200 pounds, and had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion. A later hand scratched out his Milton address and wrote in “Saint David, Arizona.”

Real Estate Transfers. Oliver and Ruth Diack of Milton sold to Robert S. and Susanne H. Bolan of Newton, Mass., land located on the north west side of “The Lane” in Milton (Farmington News, July 12, 1956).

Oliver J. Diack died in 1957.

ESTATES CONSIDERED. Oliver J. Diack, Milton. Petition to sell stocks and bonds granted (Farmington News, 1959).

Ruth (Power) Diack died in Arizona, October 11, 1970.

John P. Kimball (Chief) – 1942-43

John Pliny Kimball was born in Wolfeboro, NH, June 14, 1916, son of Fred J. and Clara M. (Dale) Kimball.

John Pliny Kimball married in Rochester, NH, June 28, 1939, Mary Elizabeth LeVangie, he of 37 White Place, Brookline, MA, and she of 87 Toxteth Street, Brookline, MA. He was a pharmacist, aged twenty-three years, and she was a stenographer and bookkeeper, aged twenty-four years. She was born in Brookline, MA, April 19, 1915, daughter of Thomas W. and Annie (Giblin) LeVangie.

Fred J. Kimball, a steam railroad laborer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Clara M. Kimball, aged fifty-two years (b. MA), his son, John P. Kimball, a drug store druggist, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Mary E. Kimball, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and his grandson, John P, Kimball, Jr., aged two months (b. NH). Fred J. Kimball owned their house on Remick Street, at its intersection with Silver Street, which was valued at $1,000.

Portsmouth Police Join in Hunt for Milton Girl. Milton police left late last night for Boston, as the search spread for Lena Anderson, 16, member of a trio of Milton girls who ran away Tuesday. The other two, Pauline Dupuis, 15, and Charlotte Weare, 16, returned to their homes yesterday but told police that they had left Lena in Boston. The girls had been sought in Portsmouth Wednesday night by Milton Chief of Police John P. Kimball and Patrolman Pierce Butler, with the assistance of City Marshal Leonard H. Hewitt, and members of the local police department. Hotels and rooming houses were investigated. It is alleged that the three girls skipped school Tuesday to go to Rochester. When they returned in the afternoon the headmaster told them to bring excuse notes from home before they would be admitted to their classes. The two girls told police that they returned to Rochester later that night and then hitch-hiked to Boston where they met three sailors. They left the Anderson girl in front of a Boston movie house in the company of one of the sailors as she refused to accompany them because she was afraid to go home, they explained. Police described Miss Anderson as being five feet six inches tall, weighing 130 pounds, having brown hair and brown eyes and wearing a red and blue flowered dress, brown and white saddle shoes, wine colored socks but no coat (Portsmouth Herald, May 8, 1942).

Rochester. Milton Girl For Whom Search Made Here, Found. (Correspondent: Basil Blake; 806-J). Lena Anderson, 16, missing since May 5, has been located Providence, R.I., where she has been working in a defense plant. Search was made for her with two other girls here and in Portsmouth at the time of their disappearance. The Milton girl, for whom a New England-wide search had been instituted, will return home Sunday, according to Patrolman John P. Kimball, of the Milton police who was in charge of the search and who has been working on the case since May. Claim Skipped Classes. On the afternoon of May 5, Lena and two companions, Charlotte Weare, 16, and Pauline Dupuis, 15, were allegedly sent home from the Nute High school and told to tell their parents that they had skipped classes in the morning. Instead they all hitch-hiked to Rochester, according to the other two girls who returned home a few days after their disappearance. Instead of going home the girls went to the Boston and Maine station in Milton and from the funds of the three which had been pooled, bought tickets for Rochester. They were seen in Rochester that night and then hitch-hiked to Boston. Patrolman John P. Kimball and Patrolman Pierce Butler of Milton went to Boston after two of the girls returned home voluntarily and said they left the Anderson girl in Boston. They told how the three girls and three sailors met outside a Boston theater and the Anderson girl, learning the others were going home, said said she was going to remain as she was afraid to return. Since then she had not been heard from until yesterday (Portsmouth Herald, August 8, 1942).

Injured Youths Leave Hospital. Treated at the Frisbie hospital late Monday for injuries sustained in an automobile accident in Milton, Stanley Parker of East Rochester and Technical Sergt. Melvin Wilkins of East Rochester, who is home on a furlough from Camp George G. Meade in Maryland, were released Tuesday. Sergeant Wilkins, said by police to have been the operator of the car, received lacerations on the face and complained of pains in his abdomen. Parker was cut on the head and was shaken up. Alfred Smith, another passenger in the car, received bruises and contusions but did not require hospital treatment. State Motor Vehicle Inspector Harold M. Foss of Dover, who was called by Patrolman John P. Kimball of the Milton police, said the car started to weave near the Boston and Maine crossing and about opposite the Wilson home, after traveling a hundred yards, left Route 16 and struck an electric light pole, snapping it (Portsmouth Herald, October 1, 1942).

John P. Kimball died in Marion, FL. June 19, 1996. Mary E. (Levangie) Kimball died in Wolfeboro, NH, April 28, 2006.

John P. Butler – 1942

John Pierce “Pierce” Butler was born in Milton, October 5, 1919, son of Edward T. and Margaret J. (Burbine) Butler.

John Pierce Butler married in Milton, November 25, 1939, Dorothy Margaret Wilson, both of Milton. He was a mill hand, aged twenty years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. Leland L. Maxfield performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, November 25, 1919, daughter of Charles W. and Florence E. (Blake) Wilson.

John P. Butler, a leatherboard mill dryer, aged twenty years (b. NH) headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Dorothy M. Butler, aged twenty years (b. NH), and his aunt, Margaret Curll, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME). John P. and Dorothy M. Butler had resided in the same place, i.e., Milton, in 1935, while Margaret Curll had resided in Newport, RI. John P. Butler rented their house on School Street, for $15 per month. Their household was enumerated between those of Fred Howard, a shoe shop shoeworker, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), and Leland Maxfield, a minister, aged thirty years.

John P. Butler enlisted in the U.S. Army in Boston, MA, October 26, 1942. He had attended four years of high school, stood 69″ tall, and weighed 155 pounds.

John P. (Dorothy M.) Butler appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1953, as a lineman for the PS [Public Service] Co. of NH, with his house at 71 Indigo Hill road.

Dorothy M. (Wilson) Butler died in Dover, NH, September 27, 2007. John P. Butler died in Dover, NH, July 13, 2018, aged ninety-eight years.

Clemence C. Dixon – 1944

Clemence Charles Dixon was born in Boston, MA, April 4, 1888, son of Joseph E. and Susanna (Mullen) Dixon.

Clemence Dixon, a U.S. government mail messenger, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. He rented his house on Charles Street, for $8 per month. He had a radio set. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Herbert F. Yeaton, a house carpenter, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and Harry L. Avery, a retail dry goods merchant, aged sixty-six years (b. NH).

Clemence Charles Dixon of Milton registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 27, 1942. He was a Milton-based U.S. government employee, aged fifty-three years (b. South Boston, MA, April 4, 1888). He stood 5′ 4″ tall, weighed 14p pounds, and had gray eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. His contact was Mr. Samuel Blaisdell of Milton.

Clemence C. Dixon died in Rochester, NH, May 10, 1951, aged sixty-three years, twenty-six days.

Roy Burroughs (Chief) – 1945-60

Leroy “Roy” Burroughs was born in Brookfield, NH, February 16, 1909, son of Howard W. and Mercy M. (Kimball) Burroughs.

Roy Burroughs married in Dover, NH, October 11, 1924, Marion G. Chamberlain, he of Brookfield, NH, and she of Milton. He was an iceman, aged twenty-one years, and she was a domestic, aged seventeen years. (She had the consent of her father). Rev. Leon Morse performed the ceremony. She was born in Chelsea, MA, July 10, 1907, daughter of Guy L. and Elizabeth (Cunningham) Chamberlain.

Roy Burroughs, an ice company laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Marian Burroughs, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and his brother-in-law, Gardner Chamberlain, a fibre mill laborer, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Roy Burroughs rented their house on North Main Street, for $10 per month. They had a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Warren Burroughs, State road trucking, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and Lyman S. Hayes, retired, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH).

Roy Burroughs, a leatherboard mill fireman, aged twenty-six [thirty-six] years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Marian G. Burroughs, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), and his brother-in-law, Howard Chamberlain, a State road laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Roy Burroughs rented their house in the Milton Community, for $12 per month. They had all resided in the same house in 1935. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Laura J. Littlefield, a widow, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and Roy M. Downs, a leatherboard mill laborer, aged forty-six years (b. NH).

MILTON. Girl Injured. The heavy rainstorm here Sunday afternoon has been reported as the reason for the one-car crash which caused the hospitalization of a Worcester, Mass., woman. Chief of Police Roy Burroughs reported the automobile left the road on Route 16, approaching Milton from the south, and hit a brick wall. Alice Dusoe of Worcester was taken to Frisbie hospital in Rochester. Her companion, said to be the driver of the car, Doris Pouliot of Boston, was released from the hospital at nightfall (Farmington News, August 11, 1955).

MILTON. Gilman, Burroughs, Mrs. Ramsey Victorious. Incumbents won reelection in the 3 contests at town meeting Tuesday. John Gilman again will serve as selectman. He defeated Leroy Forbes. Roy Burroughs defeated Robert Vachon for chief of police. Mrs. Emma Ramsey defeated Dorothy Carswell for tax collector. Town budget for Milton and the Mills will be $58,218.72, a boost of almost $3000 (Farmington News, March 12, 1959).

MILTON. SURGERY. Mrs. Roy Burroughs underwent surgery last Friday at the Frisbie Memorial Hospital and is making a good recovery (Farmington News, July 30, 1964).

Roy Burroughs died in Rochester, NH, August 8, 1975. Marian G. (Chamberlain) Burroughs died in Rochester, NH, June 28, 1978.

John Reardon – 1946-48, 1949-51

John Reardon has proven somewhat elusive. John Reardon and Anna Reardon neglected to pay their Milton poll tax for 1951, presumably because they moved from town. (Perhaps the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census may shed more light on them, when it becomes available).

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1953, as a G.E. employee, with his house at 179½ Main street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as D.S. Co. employee, with her house at 179½ Main street.

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1956, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 21 Copeland street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 21 Copeland street.

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1958, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 2 Copeland street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 2 Copeland street.

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1960, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 75 Berwick street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 2 Copeland street [75 Berwick street].

John E. (Anna E.) Reardon appeared in the Berwick, ME, directory of 1962, as a G.E. employee in Somersworth, NH, with his house at 42 Berwick street. Anna E. (Mrs. John E.) Reardon appeared as shoe worker in Somersworth, NH, with her house at 42 Berwick street.

Edwin H. Hutchins – 1948, 1954-61, 1963

Edwin Henry Hutchins was born in Wolfeboro, NH, March 15, 1927, son of Bernard S. and Teresa (Hayes) Hutchins.

Bernard S. Hutchins, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Teresa H. Hutchins, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Edwin Hutchins, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Paul Hutchins, aged eleven years (b. NH), Marion Hutchins, aged nine years (b. NH), and Money Hutchins, aged seven years (b. NH). Bernard S. Hutchins owned their house on the Lovell Lake Road, which was valued at $1,000. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

Edwin Henry Hutchins married in Milton, July 27, 1947, Gloria June Clough, he of Sanbornville, Wakefield, NH, and she of Milton Mills, Milton. He was a farmer, aged twenty years, and she was a spooler, aged sixteen years (parental consent). She was born in Milton Mills, circa 1931, daughter of Dennis and Mamie V. (Marsh) Clough.

Young G.O.P. Plans Organization. Milton – A Young Republican Club is being formed to include the towns of Milton, Milton Mills, Union, Sanbornville, and Wakefield. In charge of organization is Mrs. Edwin Hutchins of Milton Mills, and anyone interested in joining the group should contact her. The first Meeting will be Monday, Feb 19 (Farmington News, February 15, 1962).

In the following article concerning the March 1963 town election is confirmed something we might have suspected before regarding Milton’s usual pair of policemen: Milton and Milton Mills had each their own elected policeman. One of them, presumably Milton’s policeman although it is not clear, would be also the chief. Edwin Hutchins received election as a Republican candidate for Milton Mills policeman.

Milton Elects Logan Selectman. Milton – Republican Charles H. Logan defeated democratic incumbent Stanley C. Tanner, 318 to 108, in Tuesday’s election in Milton. In other contested offices, George W. Meyers lost to republican Charles R. Whitehouse, by a vote of 319 to 95; Milton Mills police, Edwin Hutchins, R., 148, Frederick Meyers, 43, Frederick Morrill, 98, Norman Place, 70; 2nd engineer in the fire department, Donald Cheney, 244, Robert McIntire, 132. Pauline Clough was elected trustee of trust funds on a write-in. The other offices were uncontested. Town meeting was held and most of the articles passed without much controversy. Article 25, which had to do with a preliminary report and plan preparation for sewerage and sewage treatment facilities was passed with a provision that the job be put up for bid (Farmington News, March 14, 1963).

MILTON MILLS. Mrs. Edwin Hutchins has concluded her work at Sprague Electric in So. Sanford, Me., and has taken a position at General Electric in Somersworth (Farmington News, December 31, 1969).

Edwin H. Hutchins died in Milton Mills, July 19, 2003, aged seventy-six years.

Howard J. Jedrey – 1952

Howard J. Jedrey was born in Georgetown, MA, June 19, 1908, son of Benjamin H. and Eliza (Chaput) Jedrey.

Howard J. Jedrey married (1st) in Ipswich, MA, February 4, 1928, Bessie E. Kent, he of Broadway Avenue, Ipswich, MA, and she of Wethersfield Street, Rowley, MA. He was a laborer, aged nineteen years, and she was at home, aged sixteen years. Rev. Joseph C. Burns performed the ceremony. She was born in Rowley, MA, circa 1911, daughter of David A. and Etta E. (Wilson) Kent.

Howard J. Jedrey, a wood industry laborer, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), headed a Rowley, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Bessie K. Jedrey, aged eighteen years (b. MA), and his child, Ralph J. Jedrey, aged one year, eleven months (b. MA). Howard J. Jedrey rented their house, for $4 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Howard J. and Bessie E. (Kent) Jedrey divorced in 1933. Howard Jedrey married (2nd) in Nowata, OK, July 1, 1934, Mary E. Hoyle. She was born in Elsmore, KS, circa 1907, daughter of William G. and Myrtle M. (Ard) Hoyle.

Howard Jedrey, a cotton mill twister, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), headed a Stratham, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary Jedrey, aged thirty-two years (b. KS), and his children, Benjamin Jedrey, aged four years (b. KS), and Charles Jedrey, aged two years (b. NH). Howard Jedrey owned their house on Bunker Hill Avenue, which was valued at $50. Howard and Mary E. Jedrey had resided in Elsmore, KS, in 1935.

Howard James Jedrey of Bunker Hill Avenue, Stratham, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Stratham, NH, October 16, 1940. He was employed by the Exeter Manufacturing Co. in Exeter, NH. He was aged thirty-two years (b. Georgetown, MA, June 19, 1908). His contact was his wife, Mrs. Mary E. Jedrey, of Bunker Hill Avenue, Stratham, NH. He was 5′ 8″ tall, weighed 142 pounds, and had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. Warranty Deeds. From Howard J. and Mary E. Jedrey to Ralph D. Laskey of Milton Mills, parcel of land on southerly side of the road leading from Milton Mills to Sanbornville (Farmington News, September 1, 1955).

Howard Jedrey, aged forty-eight years, headed an Elsmore, KS, household at the time of a Kansas county census of March 1957. His household included Mary E. Jedrey, aged fifty years, Benjamin H. Jedrey, aged twenty-one years, and Charles W. Jedrey, aged nineteen years.

Howard J. Jedrey died in Moran, KS, March 4, 1977, aged sixty-eight years.

Howard James Jedrey. Howard James Jedrey, 68, Route 1, Moran, died Friday March 4 at his home. He was born June 19, 1908, in Georgetown, Massachusetts. On July 1, 1934, he was married to Mary E. Hoyle at Nowata, Oklahoma. Mr. Jedrey was a retired laborer and former member of the Eagle Lodge. Survivors include Mrs. Jedrey of the home; two sons, Benjamin Howard Jedrey of Anaheim, California, and Charles William Jedrey of West Covina, California; three brothers, Ben Jedrey of Jacksonville, Fla.; Victor Jedrey of Andover, Mass., and Harry Jedrey of Maine, two sisters, Mrs. Agnes Roberts of Providence, Rhode Island and Mrs. Grace Burns of Raymond, New Hampshire and eight grandchildren. The funeral service was held this afternoon at the Kunkel-Ralston- Hutton Chapel with the Rev. Jean Minnich officiating. Burial was in the Moran Cemetery (Iola Register (Iola, KS), March 7, 1977).

Mary E. (Hoyle) Jedrey died in Broken Arrow, OK, January 12, 1997.


See also Milton Policemen – c1891-1914 and Milton Policemen – 1927-39


References:

Find a Grave. (2009, August 27). Leroy “Roy” Burroughs. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/41231961/leroy-burroughs

Find a Grave. (2014, February 14). Oliver James Diack. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/125500635/oliver-james-diack

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Clemence C. Dixon. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214561425/clemence-c-dixon

Find a Grave. (2013, July 28). Edwin Henry Hutchins. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114529909/edwin-henry-hutchins

Milton Policemen – 1927-39

By Muriel Bristol | April 25, 2021

In the Town Report of 1928, the Milton Town budget reported having spent $739.05 for the Protection of People and Property in 1927. That was allocated as $400 for Blister Rust, $269.85 for the Police Department, including the care of tramps, and $69.20 for the Fire Department, including Forest Fires. The allocations for 1928 were the same as for 1927 as regards the police and blister rust, but increased by $150 for the fire department.

(Blister rust (Cronartium Ribicola) is an invasive fungus introduced from China some thirty years before that attacks white pine trees).

As in earlier years, being a Milton policeman was very much as part-time job. There seem to have been no more than two part-time policemen (and rarely three) in any one year. There were also on occasion “special” policemen.

Apart from their regular duties, whatever they might have been been, Milton town budgets of this period mention paying policemen extra for traffic duty (now called detail work), rounding up tramps (including feeding them), collecting dog license fees, and even killing dogs, presumably mad or errant ones.

The Milton policemen identified in the Milton Town Reports of 1927-39 were: Fred Downs, Earle L. Walsh, William J. Madden, Fred J. Savoie, Herman J. Horne,  Verney C. Sprague. Phillip D. Pike, and George A. McKeagney.

Fred Downs – 1927-1936

Milton had two contemporary Fred Downs, the one that follows below and Fred C. Downs who, no doubt due to the duplication in names, went often by his middle name of Charles. Both were ice laborers. In the matter of determining which one was the Milton policeman, there is little on which to base a decision, at least with the currently available information. The one described below left for Rochester at the time policeman Fred Downs ceased appearing in the town records.

Fred Downs was born in Milton, December 9, 1880, son of Albert F. and Dorothy M. (Tuttle) Downs.

Fred Downs married in Milton, June 7, 1916, Ina Anna [(Bell)] Come, both of Milton. He was a shoemaker, aged thirty-six years, and she was a shoe stitcher, aged twenty-one years. Rev. John Manter performed the ceremony. She was born in Roxbury, VT, circa 1895, daughter of Joseph and Hattie M. (Gushea) Bell.

Fred Downs of Milton registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was a laborer for the Porter Milton Ice Co., aged thirty-seven years (b. December 9, 1880). His nearest relative was Ina Downs of Milton. He was of medium height, with a medium build, blue eyes, and brown hair.

Fred Downs, a [Porter-] Milton Ice Co. laborer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ina A. Downs, aged twenty-five years (b. VT). Fred Downs rented their house on the Plummer’s Ridge Road.

Fred Downs, an ice house laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Ina A. Downs, aged thirty-four years (b. VT). Fred Downs rented their house on the Plummer’s Ridge Road, for $20 per month. They had a radio set.

BURGLARS ENTER MILTON STORE. Milton, Nov. 5 – Burglars broke into a store here early yesterday and also across the river in Lebanon, Me., and then staged a party with part of the loot. At the store of Nick Sarkes, on Main street here, $90 worth of cigarettes and $10 in cash was taken after the burglars broke in a window and released the door catch. Going into Maine, they removed four cases of beer from the Tanner store, then sat on the steps and drank part of the beer and smoked some of the stolen cigarettes. The break here is being investigated by Chief Fred Downs and Deputy Sheriff Stanley Turner, and in Lebanon Deputy Sheriff H.S. Hall is being assisted by Deputy Tanner (Portsmouth Herald, November 5, 1936).

Fred (Ina) Downs appeared in the Rochester directory of 1938, as proprietor of Ike & Ine’s Tea Room, with his house on the Milton Road, R.D. #3.

Fred Downs, a restaurant proprietor, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“East Rochester”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Ina A. Downs, a restaurant proprietor, aged forty-four years (b. VT),and his helper, Rose Davis, a restaurant kitchen worker, aged fifty years (b. NH). Fred Downs rented their house on the Milton Road. Fred and Ina A. Downs had resided in Milton in 1935, and Rose Davis had resided in Acton, ME, in 1935.

Fred Downs of Milton Road, Rochester, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Rochester, NH, April 27, 1942. He was employed at Ike ‘n’ Ine’s Restaurant, aged sixty years (b. December 9, 1880). His nearest relative was his wife, Ina Downs, of R.F.D. #2, Rochester, NH. He was 5′ 9″ tall, weighed 190 pounds, with gray eyes, and white hair.

Fred (Ina) Downs appeared in the Rochester directory of 1948, as proprietor of Ike & Ine’s Tea Room, and grocery, on the Milton Road, R.D. #2, with his house at the same place.

Ike & Ine’s Tea Room appeared in the Rochester directory of 1950, on the Milton road R.D. #3, with Mrs. Fred Downs as proprietor.

Ina Downs appeared in the Rochester directory of 1953, as the widow of Fred Downs, and proprietor of The Country Store, with her house off the Milton road, R.D. #2. The Country Store, Ina A. Downs, proprietor, was on the Milton road; it sold groceries.

Earle L. Walsh – 1927-1929

Earle Leonard “Leonard” Walsh was born in Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897, son of George L. and Carrie M. (Briggs) Walsh.

Earl Leonard Walsh married in Wolfeboro, NH, April 7, 1917, Jessie Louise Tinker, both of Wolfeboro, NH. He was a machinist, aged nineteen years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-one years. Rev. Carlyle Summerbell performed the ceremony. She was born in Wolfeboro, NH, July 1, 1895, daughter of Charles A. and Elizabeth (Whitworth) Tinker.

Earl Leonard Walsh of Forge Farm, Plymouth, MA, registered for the WW I military draft in Plymouth, MA, June 5, 1918. He was employed by Sherman L. Whipple of Plymouth, MA, and was aged twenty-one years (b. Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897). His nearest relative was his wife, Jessie L. Walsh, of Forge Farm, Plymouth, MA. He was of a medium height, and slender build, with blue eyes, and brown hair.

George L. Walsh, a general farm farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie Walsh, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), his sons, Earle L. Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), Charles B. Walsh, an electric co. electrician, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Ralph W. Walsh, aged thirteen years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Jesse I. Walsh, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), his grandchild, Earling Walsh Jr., aged one year (b. MA), and his boarder, Jeremiah Hodsdon, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH). George L. Walsh owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Jessie L. (Tinker) Walsh taught at the Milton Mills school in the years 1926 to 1935 (See Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1912-52).

Earle Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Jessie Walsh, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), his children, Leonard Walsh, aged eleven years (b. MA), and Marilyn Walsh, born seven years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Charles A. Tinker, a widower, aged seventy-five years (b. ME). Earle Walsh rented their house on Church Street, for $10 per month. They had a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Lucy Marsh, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), and Annie Reynolds, a widow, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME).

MILTON MILLS. Earle Walsh, district deputy grand master, and staff installed the officers of Fidelity Lodge at Wolfeboro last Friday night, October 12 (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

LOCAL. Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., will hold its annual installation of officers this Thursday evening. The ceremonies of installation will be performed by District Deputy Grand Master Earle Walsh of Milton Mills (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

Walsh, EL - FN400419Earle L. Walsh, an undertaker, aged forty-two years (b. ME), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Jessie L Walsh, a public school teacher, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his children, Earle L. Walsh, Jr., aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Marilyn Walsh, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his father, George L. Walsh, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH). Earle L. Walsh owned [rented] their house on North Main Street, for $30 per month.

Earle Leonard Walsh of 23 Pleasant Street, Wolfeboro, NH, registered for the WW II military draft in Wolfeboro, NH, February 14, 1942. He was self-employed, aged forty-four years (b. Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897). His telephone number was Wolfeboro 160. His contact was Jessie L. Walsh of Wolfeboro, NH. He was 5′ 9″ tall, weighed 165 pounds, with blue eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion.

1 Soldier Dies, 14 Hurt As Driver Hits Column. BERGENFIELD, N.J., March 27 (AP) – An automobile drove into the rear of a drilling column of 100 soldiers last night, Bergen county prosecutor John J. Breslin said, killing one and injuring 14 others. Breslin said Charles Mordaunt, 35, sales manager for an Englewood. automobile agency, had been booked as driver of the car on a charge of manslaughter by automobile and drunken driving. He said the death charge would be presented to the grand jury Tuesday while the drunken driving complaint would be taken to Bergenfield police court. The dead soldier was Murray Winawer of Brooklyn, N.Y., married. Five soldiers were treated at the scene, while nine others, were taken to Englewood and Holy Name hospitals. The injured, identified by army officers, included Earle Walsh, [Jr.,] 23, Wolfesboro, N.H., possible fractured vertebra, condition fair. He was taken to Englewood hospital (Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, NH), March 14, 1942).

Fish and Game Report. Fishermen Act Quickly On Department’s Plea. Pickerel fishermen have responded quickly to the plea issued by the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department for information on large pickerel taken in the state. Recent reports include a 4¼ pound female, 25 inches long, 11 inches in girth, and a 3¼ pound female, 23 inches long, 8 inches in girth, taken Jan. 8, 1965, from Lake Wentworth in Wolfeboro by Earl L. Walsh of East Wolfeboro … (Portsmouth Herald, February 6, 1965).

Jessie L. (Tinker) Walsh died in Wolfeboro, NH, in March 1969.

William J. Madden – 1932, 1940-45

William James Madden was born in Wandsworth, Surrey, England, April 1, 1886, son of Jack and Annie (Otterway) Madden.

William James Madden of Milton Mills registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He was an alien, employed as a laborer for the John E. Townsend estate, aged thirty-two years (b. England, April 1, 1886). His nearest relative was Mrs. Susie S. Otterway of Milton Mills. He was of medium height and medium weight, with blue eyes and brown hair.

William J. Madden, a general work mason, aged thirty-three years (b. England), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his maternal aunt, Susan S. Otterway, a widow, aged eighty-seven years (b. NH). William J. Madden rented their house on the Sanbornville Road. William J. Madden was an alien, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1913.

William J. Madden married in Milton Mills, October 2, 1920, Beulah Naomi Marsh, both of Milton. He was a farmer, aged thirty-four years, and she was a blanket finisher, aged twenty-nine years. Rev. Edward J. Canfield performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, March 28, 1891, daughter of Edwin E. and Lucy L. (Earl) Marsh.

William J. Madden appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as a mason, with his house at Milton Mills.

Lucy Marsh, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Leroy Marsh, an odd jobs laborer, aged fifty years (b.ME), her son-in-law, William Madden, a odd jobs mason, aged forty-four years (b. England), her daughter (Madden’s wife of ten years), Beula Madden, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), and her granddaughter, Phyllis Madden, aged six years (b. NH). Lucy Marsh owned their house on Church Street, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Frank Goodwin, a general farming laborer, aged forty-five years (b. ME), and Earle Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-four years (b. NH).

MILTON MILLS. William J. Madden celebrated his birthday Monday, April 1. Wonder if he got fooled? (Farmington News, April 5, 1935).

Willie J. Madden, a painter, aged fifty-four years (b. England), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included Beulah Madden, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), his daughter, Phyllis L. Madden, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Leroy Marsh, aged sixty-two years (b. ME). Willie J. Madden owned their house at Milton Mills Center, which was valued at $1,000. They resided in the same house in 1935.

William James Madden of P.O. Box 25, Milton Mills registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 27, 1942. He was self employed, aged fifty-six years (b. Wandsworth, England, April 1, 1886). His telephone number was Milton Mills 14, and his nearest relative was Mrs. Beulah Madden of the same address. He was 5’7″ tall, weighed 150 pounds, a sallow complexion, and had blue eyes and brown hair. He had two tattoos on his right arm and one on his left arm.

William J. Madden died in South Berwick, ME, October 30, 1963, aged seventy-seven years.

Deaths and Funerals. William J. Madden. SOUTH BERWICK – William J. Madden, 77, of Portland St., died Wednesday at his home after a long illness. He was born in Wandworth, England, April 1, 1886, the son of Jack and Ann (Otterway) Madden. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Beulah (Marsh) Madden; a daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Nelson of South Berwick; and several nieces and nephews (Portsmouth Herald, 1963).

Beulah N. (Marsh) Madden died in South Berwick, ME, in July 1978.

Fred J. Savoie – 1932

Frederick Joseph Savoie was born in Dover, NH, November 29, 1896, son of Joseph W. and Delia (Burns) Savoie.

Fred J. Savoie, a U.S. Army private, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), resided at Fort Bliss, in El Paso, TX, at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. He was in the Eighth U.S. Cavalry.

Fred J. Savoie married in Somersworth, NH, October 7, 1922, Ruby Ellis, both of Milton. He was a laborer, aged twenty-five years, and she was a mill employee, aged seventeen years. She was born in Milton, May 3, 1905, daughter of George E. and Inez G. (Duntley) Ellis.

Fred Savoie, a fibre mill overseer, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Ruby Savoie, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Jacqueline Savoie, aged five years (b. NH), Maurice Savoie, aged three years (b. NH), and Elaine Savoie, aged two years (b. NH). Fred Savoie owned their house on South Main Street, which was valued at $1,600. They did not have a radio set. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Malcolm A. Hart, a general practice physician, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and Ralph E. Meserve, a fibre mill bleacher, aged twenty-two years (b. ME).

Fred J Lavoie, a leatherboard mill finisher, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ruby Lavoie, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Jacqueline P. Lavoie, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Maurice M. Lavoie, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Elaine M. Lavoie, aged twelve years (b. NH). Fred J. Savoie owned their house on Main Street in the Milton Community, which was valued at $1,500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Malcolm A.H. Hart, a medical doctor, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), and Arthur A. Jenness, a shoemaker, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Fred Joseph Savoie of Main Street, Milton, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, April 26, 1942. He was employed by the Spaulding Fibre company. He was forty-five years of age (b. Dover, November 29, 1896). He stood 5′ 3″ tall, weighed 185 pounds, and had grey eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. He had no telephone number. His contact was Mrs. Ruby Savoie, P.O. Box 260, Milton.

Fredrick J. Savoie of Milton died of coronary heart thrombosis in the U.S. Naval Hospital in Kittery, ME, January 22, 1946, aged forty-nine years, one month, and twenty-four days. (He was employed as a fireman at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard).

Fireman Dies In Portsmouth Naval Hospital. Fred J. Savoie of Milton died yesterday at the U. S. naval hospital at the Portsmouth naval base where he had been a patient for eight days suffering from smoke inhalation reportedly received while fighting a blaze aboard a submarine at the base a week ago. A member of the fire department at the base, Mr. Savoie was born in Dover, the son of Joseph W. and Delia Burns Savoie. He had been resident of Milton for the past 20 years. He was 49 years old. He served in World War I and was a member of the Oscar Morehouse post, American Legion, of Milton, the Milton fire department and Rindge lodge, Knights of Pythias, East Rochester. Survivors include his wife. Mrs. Ruby Savoie: two daughters, Jacqueline and Elaine Savoie; a son, Maurice, all of Milton, and a sister, Mrs. Jennie Wentworth of Farmington (Portsmouth Herald, January 24, 1946).

Ruby (Ellis) Savoie died in Milton, September 23, 1996.

Herman J. Horne – 1933-34

Herman Julian “Rip” Horne was born in Milton Mills, October 26, 1905, son of John E. and Olive A. (Moulton) Horne.

(His father owned the Milton Mills shop occupied by blacksmith and policeman, Hiram J. Burrows, when it burned in the early hours of Thursday, November 20, 1924. (See Milton in the News – 1924)).

Herman J. Horne married in Milton Mills, June 23, 1929, Mildred E. Dow, he of Milton Mills and she of Rochester, NH. He was a clerk, aged twenty-three years, and she was a cashier, aged twenty-five years. Rev. Edwin B. Young performed the ceremony. She was born in Dover, NH, circa 1904, daughter of Joseph W. and Charlotte (Haney) Dow.

Herman J. Horne, a dry goods salesman, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mildred D. Horne, aged twenty-six years (b. NH). Herman J. Horne rented their house on School Street, for $9 per month. They did not have a radio set. They shared their two-family dwelling with the household of William Woodbury, a poultry breeder, aged thirty-two years (b. NH).

MILTON MILLS. Mr. and Mrs. Herman J. Horne entertained Mr. and Mrs. Lester Colt of Lowell, Mass., over the weekend (Farmington News, March 1, 1935).

J. Herman Horne, an electric light line foreman, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, D. Mildred Horne, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and his children, A. David Horne, aged eight years (b. NH), O. Patricia Horne, aged six years (b. NH), Pamela Horne, aged three years (b. NH), Peter Horne, aged three years (b. NH), and Robert Horne, aged seven months (b. NH). J. Herman Horne owned their house at 43 Mt. Vernon Street, which was valued at $4,500. Those old enough to have done so had all lived in Milton Mills in 1935.

Herman J. Horne died in Rochester, NH, in June 1978. Mildred E. (Dow) Horne died in Rochester, NH, in September 1980.

Verney C. Sprague – 1935-38

Verney Charles Sprague was born in Shapleigh, ME, March 10, 1893, son of Simon S. and Annie A. (James) Sprague.

Verney Sprague married (1st) in Farmington, NH, July 1, 1914, Ella May Cook, both of Farmington, ME. They were both shoe workers, he was aged twenty-two years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. John T. Clow performed the ceremony. She was born in Meredith, NH, circa 1894, daughter of Nathaniel and Helen (Browne) Cook.

PERSONAL. Mrs. Annie Rand returned Monday from a few days’ visit with her son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Verney Sprague (Farmington News, June 9, 1916).

Verney Charles Sprague of Waterboro, ME, registered for the WW I military draft in Shapleigh, ME, June 5, 1917. He was aged twenty-five years (born Shapleigh, ME, March 10, 1893). He was a fireman for Albert Sanborn of Brownfield, ME. He was tall, with a medium build, blue eyes, and light hair. He claimed an exemption (he was married).

PERSONAL. Mr. and Mrs. Verney Sprague of Brownville, Me., are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Edgerly (Farmington News, June 15, 1917).

Vernie C. Sprague, a sawmill laborer, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Waterboro, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella M. Sprague, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH). Verney Sprague rented their house. They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of [his brother] Willie E. Sprague, a sawmill laborer, aged twenty-six years (b. ME).

Verney Sprague, a medical products salesman, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Ella Sprague, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), and his boarder, George Eastman, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME). Verney Sprague owned their house. They had a radio set.

Verney C. Sprague, a retail grocery store owner, aged forty-eight years, headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ella Sprague, aged forty-seven years. Verney C. Sprague owned their house on Main Street, which was valued at $2,800.

Verney Charles Sprague of No. Shapleigh, ME, registered for the WW II military draft in Milton Mills, April 27, 1942. He was aged forty-nine years (born Shapleigh, ME, March 10, 1893). He was self-employed in Milton Mills. He was 5′ 11″ tall, weighed 180 pounds, blue eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. He had scars on his left hand. His telephone number was Milton Mills 37-3. His nearest relative was his wife, Ella M. Sprague, P.O. Box 77, Milton Mills.

Ella M. (Cook) Sprague died in Sanford, ME, July 9, 1960.

Verney C. Sprague married (2nd) in ME, October 1, 1962, Ruth E. Bennett. She was born in Standish, ME, October 24, 1908, daughter of William N. and Almeda B. (Libby) Bennett.

Verney C. Sprague died in Shapleigh, ME, July 11, 1975, aged eighty-three years. Ruth E. Bennett died in Shapleigh, ME, April 24, 1976.

Herbert A. Downs – 1937-38, 1941

Herbert Arthur Downs was born in Barnstead, NH, January 15, 1915, son of Arthur L. and Maud G. (Welch) Downs.

Herbert A. Downs married in Milton, Mat 1, 1936, Wilma F. Warnecke, both of Milton. He was a mill worker, aged twenty-one years, and she was a bookkeeper, aged eighteen years. Rev. E. Lincoln Bigelow performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, circa 1918, daughter of William O.L. and Francina I. (Nutter) Warnecke.

Herbert A. Downs, an inspector, aged twenty-five years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Wilma F. Downs, aged twenty-two years, and his children, Arthur W. Downs, aged three years, and Sharon E. Downs, aged one month. Herbert A. Downs owned their house on the Farmington Road, which was valued at $1,000.

Herbert A. Downs died in Portland, ME, June 3, 1993.

Phillip D. “Damon” Pike – 1938-39

Phillip Damon Pike was born in Milton Mills, January 31, 1915, son of Phillip G. and Rosamond E. (Piper) Pike. (His mother taught at the Milton Mills school (See Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1912-52)).

Philip G. Pike, aged thirty-eight years. His household included his wife, Rosamond E. Pike, aged forty years, and his children, Louise E. Pike, aged seventeen years, and P. Damon Pike, aged fifteen years.

Phillip G. Pike, a retail meat market clerk, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Rosmon E. Pike, aged fifty years (b. NH), his son, Damon Pike, an auto factory mechanic, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Beatrice Pike, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and his grandson, Wayford Pike, aged nine months (b. NH). Phillip H. Pike owned their house on Highland Avenue, which was valued at $700. They had resided in the same house in 1935, excepting Beatrice Pike, who has lived in Rochester, NH, and Wayford Pike, who was not born in 1935.

Phillip Damon Pike of Milton Mills registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, in April 1942. He was an employee of Spaulding Fibre company of North Rochester, NH, aged twenty-five years (b. Milton Mills, January 31, 1915). His nearest relative was his wife, Mrs. Beatrice Louise Pike of the same address. He was 6′ tall, weighed 170 pounds, with a light complexion, and had blue eyes and blonde hair.

Damon Pike went on to become Milton’s fire chief:

N.H. Man, 76, Burns to Death. MILTON MILLS, N.H.. Jan. 14 – A 76-year-old laborer, burned to death when fire swept his two-room house here early this morning. Herbert Goldthwaith was found dead in his bed. Fire Chief Damon Pike said the blaze was believed started by a space heater. The victim leaves a son, Robert of Dover, N.H., and a daughter, Lillian (Boston Globe, January 15, 1961).

Phillip D. Pike died of smoke inhalation while fighting a barn fire in Milton, November 29, 1971.

Fire Chief Dies in Action. MILTON MILLS, N.H. (AP) – Veteran Fire Chief Damon Pike died Monday night after he apparently was overcome by smoke while fighting a barn fire. Death was attributed to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation (Portsmouth Herald, November 30, 1971).

Milton Mills News. And [our sincere sympathy] to the family of Mr. Damon Pike who lost his life fighting a fire here in town Monday evening (Farmington News, December 9, 1971).

George A. McKeagney – 1939

George Albert McKeagney was born in Boston, MA, July 9, 1908, son of Patrick H. and Mary L. (Gibson) McKeagney.

Laura Mckeagney, aged forty-seven years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her children, George Mckeagney, a fibre mill machinist, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Marie Mckeagney, aged eleven years (b. MA), and Robert Mckeagney, aged nine years (b. NH), and her half-brother, Edwin J. Gibson, a shoe shop shoe repairer, aged fifty-three years (b. MA). Laura M. McKeagney owned their house on the Wakefield Road, which was valued at $5,000. Their household was enumerated between those of George Kingston, a fibre mill laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and William A. Dickson, a fibre mill superintendent, aged fifty-five years (b. MA).

Laura M. McKeagney, a fibre mill office clerk, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her children, George A. McKeagney, a garage proprietor, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), and Robert B. McKeagney, an N.Y.A. Project foreman, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and her brother, Edwin J. Gibson, a shoe shop line laborer, aged sixty-one years (b.MA). Laura M. McKeagney owned their house, which was valued at $2,500. They had all lived in the same house in 1935.

George A. McKeagney married in Rochester, NH, July 8, 1941, Thelma M. Wright, he of Milton and she of 204 N. Main Street, Rochester, NH. He was a state trooper, aged thirty-two years, and she was a dietician, aged thirty-three years. She was born in Everett, MA, October 19, 1907, daughter of Frederick and Helen (Durgin) Wright.

George McKeagney appeared in the Rochester directory of 1941, as a state policeman, residing at 6 May street. Thelma M. (Mrs. George) McKeagney appeared as a clerk at F.W. Woolworth Co., with her house at 6 May street.

SOUTH MILTON, N.H., May 18 (AP) — The home of Mrs. Laure McKeagney, mother of State Trooper George A. McKeagney, was destroyed by fire yesterday with damage estimated at $5000. Sparks from the fire caused slight damage to the roof of an adjacent house and also started a brush and grass fire (Newport Express (Newport, VT), May 18, 1943).

George A. McKeagney died in Meredith, NH, February 13, 1987. Thelma M. (Wright) McKeagney died January 16, 1999.


See also Milton Policemen – c1891-1914 and Milton Policemen – 1940-52


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, August 8). Herbert Arthur Downs. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115104102/herbert-arthur-downs

Find a Grave. (2014, April 17). William James Madden. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/128115614/william-james-madden

Find a Grave. (2018, August 6). George A. McKeagney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192028770/george-a-mckeagney

Find a Grave. (2013, August 11). Phillip Damon Pike. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115287603/philip-damon-pike

Wikipedia. (2020, December 29). Cronartium Ribicola. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cronartium_ribicola

Milton Policemen – c1891-1914

By Muriel Bristol | April 4, 2021

The first mention of a Milton policeman that has come to hand concerns the April 1891 arrest of one Correbin E. Murphy for drunkenness.

(An examination of Strafford County Court records might shed more light on exactly when Milton policemen began sending cases that way).

Prior to having its own policemen Milton had, or perhaps had instead, many justices of the peace – as many as fifteen of them in any given year – and usually had also a resident appointed deputy sheriff who reported to the elected county sheriff.

Neighboring Farmington, NH, had town policemen as early as 1879. In 1880, five policemen, presumably including its police chief, if any there was initially, published the town’s police regulations (as countersigned by the town selectmen):

POLICE REGULATIONS FOR THE TOWN OF FARMINGTON. Article 1. No awning shade or other fixtures, in front of any store or dwelling house, shall be less than eight feet in height in the lowest part thereof. Art. 2. No boxes, barrels, or any other article, “Seats for Loafers,” will be allowed to remain on any side-walk on the Sabbath, within the limits of the village of Farmington. Art. 3. There will be no collection of persons on the side-walks, or at the corners of the streets, so as to impede or prevent any person from freely passing therein. Nor shall anyone be suffered to push, insult or abuse by words or otherwise, any person passing on the side-walk or in the streets of thus town. Art. 4. No person shall smoke any pipe or cigar, in any livery stable, or any stable used in connection with either of the hotels of this town. Art. 5. Shouting, screaming and whistling, or making any other disturbance in the streets or on the commons, particularly in the evening or night time, is strictly forbidden, under the penalty of the act hereafter mentioned. Art. 6. If two or more persons shall be on the side-walk in a situation to interfere with those that wish to pass on the side-walk, in such a manner as unnecessarily to come in contact with persons whom they may meet, they and each shall be punished as in the statute hereafter mentioned. Art. 7. Any person creating any disturbance in any public place in this town, and, being requested by a Police Officer, shall not immediately leave, or having left by such request, shall return the same evening, shall be punished as above provided. Art. 8. No person shall be allowed to play ball, pitch quoits, or make any disturbance whatever, in any of the streets, lanes or alleys of this town. Art. 9. No person or persons shall be allowed to slide or coast in any of the streets, lanes or alleys within the limits of this town. Art. 10. It shall be deemed rude or disorderly conduct, and a violation of Police Laws, for three or more persons to collect after sunset in front of the Post Office, or corners of any street in town, and there remain after a notice by the police officer to disperse, and all persons without business of necessity so found standing or sitting, shall be punished as rude and disorderly persons, according to the provisions of Chapter 296 of the General Laws of this State, Art. 11. The proprietors or employees of any and all Saloons and Restaurants, are requested to close the same at 10 P.M., and not open them on the Sabbath. Art. 12. No person shall be allowed at any meeting at the Town Hall to stamp, whistle, or make any other disturbance whatever. Art. 13. No person shall leave standing or fastened any horse or carriage in any street in such a manner as to impede the free travel thereon, in the village of this town. Art. 14. Any person offending against any of these Laws, By-Laws and Regulations, shall be punished according to the provisions of Chapter 269 and 533 of the General Laws of this State. STEPHEN NUTTER, CHAS. WHITEHOUSE, ALBERT J. WILLEY, SAML. J. LEIGHTON, JOHN G.H. SMITH, Police Officers of Farmington. Approved by the Selectmen, June, 1880. SAMUEL S. AMAZEEN, JOSEPH L. DEMERRITT, BENJAMIN ROBERTS, Selectmen of Farmington (Farmington News, June 25, 1880).

The obvious unconstitutionality of much of this might be enough almost to make one want to violate Article 12 by stamping, whistling, or making some other disturbance at the next Town Hall meeting. One might hope that Milton’s police regulations, if any there were, managed to achieve a more perfect alignment with the natural rights acknowledged by the Bill of Rights.

The offices of Milton chief of police, as well as the usually lone Milton constable or policeman, were elected positions. None of those holding those offices in this period did so on a full-time basis, they all had also their principal occupations.

The Milton policemen of this period (that have been identified to date) were: James H. “Harris” Rhines, Fred P. Howard, Charles E. Remick, Hiram J. Burrows, Hazen W. “Wesley” Downs, Hartley A. Nutter, and Mylo M. Sinclair.


James H. Rhines, Jr. – c1891-14

James Harris Rhines, Jr., was born in New Durham, NH, July 8, 1855, son of James H. and Melissa D. (Boston) Rhines.

James H. Rines married in Farmington, NH, November 12, 1877, Emma [A.] Knox, he of Farmington and she of Milton. He was a farmer, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. D.H. Adams of Farmington performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, October 19, 1855, daughter of Hosea and Belinda Q. (Leighton) Knox.

James H. Rines, works on shoes, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma Rines, keeps house, aged twenty-two years (b. NH).

The first mention of a Milton policeman that has come to hand is the April 8, 1891 arrest by Policeman J.H. Rines for public drunkenness.

MILTON. Correbin E. Murphy was arrested by Policeman J.H. Rines Wednesday night and at the court, Thursday morning, Judge Fox sentenced him to ninety days in the county jail as a common drunkard (Farmington News, April 10, 1891).

Policeman Rines appeared next in the record conducting a liquor raid on a Milton hotel. Its owner or manager, John E. Ward, was born in Calais, ME, June 27, 1843. He and his wife Eva left their home in nearby Barnstead, NH, to manage a Milton hotel in February 1892.

NORTH BARNSTEAD. We are sorry to learn of the departure of our neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. John Ward, who have gone to Milton to take charge of a hotel (Farmington News, February 12, 1892).

MILTON. Officer Rines made a raid last Saturday night on Mr. Ward’s hotel, and found evidence enough to convict him of selling liquor without a license. Mr. Ward was taken to the jail and kept there until Monday, when he had his trial. He was bound over to the superior court, which will meet at Dover in September, and held in $200 bonds (Farmington News, April 15, 1892).

MILTON. A raid was made on Ward’s hotel some time ago and he was held under bonds for the September court. Mr. Ward continued the sale of liquor without a license and last week Thursday the state took the case in hand and carried Ward to Dover, where his trial was held. He paid a large fine and returned home (Farmington News, May 6, 1892).

John E. Ward appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1895, as a teamster, with his house on Main street, at its corner with Indigo Hill road. (John E. Ward of Farmington, NH, died of apoplexy, i.e., a stroke, on the Strafford County Farm, in Dover, NH, June 13, 1926, aged eighty-three years).

MILTON. Harris Rines has strawberries in the several stages of bearing, from blossoming to ripe fruit. They are potted plants, but have been kept out of doors most of the time (Farmington News, 1898).

James Harris Rines appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a shoe edge setter, with his house at 35 South Main street.

James Rines, a day laborer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Emma Rines, aged forty-three years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Forrest E. Knox, aged twenty years (b. NH). James Rines owned their house, free-and-clear. Emma Rines was the mother of one child, of whom none was still living.

Another of the Milton Samsons is Chief of Police Harris Rines. Mr. Rines is very popular, and many of his friends assert that he is actually the strongest man in town. Chief Rines is 40, measures 5 feet 11 inches in height and tips the scales at 210 pounds. His commands are always promptly obeyed, for it is well known that the genial chief is not at all backward about enforcing them whenever occasion demands (Boston Globe, November 26, 1900 (See Milton’s Men of Muscle in 1900)).

James Harris Rines appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a shoe operative, with his house at 35 So. Main street. He appeared in the Milton directory of 1905, as a laborer, with his house at 35 So. Main street.

Milton Police Chief Rhines arrested and held in custody Genaro Calella, the suspect in the Hennessey kidnapping of 1908, until he turned him over to officer James Hoy of the Charlestown, MA, police. Before the transfer, Calella attempted to hang himself in his cell, but Chief Rhines cut him down in time.

HE TRIED HANGING, KIDNAPPER OF GIRL. Milton, N.H., May 18 – After his arrest for kidnapping seventeen-years-old Josephine Counihan of Charlestown, Mass., love-crazed Genaro Callela tried to kill himself in his cell here because he could not have her. Chief of Police Rhines, it was learned to-day, found the man hanging with a suspender around his neck from a peg in the wall where prisoners are supposed to put their clothes and cut him down just in time to save his life. Callela, who is twenty-eight years old and married, forced the girl, according to her story, to leave Charlestown with him under threat of death. He brought her here and put her in a boarding house, but while he was out getting his hair cut the girl appealed to the landlady and Callela was arrested. “I will kill myself” cried the man when he was revived after the attempt at suicide. “If I can’t have Josephine no one else shall.” He will be taken to Charlestown for trial (Meriden Journal (Meriden, CT), May 18, 1908).

James Harris Rines appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a laborer and policeman, with his house at 35 So. Main street. (He appeared also, under the alternate spelling Rhines, as a farmer and policeman, with his house at 35 So. Main street).

Hart Block - 547 White Mountatin HighwayChief of Police James Rines sought for arrest a State Highway road worker who had stabbed another road worker in their lodgings in the Hart Building in November 1909. (See Milton in the News – 1909).

MILTON. At the town meeting last Tuesday, Charles A. Jones, Haven Nutter and Samuel Drew were chosen for selectmen. Dr. M.A.H. Hart was re-elected on the school board for the next three years. Everett F. Fox town treasurer. H.L. Avery and B.B. Plummer town auditors, H.W. Downs constable, J.H. Rhines chief of police (Farmington News, March 12, 1909).

James H. Rines, Town police man, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Emma A. Rines, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), his brother-in-law, Forest Knox, a R.R. crossing flagman, aged forty years (b. NH), and his sister-in-law, Sarah Knox, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). James H. Rines owned their house, free-and-clear. Emma Rines was the mother of one child, of whom none was still living.

James Harris Rhines appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a farmer and policeman, with his house at 35 So. Main street.

J. Harris Rhines, a policeman, died of acute indigestion in Milton, September 24, 1914, aged fifty-nine years, two months, and sixteen days. (James J. Buckley, M.D., signed the death certificate).

James H. Rhines appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a farmer and policeman, who had died September 24, 1914, aged fifty-nine years. Emma A. Rhines, appeared as the widow of James H., with her house at 35 So. Main street.

Emma A. (Knox) Rhines died of fibroid phthisis in Milton, October 28, 1918, aged sixty-three years, and nine days. (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate).

Fred P. Howard – c1896-1912

Fred P. Howard was born in Rochester, NH, October 10, 1867, son of Elbridge W. and Sarah E. Howard.

Fred Howard married in Rochester, NH, May 11, 1886, Costella A. Scruton, both of Gonic, i.e., Rochester, NH. He was a shoe buffer, aged nineteen years, and she was aged nineteen years. She was born in Rochester, NH, September 24, 1869, daughter of Denman B. and Elizabeth Ann “Betsy” (Foss) Scruton.

MILTON. Chief of Police Howard captured a seven-pound lake trout at Wolfeboro Monday (Farmington News, [Friday,] May 28, 1896).

MILTON NEWS LETTER. Chief of Police Howard on Monday arrested a man, supposed to be wanted for a murder committed in Connecticut. The man proved to be a gold brick, however, as the right man was found in Massachusetts (Farmington News, August 20, 1897).

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a policeman and edge setter, with his house on School street.

Fred P. Howard, a shoe edge setter, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Costella Howard, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his child, Effie Howard, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). Fred P. Howard owned their house, free-and-clear. Costella Howard was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a shoe edge setter in Newburyport, MA, with his house at School street in Milton.

STRAFFORD CORNER. Mrs. Fred Howard and daughter, Effie, of Milton have been visiting at B.P. Berry’s the past week (Farmington News, August 8, 1902).

STRAFFORD CORNER. Mrs. Fred Howard and daughter Effie of Milton were guests of B.P. Berry’s family Wednesday of last week (Farmington News, June 19, 1903).

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directories of 1905 and 1909, as a shoe operative, with his house at 9 School street. His daughter, Effie Howard, appeared also in 1909, as a shoe operative, boarding with F.H., at 9 School street.

Fred Howard, a shoe factory finisher, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Costella Howard, aged forty years (b. NH). Fred Howard owned their house, free-and-clear. Costella Howard was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a having or working at a meat market on Main street, and as being a policeman, with his house at 9 School street.

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a shoe operative, with his house at 9 School street.

Fred Howard, a shoe shop edge setter, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Costilla Howard, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Fred Howard owned his house on the Farmington Road in Milton Village, free-and-clear.

Fred Howard, a retail meat market merchant, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-three years), Costilla Howard, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH). Fred Howard owned their house on School Street, which was valued at $1,800. They did not have a radio set. School Street lay between the Farmington Road (now Elm Street) and Church Street. It had three houses only, those of Hannah Wentworth, a widow, aged eighty-nine years (b. NH), Fred Howard, and Charles W. Wilson, a gravel company foreman, aged forty-one years (b. ME).

Costella A. (Scruton) Howard died of a pulmonary embolism at Frisbee Hospital in Rochester, NH, May 24, 1934, aged sixty-three years, and eight months. (A breast cancer operation was a contributing cause).

Fred Howard, a shoe shop shoemaker, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. He owned his house on School Street, which was valued at $1,500. He had lived in the same house in 1935.

Fred Howard died in Rochester, NH, February 1, 1950, aged eighty-two years.

Charles E. Remick – 1900-05

Charles E. Remick was born in Milton, circa 1856, son of Moses H. and Clara (Wentworth) Remick.

Charles Remick married in Wakefield, NH, August 26, 1874, Etta S. Horne, he of Milton, and she of Acton, ME. He was a farmer, aged eighteen years, and she was aged eighteen years. She was born in Sanford, ME, October 23, 1856, daughter of Edward and Louisa Horne.

Charles Remick, a day laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta S. Remick, keeping house, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and his child, Lester C. Remick, aged four years (b. NH).

Charles Remick, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta Remick, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Lester Remick, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Minnie Remick, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Forrest Remick, aged four years (b. NH). Charles Remick rented their house. Etta Remick was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living

Charles E. Remick appeared in the Milton directories of 1900, 1902, and 1905, as a policeman and shoe nailer, with his house at the rear of 70 Main street, in Milton Mills.

Remick, CE - 1909CHARLES E. REMICK appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as deputy sheriff, with his house at 42 Main street, at the corner of Charles street, in Milton Mills.

Charles Remick, a shoe factory laster, aged fifty-three years, headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Etta S. Remick, aged fifty-three years, and his child, Forest E. Remick, aged fourteen years. Charles Remick rented their house. Etta I. Remick was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Etta S. Remick died of stomach cancer in Milton Mills, April 25, 1910, aged fifty-three years, six months, and two days.

Charles E. Remick appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as having moved to Sanbornville, i.e., Wakefield, NH.

Charles E. Remick married (2nd) in Farmington, NH, September 16, 1917, Hattie M. “Maude” [(Kimball)] Hill, both of Farmington. He was a shoeworker, aged sixty years, and she was a housekeeper, aged thirty-two years. Charles Pitman, Justice-of-the-Peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Farmington, NH, circa 1884, daughter of Samuel W. and Addie R. (Young) Kimball.

Charles E. Remick of Rochester, NH, divorced Maud Remick of Farmington, NH, in Starfford County Court, October 15, 1919. He alleged extreme cruelty (one had to allege something).

Charles E. Remick, a general farm farmer, aged fifty-six [sixty-six] years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his housekeeper, Mattie L. Foss, a shoe factory lining in, aged fifty-one years (b. MA). He was divorced. They resided on Elm Street.

Harry Hamilton, a shoe factory laster, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-nine years), Minnie G. Hamilton, a shoe factory stitcher, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Rena E. Bennett, a private family housemaid, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Lena A. Hamilton, a shoe factory room girl, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Beatrice U. Hamilton, a shoe factory doubler, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Charles E. Remick, a shoe factory leveller, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Harry Hamilton rented their house at 52 Central Street, for $20 per month.

Charles E. Remick died of angina pectoris at 52 Central Street in Farmington, NH, February 11, 1936, aged seventy-six years, nine months, and seventeen days.

Hazen W. Downs – c1901-09

Hazen W. “Wesley” Downs was born in Milton, January 25, 1848, son of Joshua H. “Hanson” and Emily P. (Duntley) Downs. (Blacksmith Hazen Duntley was his maternal grandfather).

Hazen W. Downs married (1st) in Dover, NH, February 12, 1875, Fannie M. Hersom, he of Milton, and she of Dover. She was born in Waterboro, ME, circa 1849, daughter of Jesse R. and Mary E. (Smith) Hersom. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-seven years.

Hasen W. Downs, a shoemaker, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fanny Downs, keeping house, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and his daughter, Blanch Downs, aged three years (b. NH). They resided on Sixth Street.

MILTON. As the seasons change so do business men. Mr. Charles Looney has moved his goods and post-office into Wentworth’s Block on Main St., with Mr. Wesley Downs, formerly of this place, and has put in a large lot of groceries and crockery ware, and is now ready to do business o the square (Farmington News, April 29, 1881).

MILTON. Wesley Downs lost his horse Monday afternoon. While drawing a small load of brick up the hill on Silver Street, the animal fell dead in the harness (Farmington News, December 5, 1890).

Fanny M. (Hersom) Downs died of a “complication of diseases” in Milton, October 17, 1894, aged forty-six years, nine months, and two days. (W.F. Wallace, M.D., signed the death certificate).

MILTON. H.W. Downs spent last week with friends in Boston (Farmington News, April 21, 1899).

Hazen W. Downs, a teamster, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His house included his daughter, Lura Downs, a housekeeper, aged nineteen years (b. NH).

MILTON. An entertainment was given at Sid Nutter’s camp last Thursday night, by a Boston party stopping there, which was called “Dobbyn’s Rough Rider Minstrel Show, at Crape Hall.” Wesley Downs was presented by the party with a silver policeman’s badge (Farmington News, August 16, 1901).

The entertainment’s host, Sid Nutter, was father of another Milton policeman, Hartley A. Nutter (see below). John F. Dobbyn was a lieutenant in the Charlestown, MA, i.e., Boston, MA, police. He and his wife were frequent campers in Milton. (She rescued a drowning child in 1902, and it was he that escorted the alleged kidnapper of 1908 back to Boston).

Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1902 and 1905, as a truckman and policeman, with his house at 7 Silver street. Miss Lura Downs appeared in 1902 as boarding at 7 Silver street.

MILTON. At the town election Tuesday March 10, Harry Avery was chosen town clerk, Haven K. Jewett, J.H. Avery, Fred B. Roberts, selectmen, Elisha I. Libbey, treasurer, Wesley Downs, chief of police, and Dr. M.A.H. Hart on the school board. An extra appropriation of $800 was made for school. Horace Babb of Dover was present at the meeting and explained that the accumulation from the sum left by Lewis W. Nute for the care of the cemetery on Nute’s Ridge had for certain reasons not been used. It was voted that the selectmen in conjunction with a committee chosen from the heirs should be appointed to expend the accumulation in improving the grounds (Farmington News, March 13, 1903).

MILTON. Lura Downs died Dec. 31, after an illness of nine months of consumption. She was the only remaining daughter of J. [H.] Wesley Downs. The funeral was held Sunday, the D. of P. [Daughters of Pythias], of which she was a member, performing their burial service (Farmington News, January 8, 1904).

MILTON. Town meeting passed off quietly, and the following officers were elected to serve the town for the ensuing year: Selectmen, Warren Jewett, Joseph H. Avery, and Charles A. Jones; town clerk, Harry L. Avery; constables, H.W. Downs, Hartley Nutter; school board, Frank G. Howe, Forrest L. Marsh, Dr. M.A.H. Hart (Farmington News, March 12, 1904).

Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a truckman, with his house at 7 Silver street.

MILTON. At the town meeting last Tuesday, Charles A. Jones, Haven Nutter and Samuel Drew were chosen for selectmen. Dr. M.A.H. Hart was re-elected on the school board for the next three years. Everett F. Fox town treasurer. H.L. Avery and B.B. Plummer town auditors, H.W. Downs constable, J.H. Rhines chief of police (Farmington News, March 12, 1909).

Westley Downs, an odd jobs truckman, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his housekeeper, Martha G. Cushman, a private family housekeeper, aged fifty-two years (b. VT). Westley Downs owned their house, free-and-clear.

Hazen W. Downs married (2nd) in Athol, MA, August 13, 1910, Martha G. (Granger) Cushman, both of Milton, NH. He was a truckman, aged sixty-two years, and she was a housekeeper, aged fifty-three years. She was born in Fairlee, VT, August 8, 1857, daughter of Samuel L. and Hannah G. (Pierce) Granger.

Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a truckman, with his house at 7 Silver street.

Hazen W. Downs died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Milton, November 10, 1916, aged sixty-eight years, nine months, and sixteen days. (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate)

.Mrs. Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a widow, with her house at 7 Silver street.

Martha G. Downs, a widow, aged sixty-two years (b. VT), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. She owned her two-family house on Silver Street, free-and-clear. The other owner was Mary J. Twombly, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH).

Martha Downs appeared in the Brattleboro, VT, directories of 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1937, as the widow of Hazen W. Downs, with her house at 403 Western avenue.

West Brattleboro. Mrs. Effie Boynton is working as housekeeper in the home of Mrs. Martha Downs (Brattleboro Reformer, June 21, 1938).

Martha Granger Downs died on Sunset Lake Road in West Brattleboro, VT, September 28, 1938, aged eighty-one years, one month, and twenty-one days.

MRS. WESLEY DOWNS DIES. West Brattleboro Resident 9 Years, Leaves 3 Step-Sons. Mrs. Martha (Granger) Downs, 81, widow of Wesley Downs, died at 3.15 o’clock yesterday afternoon in the home of her step-grandson, Russell Cushman of the Sunset Lake road. She had been there since early in August. Last year she spent most of the time there. Her health had been gradually failing for some time. Mrs. Downs made her home for several years in the Joel Johnson house in West Brattleboro. Born in Fairlee, Aug. 8, 1857, she was a daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Pierce) Granger. She first married Peleg Cushman, of Orford, N.H., the ceremony taking place in 1892. He died about a month after their marriage. Her marriage to Wesley Downs of Milton, N.H., took place about 20 years ago. After Mr. Downs’ death Mrs. Downs moved to Rochester, N.H., coming to West Brattleboro about nine years ago. She leaves three step-sons, William, George and Henry Cushman, all of Brattleboro, and a step-daughter, Mrs. Mary Pinkham of Dover, N.H. She also leaves one brother, Charles A. Granger of West Newton, Mass. Funeral services will be held at Mitchells funeral home tomorrow at 2.30 p.m., Rev. J.H. Blackburn officiating. Burial will take place in Prospect Hill cemetery, Lebanon, Me. (Brattleboro Reformer, September 30, 1938).

Hiram J. Burrows – 1902-12

Hiram J. Burrows was born in Lebanon, ME, circa 1855, son of Edward and Mary A. (Ricker) Burrows.

Eliza Jones, Lucy Goodwin, John S. Parker, guardian of Lucy Goodwin; Ruth Lucy Goodwin, Simon Ricker, Jr., Lavinia A. Burrows, Mary Frances Burrows, Ruth Burrows, and Hiram J. Burrows, residing at North Lebanon, ME, joined with many other heirs of Benjamin Lord, deceased, in petitioning the trustees of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge for title to Brooklyn real estate held by Augustus Cruikshank, trustee (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 2, 1883).

Hiram J. Burrows married in Milton, June 29, 1884, Sarah E. Thomas, he of Milton and she of Newfield, ME. She was born in Newfield, ME, in 1862, daughter of Elbridge G. and Lydia E. (Lane) Thomas.

LEBANON, ME. Mr. L.H. Buttler has sold his farm and blacksmith shop to Hiram Burrows of Milton Mills. Mr. Butler and his son Clarence intend soon to start for the far west. We wish them success (Farmington News, September 25, 1885).

Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Sarah E. Burrows, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, John Burrows, at school, aged thirteen years (b. ME), and Eva Burrows, at school, aged nine years (b. NH). Hiram J. Burrows rented their house. Sarah E. Burrows was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directories of 1902, and 1905, as a policeman and blacksmith, on Main street, with his house on Highland street, in Milton Mills. (His house on Highland street was opposite the M.E. Church in 1905).

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a policeman and blacksmith, on Main street, with his house on the Acton side, in Milton Mills.

Geo. W. Marsh, an express teamster, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Eva M. Marsh, aged nineteen years (b. ME), and his child, Ithel E. Marsh, aged thirteen months (b. NH), his father-in-law, Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith (working out), aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law (Hiram’s wife of twenty-six years), Sarah E. Burrows, a shoe shop stitcher, aged forty-seven years (b. NH). Geo. W. Marsh rented their house. Eva M. Marsh was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Sarah E. Burrows was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a policeman and blacksmith, on Main street, with his house on the Acton side, in Milton Mills.

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a blacksmith, with his house at 20 Lebanon street, on the Acton side, in Milton Mills.

Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith (own shop), aged sixty-four years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah E. Burrows, aged fifty-six years (b. ME). Hiram J. Burrows rented their house on the Lebanon Road.

A major Milton Mills fire started in a blacksmith shop on Main st. owned by John E. Horn and occupied by Hiram Burrows in the early hours of Thursday, November 20, 1924. (See Milton in the News – 1924).

Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith (repair shop), aged seventy-five years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah E. Burrows, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME). Hiram J. Burrows owned their house, which was valued at $1,000. They did not have a radio set.

Hiram J. Burrows died in 1938. Sarah E. (Thomas) Burrows died in 1955.

Hartley A. Nutter – 1904

Hartley Addis Nutter was born in Milton, January 24, 1874, son of Luman S. “Sidney” and Arabelle “Belle” (Corson) Nutter.

Hartley A. Nutter married in Milton, July 20, 1893, Ada M. Huntress, both of Milton. He was a laborer, aged nineteen years, and she was a housekeeper, aged eighteen years. Charles H. Looney, justice-of-the-peace performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, March 17, 1875, daughter of Stillman S. and Francina (Lowe) Huntress.

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as an employee of the U.I. [Union Ice] Co., with his house near the ice house on the Leb. side.

MILTON. Town meeting passed off quietly, and the following officers were elected to serve the town for the ensuing year: Selectmen, Warren Jewett, Joseph H. Avery, and Charles A. Jones; town clerk, Harry L. Avery; constables, H.W. Downs, Hartley Nutter; school board, Frank G. Howe, Forrest L. Marsh, Dr. M.A.H. Hart (Farmington News, March 12, 1904).

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directories of 1905 and 1909, as an employee of the U.I. [Union Ice] Co., with his house at 98 Main street.

Hartley Nutter, an ice house engineer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Ada Nutter, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), and his children, Addis Nutter, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Malcom Nutter, aged ten years (b. NH), and Francine Nutter, aged eight years (b. NH). Hartley Nutter owned their house, free-and-clear. Ada Nutter was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as an employee of the U.I. [Union Ice] Co., with his house at 98 Main street.

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as an employee of the M.I. [Porter-Milton Ice] Co., with his house at 98 Main street. His daughter-in-law, Mrs. Addis S. Nutter, widow, had her house at H.A.N.’s, i.e., with he and his wife, at 98 Main street.

Hartley Addis Nutter registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He resided in Milton, and was aged forty-four years (b. January 24, 1874). He was employed by Porter-Milton Ice Co., as a laborer. His nearest relative was his wife, Addie M. Nutter, of Milton. He was of a medium height, with a medium build, gray eyes, and gray hair.

Hartley A. Nutter, a foreman at the Milton Ice Co., aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ada H. Nutter, aged forty-four years (b. ME), his daughter, Francena I. Warnecke, aged seventeen years (b. NH), his son-in-law, William H. Warnecke, a laborer at the Milton Ice Co., aged thirty-four years (b. Germany), and his grandchildren, Thelma A. Warnecke, aged three years (b. NH), and Wilma F. Warnecke, aged one year (b. NH). Hartley A. Nutter owned their house on Upper Main Street in Milton Village, free-and-clear. Son-in-law William H. Warnecke was a permantent alien, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1909.

Hartley A. Nutter, an ice company laborer, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), aged fifty-five years (b. ME), Ada H. Nutter, and his nephew, Alvin B. Roberts, a leather-board mill machinist, aged thirty-four years (b. NH). Hartley A. Nutter owned their multi-family house on No. Main Street, which was valued at $1,200. They had a radio set. They shared their building with the household of tenant [and son-in-law] William Warnecke, an ice company laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. Germany).

Hartley A. Nutter died of aortic stenosis on Main Street in Milton, December 31, 1933, aged fifty-nine years, eleven months, and seven days.

Ada H. Nutter, a boarders’ hostess, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her grandchildren, Malcom H. Nutter, a laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Donald S. Warnecke, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and her boarders, Earvin Proctor, aged seventy-seven years (b. MA), and Arnold Nash, a wood factory laborer, aged eighteen years (b. Nova Scotia). Ada H. Nutter owned their house in the Milton Community, which was valued at $1,200. They had all resided in the same house in 1935, with the exception of Arnold Nash, who had resided elsewhere in the same place, i.e., Milton.

Ada May (Huntress) Nutter died in 1966.

Mylo M. Sinclair – 1907

Mylo Martin Sinclair was born in Stow, ME, July 13, 1879, son of George H. and Susie G. (Johnson) Sinclair.

Milo M. Sinclair married in Milton, June 16, 1900, Minnie F. [(Johnson)] Ellis, he of Dover, NH, and she of Milton. Rev. E. Johnson of Lebanon, ME, performed the ceremony. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years, and she was a widowed shoe stitcher, aged thirty-two years. She was born in Milton, November 1867, daughter of James W. and Julia A. (Hatch) Johnson.

Mylo Sinclair, a shoe laster, aged twenty years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Miton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of zero years [two weeks]), Minnie Sinclair, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). Mylo Sinclair rented their house.

Miles M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as an employee of a leather-board manufacturer, with his house at 16 So. Main street. Mrs. Susie G. (George) Sinclair had also her house at 16 So. Main street.

WEST MILTON. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Johnson and their little daughter are spending his vacation from railroad work in this vicinity, visiting his aunt and sister, Mrs. George Canney and Mrs. Minnie Sinclair (Farmington News, November 22, 1901).

Milo M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1905, as an engineer for N.B.T. & Co. [N.B. Thayer & Co.], with his house at So. Main street, at the R.R. Crossing.

Mylo N. [M.] Sinclair, police officer, Milton, testified before the NH Board of Railroad Commissioners, December 13, 1907, regarding the accidental death of Lyman Welch of Wolfeboro, NH, which occurred on the railroad tracks a mile south of the Milton railroad station, September 26, 1907 (NH Board of Railroad Commissioners, 1907).

Milo M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as an engineer for N.B.T. [N.B. Thayer] Co., with his house on South Main street, at the R.R. crossing. His mother, Mrs. Susie G. Sinclair, had her house at the same address.

Mylo Sinclair, a shoe shop engineer, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie Sinclair, aged forty-two years (b. NH), his child, Arline Sinclair, aged nine years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Woodbury Johnson, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Mylo Sinclair owned their house, free-and-clear. Miriam Sinclair was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

WEST MILTON. H.D. Johnson, who was stricken with ptomaine poisoning while on his run from North Conway to Boston Friday morning, was taken from his train at Milton and conveyed to the home of his sister, Mrs. Mylo Sinclair, where he received immediate medical attention. He is so far improved that he made a trip to Boston on Tuesday, returning to the home of his aunt, Mrs. George Canney, where he will spend the remainder of the week (Farmington News, [Friday,] February 3, 1911).

Milo M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a shoe operative for M.S. [Milton Shoe] Co., with his house on South Main street, at the R.R. crossing. His mother, Mrs. Susie G. Sinclair, had her house at the same address.

Martin Sinclair registered for the WW I military draft in Rochester, NH, September 12, 1918. He resided at 6 Union Street in East Rochester, NH, and was aged thirty-nine years (b. July 13, 1879). He was employed by N.B. Thayer & Co., as a shoemaker. His nearest relative was his wife, Minnie F. Sinclair, of 6 Union Street, E. Rochester, NH. He stood 6′ 1″ tall, and had a medium build, brown eyes, and brown hair.

Mylo M Sinclair, a shoe factory rapid stitcher, aged forty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie F. Sinclair, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, James W. Thompson, aged eighty-three years (b. NH). Mylo M. Sinclair owned their house at 6 Union Street, with a mortgage.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Minnie Sinclair and her daughter, Mrs. Arline Symonds, with her little grandson, called at Teneriffe View farm a few days ago (Farmington News, September 26, 1924).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Minnie Sinclair of East Rochester called on friends here Monday (Farmington News, September 24, 1926).

Mylo M. Sinclair, a shoe factory engineer, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie J. Sinclair, aged sixty-two years (b. NH). Mylo M. Sinclair owned their house on the Salmon Falls Road. They had a radio set.

Its a Dizzy Pace! (Country correspondence in the Rochester, N.H., Courier). Mr. and Mrs. Mylo Sinclair are enjoying a new radio (Boston Globe, March 30, 1940).

Mylo Sinclair, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie Sinclair, aged seventy-two years (b. NH).

SOUTH VERNON. Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Simonds and Mr. and Mrs. Milo Sinclair were week-end guests of Rev. and Mrs. H.R. Simonds. They were returning from Florida to their home in East Rochester, N.H. (Brattleboro Reformer (Brattleboro, VT), April 21, 1950).

Mylo M. Sinclair died in March 1956. Minnie Sinclair died in March 1956.


To be continued …


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Hiram Burrows. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114726369/hiram-burrows

Find a Grave. (2002, August 22). Fred Howard. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/6722810/fred-howard

Find a Grave. (2014, January 8). James Harris Rines, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/123011041/james-harris-rines

Find a Grave. (2012, July 2). Mylo M. Sinclair. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92968497/mylo-m-sinclair

NH Board of Railroad Commissioners. (1907). Annual Report of the Railroad Commissioners of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=hmk0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA372

Milton Lumberman Frederick B. Roberts (1863-1943)

By Muriel Bristol | March 28, 2021

Frederick Belknap “Fred” Roberts was born in Milton, March 25, 1863, son of Ira and Caroline C. (Foss) Roberts. (Ira Roberts died of heart disease in Middleton, NH, June 2, 1875, aged sixty-four years. He was a carpenter).

Caroline C. Roberts, keeping house, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Fred B. Roberts, at school, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Sadie B. Roberts, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH).

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. … S.E. Twombly to F.B. Roberts, Milton. E.E. Roberts to F.B. Roberts, Milton. Joseph Plumer to F.B. Roberts, Milton (Farmington News, February 8, 1889).

MILTON. At the republican caucus Saturday afternoon the following delegates were chosen to the different conventions: State – E.W. Fox and Frank Horner. Congressional – R.M. Kimball and C.D. Fox. Senatorial – Luther Hayes and B.B. Plummer. Councillor – Chas. A. Jones and S.W. Wallingford. County – Fred B. Roberts and C.W. Gross. Town Committee – Chas. H. Looney, president; B.B. Plummer, secretary; Luther Hayes, C.A. Jones, J.H. Avery, W.H.H. Pinkham, Fred B. Roberts, S.W. Wallingford, Charles D. Fox and Charles W. Gross (Farmington News, 1892).

The partnership of Avery, Jones & Roberts appeared in the Milton business directory of 1898, as builders, and as manufacturers of  lumber, shingles, and clapboards. Fred B. Roberts evidently supplied the lumber, Harry L. Avery appears to have kept the store front. (H.L. Avery appeared also in the directory as town clerk, and as one of fifteen Milton justices-of-the-peace). Charles D. Jones‘ role is less clear, although he was also a storekeeper, being specifically a pharmacist, as well as being a medical doctor.

Fred B. Roberts, a contractor & builder, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his sister, Sadie B. Roberts, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), his brother-in-law, Freeman D. Pike, a day laborer, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), his sister (Pike’s wife of forty years), Sophia [(Roberts)] Pike, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), his niece, Addie C. Pike, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), his nephew, Lewis F. Pike, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his boarder, Richard Colbath, a telegrapher, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Freeman D. Pike owned their house, free-and clear. Sophia [(Roberts)] Pike was the mother of four children, of whom two were still living.

Avery-Jones-Roberts - 1900Avery, Jones & Roberts appeared in the Milton business directory of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as builders, and as manufacturers of  lumber, shingles, and clapboards. H.L. Avery appeared also as town clerk, and as a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

The NH General Court authorized incorporation of the Milton Water Works Company, March 21, 1901, with initial board members Malcom A.H. Hart, Charles H. Looney, S. Lyman Hayes, Charles D. Jones, Fred B. Roberts, Harry Avery, George E. Wentworth, Joseph H. Avery, Ira W. Jones, Arthur W. Dudley, Everett F. Fox, Henry F. Townsend, Freeman H. Lowd, William T. Wallace, Frank G. Horne, Charles A. Jones, and Nathaniel G. Pinkham. It established itself July 19, 1899, with Harry L. Avery as its treasurer (NH Secretary of State, 1901).  

Madokawanda By-Laws - 1926PERSONAL. Fred B. Roberts is spending his vacation at the Roberts farm on the Rochester road (Farmington News, July 26, 1901).

MILTON. At the last meeting of Madokawanda Tribe, No. 21, I.O.R.M., the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Sachem, H.F. Finnegan; prophet, James Leighton; senior sagamore, Harry Perkins; junior sagamore, G. Frank Davis; C. of W., Fred B. Roberts; K. of W., Fred S. Hartford; C. of R., Edwin L. Leighton; trustee for three years, Fred B. Roberts (Farmington News, January 8, 1904).

Outgoing NH Governor Nahum J. Batchelder swore in Fred B. Roberts and 316 others as NH State Representatives, January 4, 1905. Roberts was Milton’s representative.

Partner Charles D. Jones died of typhoid fever in Milton, July 2, 1908, aged forty-four years, nine months, and ten days. The firm of Avery, Jones & Roberts continued as Avery & Roberts.

AJR Box MaterialFreman D. Pike, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-nine years), Sopha N. Pike, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and his boarders, Fred B. Roberts, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and Susan Roberts, aged forty-one years (b. NH). Sophia Pike was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Avery & Roberts appeared in the Milton business directory of 1912, and 1917, as builders, and as manufacturers of  lumber, shingles, and clapboards. H.L. Avery appeared also as town clerk, and as a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

Fred P. Jones, Union P.O. (Telephone 41-15) was State Forest Fire Warden for Milton in 1911-12, 1913-14, and 1915-16. (Jones was the father of theatrical designer Robert E. Jones). Jones’ Forest Fire Deputies were Fred B. Roberts, Milton P.O. (Telephone 23-2); H.R. Jewett, Sanbornville P.O. (Telephone 9-4); Isaac L. Lord, Union P.O. (Telephone 6-21); and F. Leroy Tripp, Farmington P.O. (Telephone 42-15) (NH Forestry Commission, 1912; NH Forestry Commission, 1914; NH Forestry Commission, 1916).

LOCAL. Two cases from Milton were brought before Judge A.H. Wiggin in the local district court on Wednesday of this week: That of State vs. Joseph D. Willey, brought by High Sheriff Edward S. Young on a charge of “keeping for sale,” in which the respondent entered a plea of guilty and the court imposed the minimum fine and jail sentence. Sentence was suspended upon payment of costs. The other case, that of State vs. Robert McIntosh, brought by Fred B. Roberts, wherein the respondent was charged with using derisive language toward the complainant, the respondent plead guilty and was fined five dollars and costs (Farmington News, December 15, 1916).

(McIntosh’s wife would divorce him in the following year. She alleged habitual drunkenness over a period of three years (One must recall always that allegations by themselves are simply that, allegations)).

Avery-Roberts - 1917Fred B. Roberts married in Milton, October 10, 1917, Mary Jane ((Raynor) Burke) Spaulding, he of Milton, and she of Worcester, MA. He was a lumber dealer, aged fifty-four years, and she was a housekeeper, aged forty-one years. Rev. A.T. Everett performed the ceremony. She was born on Prince Edward Island, Canada, circa 1875, daughter of John W. and Mary Ann Raynor. (Mary J. Raynor married (1st) in Milton, June 28, 1899, William E. Burke, both of Milton. Mary J. (Rayner) Burke married (2nd) in Worcester, MA, September 22, 1903, Algernon S. Spaulding (1847-1915), both of Worcester).

Fred B. Roberts, a lumberman (owner), aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary J. Roberts, aged forty-three years (b. Canada). Fred B. Roberts owned their farm on Upper Main Street in Milton Village (near its intersection with the Teneriffe Mountain Road). Mary J. Roberts was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1883.

REPUBLICANS FILE FOR NEW HAMPSHIRE PRIMARIES. CONCORD, N H., July 23 – All the candidates for the September primaries, who filed with the Secretary of State today, were Republicans. The list included John H. Garland of Conway, State Senator; James H. Joyce of Somersworth, Fred B. Roberts of Milton, County Commissioners; Ralph W. Davis of Derry. Henry H. Amsden of Concord, Adelbert M. Nichols of Claremont, John E. Dorr of Jefferson, William C. Goss of Henniker, Representatives (Boston Globe, July 24, 1920).

ROCHESTER MAN HIT BY TREE SUES FOR $5,000. Rochester, Aug. 31 – Claiming he received injuries when a tree on the property of Avery [&] Roberts, lumber dealers at Milton, fell on him, Feb 28, 1924, that made it necessary for him to resign as chief of police and deputy sheriff at that place. Arthur F. Remick has brought suit against the firm for $5000 (Portsmouth Herald, August 31, 1925).

Fred B. Roberts, a lumberman (own mill), aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary J. Roberts, aged fifty-two years (b. Canada). Mary J. Roberts was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1894. Fred B. Roberts owned their house on North Main Street, which was valued at $1,800. They had a radio set.

Partner Henry L. Avery died of a sudden cerebral hemorrhage in Milton, September 30, 1936, aged seventy-two years, eight months, and two days.

Here and There. The Milton town pound, one of the few remaining in New Hampshire, which was removed and rebuilt two years ago to permit a change in the location of the highway, has just been marked with a commemorative tablet by Fred B. Roberts, veteran town meeting moderator, and Ira W. Jones. In the early days pounds were common in New England for the confinement of cows and other domestic animals caught running at large. Early records of the town show that in 1803, when Gilman Jewett was town clerk, it was voted that the “town build a pound as near the center of the town as convenient.” The following year the pound was built, according to the records, “on land westerly opposite the town house, by Jonathan Pinkham.” The pound is circular and 30 feet in internal diameter. The walls are of field stone, about six feet high. A wooden gate adorns the front (Portsmouth Herald, July 3, 1939).

Milton Town Pound - 1806Fred B. Roberts, a lumberman (owner), aged seventy-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary J. Roberts, aged sixty-three years (b. Canada). Fred B. Roberts owned their house in the Milton community, which was valued at $1,800.

Fred B. Roberts died of a cerebral hemorrhage on Main Street in Milton, October 31, 1943, aged eighty years, seven months, and six days.

IN MEMORIAM. Fred B. Roberts. Fred B. Roberts, 81, well known Milton businessman and a lifelong resident of that community, died last Sunday, following a sudden illness. Mr. Roberts was a prominent figure in Milton civic affairs for many years. He was the last surviving member of the firm of Avery, Jones and Roberts. Besides operating a women’s furnishings store he was also a lumber dealer. Active in politics, he served the town in the legislature for three terms, held several town offices and was moderator of the town for over twenty years. He was a member of the Masonic lodge in Union and Order of Red Men in Milton. Funeral services were held at Milton Wednesday afternoon. Burial was in Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, November 5, 1943).

CHARTER DRAPED AT OES MEETING. At the Eastern Star meeting Tuesday night, presided over by Worthy Matron Virginia Ham, the charter was draped for Mrs. Mary Roberts of Milton and the altar was draped for Past Grand Patron Howard K. Streeter and Past Grand Matron Mrs. Florence M. Lord, both of Manchester, who passed away recently. This was the last meeting until September. Plans were made to attend the service at Milton Community Church with the Masonic Lodge on June 19 (Farmington News, June 16, 1960).


References:

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Harry L. Avery. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214557733/harry-l-avery

Kelleher Auctions. (2020). Nineteenth Century U.S. Patent Envelopes [Page 7]. Retrieved from www.kelleherauctions.com/lot_pdfs/3003/712482.pdf

NH Forestry Commission. (1912). Biennial Report of the Forestry Commission for the Two Fiscal Years Ending 1911-12. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-A48AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA130

NH Forestry Commission. (1914). Biennial Report of the Forestry Commission for the Two Fiscal Years Ending 1913-14. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=SOhDAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA107

NH Forestry Commission. (1916). Biennial Report of the Forestry Commission for the Two Fiscal Years Ending 1915-16. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=oMArAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA170

NH Secretary of State. (1901). Laws of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vJxGAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA781

Worthpoint. (2021). 1926 By-Laws for Madokawanda Tribe N0. 21 Improved Order of Red Men – Milton, NH. Retrieved from www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/1926-laws-madokawanda-tribe-21-1863377734

School District Election Results for March 9, 2021

By Muriel Bristol | March 21, 2021

Milton’s School District election of Tuesday, March 9, 2021, was quite lightly attended – only 638 participants – despite its being a clear day. (Ed.: This turnout would be only about 20% of the registered voters).

The Milton School District does not entitle its articles as does the Town. The titles employed below have been drawn from the text of the articles.

.Article 1: School Board Election. Abigail Rooney and incumbent Douglas H. Shute won the two three-year seats on the School Board with 202 votes (31.7%) and 190 votes (29.8%) respectively. The other four candidates were Travis J. Corriveau, with 185 votes (29.0%), Lynette McDougall, with 170 votes (26.6%), John Gagner, with 161 votes (25.2%), and Donald C. Diamant, Jr., with 124 votes (19.4%). There was also 1 “Scattering” write-in vote (0.2%) for Kenneth Tucker.

(Ed.: Abigail Rooney replaced outgoing board member Paul Steer, who ran instead for the Planning Board in the Town election). 

Results of the following outside warrant articles have been arranged by their vote counts.

Article 6: Building Maintenance, Repair, Renovation and Capital Project Reserve Fund. This article passed with 451 votes (70.7%) in favor, 153 votes (24.0%) opposed, and 34 abstentions (5.3%).

Article 5: Educationally Disabled Children Expendable Trust Fund. This article passed with 449 votes (70.4%) in favor, 152 votes (23.8%) opposed, and 37 abstentions (5.8%).

Article 7: School Bus Trust Fund. This article passed with 442 votes (69.3%) in favor, 158 votes (24.8%) opposed, and 38 abstentions (6.0%).

Article 8: Technology Expendable Trust Fund. This article passed with 432 votes (67.7%) in favor, 166 votes (26.0%) opposed, and 40 abstentions (6.3%).

Article 2: Operating Budget. This article passed with 397 votes (62.2%) in favor, 200 votes (31.3%) opposed, and 41 abstentions (6.4%).

(Ed.: The School Board shared generally the Board of Selectmen’s group-think approach. They managed to “achieve” a unanimous 5-0 vote recommending all of their spending articles, excepting only this operating budget article, which was recommended by only a 3-2 vote. The School Board had been advised strongly by the Budget Committee to devise a proposed budget that was lower than the default budget (as was done with the Town operating budget). It would seem that two members just could not bring themselves to recommend a budget that did not increase over the default budget).

Article 4: Library Media Fund. This article passed with 383 votes (60.0%) in favor, 219 votes (34.3%) opposed, and 36 abstentions (5.6%).

Article 3: Vehicle Capital Reserve Fund. This article passed with 364 votes (57.1%) in favor, 231 votes (36.2%) opposed, and 43 abstentions (6.7%).


See School District Election Results for March 10, 2020 and School District Election Results for March 12, 2019. (See also Town Election Results for March 9, 2021)