Milton Under “Semi-Prohibition” – 1855-02

By Muriel Bristol | November 28, 2021

Liquor prohibition came to the fore as a political issue in the 1830s. It would be closely associated with the issues of abolition of slavery, female suffrage, and even – for a time – opposition to immigration (especially non-Protestant immigration). (See also Milton and Abolitionism).

Prohibitory laws were passed in the neighboring states of Maine in 1851, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Vermont in 1852, and Connecticut in 1854. Some of these went through several versions, as the initial laws were struck down or modified.

Dow, Neal - DaguerreotypePortland’s Mayor Neal S. Dow (1804-1897) lobbied hard for passage of the Maine prohibition legislation that would be widely-known the “Maine Law” or the “Dow Law.” He lost his 1852 bid for re-election, and he blamed his loss on Irish immigrants. His Whig party more or less dissolved in 1854, and, when he ran again in 1855, Dow was only narrowly elected – by a margin of only 47 votes – by a coalition of voters from the Temperance, Abolition (“Free Soil”), and the anti-immigrant Know-Nothing (“American”) parties, as well as the then newly-formed Republican party.

For the Transcript. Neal Dow was nominated for Mayor at Portland last evening, at a meeting of the new Republican party, including the Temperance, Abolition and Know-Nothing parties, especially the latter. The meeting was numerously attended (Boston Evening Transcript, March 30, 1855).

Mayor Dow purchased mistakenly – he should not have done so in his own name – a city supply of alcohol, and thus became entangled in the technicalities of his own law (for which he was indicted). On Saturday, June 2, 1855, an unruly mob tried to seize that city alcohol supply in what was termed the “Portland Rum Riot.” Dow called out the militia and ordered them to fire on the crowd, killing one and wounding others. (Note that the pro-Dow report extracted below employed terminology that sought to associate the Democrat party with both rum and mobs).

Serious Liquor Riot in Portland – the City Agency Attacked – the Military Called Out – A Round Fired into the Crowd – One Man Killed, and other Wounded. On Saturday night last, a rumocratic and mobocratic gang of rowdies, in Portland, attempted to destroy $1600 worth of spirituous liquor bought by Mayor Dow for the City Agency. Every effort having been made in vain to disperse the mob, the military was called out and the riot act read; but the rioters disregarded every warning, and assailed the soldiers and authorities with stones and other missiles, when the order was given to fire, and the ringleader (John Robinson [Robbins] of Deer Isle) killed on the spot, and several others wounded. The excitement in Portland was very great, but we have no room for particulars (Liberator, [Friday,] June 8, 1855).

Other published accounts claimed that the unfortunate John Robbins (aged twenty-two years) was in fact not the ringleader, nor even a participant, but merely a bystander, and that the militia had fired without warning.

Meanwhile, incoming NH Governor Ralph Metcalf (1796-1858) transmitted his legislative priorities to the NH legislature, June 7, 1855. A prohibition law was high on his list.

MESSAGE OF THE GOVERNOR OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. … The Governor looks upon the liquor traffic as a public nuisance and the parent of crime; and as being a more aggravated offence than either larceny, forgery, counterfeiting, or their kindred crimes, and seeing that persuasion has in vain operated to correct the evil, the Governor recommends, that in imitation of other States, in which almost a prohibitory law has passed and been put in execution, New Hampshire be furnished with an enactment, as he says, prohibiting the sale of liquors, with a very limited discrimination, if any be advisable; a law which will protect the legal rights of all citizens, but with ample power to effectually enforce its provisions so far as possible; the penalties of which shall be commensurate with the offence. Such a law, I have no doubt, is expected and demanded by the people of New Hampshire, and the welfare and prosperity of the State demand it; our social and domestic relations demand it; moral [-ity] and religion demand it; patriotism demands it, and I cannot believe that these demands will be slighted by a legislature elected under circumstances peculiarly prophetic (Boston Evening Transcript, June 8, 1855).

Gov. Metcalf, who had been a Democrat for most of his career, had split with his party over their opposition to abolition (and his support of it). He had become instead the gubernatorial candidate of the anti-immigrant Know-Nothing party. (Farmington’s native son, Henry Wilson (1812-1875), who had been a Whig, also associated himself with the Know-Nothing party at this time).

On the subject of foreigners and naturalization, the message is very elaborate, and embraces in particular Roman Catholics especially, who, the Governor thinks, are entirely opposed to the adoption of the principles of freedom, and incapacitated of self-government, as in numerous instances they vote as they are paid or directed, by parties holding spiritual control over them. He recommends an extension of the period of naturalisation by the General Government, and such action within the States as will prescribe the process of naturalisation; also, that a law be made providing that no foreign-born person be eligible for office until he has had twenty-one years residence in the country. Without this restriction he thinks they have no right to seek or expect any share in the government of the country, and that to Americans, and to them alone, can it be safely entrusted (Boston Evening Transcript, June 8, 1855).

New Hampshire passed its own prohibitory law on a third attempt in July 1855, only a month after the Portland Rum Riot. (Milton’s state representatives of 1855-56 were Eli Wentworth (1821-1862) and David Wallingford (1819-1903)). Two prior legislative attempts had been blocked (in 1852 and 1854) by the state senate as being unconstitutional. (The original “Maine Law” was replaced in Maine by a milder variant in 1858).

Prohibitory Liquor Law in New Hampshire. In the New Hampshire House of Representatives yesterday afternoon, a stringent prohibitory liquor law was passed. The vote on the final passage of the bill stood – yeas 213; nays 50. The Concord Patriot of this morning reports that several amendments were made to the bill by the chairman of the committee which reported the bill, the principal of which was one authorizing the authorities to destroy confiscated liquors of bad quality, and add costs to fines; also, providing that claimants of liquors seized, but proved not to have been kept for sale, should be paid their costs out of the county treasuries (Boston Evening Transcript, July 7, 1855).

Liquor Law in New Hampshire. The new liquor law passed by the last New Hampshire Legislature, goes into operation today (Boston Evening Transcript, August 13, 1855).

Neither the production nor the consumption of liquor was forbidden under the law, but only its sale. And State liquor commissioners might authorize even the sale of liquor by druggists fulfilling prescriptions, and by state agents for medicinal, mechanical and manufacturing purposes. (Separate Federal licensing was also available). Despite having been put forward as a “stringent” liquor law, frustrated prohibition advocates characterized it as being instead merely “Semi-Prohibition,” i.e., only a half measure.

Jedediah L. Duntley (c1834-1914), William H. Huntress (1822-1873), and Llewellyn D. Reed (c1825-1870), all of Milton, each paid $20 in excise tax on their retail liquor licenses in Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1862. Most of those paying also paid separate excise taxes for their hotel licenses. (See also Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1863, and Milton’s US Excise Tax of May 1864).

New Hampshire’s “semi-prohibition” regime was enforced weakly and unevenly. The city of Manchester evolved a selective enforcement scheme known as the “Healey System,” which became the statewide model. Under such a “system,” authorities conducted only occasional token raids and arrests, resulting in fines.

The real issue is whether the famous “Healey” system, peculiar to New Hampshire, will be done away with or strengthened. No city or State election ever created the interest of the present. The system by which the liquor traffic has been controlled since the prohibitory law of 50 years ago went into effect has been very simple. Saloons have been run openly. The chief of police in each city has brought the proprietors or their agents into court at intervals, where a fine was imposed. It was for him to say who should open saloons and how often the owner should be fined (Boston Post, May 10, 1903).

As such, the so-called “Healey System,” with its periodic fines, was regarded as a sort of quasi-licensing rather than an outright prohibition.

The aforementioned William H. Huntress appeared openly in the Ninth (1870) Federal Census as a Milton saloon keeper, aged forty-three years (b. NH). His son, Charles A. Huntress appeared as his saloon clerk, aged sixteen years (b. NH).

Neighboring Farmington, NH, provided several examples of liquor raids in the early 1880s. Samuel H. Burnham (1835-1906), Charles E. Nutter (1852-1905), George W. Hobbs (1856-1889), and Natt F. Ham (c1848-1891) had all identified themselves forthrightly as Farmington saloon keepers at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Others raided included James J. “Happy-Go-Lucky” Lord (c1840-1908), a painter; and Elbridge G.L. Wedgewood (c1840-1898), a lumber dealer.

The local Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (W.C.T.U) chapter claimed proudly to have instigated the raids, and it was usually women mentioned as informants or complainants in news accounts. A modern civil libertarian might express some concern that the standard of probable cause being employed by the authorities was so ridiculously weak (“round up the usual suspects”).

FARMINGTON – This [W.C.T.U.] Union was organized in January of the present year [1882]. The membership has increased from thirty-two to eighty-five. Prayer and business meetings are held every fortnight. Gospel temperance meetings have been held each week, with an average attendance of one hundred and with good interest. Many drinking men have come into these meetings. A large number of them have signed the pledge and quite a number have become Christians. A Juvenile Union has been formed and holds its meetings every Sunday afternoon, having about eighty members. The young men have a public temperance meeting at the close of their school each week, $4.00 has been expended for children’s tracts and papers. The aim of the Union has been to give instruction and make Temperance popular among the young people. Mr. and Mrs. Thorndike were secured to give one of their pleasing “Illuminated Temperance Armory Entertainments.” The pastors have preached on temperance several times at the request of the Union. Miss Colman’s book is to be introduced into the schools this Fall. At the time of the town meeting in the Spring, a stall was arranged by the ladies of the Union and they dealt out coffee and refreshments to the thirsty voters, free of charge. Many an imbiber of strong drink was thus saved from temptation, and twelve men signed the pledge. At the instigation of the Union, a general raid has been made upon the various saloons and hotels where liquor was supposed to be sold. Several indictments have been made and the work is still going on (W.C.T.U. of NH, 1882). 

LOCALS. Another unsuccessful liquor raid was made Thursday night on the saloons of Charles E. Nutter and E.L. Wedgewood. Warrants were sworn out by Mrs. D.W. Edgerly and Mrs. Caleb Hanson (Farmington News, [Friday,] December 1, 1882).

Mrs. Caleb Hanson and Mrs. D.W. Edgerly were mother and daughter. Ellen A. Hanson [(1845-1920)] married in Strafford, NH, March 26, 1864, Dr. D.W. [Daniel W.] Edgerly [(1837-1890)], she of Strafford, NH, and he of Farmington, NH. She was aged eighteen years, and he was aged twenty-six years. (Dr. Daniel W. Edgerly was a Civil War veteran, dentist, minister, and sometime judge of the Farmington police court [!]). His father, Rev. Daniel L. Edgerly, performed the ceremony. Hanson was born in Strafford, NH, in 1845, daughter of Caleb and Louisa H. (Evans) Hanson.

Nutter and Wedgewood were raided again the very next night, but also Natt F. Ham, and James J. “Happy-Go-Lucky” Lord. It was again a local woman that made the complaints.

LOCALS. The quiet waters were slightly disturbed Friday night by raids upon the following parties: C.E. Nutter was visited by officer Armstrong assisted by John Armstrong, but nothing of a contraband nature was discovered. E.L. Wedgewood was interviewed by officer Whitney and Elmer Childs. Here they succeeded in taking a little whiskey and some lager. N.F. Ham was called upon by sheriff Hall, accompanied by Frank P. Burley. Their search here was rewarded with a schooner or two of beer. Happy-go-lucky Lord appeared to be the most surprised man of all when officer Nutter and Frank Bush walked in and invited him to close up, which he promptly did, and appeared to be sorry (?) that he could not accommodate the officials; but instead of whiskey, beer or anything of that vile nature, of which he appeared to be ignorant, he offered to substitute a clam chowder, but as that has not yet been declared contraband of war and furthermore was decidedly hot, they concluded to touch not, taste not, and more especially handle not, and Jim was left in peace. The warrants in all the above cases were signed by Mrs. Will L. Dow (Farmington News, December 8, 1882).

Sadie F. Parcher married in Farmington, NH, February 9, 1879, William L. Dow [(1848-1935)], both of Farmington, NH. He was a shoe dresser, aged thirty years, and she was a shoe stitcher, aged twenty-three years. Free-Will Baptist Rev. C.A. Bickford performed the ceremony.

Frank E. Bush (1850-1940), the harness maker who had assisted in the raid on “Happy-Go-Lucky” Lord’s chowder dinner, lost his job over his participation. His boss, Farmington merchant William W. Fuller (1825-1900), thought that Bush’s temperance activities were bad for business. The context suggests that Bush had participated at the instigation of his wife, Addie (Fisher) Bush (1855-1938), a milliner.

LOCALS. Owing to a too-free indulgence and expression of temperance principles, F.E. Bush, an employee in W.W. Fuller’s harness shop, has received his discharge. We learn from Mr. Bush himself that until the recent raid he has not personally been an active worker and has so stated to Mr. Fuller, but Mr. F. stated that the active part taken by his (Bush’s) wife worked to the injury of the harness business and requested Mr. Bush to put a stop to it or he should have to get someone in his stead. Mr. B., considering these repeated requests to be an infringement of personal rights in such matters, concluded to vacate his situation. He has two or three situations in view out of town, but does not at this season wish to move if he can get employment here at fair rates. Mr. Fuller claims that Mr. Bush resigned his situation principally on account of the question of wages. Mr. B. wanted more pay which Mr. F. said he could not give at present, particularly as his trade was injured by Bush’s, or his wife’s, position upon the liquor question. Mr. Bush wanted to know whether, if he remained at his present salary, he shall have to come under restrictions in temperance matters, and Mr. Fuller said yes. Consequently, Mr. Bush took himself out of the way (Farmington News, December 8, 1882).

But Bush’s troubles were not yet over. He and the now twice-raided Charles E. Nutter happened to encounter each other at the railroad depot in Rochester, NH, on the following Monday.

LOCALS. Charles E. Nutter and Frank E. Bush, both of Farmington, met at the depot in Rochester, Monday, and had a little confab in regard to the liquor raids in this village, and before they got through Nutter knocked Bush down and gave him quite a pummeling. Nutter then came home, but was soon followed by sheriff Greenfield who arrested him and took him back to Rochester, where he was fined for assault and battery, costing him about $18.00 (Farmington News, December 8, 1882).

LOCALS. The quiet waters were again disturbed Monday, and a dive into the depths for condemned stuff resulted in nix at Lord’s. At Nutter’s a bottle of whiskey was fished out of the stable, but at the trial Jesse Whitten came forward and claimed it thus clearing Nutter (Farmington News, February 16, 1883).

Jesse A. Whitten (1855-1903) married in Farmington, NH, November 28, 1878, Annie I. Canney (1859-1942), he of Farmington and she of Lebanon, ME. He was a hostler, aged twenty-three years, and she was a housekeeper, aged eighteen years. Rev. W.E. Darling performed the ceremony.

LOCALS. Mrs. William Welch of Central Cottage is in receipt of an anonymous communication on the alleged sale of intoxicants in the saloon kept by James Lord, on Central street. Mrs. W. wishes it distinctly understood that she takes no notice of any anonymous communications. If any one has any communication to lodge, let them make it [in] a straight, forward and regular way (Farmington News, November 13, 1885).

Central House - FN890628 Mary H. Wilkinson (1835-1924) married in Alton, NH, January 3, 1860, William Welch (1833-1891). They kept the Central House or Central Cottage hotel (and livery stable) on Central Street in Farmington, NH.

In November 1885, Strafford County Sheriff John G. Johnson (1832-1907) of Farmington, NH, raided hotelier Jacob D. Garland (1833-1897) of Milton, for illegal sale of intoxicants, based upon on information provided by Charles H. Applebee (1862-1946) of Milton Mills.

LOCALS. The Phoenix Hotel, Milton Three Ponds, J.D. Garland, proprietor, was overhauled by Sheriff Johnson, Saturday, on complaint of C.H. Applebee, of Milton Mills, for the illegal sale of intoxicants. Rum, whiskey and wine were found, and on Monday Mr. Garland appeared before Justice E.W. Fox at Milton and was fined $50 and costs, amounting to $62.80, which was paid (Farmington News, [Friday, November 15, 1885).

At the conclusion of an editorial decrying the ready availability of liquor, a Milton manufacturer was mentioned as having been put off by the situation in neighboring Farmington, NH.

LOCALS. … To show further what all this is leading to we have the statement of one of the most prominent citizens of Milton in effect that the shoe firm there of Messrs. Burley & Usher had some thought of moving here until on visiting the village and noting the drift of affairs they expressed themselves as doubtful of successfully conducting business here without great trouble from drunkenness. That is certainly a very disparaging statement to go to the public, but blind your eyes as you may, any one who will go upon our streets most any evening will see enough to be convinced that it is time to reform. We should be glad to hear from any one who has any ideas to advance on the subject. Our columns are open (Farmington News, December 17, 1886).

In early 1889, contravening legislative proposals were made for a local option liquor licensing law and to insert prohibition directly into the NH constitution. Both efforts failed.

Frank Jones Adv - Pre-1900TEMPERANCE NEWS. WHAT WILL BE THE DECISION? … In New Hampshire the prospects of success for the amendment are even less, for in this State two-thirds of all the votes cast are necessary for its ratification. The fact that a bare majority of the Constitutional Convention voted for the submission of the amendment to the people augurs badly for its success. New Hampshire already has statutory prohibition of the sale of intoxicants, though their manufacture is permitted. Nevertheless, in the city of Portsmouth, with but ten thousand inhabitants, there are, according to the “Voice,” 150 persons with Federal liquor licenses. The “Voice” naturally maintains that this disgraceful violation of the law is due to the influence of the great brewery of Frank Jones. Yet if the statutory laws can be defied so openly, it is not likely that two-thirds of the people of the State will favor the in corporation of prohibition into their law (Christian Union, February 7, 1889).

Barrington-native Franklin “Frank” Jones (1832-1902) was the largest brewer in New Hampshire, as well as having many other business interests. (Neither brewing ale nor possessing it was prohibited, but only its sale). Democrat Jones had been twice Mayor of Portsmouth, NH, and twice a U.S. Representative.

PROHIBITIONISTS VOTING FOR A LICENSE LAW. The New Hampshire House of Representatives is in a mood favorable to the enactment of a stringent liquor license law, if the votes on the skirmish over the majority and minority reports of the committee to whom the subject was referred are indications of legislative sentiment. The majority reported a license bill; the minority, inexpedient to legislate. Yesterday, by a vote of 137 to 126, the House refused to substitute the minority report for that of the majority, and took up the bill. The members from the cities and large towns, generally, voted for license. The Prohibitionists will, of course, say they did this, because cities and large towns are wickeder than small places, and that, of course, their representatives reflect the prevailing sentiment. But, in reality, probably these gentlemen were influenced by their opportunities for acquainting themselves with the failure of prohibition in New Hampshire. In Manchester, Portsmouth and other cities liquor is sold with little concealment. These cities lose revenue and gain nothing by the prohibition law. In many of the smaller towns there is a tacit understanding that one liquor dealer shall he permitted to do business provided he keeps an orderly place and does not make it over-conspicuous. Some hotel keepers have an understanding with local authorities that so long as they do not sell to the townspeople their bar business shall not be interfered with. They are thus at liberty to supply liquors to discreet travellers, and this permission is undoubtedly expanded. We have been told by a gentleman for many years a deputy sheriff in New Hampshire, that the prohibition law is practically a dead letter, except when saloons or liquor places become nuisances, or it is used as an instrument of personal or political revenge. Prohibition does not prohibit in New Hampshire any more than in any other State (Boston Evening Transcript, August 9, 1889).

Vermont, and (as regards spirits) New Hampshire, adopted prohibition, respectively, in 1852 and 1855. In the latter State the sale of beer has been forbidden since 1878; a proposition to make prohibition constitutional was rejected in 1889. New Hampshire also is peculiar in forbidding the sale only, not the manufacture, of intoxicating liquors. Attempts to pass a licensing measure have been made more than once in recent years in this State and have not fallen very far short of success, being defeated in 1889 by 144 votes to 118, and in the following year by 166 to 148 (Fanshawe & Rathbone, 1893).

Frank Leighton of Milton went drinking at a saloon in Rochester, NH, March 30, 1891. He died a grisly death on his return trip when he got caught in the gears of his wagon and was dragged for six miles. (See Milton in the News – 1891).

West Milton salesman Luther H. Wentworth (1844-1917) returned from an April 1897 business trip in late April 1897. He, being a Milton justice-of-the-peace, engaged a police officer to raid several alleged liquor dealers, who were then tried before another justice-of-the-peace.

WEST MILTON. L.H. Wentworth returned from a two weeks’ trip to Rhode Island last week. On Monday, accompanied by an officer, he raided the places of several alleged liquor dealers. Hearings were heard in the cases before Judge Fox, who imposed fines on those found guilty (Farmington News, May 7,  1897).

Milton Rev. Fred E. Carver accused druggist Frank E. Fernald of selling a quart of spirituous liquor “unlawfully and for the sake of wicked gain,” May 29, 1897. The dénouement was unexpected to say the least. (See The Preacher and the Druggist – 1897).

In the first of several August 1897 raids, it is readily apparent that those officials acting at the behest of the “temperance people” had again scant concern for probable cause in raiding some of the many alleged “saloon keepers.”

MILTON NEWS LETTER. SEVERAL LIQUOR RAIDS LAST WEEK. The temperance people scored a point last week against the saloon keepers. All the saloons in town were raided one night, with the result that nothing was found in any of the places. But in a subsequent raid the following night their efforts proved more successful and F.M. Chamberlin of the Phoenix House was obliged to settle in police court (Farmington News, September 3, 1897).

MILTON. Fred Chamberlain was raided last week. Beer was found (Farmington News, August 30, 1901).

After nearly fifty years of “semi-prohibition,” it was apparently thought still necessary to warn off “drunkards” when seeking first-class machinists. (One might suppose almost that a rather expansive sense of the term was in play).

MALE HELP WANTED. WANTED – Machinist of first-class ability, to go to Milton, N.H.; steady situation will be given to a reliable man capable of taking charge; positively no drunkards. D 11, Globe office (Boston Globe, January 24, 1902).

At the very same time that this advertisement’s type was being set, a major shakeup in the whole liquor situation was in the offing.


Continued in Milton Under “Local License” – 1903-18


Of the tyrant, spies and informers are the principal instruments – Aristotle


References:

Anti-Saloon League. (1920). Anti-Saloon League Year Book. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=HktYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA191

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Charles H. Applebee. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114698767/charles-h-applebee

Find a Grave. (2015, August 13). Frank E. Bush. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/150681899/frank-e-bush

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Frederick Moody “Fred” Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114673086/frederick-moody-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2001, February 21). Neal S. Dow. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/20375/neal-s-dow

Find a Grave. (2011, September 22). William Lawton Dow. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/76937444/william-lawton-dow

Find a Grave. (2015, August 10). Daniel W. Edgerly. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/150450223/daniel-w-edgerly

Find a Grave. (2014, September 14). Jacob Dudley Garland. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/135906165/jacob-dudley-garland

Find a Grave. (2019, May 20). Natt F. Ham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/199297960/natt-f-ham

Find a Grave. (2016, October 8). Caleb Hanson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/171009689/caleb-hanson

Find a Grave. (2006, October 29). Frank Jones. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/16367419/frank-jones

Find a Grave. (2007, September 2). Ralph Metcalf. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/23216999/ralph-metcalf

Find a Grave. (2015, November 8). Charles E. Nutter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154758557/charles-e-nutter

Find a Grave. (2012, December 4). John Robbins. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/101709303/john-robbins

Find a Grave. (2017, October 26). David Wallingford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184628124/david-wallingford

Find a Grave. (2016, February 3). William Welch. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/157792166/william-welch

Find a Grave. (2009, August 27). Eli Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/41228173/eli-wentworth

Find a Grave. (2016, October 2). Jesse Whitten. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170814909/jesse-whitten

National Advocate. (1903, March). National Advocate. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=dA5QAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA172

NH General Court. (1912). Annual Reports. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=dVIbAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA5-PA74

NH License Commissioners. (1912). Annual Reports. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=6NlKAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA5-PA93

Outlook Publishing. (1903, March 28). New Outlook. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=99DUAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA699

Thornton, Mark. (1991). The Economics of Prohibition. Retrieved from cdn.mises.org/Economics%20of%20Prohibition_2.pdf

W.C.T.U. of NH. (1882). Ninth Annual Session of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=73Y9AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA11

Wikipedia. (2021, October 29). Know Nothing. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Know_Nothing

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South Milton Manufacturers H.V. Wentworth & Son

By Muriel Bristol | November 21, 2021

Hiram Varney Wentworth was born in Milton (or Rochester), November 12, 1818, son of Ichabod H. and Peace (Varney) Wentworth.

Ichabod H. Wentworth headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Peace (Varney) Wentworth], one male aged 20-29 years [Hiram V. Wentworth], one male aged 15-19 years [Eli Wentworth], one female aged 15-19 years, and one male aged 5-9 years. Four members of the household were engaged in agriculture. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Plumer, Jr., and William Wentworth.

Hiram V. Wentworth married, circa 1842, Mary J. Nute. She was born Milton, circa July 1820, daughter of John C. and Sarah A. (Varney) Nute.

Younger brother Eli Wentworth married in Milton, July 23, 1843, Mehitable Jane Howe, both of Milton. Jacob Davis performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, in 1822, daughter of Jonathan and Mehitable (Twombly) Howe.

Son Henry Harrison Wentworth was born in Milton, December 3, 1843.

Hiram V. Wentworth was an officer on the regimental staff of the 39th NH Militia Regiment in 1846. He was its Adjutant. The 39th NH Militia Regiment was commanded by Col. Asa Roberts of Farmington, NH. His regimental staff included also Lt. Col. Samuel Jones of Farmington, NH, Major James Bodge of Rochester, NH, and Quartermaster Enoch Bunker of Farmington, NH.

The Militia of New-Hampshire, according to the returns made to the Adjutant General, is organized in four Divisions, eight Brigades, and forty-two Regiments; the 41st Regiment has never been organized. The number of Division and Brigade officers in June, 1845, was 52; Regimental, Field and Staff officers, 323; the number of companies – Infantry, 281; of Grenadiers, 8; of Light Infantry, 60; of Riflemen, 46; aggregate of officers, musicians, and privates, 26,117. Cavalry companies, 20; aggregate of officers, musicians, and privates, 740. Artillery companies, 35; aggregate of officers, musicians, and privates, 1,954. Grand total of the enrolled military force of the state, 28,863 (Claremont, 1846).

The 39th NH Militia Regiment was one of five regiments in the 2nd NH Militia Brigade, which was commanded by Brig. Gen. Alfred Hoit of Lee, NH. The 2nd NH Militia Brigade was one of three brigades in the 2nd NH Militia Division, which was commanded by Maj. Gen. Jeremiah Roberts of Farmington, NH. (Col. Enoch W. Plumer of Milton was commander of the 33d NH Militia Regiment; his officers were from Brookfield, NH, East Alton, NH, Sanborn[ville, Wakefield], NH, and Wakefield, NH. The 33d NH Militia Regiment was in the 7th NH Militia Brigade, which was also in the 2nd NH Militia Division).

Hiram B. Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. Wentworth, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and Henry H. Wentworth, aged six years (b. NH). Hiram B. Wentworth had real estate valued at $350. They shared a two-family residence with the household of [his brother,] Eli Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). Their two-family residence appeared in the enumeration between those of Asa M. Dunnell, a farmer, aged eighty-one years (b. NH), and Ichabod Wentworth, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Mother-in-law Sarah A. (Varney) Nute died in Milton, October 7, 1856.

The NH Agricultural Society awarded H.V. Wentworth of Milton its $20 second prize in the category of Stallions of 6 Years and Upwards for his Morgan horse stallion St. Laurence, in 1859. Enoch W. Plummer of Milton received the $5 third prize for his stallion Messenger (NH State Agricultural Society, 1859).

H. Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. Wentworth, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and H.H. Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged sixteen years (b. NH). H. Wentworth had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between John H. Varney, a shoemaker, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and Eli Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH).

Younger brother Eli Wentworth enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 6th NH Vol. Infantry Regiment, October 18, 1861. The 6th Regiment fought at the Battle of South Mills (aka Camden), April 19, 1862. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant, July 4, 1862. The Sixth NH Regiment fought at the Second Battle of Bull Run, August 29, 1862; South Mountain, September 14, 1862; the Battle of Sharpsburg (or Antietam), September 17, 1862, and the Battle of Fredericksburg, December 11-15, 1862. Wentworth was assigned as regimental Quartermaster, March 19, 1863. The Sixth NH Regiment was sent with General Burnside to Kentucky, and from there, it participated in the siege of Vicksburg, MS, and the Mississippi campaign. Vicksburg fell on July 4, 1863.

The hardships which all [in his Ninth Corps] were obliged to endure were excessive. Water which the horses refused to drink, the men were obliged to use in making their coffee. Fevers, congestive chills, diarrhea, and other diseases attacked the troops. Many sank down upon the roadside and died from sunstroke and sheer exhaustion (Jackman, 1891).

Eli Wentworth died of a camp fever in Milldale, MS, July 18, 1863, aged forty-two years, and six months. (He left a widow, Mehitable J. (Howe) Wentworth, and two children, Clara M. Wentworth and Charles W. Wentworth). Milton’s GAR veterans’ post would be named for him.

Son Henry H. Wentworth married in Dover, NH, January 17, 1864, Louisa M. Hayes, both of Milton. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years, and she was aged eighteen years. Rev. J.T.G. Colby performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, December 12, 1846, daughter of Luther and Louisa A. (Bragdon) Hayes. (See South Milton’s High Sheriff Luther Hayes (1820-1895)).

H.V. Wentworth of So. Milton, was assessed $10 for his Class B horse dealing license in the U.S. Excise Tax of 1864. Ordinarily, the Federal government subsisted mainly on import duties. This series of Federal excise taxes were emergency wartime measures.

Granddaughter Anna Harrison Wentworth was born in Milton, March 31, 1866, daughter of Henry H. and Louisa M. (Hayes) Wentworth.

The NH State Treasurer paid H.V. Wentworth $100 in recruiting fees between June 1866 and May 1867 (NH Treasury Department, 1867).

Hiram V. Wentworth was one of the ten prominent Milton citizens who incorporated a private secondary school – the Milton Classical Institute – at Three Ponds Village in Milton, NH, in July 1867. The incorporators included also NH Governor’s Councilor (and ex-officio NH State Board of Education member) Charles Jones, Strafford Sheriff Luther Hayes, manufacturer William P. Tuttle, Dr. George W. Peavey, and others.

Milton voters sent John U. Simes and Hiram V. Wentworth to represent them in the NH House of Representatives during the 1867-68 biennium. Rep. John U. Simes occupied seat 5-33, and resided at G.L. Nutter’s boarding house; Rep. Hiram V. Wentworth occupied seat 2-42, and resided in the Eagle hotel (McFarland & Jenks, 1867).

Hiram V. Wentworth appeared in the Milton business directories of 1868, and 1869-70, as postmaster at South Milton. He appeared also in the latter year as a Milton manufacturer of boots and shoes.

AGRICULTURAL FAIRS. Strafford County, N.H. Fair at Great Falls, Sept. 11-16. The Journal says that the entries of Stock, Fruit, Vegetables, implements, manufactures, &c. were large and attractive. In the procession were town teams of eleven yoke of oxen each from Barrington, Somersworth, Rollinsford, and the County Farm; and ten yoke from Dover, drawing huge carriages, tastefully ornamented, and filled with singing children and other happy people. The Journal does not give the premiums awarded, but remarks that the exhibition is ahead of all previous ones, and all are perfectly satisfied. The receipts amount to about $5000, which will place the Society on good footing pecuniarily. On Wednesday morning the following board of Directors was chosen M.C. Burleigh, S.C. Chick, Great Falls; Noah Tebbetts, Joseph Nutter, Rochester; H.V. Wentworth, Milton; W.R. Garvin, Rollinsford; C.R. Meserve, Madbury; Wm. F. Jones, Durham; E. Bartlett, Lee; C.W. Davis, Farmington; A.G. Orne, Middleton; G.S. Gilman, New Durham; R.B. Peavey, Strafford, Elisha Locke, Barrington (New England Farmer, September 25, 1869).

Hiram V. Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. Wentworth, keeping house, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), Henry H. Wentworth, a shoe manufacturer, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), Louisa A. Wentworth, a housekeeper, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Anna H. Wentworth, at school, aged five years (b. NH), James M. Gage, a shoe cutter, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), James M. Corson, a shoe finisher, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), Charles L. Furber, a farm laborer, aged forty-six years (b. NH). Hiram V. Wentworth had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $1,654. Their household appeared in the enumeration between a vacant house (adjoining Theodore Lyman, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH)), and Mehitable J. Wentworth, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH).

H.V. Wentworth appeared in the Milton business directories of 1871, and 1873, as a South Milton manufacturer of boots and shoes. His son, H.H. [Henry H.] Wentworth, appeared in his place in the Milton business directory of 1874, and 1875, as the South Milton manufacturer of boots and shoes.

Father Ichabod H. Wentworth made his will, presumably in Milton, October 28, 1871. He devised $200 and an undivided share in West Milton land to his son, Hiram V. Wentworth; $50 to Mary J. [(Nute)] Wentworth; $50 to Mehitable J. [(Howe)] Wentworth; $10 to Clara M. [(Wentworth)] Burley, wife of Daniel S. Burley; a life estate in all notes, bonds, money, and personal property to his wife, Peace [(Varney)] Wentworth; and, after her decease, the household furniture to Mary J. [(Nute)] Wentworth and Mehitable J. [(Howe)] Wentworth. He devised the remaining undivided share in the West Milton land to his grandsons, Henry H. Wentworth and Charles W. Wentworth, as well as any rest and residue not devised. (The land was bounded north by land of H.H. Pinkham, west by land of Joseph Horn, south by land of Joseph Barker, and east by land of David Furbush). John F. Hart, Ira S. Knox, and Ezra H. Twombly signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 83:99).

Father-in-law John C. Nute died in Milton, April 26, 1872. Mary J. (Nute) Wentworth died in Milton, May 13, 1872, aged fifty-one years, ten months. Father Ichabod H. Wentworth died in Milton, July 19, 1872. Mother Peace (Varney) Wentworth died in Milton, August 14, 1873.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. FIRE IN SOUTH MILTON. Great Falls, July 24. Hiram P. Wentworth’s shoe manufactory at South Milton was totally destroyed by fire, with in contents, last night. Loss shout $30,000; partially insured. It is supposed to have been the work of an incendiary (Boston Evening Transcript, July 24, 1875).

AT SOUTH MILTON, N.H. Great Falls, N.H., July 24. Hiram V. Wentworth’s shoe manufactory, at South Milton, burned last night. Loss $30,000. Partly insured (Chicago Tribune, July 25, 1875).

H.H. [Henry H.] Wentworth appeared in the Milton business directories of 1876, as a South Milton boot and shoe manufacturer. (The directory publishers may not have awoken to the facts on the ground: the shoe manufactory had been destroyed in the previous year).

Henry H. Wentworth, a butcher, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Louisa M. Wentworth, keeping house, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Annie H. Wentworth, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Hiram V. Wentworth, at home, aged sixty-one years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Henry B. Scates, a farmer, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), and Charles W. Wentworth, a farmer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH).

H.V. Wentworth & Son, i.e., Henry H. Wentworth, appeared in the Milton business directory of 1880, 1881, and 1882, as lumber manufacturers.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. H.V. Wentworth to D.S. Burley, land in Milton, $1,200 (Farmington News, July 27, 1888).

Sister-in-law Mahitabale [J. (Howe)] Wentworth, widow of 1st Lt. Eli Wentworth, appeared in the surviving Veterans Schedule of the Eleventh (1890) Federal Census.

Hiram V. Wentworth died in Milton, September 12, 1890, aged seventy-one years, ten months, and seventeen days. C.D. Jones, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Granddaughter Annie H. Wentworth married in Milton, April 21, 1891, Henry E. Chamberlain, she of Milton and he of Lakeside, NH. He was a stock grower, aged twenty-six years, and she was aged twenty-five years. Rev. John Manter performed the ceremony. Chamberlain was born in Union, [Wakefield,] NH, circa 1865, son of George W. and Emily E. Chamberlain.

Henry Wentworth, a truckman, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Louisa M. Wentworth, aged fifty-three years (b. NH). Henry Wentworth owned their house in Milton Village, free-and-clear. Louisa M. Wentworth was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of George E. Wentworth, a butcher, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and Daniel Corkery, a shoe shop hand, aged fifty-seven years (b. Canada (Eng.)).

Henry H. Wentworth, an odd jobs laborer, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-five years), Louisa Wentworth, aged sixty-three years (b. NH). Henry Wentworth owned their house, free-and-clear. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Harry F. Whitehouse, an odd jobs painter, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and Edward Costeau, a leatherboard beater-man, aged thirty-two years (b. Canada).

Louisa M. (Hayes) Wentworth died of throat and lung cancer in Milton, January 21, 1915, aged sixty-eight years, one month, and nine days. Edson M. Abbott, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Henry H. Wentworth, a widower, aged seventy-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his granddaughter, Louise E. Chamberlain, aged twenty-two years (b. NE). Henry H. Wentworth owned their house on Upper Main Street, in Milton Village, free-and-clear. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Grover C. Rines, a leatherboard laborer, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Fred B. Roberts, a lumberman, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Henry H. Wentworth died of chronic myelitis in Milton, May 9, 1920, aged seventy-six years, five months, and six days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.


References:

Claremont Manufacturing Company. (1846). New Hampshire Register and Farmer’s Almanac. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=5ucWAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA89

Find a Grave. (2012, June 2). Annie Harrison Wentworth Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/91246369/annie-harrison-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2016, November 13). John C. Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/172705709/john-c.-nute

Jackman, Lyman. (1891). History of the Sixth New Hampshire Regiment in the War for the Union. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=FFG5ulXEkKsC

McFarland & Jenks. (1867). Political Manual and Annual Register for the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=13sBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA58

NH State Agricultural Society. (1859). Transactions of the New Hampshire State Agricultural Society. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=CoQ5AQAAMAAJ

NH Treasury Department. (1863). Report of the State Treasurer for the Fiscal Year Ending June 1, 1863. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=bVNEAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA4-PA29

Milton’s Phoenix House, c1880-1908

By Muriel Bristol | November 14, 2021

The name “Phoenix” might suggest an establishment reborn after a fire. On the other hand, the Phoenix House might have been named in imitation of one of the many existing Phoenix houses, hotels, and halls both in New Hampshire and elsewhere. The most prominent was the Phoenix Hall in Concord, NH.

The available information seems to suggest that Milton’s Glendale House (c1879-83), Phoenix House (1883-08) and, finally, Chamberlain House (1908-09), might have been all in the same location although under a succession of different names. (Strafford County Deeds might shed further light upon this question).

The identified proprietors of Milton’s Phoenix House during this period were Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr., Ed Grant (and his locum Jacob D. Garland), Mrs. Remick (and her locum John E. Hayes), E. Edgerly (and his locum Horace C. Drew), and Fred M. Chamberlain.

Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr. – c1883-1886

Horatio Gates Wentworth, Jr., was born in Lebanon, ME, July 4, 1841, son of Horatio G. and Esther (Lowell) Wentworth. (He and his father were namesakes for Revolutionary War General Horatio Gates).

Horatio Wentworth, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon (“North Lebanon P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Esther Wentworth, aged forty-five years (b. ME), Horatio Wentworth, [Jr.,] a farm laborer, aged nineteen years (b. ME), Ann M. Wentworth, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Timothy Wentworth, aged eleven years (b. ME), Mary A. Wentworth, aged nine years, and Jerry E. Wentworth, aged four years (b. ME). Horatio Wentworth had real estate valued at $800 and personal estate valued at $150.

Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr., married Susan H. Hersom. She was born in Lebanon, ME, December 10, 1841, daughter of John and Asenath (Shorey) Hersom.

Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr., of Lebanon, ME, registered for the Civil War Class I military draft in York County, ME, in June 1863. He was a laborer, married, aged twenty-two years.

H.G. Wentworth, Jr., a farmer, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan Wentworth, keeping house, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME). H.G. Wentworth, Jr., had read estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $100. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Edmond Grant, a hotel keeper, aged forty-one years (b. ME), and Sylvester Fall, a retail grocer, aged forty-one years (b. ME).

H.G. Wentworth appeared in the Milton directories of 1880, 1881, and 1882, as proprietor of Milton’s Glendale House hotel. (The Glendale House had not appeared in the prior Milton business directory of 1877 nor in those that preceded it).

Horatio G. Wentworth, keeps hotel, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA [SIC]), headed a Milton (“Milton 3 Ponds Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Susan Wentworth, keeping house (hotel), aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), and his boarders, George Babcock, works for ice co., aged twenty-two years (b. MA), Nelson Babcock, works for ice co., aged nineteen years (b. MA), George Ingalls, works for ice co., aged thirty years (b. MA), George B. Knowlton, works for ice co., aged twenty-three years (b. MA), Howard Conkling, works for ice co., aged twenty-eight years (b. VT), and Thomas J. Gile, works for ice co., aged twenty years (b. ME). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of George I. Jordan, works on shoes, aged forty-five years (b. ME), and Albert F. Downs, works on shoes, aged thirty years (b. NH).

MILTON. Horatio Wentworth, proprietor of the Glendale House, has sold out to parties from Dover. We learn that he is going into business at East Rochester (Farmington News, February 25, 1881).

AUCTION SALES. HOTEL AT AUCTION. The well-known Glendale House, situate at Milton “Three Ponds” village, on the banks of a beautiful lake on the Conway division of the Eastern Railroad, will be sold at public auction, THURSDAY, May 25, at 2 o’clock P.M., sharp; situate in a growing manufacturing village, amid beautiful scenery, pure air, on the direct line of White Mountain travel, excellent boating, fishing, etc.; within two minutes walk of the depot, it presents superior advantages as a summer resort for the invalid or pleasure-seeker; terms liberal. Apply to H.A. WORTHEN, carriage manufacturer, or V.H. McDANIEL, Auctioneer, Dover, N.H. (Boston Globe, May 23, 1882).

We may note that the auction advertisement’s highlights seem to have been pitched more towards rusticators, i.e., tourist interests, than the ice industry men that had filled his rooms in 1880.

Despite the report of his intention to pursue other interests, H.G. Wentworth appeared once more in the Milton business directory of 1884, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

Horatio G. Wentworth, a farmer, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA [SIC]), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-nine years), Susan H. Wentworth, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), his mother, Esther Wentworth, aged eighty-four years (b. ME), and his boarders, Freeman A. Peacock, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA), and Daniel Tate, a day laborer, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME). Horatio G. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear. Esther Wentworth was the mother of seven children, of whom four were still living.

Horatio G. Wentworth, a general farm farmer, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA [SIC]), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-six years), Susan H. Wentworth, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), Simeon Streeter, a farm laborer (home farm), aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Freeman A. Peacock, own income, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA). Horatio G. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear. Susan H. Wentworth was the mother of no children.

Susan (Hersom) Wentworth died of chronic interstitial nephritis in Lebanon, ME, December 11, 1917, aged seventy-six years, and one day. She had resided in Lebanon, ME, for thirty years, i.e., since about 1886-87, having moved there from her previous residence in Milton, NH. H.E. Anderson, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Nathaniel S. Carll, a general farm farmer, aged forty-six years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alta M. Carll, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and his boarder, Horatio G. Wentworth, a widower, aged seventy-eight years (b. MA [SIC]). Nathaniel S. Carll owned their farm on the Milton North Road, free-and-clear.

Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr., died in 1925.

Jacob D. Garland – 1886-1889

Jacob Dudley “Dudley” Garland was born in Middleton, NH, in 1833, son of Alfred and Abigail (Horne) Garland.

Jacob D. Garland married (1st) in Farmington, NH, April 13, 1852, Caroline W. Henline, he of Farmington, NH, and she of Somerville, NH.

Jacob D. Garland married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, January 9, 1855, Ann A. Pinkham, he of Farmington, NH, and she of Somerville, NH. She was born in New Durham, NH, September 4, 1837, daughter of Luther and Harriet (Burnham) Pinkham.

Jacob D. Garland, a shoemaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Ann A. Garland, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Llewellen D. Garland, aged five years (b. NH), Eugene A. Garland, aged three years (b. NH), Caroline W. Garland, aged one year (b. NH), and George H. Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged eighteen years (b. NH).

Jacob B. Garland, a landlord, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Anna A. Garland, a landlady, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Loullen B. Garland, at home, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Eugene A. Garland, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Charles Smith, a harness maker, aged thirty years (b. NH), Emma Smith, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Danl. Varney, works in shoe manufactory, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). Jacob B. Garland had personal estate valued at $1,300 and Charles Smith had personal estate valued at $1,000.

Jacob Garland, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ann A. Garland, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and his help, Charles Garland, aged nine years (b. NH). They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of Eugene A. Garland, a farmer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH).

LOCALS. It is reported that J.D. Garland of West Milton has bought Jewell’s Hotel at Bow Lake, Strafford, and will take possession about the first of April (Farmington News, February 29, 1884).

FOR SALE. My farm containing 105 acres. Situated in Milton, two miles from Farmington Village. Good buildings, consisting of a story and half House, with L, containing nine rooms and a good cellar. Nice finished barn, 40×50, built 6 years since. Good shoe shop, hog house, corn house; two good wells of water; good pasture with never failing water and well wooded. Two hundred young apple trees just coming in bearing. Nice garden with a good variety of Pear, Peach and Plum trees. Grapes, Currants, Gooseberries, Strawberries, Raspberries and Blackberries. In a good neighborhood and as pleasant a location as can be found. J.D. GARLAND (Farmington News, March 21, 1884).

LOCALS. The Phoenix Hotel, Milton Three Ponds, J.D. Garland, proprietor, was overhauled by Sheriff Johnson, Saturday, on complaint of C.H. Applebee, of Milton Mills, for the illegal sale of intoxicants. Rum, whiskey and wine were found, and on Monday Mr. Garland appeared before Justice E.W. Fox at Milton and was fined $50 and costs, amounting to $62.80, which was paid (Farmington News, [Friday, November 15, 1885).

Jacob D. Garland was mentioned as an abutter of a property on the Hare Road in West Milton by John H. Hersey, administrator of the estate of Garland’s deceased neighbor, John S. Hersey, in settling the estate in 1886. (Garland’s adjoining land was likely the same that he had advertised for sale in 1884).

… Also another tract of land, in said Milton, containing about 40 acres, and bounded as follows: Northerly by land of Jacob D. Garland, easterly by land of Daniel C. Emery and Ira A. Cook, southerly by land of heirs of Ichabod Hayes, and westerly by land of heirs of Emery Nute, and the hare road, so called (Farmington News, February 5, 1886).

LOCALS. Mrs. Dudley Garland, Milton, met with a painful accident Thursday, cutting her hand severely with a piece of lamp chimney, and in consequence of severe pain had a slight attack of lockjaw. She is now convalescent (May 28, 1886).

J.G. [J.D.] Garland appeared in the Milton business directory of 1887, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

LOCALS. J.D. Garland and wife have taken a tenement in the Newell & Hanson block. They intend to keep a boarding house (Farmington News, December 9, 1887).

A CHAPTER OF ACCIDENTS. … A slight accident broke the monotony of our streets. teams Saturday afternoon, when the teams of J.D. Garland and A.G. Orne collided while both horses were walking moderately along. Orne was in the act of crossing the bead of Central street, when Garland coming down that street attempted to turn the comer by the Boston Clothing Co.’s. The result was they deliberately walked into each other, Garland’s shaft going through one of Orne’s hind wheels, upsetting the latter and throwing him out, but without injuring him. The opposite wheel was knocked out of the hub and one of the perches to the vehicle broken. Garland’s team was uninjured (Farmington News, August 10, 1888).

MILTON. Mr. Garland has thoroughly painted and repaired the Phoenix, and sets one of the cleanest tables to be found (Farmington News, June 21, 1889).

MILTON. It is announced that Mrs. Remick, of Milton Mills, has purchased the Phenix Hotel, owned by Mr. Ed Grant, of Great Falls, and occupied by Mr. Llewellyn [Jacob D.] Garland. It is said that the hotel and stable were sold for the sum of $2,000. Some land on the opposite side of the street, suitable for house lots, were not included in the sale. Mr. Garland has professed to keep a temperance house, which no one will dispute in the least. Mr. and Mrs. Garland, by their genial and kind habits, made many friends, and established the fact, so many times disputed, that a public house could be self-sustaining, if intoxicants could be strictly excluded. It is a pleasure to realize that nothing that can intoxicate can be obtained in or about Milton – not even a glass of ale or cider – nearer than Rochester or Farmington. It is not denied that it is used to some extent, but not as it would be if it were sold here as formerly. Temperance people here recognize the fact, and will make it up hill work for those who attempt its sale here – Cor of Free Press (Farmington News, October 25, 1889).

Dudley Garland appeared in the surviving Veterans’ Schedule of the otherwise destroyed Eleventh (1890) Federal Census. He was said to have enlisted in the 10th Regiment NH Volunteer Infantry, September 28, 1862. He was recorded as a Milton resident served by the Farmington post office, i.e., he was a West Milton resident.

PERSONAL. J.D. Garland and wife would like some children to board. They will, also care for soldiers and invalids. See ad (Farmington News, December 11, 1891).

WANTED. Children to Board. Pension Soldier or Invalids cared for at my home at reasonable prices. MRS. A.A. GARLAND. 10-1m (Farmington News, December 11, 1891).

WEST MILTON. Dudley Garland is dangerously ill (Farmington News, September 10, 1897).

WEST MILTON. Mr. Garland is still critically ill and Mrs. Garland has been ill a few days (Farmington News, September 24, 1897).

Jacob D. Garland died of nervous prostration in Milton, September 22, 1897, aged sixty-six years, five months, and three days. J.S. Elkins, M.D., signed the death certificate.

LOCALS. Miss Gertrude Garland, of the Robinson seminary in Exeter, accompanied by her mother, Mrs. Frank Shapleigh, attended last week the funeral of her grandfather, Dudley B. Garland of West Milton. The deceased leaves a widow and one son, besides his granddaughters, Miss Maud Garland and the young lady before mentioned (Farmington News, October 1, 1897).

LOCALS. Mrs. Dudley Garland lost a valuable horse from colic, on Saturday (Farmington News, December 3, 1897).

PERSONAL. Mrs. Dudley Garland of Milton and Miss Maude Garland of this [Farmington] village went to Exeter Wednesday to attend the commencement exercises and reception at Robinson Female seminary, Exeter, where Miss Gertrude Garland, granddaughter of the former and cousin of the latter, graduates in the class of 98 (Farmington News, June 17, 1898).

WEST MILTON. Miss Gertrude Garland, who has completed her studies at Robinson’s Female seminary at Exeter, is with her grandmother, Mrs. Dudley Garland. Miss Garland expects to enter Mt. Holyoke college in September (Farmington News, June 24, 1898).

Ann A. Garland, a farmer, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her boarders, Andrew Hunt, a capitalist, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA), and Robert McGuire, at school, aged eight years (b. MA). She owned her house, with a mortgage. Ann A. Garland was the mother of three children, of whom one was still living. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Arthur Nute, a farmer, aged forty years (b. NH), and John Cook, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH).

Ann A. Garland, a boarding-house housekeeper, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her boarders, Clifton Pinkham, a shoe factory trimming cutter, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), [his wife (of three years),] Mary Pinkham, a shoe factory folder, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Ella M. Cook, a shoe factory fitter, aged seventeen years (b. NH). She owned her house at 42 Central Street, free-and-clear. Ann A. Garland was the mother of three children, of whom one was still living. Mary Pinkham was the mother of two children, of whom none were still living.

LOCALS. W.D. Henderson of Dedham, Mass., has purchased the Ann Garland place in the north part of the village, and it is to be occupied by his father-in-law, Mr. Nickerson, who will remove here from Dedham (Farmington News, February 11, 1910).

Ann A. Garland, a widow, aged eighty-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her lodger, George D. Garland, a shoe factory odd jobs worker, aged twenty-one years (b. ME). She owned her house on Bunker Street, free-and-clear. (Ann A. Garland’s father and mother were said to have been respectively natives of New Hampshire and Tennessee).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Ann Garland of Farmington has been a recent guest of Mr. and Mrs. L.D. Garland (Farmington News, September 20, 1920).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Ann Garland of Farmington celebrated her eighty-fourth birthday last Saturday at the home of her son, L.D. Garland (Farmington News, September 9, 1921).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Cora Garland is still at Farmington caring for Mrs. Ann Garland. Anna Varney is at the home of L.D. Garland, acting in the capacity of housekeeper in the absence of Mrs. Garland (Farmington News, December 9, 1921).

Ann A. (Pinkham) Garland died of chronic myocarditis on the Hare Road in Milton (four weeks’ residence), December 25, 1921, aged eighty-four years, three months, and twenty-one days. P.H. Greeley, M.D., signed the death certificate.

IN MEMORIAM. Ann A. Garland. In the death of Mrs. Ann A. Garland, which occurred at the home of her son, Llewellyn D. Garland, at West Milton last Sunday night, this locality lost one of its oldest and most useful residents. The end resulted from a complication of diseases at the advanced age of 84 years. The deceased was a native of New Durham, the only daughter by the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Luther Pinkham. Except for a few years spent in Canada during the lifetime of her husband, Dudley Garland, she always resided in Farmington and Milton, 25 years In the latter and over 20 in the former. Being of an industrious and retiring temperament, she never affiliated with any organization and those who knew her best met her most often at her home where she always found time to exercise charities that found their way abroad and into the lives of the unfortunate. She possessed a kindly disposition that manifested itself most favorably in a devotion for children and among them she was always happy. A host of friends unite in sympathy for the son and two granddaughters, Mrs. John Rhodes of Worcester, Mass., and Mrs. John Gilman of Laconia. Funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from the home where death occurred, Rev. J.G. Haigh officiating. Remains were taken to Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, December 30, 1921).

John E. Hayes – 1887-189?

John Elihu Hayes was born in Lancaster, NH, September 18, 1832, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Hersom) Hayes.

James Clark, a farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon (“Lebanon Centre”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Hos household included Betsey Clark, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), Mary E. Fall, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), John Clark, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Carrie W. Fall, aged six years (b. ME), Mary Clark, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), and John Hayes, a farm laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME [SIC]). James Clark had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $200. John Hayes had real estate valued at $625.

John E. Hayes married, circa 1861, Mary E. (Clark) Fall. She was born in Lebanon, ME, April 6, 1833, daughter of James and Betsy (Hayes) Clark.

John E. Hayes, of Lebanon, ME, registered for the Civil War Class I military draft in York County, ME, in June 1863. He was a farmer, married, aged twenty-eight years.

John E. Hayes, a farmer, aged thirty-six years (b. ME [SIC]), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary Hayes, keeping house, aged thirty-six years (b. ME), James H. Hayes, aged eight years (b. ME), Richard Hayes, aged three years (b. ME), John E. Clark, a farmer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Betsey Clark, at home, aged seventy-two years (b. ME), and Carrie W. Fall, aged sixteen years (b. ME). John E. Hayes had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $500. John E. Clark had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $1,000.

John E. Hayes, a butcher and farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. Hayes, keeping house, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, James H. Hayes, at school, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Richard Hayes, at school, aged thirteen years (b. ME), and George P. Hayes, at house, aged five years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles H. Prescott, a farmer, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), and William F. Cutts, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. ME).

LOCALS. A.H. Wiggin, clerk at W.I. Nutter’s meat market, is laid by for a season with what doctors pronounce a felon. J.E. Hayes of the Phenix hotel, Milton, is filling his position at the market. Since the writing above we learn that a New York doctor says the trouble is caused by blood poisoning (Farmington News, July 22, 1887).

(A “felon” in this medical sense is an infection or abscess involving the bulbous distal end of a finger).

J.E. Hayes appeared in the Milton business directory of 1889, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

MILTON. There will be a free ball this evening, with a supper at the Phoenix House (Farmington News, [Friday,] December 25, 1891).

John P. Hayes, butchering, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-nine years), Mary E. Hayes, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and his son, George Hayes, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). John P. Hayes owned their farm, free-and-clear. Mary E. Hayes was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Moses B. Plummer, a farm laborer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and Frank G. Horne, a commercial traveler, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH).

John E. Hayes died of carcinoma of the bowels on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, November 13, 1901, aged sixty-nine years, and two months. He had lived in Milton for twenty-eight years, having previous lived in Lebanon, ME. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Mary E. (Clark) Hayes died of pulmonary tuberculosis in Milton, October 30, 1903, seventy years, six months, and twenty-four days. She had resided in Milton, for thirty years, i.e., since about 1872-73, having moved there from her previous residence in Lebanon, ME. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Horace C. Drew – 189?-1893

Horace C. Drew was born in Eaton, NH, July 17, 1849, son of Thomas and Sarah (Bryant) Drew.

Horace C. Drew married in Ipswich, MA, March 24, 1873, Margaret E. Walker, he of Middleton, NH, and she of Ipswich, MA. He was a farmer, aged twenty-three years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. Thomas Moroney performed the ceremony. She was born in Ireland, May 23, 1853, daughter of John and Elizabeth “Elsy” (Black) Walker.

Horace Drew, a farmer, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Maggie E. Drew, keeping house, aged twenty-seven years (b. Ireland), and his daughter, Elizabeth S. Drew, aged six years (b. NH).

E. Edgerly appeared in the Milton business directory of 1892, as manager of Milton’s Hotel Phœnix. Horace Drew appeared as its manager.

LOCALS. Horace Drew of Middleton has 35 boarders at his home for the summer season (Farmington News, August 12, 1898).

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has quite a large number of summer boarders (Farmington News, July 7, 1899).

Horace Drew, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Middleton, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Margaret E. Drew, aged forty-six years (b. Ireland), Edwin C. Drew, a farm laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), William D. Drew, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Clifton Drew, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), Clifford Drew, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), and John J. Drew, at school, aged six years (b. NH), and his boarders, Calvin Head, a teamster, aged forty years (b. NH), Fannie Head, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and George Willard, a farm laborer, aged seventy years (b. ME). Horace Drew owned their farm, free-and-clear. Margaret E. Drew was the mother of eight children, of whom six were still living. Fannie Head was the mother of one child, of whom none was still living.

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has his usual number of summer boarders (Farmington News, July 27, 1900).

MIDDLETON. Horace Drew has had his usual number of guests at Valley Farm but they are now fast returning home (Farmington News, August 31, 1900).

LOCAL. Horace Drew of Middleton is entertaining between thirty and forty summer boarders from Boston and elsewhere (Farmington News, July 26, 1901).

MIDDLETON. George Willard, who has been with Horace Drew for several years, has returned to his old home in Georgia (Farmington News, December 13, 1901).

MIDDLETON. Mrs. Horace Drew has a few summer boarders (Farmington News, June 9, 1905).

Horace Drew, a general farm farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Middleton, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-four years), Margaret M. Drew, aged fifty-four years (b. England [SIC]), Edwin C. Drew, a lumber teamster, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), Clifton T. Drew, a lumber teamster, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Clifford H. Drew, a home farm laborer, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and John J. Drew, a home farm laborer, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Horace Drew owned their farm, with a mortgage. Margaret E. Drew was the mother of nine children, of whom six were still living. She had immigrated in 1860.

MIDDLETON. Mrs. Horace Drew, who is seriously ill with a complication of diseases, is a little more comfortable (Farmington News, April 21, 1911).

Margaret E. (Walker) Drew died of heart disease in Middleton, NH, September 20, 1911, aged fifty-eight years, three months, and twenty-eight days. E.C. Perkins signed the death certificate.

Local. Mrs. Horace Drew of Middleton passed away Wednesday morning. Funeral will be held Friday afternoon at the home (Farmington News, September 22, 1911).

Horace C. Drew died of chronic nephritis in Middleton, NH, September 23, 1911, aged sixty-two years, two months, and five days. J.A. Stevens, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Middleton. Entered in to rest September 20, after a long illness, Mrs. Maggie Drew, wife of Horace Drew, aged 58 years. Services were held at the home Friday under the direction of B.F. Perkins. Rev. Mr. Coleman spoke comforting words to the relatives. Saturday, Mr. Drew passed away and these two dear ones who had passed a long and happy life together were reunited in the “great beyond,” after brief separation. The funeral was held Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Drew were among our best townspeople and they will be sadly missed. One daughter, Mrs. Frank Leighton, and five sons, Edwin C., William D., Clifton, Clifford and John, are left to mourn the loss of father and mother in the short space of three days. There are eight grandchildren also, who grieve for them. The sympathy pf the entire community is with them in their double bereavement. Mr. Drew is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Charles Leighton and Mrs. Frank Woodman, also three brothers, Benjamin, Wesley and Ellsworth, and numerous nephews and nieces. (Farmington News, September 29, 1911).

Fred M. Chamberlin – 1893-1908

Frederick Moody “Fred” Chamberlain was born in Milton, May 29, 1858, son of Samuel G. and Mary E. (Fall) Chamberlain.

Samuel G. Chamberlin, a farmer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. Chamberlin, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), his children, Delia E. Chamberlin, at home, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Fred Chamberlin, a peddler, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), and Moses G. Chamberlin, a farm laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and his sister, Lucy R. Chamberlin, at home, aged sixty-one years (b. NH).

Fred M. Chamberlain was installed in the office of Worshipful Marshal of the Eureka Lodge, No. 56, of the International Organization of Grand Templars (I.O.G.T.) in May 1886. The I.O.G.T. was a fraternal organization devoted to temperance.

UNION. At the regular meeting of Eureka Lodge, No. 56, I.O. of G.T., on Tuesday evening the following officers were installed for the present term by Deputy Grand Worthy Chief Templar, A.H. Chamberlain: W.C.T., Chas. W. Horne; W.V.T., Emma Chamberlain; W.R. Secy. Mary F. Horne; W.F. Secy., Frank Tebbetts; W. Treas., Mrs. J.L. Johnson; W. Chap. Albra P. Hanson; W.A.S., Horace H. Moulton; W. Mar., Fred M. Chamberlain; W.D.M., Mary A. Wadleigh; W.I.G., Ida F. Sanborn; W.O.G., Freeman L. Johnson; W.R.H.S., Chas. H. Prescott; W.L.H.S., Lovie Sanborn; P.W.C.T., A.H. Chamberlain. OCCASIONAL (Farmington News, May 21, 1886).

Fred M. Chamberlain married (1st) in Milton, October 9, 1886, Grace M. Dicey, both of Wakefield, NH. He was a laborer, aged twenty-one years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. Henry E. Allen performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, circa 1865, daughter of George W. Dicey.

Son Guy H. Chamberlain was born in Wakefield, NH, July 22, 1887.

LOCALS. At the track, Saturday, Wes Locke and a Mr. Chamberlain of Milton will try and find out whose horse is a trotter. They will probably succeed to the satisfaction of both parties (Farmington News, June 20, 1890).

Daughter Pearl E. Chamberlain was born in Milton, November 14, 1893.

F.M. Chamberlin appeared in the Milton business directories of 1894, and 1898, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

MILTON NEWS LETTER. SEVERAL LIQUOR RAIDS LAST WEEK. The temperance people scored a point last week against the saloon keepers. All the saloons in town were raided one night, with the result that nothing was found in any of the places. But in a subsequent raid the following night their efforts proved more successful and F.M. Chamberlin of the Phoenix House was obliged to settle in police court (Farmington News, September 3, 1897).

Personally Conducted, By Land and Sea. Mr. Fred M. Chamberlain, proprietor of the Phoenix House at Milton, N.H., is to build a new hotel in that town just north of his present house, which will be modern in every particular, and when finished, one of the best equipped and furnished hotels in that section of the country (Boston Home Journal, January 21, 1899).

The new hotel contemplated here was likely “The Sands” summer hotel, built at Meeting House pond, and which Chamberlain managed in later years.

MILTON. A runaway accident was averted, last week, by the prompt action of George E. Wentworth of this village. A team belonging to F.M. Chamberlin stood in front of his stable and started suddenly on the run over the bridge into Lebanon. Wentworth sprang on behind the hack and remained until ascending the hill on the other side, when he secured the reins and restored the team to the owner unhurt (Farmington News, April 25, 1900).

Chamberlin, Fred M.
Fred M. Chamberlin, and one of his horses, near the Milton train station (Photo: Dianne O’Neill). (Note the still extant railroad freight house behind the horse’s head)

Fred Chamberlin, a hotel keeper, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Grace M. Chamberlin, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), his children, Guy Chamberlin, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Pearl Chamberlin, at school, aged six years (b. NH), his servant, Albert F. Downs, a hotel servant, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his boarder, D.L. Perkins, a paper mill operative, aged forty-six years (b. “unknown”). Fred Chamberlin rented their house. Grace M. Chamberlin was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of George Jordan, a picker stick maker, aged sixty-four years (b. ME), and Frank S. Lee, a house painter, aged fifty-four years (b. NH).

F.M. Chamberlin appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, 1904, and 1905-06, as proprietor of Milton’s Phenix House hotel.

The neighbor mentioned in the 1900 Census, George I. Jordan, appeared in the Milton directory of 1901, as a manufacturer of picker sticks at 54 Main street, residing there als0. (Frank S. Lee had removed to Roxbury, MA). Albert F. Downs appeared as a laborer, resident at the Phoenix House.

MILTON. Fred Chamberlain was raided last week. Beer was found (Farmington News, August 30, 1901).

Phoenix - 1905Fred M. Chamberlin, of Milton divorced his first wife, Grace M. (Dicey) Chamberlain, of Roxbury, MA, in Strafford County Superior Court, October 2, 1902. He alleged adultery (one had to allege something); and received custody of a minor child, Guy H. Chamberlin. (She died at the NH State Hospital in Concord, NH, June 15, 1908, aged forty-seven years).

MILTON. Fred Chamberlin, proprietor of the Phoenix house, is in a critical condition from a cut on his hand, which has resulted in blood poisoning (Farmington News, March 4, 1904).

DOGS, CATS, ETC. FOR SALE – 1 extra good rabbit dog, $25; others, not so good, for sale. Write F.M. CHAMBERLAIN, Phœnix house, Milton, N.H. (Boston Globe, October 30, 1904).

Son Guy H. Chamberlain married (1st) in Milton, July 8, 1906, Elizabeth M. Cunningham, he of Milton and she of Sanford, ME. He was a hotel clerk, aged twenty-one years, and she was at home, aged nineteen years. Rev. R.M. Peacock performed the ceremony. She was born in Kinning Park, Glasgow, Scotland, April 22, 1887, daughter of Alexander A. and Elizabeth (Lumsden) Cunningham.

Fred M. Chamberlain married (2nd) in Milton, February 8, 1907, Caroline E. [(Armstrong)] Reed, he of Milton and she of Houlton, ME. He was a hotel proprietor, aged forty-eight years, and she was a widowed housekeeper, aged thirty-two years. She was born in Glassville, New Brunswick, Canada, circa 1874, daughter of James and Abigail (Thompson) Armstrong.

Chamberlain and his second wife aided the victim of the 1908 Hennessey Kidnapping at their hotel.

Hotel Chamberlin Milton, NH
Hotel Chamberlin Milton, NH

Fred M. Chamberlain was proprietor of Chamberlain House in 1909. He kept also for a time a separate summer hotel (“The Sands”) at Meeting House pond.

UNION. Miss Pearl Chamberlain of Milton visited her aunt, Mrs. Edward Reed, last week (Farmington News, February 25, 1910).

Fred M. Chamberlain, an odd jobs teamster, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife (of three years), Caroline Chamberlain, aged thirty-five years (b. Canada), his [step] children, Myrtle Chamberlain [Armstrong], a dressmaker, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and Elmer Chamberlain [Armstrong], aged thirteen years (b. ME), and his hired man, Mike Sullivan, a stable laborer, aged thirty-five years (b. MA).

In 1912, the erstwhile hotelier was engaged in “teaming,” i.e., working as a teamster, and now resident at 107 North Main street, rather than in his hotel near the depot.

Daughter Pearl E. Chamberlain married in Brockton, MA, April 18, 1915, John H. Madden, both of 69 Fuller Street, Brockton, MA. She was at home, aged twenty-one years, and he was an ice businessman, aged forty-nine years. Rev. Allen Hudson performed the ceremony. Madden was born in Boston, MA, circa 1865, son of Joseph and Mary (Hogan) Madden.

Caroline A. Chamberlin, of Milton, divorced her husband, Fred M. Chamberlain, of Milton, in Strafford County Superior Court, October 15, 1915. She alleged extreme cruelty (one had to allege something)

By 1917, Fred M. Chamberlain was employed by the Boston Ice Company, and still resident at 107 North Main street.

Daughter-in-law Elizabeth Cunningham died of pneumonia in Milton, October 4, 1918, aged thirty-three years, ten months, and nine days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate. (See Milton in the News – 1918).

Fred M. Chamberlain, ice cutter laborer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his son, Guy H. Chamberlain, an ice cutter laborer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and his grandchildren, Marion G. Chamberlain, aged eleven years (b. MA), Gardner M. Chamberlain, aged ten years (b NH), Madeline L. Chamberlain, aged eight years (b. MA), Howard R. Chamberlain, aged six years (b. MA), Pearl E. Chamberlain, aged four years (b. MA), and Muriel Chamberlain, aged two years (b. NH).

WEST MILTON. Town meeting was held on Saturday, and the following were elected selectmen: Fred M. Chamberlain, Charles S. Philbrick, Joseph H. Avery (Farmington News, March 19, 1920).

Son Guy H. Chamberlain married (2nd) in Dover, NH, August 27, 1921, Verna M. Woodman, he of Milton and she of Ossipee, NH. He was an iceman, aged thirty-four years, and she was a domestic, aged seventeen years. Rev. Leon Morse performed the ceremony. She was born in Ossipee, NH, circa 1903, daughter of Fred and Etta M. (Colby) Woodman.

WEST MILTON. We are sorry to learn that Fred Chamberlain had the misfortune to break his leg one day last week, and was taken to a hospital (Farmington News, March 6, 1925).

Son Guy H. Chamberlain owned in 1926 the Milton dance pavilion that would later be named Frolic Haven.

Fred Chamberlain, a road commissioner (state road), aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his grandchildren, Howard Chamberlain, aged fifteen years (b. MA), Pearl Chamberlain, aged thirteen years (b. MA), and Muriel Chamberlain, aged twelve years (b. ME). Fred Chamberlain owned their house on North Main Street, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set.

Daughter-in-law Verna W. Chamberlain divorced son Guy H. Chamberlain, both of Wakefield, NH, in Carroll County Superior Court, July 3, 1931. She alleged abandonment.

TO SUPERVISE ROAD WORK. The work of the State Highway located in Division 7 has been allocated to 15 district patrolmen. With this new system N. Sherman Rand road agent in Rye for a number of years has supervision of construction and repair of the state highways in New Castle, Newington, North Hampton, Portsmouth, and Rye and Earl Caswell of Greenland has charge of the main state highways in Greenland and Stratham and the back roads in Newington and Portsmouth. These men will have charge of construction, repairs, hiring of men and other work connected with the state highways and in towns where their work overlaps they will work jointly, one man taking the main roads and the other the less travelled back road. The 15 district patrolmen appointed for District 7 are: J.P Garvin, Sanbornville; F.M. Chamberlain, Milton; A.F. Emerson, Farmington; Arthur Jalbot, Somersworth; M.T. Malone, Dover; Lewis Walker, Newmarket; Earl Caswell, Greenland; N. Sherman Rand, Rye; Earl Spear, North Hampton; Fred Gallant, Exeter; James Eaton, Seabrook; John Hilliard, East Kingston; Clarence Green, Plaistow; Eugene Kimball, East Kingston; John Dudley, Exeter (Boston Globe, April 20, 1933).

Daughter Pearl E. (Chamberlain) Madden died in Boston, MA, April 28, 1933, aged thirty-nine years.

DEATHS. MADDEN – In South Boston, April 28, Pearle E. (Chamberline), beloved wife of John H. Madden. Funeral from her late home, 764 East Sixth st., Monday, May 1, at 8 a.m. Requiem high mass at St. Eulalia’s Church at 9. Relatives and friends invited (Boston Globe, April 29, 1933).

Frederick M. Chamberlain died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Union, Wakefield, NH, May 30, 1935, aged seventy-seven years, and one day. P.A. Kimball, M.D., signed the death certificate.

IN MEMORIAM. Fred Chamberlain. Fred Chamberlain of Milton, aged 77, passed away at Union last Thursday evening. The deceased was a native of Milton Mills, the son of Samuel G. and Mary E. (Fall) Chamberlain. He was well known in this section where he served as state road patrolman between Milton and Sanbornville. He is survived by one son, Guy Chamberlain; a sister, Mrs. Charles Lowes of Union, a brother, Moses Chamberlain of Milton Mills, and twelve grandchildren living in Milton and Boston. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at the Congregational church. Bearers were Fred Foster, Ed Jordan, Charles Tanner and Martin Eaton (Farmington News, June 7, 1935).


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Frederick Moody “Fred” Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114673086/frederick-moody-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2011, February 28). Grace M. Dicey Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/66263737/grace-m.-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2013, August 13). Samuel Gardner Chamberlain. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115369940/samuel-gardner-chamberlain

Find a Grave. (2014, September 14). Jacob Dudley Garland. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/135906165/jacob-dudley-garland

Find a Grave. (2017, August 5). John E. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/182087952/john-e-hayes

Find a Grave. (2019, April 28). Pearl Evangeline Chamberlain Madden. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/198723156/pearl-evangeline-madden

Find a Grave. (2012, November 24). Horatio G. Wentworth, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/101246605/horatio-g.-wentworth

Wikipedia. (2021, September 13). Horatio Gates. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatio_Gates

Milton in NH Education Report, 1882

By Muriel Bristol | November 7, 2021

In his June 1882 report, NH Superintendent of Instruction J.W. Patterson provided some statistics regarding Milton.

Milton’s town school committee members were identified as being John U. Simes, and H.F. Pitcher, M.D.. (John U. Simes (1836-1927) of Milton Mills was a trader, i.e., a storekeeper; and Herbert F. Pitcher (1853-1924) was a Milton physican). (They would seem to have been short by one committee member).

Milton had 11 school districts and 13 schools in town, 2 of which were graded schools and none were district and town high schools. There were 11 schoolhouses, of which none that were unfit for use and none were built during the year. Maps and globes were available in 11 schoolhouses. The value of schoolhouses, furnishings and sites was estimated at $8,000, and the value of apparatus was estimated at $150. Only 2 of the district schools had an average of 12 scholars of less; and 1 had an average of 6 scholars or less. The average run of district school classes was 18.4 weeks. (The Strafford County average was 20.82 weeks).

Milton had 146 male and 138 female students enrolled. Of these, 31 were aged under six years, 233 were aged between 6 and 16 years, and 29 were aged over 16 years. There were 39 students pursuing higher branches, and there were 14 students aged between 5 and 15 years that were not attending any school. Average daily attendance was 201 students.

There were 4 male teachers, making an average of $40.00 per month, and 14 female teachers, making an average of $23.42 per month. Of these, 2 were teaching for the first time, and 10 had been teachers for more than one term. (One might infer that the remaining 16 had been teachers already for a single prior term). Of these, 2 of them had been to Normal school. Of 208 Strafford County teachers, only 30 (11.6%) had been to Normal school).

Under the heading Private Schools of a Higher Grade, Milton had its Classical Institute, which was situated at Milton Three Ponds. It had been chartered and organized in 1866. The value of its building, apparatus and grounds was $2,800. It had a 44-week school year, which began in September. It had no male teachers and 2 female teachers; and it had 17 male and 31 female students. Of these, 37 of them were NH residents, 18 of them were pursuing higher branches.

The school committee had available to it $1,925.41; of which $1,092.00 came from the town tax for support of schools, $483.00 came from district school taxes, $120.62 came from the literary fund, $129.00 came from local funds and the dog tax, $100.79 came from the railroad tax, and $0.00 came from contributions.

Milton expended $0.00 for new buildings, $358.00 in interest, $25.00 in permanent repairs, $100.0o in miscellaneous expenses; and $1,223.71 in teacher salaries, for a grand total of $1,766.71. The average cost of salaries and miscellaneous expenses per scholar was $4.66. (The county average cost per scholar was $7.29).


Previous in sequence: Milton in NH Education Report, 1881; next in sequence: Milton in NH Education Report, 1884


References:

NH Superintendent of Public Instruction. (1882). Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qholAQAAIAAJ

Milton’s Duntley Family Blacksmiths – 1838-1916

By Muriel Bristol | November 1, 2021

Milton’s village smithies for nearly eighty years were Hazen Duntley and his son, Ira W. Duntley.

Hazen Duntley

Hazen Duntley was born in Bow, NH, circa February 1805, son of Joseph and Jane W. (Eastman) Duntley.

Mr. Hazen Duntley married (1st) in New Durham, NH, October, 18, 1829, Miss Phebe Leighton, he of Sandwich, NH, and she of Farmington, NH. Rev. Nathaniel Berry performed the ceremony. She was born in Farmington, NH, in 1811.

Hazen Duntley headed a Thornton, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years (himself), one female aged 15-19 years (Phebe (Leighton) Duntley), and one female aged under-five years. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of the Widow Susan Wadson, and John Fish.

Son Jedediah L. Duntley was born in Farmington, NH, in 1834.

In 1838 Hazen Duntley built his blacksmith shop on almost the same site as that now owned by his son, Ira W., and followed the blacksmith trade, during all his active life, during the Civil war serving as a blacksmith for three years in the same regiments as his son. He was an expert workman and dependable, honest man. In politics he was a Democrat and religiously affiliated with the Free Baptist church (Scales, 1914). 

Ms. Sarah Ricker’s Milton and the New Hampshire Farm Museum placed the son’s blacksmith shop – hereabove said to have been at “almost” his father’s original site – at the “center of town near where the police station used to be housed.” Photographs printed therein show its remains next to, and set back towards the river from, a large three-story building with a mansard roof, identified elsewhere as having been a ballroom (perhaps the three-story A.O.U.W. hall (built c1890)).

Hazen Duntley headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years (himself), one female aged 30-39 years (Phebe (Leighton) Duntley), one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged 5-9 years (Lorenzo D. Duntley and Jedediah L. Duntley), and one female aged under-5 years (Mary J. Duntley). One member of the household, i.e., Hazen Duntley, was engaged in Manufacture and Trade. Their house appeared in the enumeration between those of Daniel Wentworth, and Benjamin F. Wentworth.

BlacksmithingHazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Phebe Duntley, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Lorenzo D. Duntley, a shoemaker, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Jedidiah L. Duntley, a shoemaker, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Mary J. Duntley, aged twelve years (b. NH), Ira W. Duntley, aged nine years (b. NH), Amos G. Duntley, aged seven years (b. NH), Lorania Duntley, aged four years (b. NH), Bethann Duntley, aged four years (b. NH), Nathan Jones, Jr., a blacksmith, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Hosea Knox, a shoemaker, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Their house appeared in the enumeration between those of Stephen Drew, physician, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), and James Pinkham, shoemaker, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH).

Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Phoebe Duntley, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), J.L. Duntley, a blacksmith, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Mary J. Duntley, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Ira W. Duntley, a blacksmith, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Amos G. Duntley, a blacksmith, aged sixteen years (b. NH), A. Duntley, aged fourteen years (b. NH), L. Duntley, aged fourteen years (b. NH), P.A. Duntley, aged eight years (b. NH), and Sally Leighton, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Hazen Duntley had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $800. Their house appeared in the enumeration between those of Stephen Twombly, a shoemaker, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Charles A. Sawyer, a R.R. agent, aged thirty-five years (b. NH).

Son Jedediah L. Duntley married (1st) in Rochester, NH, November 28, 1860, Susan Dearborn.

Hazen Duntley of Milton, aged forty-four years (b. Bow, NH), enlisted as a farrier in Company K of the 1st NH Cavalry Regiment, on Monday, 7 October 1861, and swore allegiance that same day before Eli Wentworth, possibly in Milton. His son, Ira W. Duntley, had enlisted in the same company and regiment three days earlier. One might suppose that the elder Duntley enlisted in order to accompany the son after learning of his enlistment. They both mustered in at Concord, NH, October 24, 1861.

Duntley was detached to the Quartermaster Department, November 15, 1862, and returned to his unit, January 15, 1863. He was again detached to the Quartermaster Department, March 15, 1863, and extended there, in Dumfries, VA, April 13, 1863, returning May 15, 1863. He was assigned to a dismounted detachment at Potomac Creek, VA, the following day, May 16, 1863. He transferred, evidently to the 1st RI Cavalry, January 7, 1864. He mustered out at Concord, NH, October 24, 1864. (The son followed him on December 4, 1864).

Daughter Lorania Duntley married in Milton, March 30, 1867, John S. Corson.

Son Ira W. Duntley married in Somersworth, NH, April 18, 1867, Sarah A. Hodgman.

Hazen Duntley appeared in the Milton business directory of 1868, as Milton blacksmith.

Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Phebe Duntley, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), Mary J. Duntley, works in shoe factory, aged thirty years (b. NH), and Phebe A. Duntley, at home, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Presumably, Hazen Duntley rented, as he had no real estate. Their house appeared in the enumeration between those of John S. Corson, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), and Ezra H. Twombly, postmaster, aged forty-one years (b. NH).

Phebe (Leighton) Duntley died in Milton, November 26, 1871, aged sixty years.

Hazen Duntley married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, September 2, 1872, Mary Murray, he of Milton and she of Rochester, NH. He was a blacksmith, aged sixty-seven years, and she was aged sixty-eight years. Rev. D.J. Smith performed the ceremony. She was born in New Durham, NH, circa 1806, daughter of John and Abigail Murray.

H. Duntley & Son appeared in the Milton business directories of 1873, 1874, 1875, 1876, 1877, and 1880, as Milton blacksmiths.

Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his son, Ira W. Duntley, a blacksmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Sarah A. Duntley, keeping house, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), his grandchildren, Addie C. Duntley, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Hattie M. Duntley, at school, aged ten years (b. NH), and his boarder, Herbert F. Pitcher, a physician, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). Their house appeared in the enumeration between those of Sarah Shapleigh, keeping house, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), and John P. Pinkham, works on shoes, aged forty-three years (b. NH).

H. Duntley & Son appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, and 1882, as Milton blacksmiths.

Hazen Duntley died of heart paralysis in Milton, November 15, 1884, aged seventy-nine years, eight months, and twenty days. He was a widowed mechanic.

Ira W. Duntley

Ira W. Duntley was born in Milton, March 16, 1842, son of Hazen and Phebe (Leighton) Duntley. One might suppose that he was a namesake for Ira Worster, a West Milton abolitionist and uncle of Lewis W. Nute. (Hydraulic engineer Ira W. Jones was another so named).

IRA W. DUNTLEY, who is one of Milton’s best known citizens, holds a record for continuous work in one line, having been engaged in horseshoeing for fifty-four years in his own blacksmith shop, after three years’ similar service during the Civil war, as a member of Company K, First R.I. Cavalry, and of Company K, First N.H. Cavalry (Scales, 1914).

Ira W. Duntley attended the village school and learned his trade with his father. After serving three years in the army, as noted above, he was discharged December 4, 1864, in Virginia, and returned then to Milton, where he has carried on his work as horseshoer and blacksmith to the present time. He is a member of and at times has been an official of Eli Wentworth Post G.A.R., No. 89, at Milton and is greatly interested in Grand Army affairs. In politics he gives support to the Democratic party but does not call himself a politician. Mr. Duntley married Miss Sarah A. Hodgeman, who was born near Lowell, Mass., and they have two daughters: Ada C., who is the wife of Robert McIntosh, of Milton, and Hattie M., who resides with her parents. Mr. Duntley and family attend the Free Baptist church. For forty years he identified with the Milton lodge of Odd Fellows, and is a charter member of the Madokawando Tribe, No. 21, Improved Order of Red Men. Mr. Duntley is highly regarded as a neighbor and citizen, being a man of character and charitable impulses (Scales, 1914).

Ira W. Duntley, a blacksmith, aged eighteen years (b. NH), resided in the Milton household of his father, Hazen Duntley, also a blacksmith, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. (See Hazen Duntley above). Meanwhile, Sarah A. Hodgman, sewing, i.e., a seamstress, aged seventeen years (b. MA), resided with her siblings in the Wakefield (“Union”) household of their mother, Adeline A. Hodgman, a houseworker, aged fifty years (b. NH).

Ira W. Duntley of Milton, aged nineteen years (b. Milton, NH), enlisted as a farrier in Company K of the 1st NH Cavalry Regiment, on Friday, 4 October 1861. His father enlisted in the same company and regiment on the following Monday. One might suppose that the father enlisted in order to accompany the son after learning of his enlistment. They both mustered in at Concord, NH, October 24, 1861.

Duntley was detached to the Quartermaster Department, November 15, 1862, and returned to his unit, May 15, 1863. He was assigned to a dismounted detachment at Potomac Creek, VA, the following day, May 16, 1863. He transferred, evidently to the 1st RI Cavalry, January 7, 1864. He mustered out December 4, 1864 (two months after his father).

Ira W. Duntley married in Somersworth, NH, April 18, 1867, Sarah A. Hodgman, he of Milton and she of Union, [Wakefield,] NH. Rev. F.K. Stratton performed the ceremony. She was born in Walpole, MA, February 2, 1844, daughter of Samuel and Adaline A. Hodgman.

Ira W. Duntley, a blacksmith, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah A. Duntley, keeping house, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), Addie C. Duntley, aged two years (b. NH), and Hattie M. Duntley, aged ten months (b. NH). Ira W. Duntley had personal estate valued at $600.

H. Duntley & Son appeared in the Milton business directories of 1873, 1874, 1875, 1876, 1877, and 1880, as Milton blacksmiths.

Ira W. Duntley, a blacksmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and his family lived in the Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household of his father, Hazen Duntley, also a blacksmith, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. (See Hazen Duntley above).

H. Duntley & Son appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, and 1882, as Milton blacksmiths. Thereafter, I.W. Duntley appeared in the Milton business directories of 1884, 1887, and 1889, as a Milton blacksmith.

Ira W. Duntley appeared in the Milton business directories of 1892, 1894, and 1898, as a Milton blacksmith.

Daughter Addie C. Duntley married in Milton, August 26, 1897, Robert A. McIntosh, both of Milton. She was a lady, aged twenty-nine years, and he was a laster, aged twenty-seven years. Rev. Myron P. Dickey performed the ceremony. McIntosh was born in Calais, ME, circa 1870, son of David and Margaret McIntosh.

Ira Duntley, aged fifty-eight years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included Sarah A. Duntley, aged fifty-six years, his daughter, Addie C. Mcintosh, aged thirty-one years, his son-in-law, Robert A. Mcintosh, aged twenty-eight years, his grandchildren, Robert D. Mcintosh, aged two years, and Irma Mcintosh, aged two months, and his daughter, Hattie Duntley, aged thirty years.

Duntley, IW - 1912Ira W. Duntley appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as a Milton blacksmith. In the latter two directories, he was also listed as a carriage repairer, horseshoer, and wheelwright.

Ira W Duntly, a blacksmith (general shop), aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Hos household included his wife, Sarah A. Duntly, aged sixty-six years (b. MA), his children, Hattie M. Duntly, a shoe factory stitcher, aged forty years (b. NH), and Adda C. McIntosh, aged forty-two years (b. NH), his son-in-law, Robert A. McIntosh, a fancy goods merchant, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), and his granddaughter, Erma McIntosh, aged ten years (b. NH). Ira W. Duntly owned their house, free-and-clear.

Ira W. Duntley appeared in the Milton business directories of 1912, as a Milton blacksmith. He was also listed as a carriage repairer, horseshoer, and wheelwright.

Blacksmith Shop - BG130927BUSINESS CHANCES. HORSESHOEING and blacksmith shop for sale; good tools, power drill, band saw and planer, run by gas engine; all work one can do; practically no competition. Address Box 246, Milton, N.H. SSu* (Boston Globe, September 27, 1913).

But it appears to have been “no sale.” The blacksmith shop, although not the tools, would be advertised again after his death.

Sarah A. (Hodgman) Duntley died of chronic interstitial nephritis in Milton, January 1914, aged sixty-nine years, eleven months.

Baptist Church Notes. Rev. J.T. Clow, pastor of the Free Baptist church, was called to Milton to speak at the funeral service of Mrs. Sarah Duntley, wife of Ira Duntley, on Saturday, January 3 (Farmington News, January 9, 1914).

Ira W. Duntley, blacksmith, died of chronic myocarditis in Milton, March 20, 1916, aged seventy-four years, and four days, still possessed of his blacksmith shop. James J. Buckley, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Death of Ira W. Duntley. Ira W. Duntley, one of Milton’s prominent and respected citizens, and well known among Farmington people, passed away at his home in that village Monday evening after a short illness of senile debility, at the age of 74 years. Mr. Duntley, by trade, followed in the footsteps of his forefathers, having been a blacksmith, and did business in the same shop as his father and grandfather. It is also remarkable to learn that until the recent illness of the deceased the fire in the forge had not been allowed to go out for years. For over 40 years Mr. Duntley served as sexton of the Congregational church in his town and was one of four last surviving members of Eli Wentworth Post G.A.R. He left two brothers, a sister, two daughters and one granddaughter. Funeral was held from the home this Thursday at 1.30 p.m. (Farmington News, [Friday,] March 24, 1916).

BUSINESS CHANCES. BLACKSMITH SHOP for sale or to let in Milton, N.H., formerly owned by I.W. DUNTLEY, only shop in town, estab. 75 years. R.A. McINTOSH, Melton [SIC], N.H. dSu3t je24 (Boston Globe, June 24, 1916).

Robert A. McIntosh was daughter Addie C. (Duntley) McIntosh’s husband. (He sold Gents’ Furnishings at 28 Main street).

(Elijah P. Oakes was operating a blacksmith shop on Lake Side road, Lebanon side, near the bridge, Milton, in 1917).


References:

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Hazen Duntley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214561863/hazen-duntley

Find a Grave. (2011, January 3). Ira W. Duntley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/63690764/ira-w.-duntley

Longfellow, Henry W. (1842). The Village Blacksmith. Retrieved from www.hwlongfellow.org/poems_poem.php?pid=38

Ricker, Sarah. (1999). Milton and the New Hampshire Farm Museum. Arcadia Publishing

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA578

Wikipedia. (2021, May 28). 1st New Hampshire Cavalry Regiment. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_New_Hampshire_Cavalry_Regiment

Wikipedia. (2021, May 28). 1st Rhode Island Cavalry Regiment. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Rhode_Island_Cavalry_Regiment

Milton Mills’ Centennial House, 1876-1904

By Muriel Bristol | October 24, 2021

The name “Centennial House” acknowledges its establishment during the U.S. centennial year of 1876.

The identified proprietors of Milton’s Centennial House during this period were John W. Prescott (1846-1927), and Benjamin Hoyle (1843-1923).

John W. Prescott – 1876-188?

John Wesley Prescott was born in Dover, NH, June 26, 1846, son of Ezekiel and Elzira F. (Fernald) Prescott.

Nathl. D. Farnsworth, works in shoe shop, aged thirty-two [i.e., forty-two] years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield (“Union P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Ruth A. [(Almed)] Farnsworth, keeping house, aged thirty [i.e., forty] years (b. NH), Rosa B.H. [(Farnsworth)] Berry, at home, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and John W. Prescott, dry goods & groceries, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Nathl. D. Farnsworth had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $360. John W. Prescott had personal estate valued at $1,500.

John W. Prescott married in Dover, NH, September 17, 1870, Adelaide Sarah “Addie” Jewett, he of Brookfield, NH, and she of Milton. He was aged twenty-three years and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. I.D. Stewart performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, March 28, 1849, daughter of David and Susan M. (Fox) Jewett.

NEW ENGLAND. NEW HAMPSHIRE. The Sanborn House at Wolfeboro Junction is now open and kept by John W. Prescott (Boston Globe, September 24, 1872).

Prescott, JW - Sanborn House - 1874John Prescott appeared in the NH business directories of 1873 and 1874, as proprietor of the Sanborn House hotel at Wolfeboro Junction, in Wakefield, NH.

John W. Prescott opened the Centennial House hotel in Milton Mills in June 1876. One might suppose he named it for the U.S. Centennial, i.e., July 4, 1876. His advertisements highlighted features that might appeal to rusticators, i.e., tourists.

BG760627-CentennialJ.W. Prescott appeared in the Milton business directory of 1880, as proprietor of Milton Mills’ Centennial House hotel.

John W. Prescott, a stable keeper, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Addie Prescott, a milliner, aged thirty-one years (b. NH). Their household appeared between those of William G. Lermond, a carpenter, aged thirty-five years (b. Scotland), and Oscar F. Marsh, works in felt mill, aged thirty-three years (b. NH).

J.W. Prescott appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, 1882, and 1884, as proprietor of Milton Mills’ Centennial House hotel. He advertised his hotel in the Boston Globe in the summer of 1888 as being suitable for summer boarders.

SUMMER RESORTS. SUMMER BOARDERS looking for a place in the country where they can enjoy themselves quietly, can be accommodated at Centennial House, Milton Mills, N.H., P.O. box 113 SuTThS6t* jy22 (Boston Globe, July 28, 1888).

BG880728-Centennial House(The printers’ code that follows the actual advertisement notes that this advertisement should be printed in the Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday editions 6 times, i.e., for a period of six weeks, beginning July 22).

John W. and Adelaide F. (Jewett) Prescott relocated from Milton Mills to Union village, in Wakefield, NH, circa 1892-93.

WAKEFIELD. Mrs. John W. Prescott has opened millinery parlors at the Geo E. Hart House on Main street (Farmington News, October 14, 1892).

J.W. Prescott appeared in the NH directory of 1897, as proprietor of one of two livery stables in Union, Wakefield, NH. (Hotelier R.H. Pike was proprietor of the other).

MILTON. Mrs. Prescott and Miss Wallace have closed their millinery parlors for the season (Farmington News, July 9, 1897).

John W. Prescott received an appointment as U.S. Postmaster at Union village in Wakefield, NH, September 17, 1897. Such appointments were at this time political sinecures. As Prescott received his initial appointment during the presidency of Republican William McKinley, one might suppose that he too was a Republican.

The U.S. Register of July 1, 1899 recorded compensation of $439.51 having been paid to Union postmaster John W. Prescott.

Mrs. J.W. Prescott appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a milliner on Main street, near the P.O., with her house at U.V., i.e., Union Village in Wakefield, NH. (A milliner is one who designs, makes, trims, or sells women’s hats).

John W. Prescott, postmaster, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield (“Union Village”), NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-nine years), Addie Prescott, a milliner, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and Gertrude Nichols, aged ten years (b. NH). John W. Prescott owned their house, free-and-clear. Addie Prescott was the mother of child, of whom none were still living.

UNION. Mrs. J.W. Prescott is away visiting friends (Farmington News, June 14, 1901).

Mrs. J.W. Prescott appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a milliner, with her house at Union, [Wakefield,] NH.

UNION. Last Friday morning Mrs. J.W. Prescott met with a serious accident by falling on the ice, breaking her leg above the ankle. She is as comfortable as can be expected at this writing (Farmington News, January 24, 1902).

The U.S. Register of July 1, 1903 recorded compensation of $523.54 having been paid to Union postmaster John W. Prescott.

MILTON. Mrs. J.W. Prescott of Union was in town last Thursday (Farmington News, June 17, 1904).

The U.S. Register of July 1, 1905 recorded compensation of $552.40 having been paid to Union postmaster John W. Prescott.

UNION. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Prescott of Lawrence, Mass., who have been visiting his brother, John W. Prescott, returned home last week (Farmington News, October 1, 1909).

UNION. John W. Prescott is taking an outing in Boston this week (Farmington News, October 29, 1909).

John W. Prescott, postmaster at Union, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of t[hir]ty-eight years), Adelaide Prescott, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH). John W. Prescott owned their house, free-and-clear.

UNION. Mrs. John W. Prescott and Mrs. E.O. Wiggin attended the sale at Sanbornville last week (Farmington News, December 23, 1910).

John W. Prescott, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Adelaide Prescott, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH). John W. Prescott owned their house, free-and-clear. They shared a two-family resident with the household of tenant George Hawley, an excelsior mill presser, aged thirty-two years (b. NH).

John W. Prescott died of pulmonary edema in Union, [Wakefield,] NH, April 8, 1927, aged eighty-one years, ten months, and twelve days. He had been resident in Wakefield, NH, for thirty-three years.

A[de]laide Prescott, a widow, aged eighty-five years (b. NH). was one of fourteen “inmates,” i.e., residents, of the Gafney Home on Wakefield Street in Rochester, NH, at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Herbert A. Hoffman, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), was its resident superintendent, and his wife, Mary Hoffman, aged fifty-one years (b. VT), was its resident matron. There was also a nurse, cook, and a maid. Twelve of the retired residents were female and two of them were male. (Two of the retired residents were a married couple). The home had a radio set.

Adelaide F. (Fernald) Prescott died of lobar pneumonia in the Gafney Home in Rochester, NH, April 29, 1936, aged eighty-eight years, one month, and two days. She had been a resident there for nine years, i.e., since the 1927 death of her husband. Edson M. Abbott, M.D. signed the death certificate.

UNION. George Morrill was quite pleased to find when he returned to Union for the winter that he could have the same box number which he has continuously since he had it of the late John W. Prescott forty-two years ago (Farmington News, October 23, 1936).

Benjamin Hoyle – 188?-1904

Benjamin Hoyle was born in Bowling, Yorkshire, England, November 1, 1843, son of Eli and Mary (Kemp) Hoyle.

Mary Hoyle, a widow, aged forty-eight years (b. Ossett), headed a Gawthorpe, Ossett, Yorkshire, household at the time of the UK Census of 1861. Her household included Thomas Hoyle, a woolen spinner, aged twenty-four years (b. Laster Dyke), Mary Hoyle, a worsted spinner, aged twenty-one years (b. Laster Dyke), James Hoyle, a worsted spinner, aged nineteen years (b. Bowling), Benjamin Hoyle, a worsted spinner, aged seventeen years (b. Bowling), Jane Hoyle, a worsted spinner, aged fifteen years (b. Bowling), Nancy Hoyle, a worsted spinner, aged thirteen years, and Hannah Hoyle, aged eight years (b. Ossett).

Benj Hoyle, works in woolen mill, aged twenty-five years (b. England), was one of thirty-one resident mill workers in the Haverhill, MA, household of Mary P. Jones, keeps house, aged forty-one years (b. ME).

Benjamin Hoyle married in Somersworth, NH, October 14, 1871, Abbie J. Witham, both of East Rochester, NH. He was a spinner, aged twenty-seven years, and she was aged thirty-one years. Rev. J.F. Smith performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, March 16, 1839, daughter of Amos/Amasa Witham.

Benjamin Hoyle, works in woolen mill, aged thirty-eight years (b. England), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Abbie J. Hoyle, keeping house, aged forty years (b. ME), his servant, Georgietta Merrill, a servant, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and his boarders, Joseph Naylor, works in woolen mill, aged fifty-eight years (b. England), Norris Maddox, works in woolen mill, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), Annie Tenney, works in woolen mill, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Jennie Pollack, works in woolen mill, aged fifty years (b. Scotland), Emma Rankin, works in woolen mill, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), Lucretia Rankin, works in woolen mill, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), and Maggie Chalmers, works in woolen mill, aged thirty years (b. Scotland).

Benj. Hoyle appeared in the Milton business directories of 1887, 1889, as proprietor of Milton Mills’ Centennial House hotel.

Benjamin Hoyle appeared in an 1892 list of Summer Hotels and Boarding-Houses, as proprietor or landlord of Centennial House in Milton (NH Board of Agriculture, 1892).

Benj. Hoyle appeared in the Milton business directories of 1894, and 1898, as proprietor of Milton Mills’ summer boarding house.

Benjamin Hoyle appeared in an 1897 list of Summer Hotels and Boarding-Houses, as proprietor or landlord of Centennial House in Milton (NH Department of Agriculture, 1897).

Benjamin Hoyle appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a spinner at the W. mill, i.e., the Waumbeck mill, with his house on North Main street, W. road, in Milton Mills.

Benjamin Hoyle, a wool spinner, aged fifty-seven years (b. England), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Abby J. Hoyle, aged sixty-one years (b. ME). Benjamin Hoyle owned their house, free-and-clear. Abby J. Hoyle was the mother of no children. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Alby Merrill, a day laborer, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and Charles S. Wentworth, a day laborer, aged forty-two years (b. NH).

Benj. Hoyle appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, and 1904, as proprietor of a Milton Mills’ summer boarding house.

Benjamin Hoyle appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a spinner at the W. mill, i.e., the Waumbeck mill, with his house on North Main street, W. road, in Milton Mills. He appeared in the Milton directory of 1905-06, as a spinner at the W. mill, with his house at 106 North Main street, W. road, in Milton Mills.

Benjamin Hoyle, own income, aged sixty-seven years (b. England), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-nine years), Abby J. Hoyle, aged seventy-one years (b. ME). Benjamin Hoyle owned their house, free-and-clear. Abby J. Hoyle was the mother of no children. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Freeman D. Stevens, a shoe factory cutter, aged sixty years (b. NH), and Alby Merrill, own income, aged sixty years (b. VT).

Benjamin Hoyle appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a spinner at the T. mill, i.e., the Townsend mill, with his house at 106 North Main street, W. road, in Milton Mills. Benjamin and Abbie J. (Witham) Hoyle relocated from Milton Mills to East Rochester, NH, circa 1912-13.

Abbie J. (Witham) Hoyle died of cerebral paralysis (and liver cancer) in East Rochester, NH, March 15, 1916, aged seventy-six years, eleven months, and twenty-one days. She had resided in East Rochester, NH, for three years, formerly residing in Milton Mills. Stephen Young signed the death certificate.

Benjamin Hoyle appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as having removed from Milton to Rochester, NH. (This would have occurred at some time between the directory of 1912 and that of 1917). He appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1917, as a retiree, making his home with J.W. Clark, on Summer street, in East Rochester, NH.

John W. Clark, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucy B. Clark, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), his children, Abbie E. Clark, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and Ardis C. Clark, aged seventeen years (b. NH), his grandson, Perley A. Clark, aged ten months (b. NH), and his boarder, Benjamin Hoil [i.e., Hoyle], aged seventy-six years (b. England). John W. Clark owned their farm on Summer Street. Benjamin Hoil had immigrated into the U.S. in 1869, and become a naturalized citizen in 1880.

Benjamin Hoyle appeared in the Rochester, NH, directories of 1921, and posthumously in 1924, as a retiree, boarding on Summer street, in East Rochester, NH. (He appeared in the directory of 1926, again posthumously, as a retiree, boarding on Broadway street.

Benjamin Hoyle died of apoplexy, i.e., a stroke, in East Rochester, NH, January 10, 1923, aged seventy-nine years, two months, and nine days. He had resided in East Rochester, NH, for ten years, formerly residing in Milton Mills. John H. Bates signed the death certificate.


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Benjamin Hoyle. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115416845/benjamin-hoyle

Find a Grave. (2013, August 15). John Wesley Prescott. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115526298/john-wesley-prescott

Keyes, George L. (1874). Keyes’ Hand-book of Northern Pleasure Travel. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=_h89AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA212

NH Board of Agriculture. (1892). Lakes and Summer Resorts in New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=85Y-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA78

NH Department of Agriculture. (1897). Gems of the Granite State. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=c3MUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PP76

Milton in NH Education Report, 1881

By Muriel Bristol | October 17, 2021

In his June 1881 report, the NH Superintendent of Instruction provided some statistics regarding Milton.

Milton’s town school committee members were identified as being C.D. Fox, and C.L. Plumer. (Charles D. Fox (1856-1916) of Milton Mills was then a school teacher; and Cyrus L. Plumer (1841-1910) was the Milton Free-Will Baptist minister). (This was one less than the usual three committee members).

Milton had 10 school districts and 13 schools in town, 2 of which were graded schools and 2 were district and town high schools. There were 11 schoolhouses, of which none that were unfit for use and none were built during the year. Maps and globes were available in 12 schoolhouses. The value of schoolhouses, furnishings and sites was estimated at $8,000, and the value of apparatus was estimated at $200. Only 1 of the district schools had an average of 12 scholars of less; and 1 had an average of 6 scholars or less. The average run of district school classes was 18.3 weeks. (The Strafford County average was 23.25 weeks).

Milton had 1 fractional school district. It paid $55.00 in superintendence. Some 75 students had no absences during the year. It had 6 students attending private schools.

Milton had 155 male and 139 female students enrolled. Of these, 30 were aged under six years, 241 were aged between 6 and 16 years, and 23 were aged over 16 years. There were 60 students pursuing higher branches, and there were 9 students aged between 5 and 15 years that were not attending any school. Average daily attendance was 247.73 students.

There were 5 male teachers, making an average of $37.50 per month, and 15 female teachers, making an average of $22.09 per month. Of these, 5 were teaching for the first time, and 6 had been teachers for more than one term. (One might infer that the remaining 9 had been teachers already for a single prior term). Of these, none of them had been to Normal school. Of 171 Strafford County teachers, only 20 (11.7%) had been to Normal school).

Under the heading Private Schools of a Higher Grade, Milton had its Classical Institute, which was situated at Milton Three Ponds. It had been chartered and organized in 1866. The value of its building, apparatus and grounds was $2,800. It had a 44-week school year, which began in September. It had no male teachers and 2 female teachers; and it had 17 male and 31 female students. Of these, 37 of them were NH residents, 18 of them were pursuing higher branches. [These would seem to be the same figures as those reported in the report of 1879].

The school committee had available to it $1,586.12; of which $1,050.00 came from the town tax for support of schools, $300.00 came from district school taxes, $120.62 came from the literary fund, $115.50 came from local funds and the dog tax, $0.00 came from the railroad tax, and $0.00 came from contributions.

Milton expended $0.00 for new buildings, $0.00 in interest, $250.00 in permanent repairs, $35.5o in miscellaneous expenses; and $1,543.95 in teacher salaries, for a grand total of $1,884.45. The average cost of salaries and miscellaneous expenses per scholar was $5.37. (The county average cost per scholar was $6.48).


Previous in sequence: Milton in NH Education Report, 1879; next in sequence: Milton in NH Education Report, 1882


References:

NH Superintendent of Public Instruction. (1881). Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qholAQAAIAAJ

Milton Delegate Bard B. Plummer (1846-1919)

By Muriel Bristol | October 10, 2021

Plummer's Ridge - Milton 1856 (Detail)
Milton in 1856 (Detail). The E.W. Plummer farm, subsequently the B.B. Plummer farm, on Plummer’s Ridge is indicated by the red arrow. (Just above it was the C. Jones farm, now the NH Farm Museum)

Bard B. Plummer was born in the family farmstead on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, June 18, 1846, son of Enoch W. and Orinda (Ayers) Plummer. (Bard B. Plummer’s great-grandfather, the Hon. Bard [or Beard] Plummer (1754-1816), a revolutionary soldier and one of Milton’s founders, had the same name, as did several of the current subject’s uncles and cousins).

Bard B. Plummer, after leaving the common schools, attended the Wakefield Academy and the Maine State College. When his education was completed he returned to the homestead, and he has since given his attention to general farming. He owns five hundred acres of excellent land, which is desirably located; and he makes it a point to avail himself of modern improvements in the practice of agriculture (Biographical Review, 1897).

Bard B. Plummer was an A.F. & A.M. Mason as early as 1870. A NH Grand Lodge abstract had him as secretary of Unity Lodge, of [Union,] Wakefield, NH, as of May 1870. A.M. Brackett was its Worshipful Master. The lodge had 75 members, who paid a total of $15.50 in dues. Their meetings took place on Thursdays on or before F.M. (the First Monday). (NH Grand Lodge, 1870).

In Masonry Mr. Plummer is [i.e., would be by 1897] well advanced, being a Past Master of Unity Lodge, A.F. & A.M., of Union, N.H., of which he was Secretary for nineteen years; a member of Columbia Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Farmington, N.H., and of St. Paul Commandery, Knights Templar, of Dover, N.H. He is also Past Dictator of Love [Lowell] Lodge, Knights of Honor [Husbandry], of Union (Biographical Review, 1897).

Bard Burge Plummer married in Milton, October 15, 1875, Eliza Dixwell Wentworth, both of Milton. He was a farmer, aged twenty-nine years, and she was aged twenty-four years. Rev. James Doldt performed the ceremony. She was born in Jamaica Plain, MA, December 13, 1851, daughter of John J. and Elizabeth (Currant) Wentworth.

Mr. Plummer married Eliza D. Wentworth, daughter of John J. Wentworth, of Jamaica Plain, Mass. They have four children, namely: Lucia C., Fanny W., Bard B., who is attending Durham College, and Orinda (Biographical Review, 1897). 

B.B. Plummer appeared in the Milton business directories of 1875, 1876, and 1880, as a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

Daughter Lucia C. Plummer was born in Milton, May 18, 1877. Daughter Fanny W. Plummer was born in Milton, July 28, 1878.

The Milton Board of Education for 1879 was J.V. [J.P.] Bickford, I.N. Lowell, and B.B. Plummer. (Jesse P. Bickford (1844-1910) was principal of the Milton Classical Institute; and John N. Lowell (1846-1903) was a Congregational minister).

UNITY LODGE, NO. 62, at Union Village, is my home Lodge. I have attended all of its communications for a long time, with very few exceptions. Formerly this Lodge had the reputation of closely adhering to all the proprieties of Masonry, and I hope it is not without its merits at the present time. Until recently the Lodge has had but little work to do so it was about impossible to make rapid progress in everything commendable, but now we have work and interest sufficient for perfecting ourselves, and if we are not as we should be, we have no good excuse. We are pleased to receive visits from any of the Craft, and invite criticism upon our proficiency. At our regular communication of May 1st, 1879, District Grand Lecturer, Brother L.M. Nute, visited our Lodge, and in his usual agreeable and impressive manner conferred the third degree which was much enjoyed by the brethren. Brother Nute paid us a compliment, by saying our work was the best he had witnessed for a long time. Our records are fully and properly kept by Brother B.B. PLUMMER, our Secretary of long standing. Financially, we are comfortably situated, having quite a fund at interest with monthly accumulations. … Respectfully submitted, CHARLES A. VARNEY, D.D.G.M. (NH Grand Lodge, 1879).  

Son Bard B. Plummer, Jr., was born in Milton, October 22, 1879.

UNION. The following officers of Unity No. 62 A.F.A. Masons were publicly installed by Right Worshipful District Deputy Grand Master, Charles A. Varney, assisted by Daniel S. Burley, as Grand Marshal, on Thursday evening last: Asa M. Brackett, W.M.; Chas. W. Horne, S.W.; John E. Scruton, E.W.; Chaplain L. Smith, Treas.; Bard B. Plummer, Sec.; Frank B. Drew, S.D.; Fred E. Stevens, J.D.; Rev. Geo. O. Jenness, Chap.; Jacob S. Adams, Mar.; A.H. Chamberlain, S.S.; G.B. Corson, J.S.; James W. Nutter, Organist; Geo. W. Dicey, Tyler; Charles C. Hayes, Rep to the G.L. At the close of the installation ceremonies, a supper and ball were in order, and a very pleasant time was enjoyed by all. The members of this Lodge have recently re-furnished their lodge room with a set of solid black walnut furniture, at an expense of nearly two hundred dollars which adds very much to the beauty of the room (Farmington News, March 5, 1880).

Plummer, Bard B - 1914Bard B. Plumer, a farmer, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eliza D. Plumer, keeping house, aged twenty-eight years (b. MA), and his children, Lucia C. Plumer, at house, aged three years (b. NH), Fannie W. Plumer, at house, aged one year (b. NH), and Bard B. Plumer, at house, aged seven months (b. NH (October [1879])). They shared a two-family residence with the household of [his father,] Enoch W. Plummer, a farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joseph Plummer, aged sixty years (b. NH) and Enoch S. Mason, a farmer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH).

B.B. Plummer appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, and 1889, as a Milton justice-of-the-peace. He appeared also on the Board of Education in 1889; and as a manufacturer of mowing machines, horse rakes &c in 1887 and 1889.

UNION. On Thursday eve, Feb. 24th, the officers of Unity Lodge, No. 62 A.F. and Accepted Masons, were installed by Charles A. Varney, D.D.G. Master, as follows: W.M., Asa M. Brackett; S.W., Leroy J. Cooper; J.W., George W. Burleigh; Treasurer, Jacob S. Adams; Secretary, Bard B. Plummer; Marshal, Frank B. Drew; S.D., Charles A. Varney; J.D., Daniel S. Burleigh; S.S., Thomas C. Burleigh. The Chaplain, J.S., and Tyler were installed by proxy. The installation was a public one and was well attended. A supper was furnished by the fraternity at the close (Farmington News, March 4, 1881).

Plummer belonged also to the National Grange of the Order of Patrons [or Knights] of Husbandry. The Grange was an agriculturally-oriented social organization that sought also to promote farm interests. Its offices were patterned, or at least named, after those of a medieval English grange or farm estate.

UNION. Officers elect of Lowell Lodge, No. 1185, K. of H., are as follows: Dictator, C.W. Horne; A.D., J.E. Hayes; V.D., Geo. E. Drawbridge; Reporter, Frank B. Drew; Fin. Rep., Edwin W. Jenkins; Treas., John E. Scruton; Guide, Horace H. Moulton; Chap., Bard B. Plummer, Rep. to Grand Lodge, Chas. W. Horne; Alternate, Frank B. Drew (Farmington News, January 23, 1885).

Daughter Orinda Plummer was  born in Milton, June 9, 1886. She was a namesake for her paternal grandmother, Orinda (Ayers) Plummer.

This [Unity Lodge, No. 62, A.F. and A.M. of Union] lodge has been instituted nearly thirty-two years, yet all of its past masters are living, and only two of the charter members have died, Dr. William B. Reynolds and Joseph Sharpe. The membership is now one hundred and twenty-five. Bro. Bard B. Plummer has held the office of secretary for seventeen years, and Charles W. Horne has filled more chairs than any other member, having held every office except secretary, treasurer, and marshal. Brothers Asa M. Brackett and Charles A. Varney have each served several terms as district deputy grand lecturer, and as district deputy grand master for this (No. 6) district (Merrill, 1889).

As an active supporter of the Republican party he has figured conspicuously in public affairs. For five years he was a member of the School Board (Biographical Review, 1897).

The Milton Board of Education for 1889 was B.B. Plummer, Charles D. Jones, and William E. Pillsbury. (Charles D. Jones (1863-1908); and William E. Pillsbury (1845-1907) were both physicians).

UNION. The following officers of Unity Lodge, No. 63, A.F. & A.M., were installed by Past D.D. Grand Master, Asa M. Brackett, on Thursday evening: W.M., J. Frank Farnham; S.W., Frank H. Moore; J.W., Myran L. Johnson; treasurer, Fred E. Stevens; secretary, Bard B. Plummer; marshal, Frank B. Drew; chaplain, Charles W. Horne; S.D., Geo. W. Burleigh, J.D., John C. Penney; S.S., Joseph L. Johnson; J.S., A.H. Chamberlain; tyler, J.F. Moore; representative to grand lodge, Frank B. Drew (Farmington News, February 14, 1890).

The Milton Board of Education for 1890 was W.E. Pillsbury, Rev. Frank Haley, and B.B. Plummer. (William E. Pillsbury (1845-1907) was a physician; and Rev. Frank Haley (1835-1904) was a Congregational minister and husband of Plummer’s sister, Sarah (Plummer) Haley (1846-1931)).

The Milton Board of Education for 1891 was W.E. Pillsbury, B.B. Plummer, and I.A. Cook. (William E. Pillsbury (1845-1907) was a physician; and Ira A. Cook (1843-1898) was a farmer).

Bard B. Plummer ran in the election for Strafford County Sheriff in November 1892.

He was Sheriff of Strafford County from 1892 to 1894, during which time he had charge of the jail in Dover, and was appointed Deputy Sheriff by his successor, James E. Hayes (Biographical Review, 1897).

MILTON. Bard B. Plummer was elected sheriff by the republicans of Strafford county (Farmington News, November 18, 1892).

The NH Grange’s Worthy Secretary reported to its Worthy Master that twenty-six grange chapters had been organized during the year ending September 30, 1892. The Lewis W. Nute Grange (No. 193) in Milton was one of them. It was formed with Bard B. Plummer as Master, and thirty charter members. W.K. Norton was its Lecturer, and William A. Jones was its Secretary (NH General Court, 1893). (Plummer’s son, Bard B. Plummer, Jr., would be Master in his turn in or before 1905).

The office of Master corresponded roughly with that of a president in other organizations, the overseer with a vice-president, and the gatekeeper with a sergeant-at-arms. Lecturers were instructors and Stewards were responsible for a Grange’s property and effects.

MILTON. Lewis W. Nute grange organized Friday night, twenty-six members, by Frank P. Wentworth of Rochester. Officers elected and installed: B.B. Plummer, master; Fred P. Jones, overseer; C.A. Jones, secretary; Dr. M.A.H. Hart, treasurer; W.K. Norton, lecturer; Miss F.A. Ober, assistant lecturer; Miss Birdie B. Harte, chaplain; S.E. Twombly, steward; R.H. Shaw, assistant steward; Miss Sarah L. Benson, lady assistant steward; Mrs. B.B. Plummer, Ceres; Mrs. W.K. Norton, Pomona; Miss Minnie Woodman, Flora; L.C. Hayes, gatekeeper (Farmington News, December 23, 1892).

The female Grange offices of Ceres, Pomona, and Flora symbolized the mythological three Graces. The Ceres was responsible for ceremonially draping the Grange’s charter, and the other two for decorating with fruit and flowers, respectively. They sat at the head table with the other principal officers. (One might note that, in some cases at least, they were the wives of those principal officers).

Plummer won the November 1892 Sheriff election with 4,468 votes (50.2%), while William S. Hayes received 4,269 votes (48.0%), Alfred W. Jones received 162 votes (1.8%), and John G. Johnston received 1 vote (0.0%) (Farmington News, January 13, 1893).

THE OFFICIAL VOTE. The last official returns of the election for Strafford county officers was made to the county clerk Dec. 6 and he read them at the Law term the following day. The vote in the county was: For solicitor – Wm. F. Nason, 4533; Samuel D. Felker, 4266; Geo. W. Benn, 137; Geo. R. Renn, 8. For sheriff – Bard B. Plummer, 4468; Wm. S. Hayes, 4269; Alfred W. Jones, 162; John G. Johnson, 1. For treasurer – Geo. D. Nowell, 4390; Geo G. Nowell, 39; Ichabod B. Berry, 4228; Joseph P. Swasey, 149. For register of deeds – Frank S. Tompkins, 4797; Michael R. Sullivan, 3972; Wm. H. Courser, 110. For register of probate – Wm. W. Martin, 4379; Charles S. Clifford, 4284; John A. Fall, 126. For county commissioners – Wm. W. Cushman, 4510; John N. Haines, 4379; John B. Philbrick, 4462; Frank P. Reeve, 4111; John P. Hall, 4096; Henry J. Grimes, 4158; John Bartlett, 138; Nathan O. Sanborn, 122; Frederick R.S. Mildon, 125 ; F.R.S., Meldon, 3 (Farmington News, January 13, 1893).

One may note that Geo. W. Benn and Geo. R. Renn were alternate spellings of the same name, the second being a misspelling. The same was the case also with Geo. D. Nowell and Geo. G. Nowell; and with Frederick R.S. Mildon and F.R.S. Meldon.

UNION. At the annual meeting of Unity Lodge the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: W.M., Bard B. Plummer; S.W., Myron L. Johnson; J.W., William M. Lord; treasurer, Fred E. Stevens; secretary, J. Frank Farnham; representative to grand lodge, J. Frank Farnham. Bard B. Plummer, the master elect, has faithfully served the lodge as secretary for the past nineteen years, and he is well worthy of this promotion. The lodge has also done well in selecting the retiring master to succeed Mr. Plummer as secretary. The officers will be publicly installed Feb. 16 (Farmington News, February 3, 1893).

The following apprehension of a murder suspect sounded initially like a hopeful development for Sheriff Plummer but turned out to be a case of mistaken identity. (The forensic use of fingerprints, although on the horizon, lay still in the future).

HELD FOR HORSE STEALING. Man Arrested in Pulaski, Tenn., Who Is Believed to Be Julius H. McArthur, a New Hampshire Murderer. DOVER, N.H., Oct 22- Sheriff Bard D. Plummer of Milton has received a letter from the sheriff of Pulaski, Tenn., asking what reward was offered for the capture of Julius H. McArthur, alias Simpson, alias Dorsey, who murdered Deputy Sheriff Charles H. Smith of Barrington in Strafford, May 6, 1891. Gov. John B. Smith also has received a letter from J.M. McDonald, chief of police of Pulaski, Tenn., which gives an exact description of the much-wanted criminal. The letters are now in the possession of Atty. Gen. Edwin G. Eastman, who is in communication with the officials of Pulaski. Mr. Eastman has telegraphed the officials there to hold the man and to send him a photograph of the prisoner at once. The man is under arrest at Pulaski for horse stealing, under the name of Dorsey, and the attorney general is of the opinion, from the description received, that the man is McArthur. The McArthur ease was one of the most celebrated, and certainly one of the most sensational ever brought before a justice in New Hampshire. On May 5, 1591, Julius McArthur stole a team from near Rochester, owned by J.W. Kendall of Enosburg Falls, Vt. On the following day a posse was organized, and, headed by Deputy Sheriff Charles H. Smith, they followed the track of the thief into the town of Strafford, about seven miles from Rochester. Smith caught sight of McArthur, and immediately grappled with him, but not so effectually as to prevent McArthur from drawing a revolver, with which he fatally wounded the deputy sheriff with a bullet in the side. Smith, in spite of his wound, hung on to McArthur, and he was finally overpowered by the posse, and lodged in the Dover jail. The next day after his arrest McArthur tried to commit suicide by opening a vein in his right arm. The jailor discovered the attempt just in time to save the man’s life. The prisoner refused to eat his food, and appeared to be a very sick man. McArthur was then removed from the prison to the hospital. On the evening of July 7, 1891, a little while after jailer Libby had gone away in search of a physician for another prisoner. Mrs. Libby sent his little girl to McArthur’s cell to carry him an evening paper, when it was discovered that he had sprung the lock to the door and escaped. Telegrams were scattered broadcast throughout New England, and a reward of $100 was offered for his capture (Boston Globe, October 23, 1894).

B.B. Plummer appeared in the Milton business directories of 1894, and 1898, as a Milton justice-of-the-peace. He appeared also as a manufacturer of mowing machines, horse rakes &c in 1894 and 1898.

MILTON. Miss May Smart of Ossipee Centre is visiting Fannie Plummer (Farmington News, August 17, 1894).

White's Opera House, Concrord, NHMr. and Mrs. Bard B. Plummer were raised or promoted to the NH Grange’s Sixth Degree at White’s Opera House in Concord, NH, on the second day of its convention there, December 19, 1894 (NH State Grange, 1894).

LOCALS. The following is the full list of deputy sheriffs, as appointed by Sheriff Hayes: George W. Parker and James H. Davis of Dover, Bard B. Plummer of Milton, Henry F. Walker and Frank I. Smith of Rochester, James S. McDaniel of Somersworth, and Jabez Stevens of Durham. … Sheriff James E. Hayes took charge of affairs at the jail at Dover, Monday. Saturday there was a revolt against Jailor Scales among a portion of the prisoners, which continued up to the time Sheriff Hayes took charge of affairs. He took the handcuffs from the prisoners, gave them something to eat, and soon had them on their good behavior (Farmington News, April 5, 1895).

Mother Orinda P. (Ayers) Plummer died of a liver abscess in Milton, April 18, 1895, aged seventy-seven years, eight months, and twelve days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

MILTON. The funeral of Mrs. Enoch Plumer occurred Saturday afternoon. She leaves a husband and five children (Farmington News, [Friday,] April 26, 1895).

Father Enoch W. Plummer died of cirrhosis of the liver in Milton, June 18, 1896, aged eighty-one years, two months, and fourteen days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

HERE AND THERE. Mr. and Mrs. John S. Roberts attended on Sunday the funeral of deacon Enoch W. Plumer of Milton, who was a citizen truly well known (Farmington News, June 26, 1896).

John S. Roberts’ first wife had been Enoch W. Plummer’s youngest daughter, Susan (Plummer) Roberts (1854-1878). (He married (2nd) in Farmington, NH, December 26, 1883, [Mary] Ella Pearl [(1848-1905)], both of Farmington, NH).

MILTON NEWS-LETTER. Misses Lucy and Fannie Plummer of Plummer’s ridge are entertaining their friends Misses Marion and Martha Ober of South Natick, Mass. … A pleasant social gathering of young people occurred at the house of B.B. Plummer, Monday evening (Farmington News, August 20, 1897).

He is [in 1897] a member of the Board of Trustees of the Nute High School of Milton (Biographical Review, 1897).

NH Governor Frank W. Rollins invented and promoted Old Home Week reunion celebrations throughout New Hampshire in 1899. B.B. Plummer was president of Milton’s committee and C.H. Cole was its secretary (NH Department of Agriculture, 1901). (Charles H. Cole (1852-1936) appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a shoe burnisher, with his house on So. Main street, at its corner with Toppan street).

Bard B. Plummer, a farmer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Eliza D. Plummer, aged fifty-one years (b. MA), his children, Lucia C. Plummer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Fannie W. Plummer, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Bard B. Plummer, Jr., aged twenty years (b. NH), and Orinda Plummer, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and his boarder, Christie L. Jones, a farm laborer, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH). Bard B. Plummer owned their farm, free-and-clear. Eliza D. Plummer was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Fred P. Jones, a farmer, aged forty years (b. NH), and Joseph Plummer, a farmer, aged eighty years (b. NH).

WEST MILTON. Miss Elfrida Peacock is spending the week at Milton Ridge, as the guest of her friend Miss Orinda Plummer. Miss Peacock, a graduate this June of Nute high school, expects to take an extended course at a Normal school this fall (Farmington News, July 20, 1900).

B.B. Plummer appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as a Milton justice-of-the-peace. He appeared also as a manufacturer of mowing machines, horse rakes &c in those same years.

Mrs. B.B. Plummer donated $1.00 to the Pennsylvania Prison Society, at sometime between March 1, 1902, and February 28, 1903 (Pennsylvania Prison Society, 1903).

Milton sent Bard B. Plummer as its delegate to New Hampshire’s Eighth Constitutional Convention, which met in Concord, NH, December 2, 1902. The convention drafted ten proposed amendments to the NH Constitution, which then went on the statewide ballot for approval. Four of them were passed in 1904 by the electorate at large, while six of them were rejected. The summary titles of the proposed amendments were: 1) Educational qualifications for voting, 2) Examination of military officers, 3) Appointment of Commissary General (rejected), 4) Extension of taxation, 5) Extension of police court jurisdiction (rejected), 6) Elimination of “Protestant,” etc., from Bill of Rights (rejected), 7) Woman’s suffrage (rejected), 8) Regulation of trusts, 9) Reduction of legislature (rejected), and 10) Voting precincts (rejected) (NH Constitutional Convention, 1918).

B.B. Plummer was one of the “promoters” of the Milton & Lebanon Building Association, when it was incorporated in February 1904.

Maine Corporations. Milton & Lebanon Building Association, Lebanon – Capital, $10,000. Promoters, F.H. Thayer, Boston; Joseph H. Avery, B.B. Plummer, J. Gardner Alden, Milton; Ira W. Jones, Lebanon (Boston Globe, February 29, 1904).

B.B. Plummer of Milton bought a thoroughbred Guernsey bull named Johnnie Bull (H.R. No. 9013) from Montgomery Rollins in 1904 (American Guernsey Cattle Club, 1904). This was perhaps the beginning of the stock farm he ran in 1917. Montgomery Rollins was a Boston banker, with his house at Chestnut Hill.

MILTON. Miss Lucia C. Plummer is in Boston, Mass., for a visit (Farmington News, April 1, 1904).

Lewis W. Nute Grange. A special meeting of Lewis W. Nute grange, Milton, was held June 18. A very interesting entertainment was given by the children under the direction of Mrs. Annie O. Willey, Miss Fanny W. Plummer and Mrs. Catherine Dove. At the regular meeting of the grange, June 22, the third and fourth degrees were conferred upon two candidates (Farmington News, July 2, 1904).

Lewis W. Nute Grange. A very instructive as well as entertaining meeting was held Aug. 10. The subject was New Hampshire. The various natural features of the state were taken up by essays, as was also its noted men and musicians. Selections were read from New Hampshire poets, and the music composed by New Hampshire composers was rendered (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), August 27, 1904).

MILTON. Miss Orinda Plummer has accepted a position in the office of Spaulding Bros. (Farmington News, September 16, 1904).

The Milton selectmen of 1906 were J.H. Avery, B.B. Plummer, and E.A. Wentworth. (Joseph H. Avery (1844-1937) was then postmaster; and Edgar A. Wentworth (1856-1932) was a teamster).

Son Bard B. Plummer, Jr., married in Sanbornton, NH, August 20, 1906, Ruth L. Fall, both of Milton. He was a farmer, aged twenty-six years, and she was a teacher, aged nineteen years. Rev. Elisha H. Wright performed the ceremony. (Rev. Wright would be elected to the NH House of Representatives several months later (Hartford Courant (Hartford, CT), November 8, 1906)). She was born in Milton, circa 1886, daughter of George G. and Lizzie (Lyman) Fall.

PERSONAL. Hearty good wishes attend the marriage, on August 19th, of Miss Ruth Lyman Fall to Bard B. Plummer, Jr., both of Milton (Farmington News, August 31, 1906).

MIDDLETON. Mr. and Mrs. Bard B. Plummer gave a reception last Saturday evening from 8 until 10 o’clock at their home in Milton, in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Bard B. Plummer, Jr., who were recently married. The house was filled to overflowing, and the young bride looked very lovely in her bridal gown. They were the recipients of many beautiful presents. Punch was served in the dining room throughout the evening and refreshments of cake and ice cream were served at the close of the reception. Guests were present from Milton, Milton Mills, Brookfield, Wakefield, Union, Middleton, Dover, Massachusetts and other places. The evening was much enjoyed by all (Farmington News, [Friday,] September 21, 1906).

Daughter Lucia C. Plummer married in Milton, September 20, 1906, George E. Fox, she of Milton and he of Acton, ME. He was a widowed farmer, aged thirty-seven years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-nine years. Rev. Myron P. Dickey performed the ceremony. George E. Fox was born in Acton, ME, circa 1870, son of Henry L. and Sarah A. (Moulton) Fox.

The Milton selectmen of 1907 were B.B. Plummer, E.A. Wentworth, and H. Plummer. (Edgar A. Wentworth (1856-1932) was a teamster; and Hazen Plummer (1866-1935) was an inspector for the United Shoe Machinery Company).

Plummer, Bard B - 1909B.B. Plummer of Milton bought Holstein-Frisian stock from Ashton Rollins in 1909 (Houghton, 1909).

Bard B. Plummer, a general farm farmer, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eliza D. Plummer, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA), his son, Bard B. Plummer, Jr., a home farm farmer, aged thirty years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Ruth L. Plummer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), his daughter, Orinda Plummer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), his granddaughter, Elizabeth Plummer, aged one year (b. NH), his sister-in-law, Fannie Littlefield, aged sixty-two years (b. MA), his nephew, Roscoe Littlefield, aged thirty-four years (b. CA), and his servant, John M. Smith, a general farm laborer, aged twenty-two years (b. VT).

In March 1911, the NH General Court approved the incorporation of the Nute Charitable Association (as set forth in the last will of Lewis W. Nute.

Section 1. That Everett F. Fox, Charles A. Jones, M.A.H. Hart, Harry L. Avery, Walter E. Looney, Charles D. Fox, Moses G. Chamberlain, and their successors are hereby made a body corporate by the name of the Nute Charitable Association, and shall have and enjoy all the powers and privileges and be subject to all the liabilities incident to corporations of a similar nature, and by that name may sue and be sued. Harry L. Avery or Charles A. Jones may call the first meeting of said association by letter mailed to each member of said association at least seven days prior to the date set for said first meeting (NH General Court, 1911a).

Section 1 was amended by the NH Senate to add the names Bard B. Plummer, and Joseph H. Avery after the name Harry L. Avery (NH General Court, 1911b).

B.B. Plummer appeared in the Milton business directories of 1912, and 1917, as a Milton justice-of-the-peace. He appeared also as a selectman in 1912, manufacturer of agricultural implements in 1912 and 1917, and proprietor of a stock farm in 1917.

Personal. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Thomas and Mrs. and Mrs. Leo Gilman motored to Milton Three Ponds Monday night and attended the dance given by the “Three of Us” club of that town. The Misses Susan Haley, Maud Carter and Orinda Plummer were hostesses (Farmington News, August 16, 1912).

WEST MILTON. The town went substantially republican in spite of a small vote. Selectmen elected were: Forest T. [L.] Marsh, Milton Mills, Bard B. Plummer, Milton, Fred Reynolds, West Milton; Everett F. Fox, town treasurer; Harry L. Avery, town clerk; Robert Page, member of school board for three years (Farmington News, March 16, 1917).

WEST MILTON. The town meeting at Milton drew out a big vote as the result of the sharp contest for the selection of the third selectman. The old board was re-elected, as follows: Selectmen, Forrest L. Marsh, Bard B. Plummer, James F. Reynolds; town clerk, Harry L. Avery; treasurer, Everett F. Fox. School meeting was held at the close of town meeting and Dr. M.A.H. Hart and Everett F. Fox were unanimously re-elected as member of the board of education and school treasurer, respectively (Farmington News, March 18, 1918).

Daughter Fanny W. Plummer married in Oakland, CA, January 4, 1919, Burge P. Littlefield. Rev. F.G. Van Horn performed the ceremony. Littlefield was born in CA, October 12, 1878, son of Charles A. and Mary F. (Wentworth) Littlefield. (His very name, Burge Plummer Littlefield, certainly suggests some prior connection to the Plummer family).

LOCAL. At the annual meeting Tuesday, the town of Milton unanimously elected a republican board of officers, as follows: Selectmen, Bard B. Plummer, Forrest L. Marsh, Fred Chamberlin; town clerk, Harry L. Avery, town treasurer, Everett F. Fox (Farmington News, March 14, 1919).

Bard B. Plummer died of lobar pneumonia on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, October 22, 1919, aged seventy-three years, four months, and four days. James J. Buckley, M.D., signed the death certificate.

LOCAL. Deep regret is expressed throughout this community over the death of Bard B. Plummer, Sr., which occurred at his home on Plummer’s Ridge, Milton, Wednesday evening, following an attack of pneumonia. He was a native and lifelong resident of the town where his death occurred, having been born there 73 years ago. During his lifetime he was active and influential in the affairs of his community and had held and discharged honorably and faithfully the duties of most of the offices within the gift of his townspeople. The deceased was prominent in Masonic circles and possessed a wide and devoted acquaintance throughout the state. Sympathy from all quarters is tendered the bereaved widow, three daughters and one son, who survive. For many years the deceased was a member and deacon of the Congregational church at Milton. Funeral will be held from the home Saturday afternoon at two o’clock (Farmington News, October 24, 1919).

Daughter Orinda Plummer married in Manhattan, New York, NY, April 19, 1921, William G. Lyttle. He was born in Killoran, Sligo, Ireland, December 15, 1877, son of Robert and Frances “Fanny” (Burns) Lyttle. (He died in Rochester, NY, January 3, 1925).

Orinda P. [(Plummer)] Little, an electrical bookkeeper, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Sharon, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her twin sons, William G. Little, aged eight years (b. MA), and Robert A. Little, aged eight years (b. MA), her mother, Eliza D. [(Wentworth)] Plummer, retired, aged seventy-eight years (b. MA), and her sister, Fanny W. [(Plummer)] Littlefield, a private family housekeeper, aged fifty-one years (b. NH). Orinda P. Little owned their house at 11 Crest Road, which was valued at $8,500. They did not have a radio set. All three women were widows, Orinda P. Little having married at thirty-four years of age, Eliza D. Plummer at twenty-three years of age, and Fanny W. Littlefield at forty years of age.

Eliza D. (Wentworth) Plummer died in Sharon, MA, March 12, 1931, aged seventy-nine years.


References:

American Guernsey Cattle Club. (1904). Herd Register. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MNJIAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PT442

Biographical Review Publishing. (1897). Biographical Review: Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Merrimack and Sullivan Counties, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=C2sjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA157

Find a Grave. (2017, October 19). Enoch W. Plumer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184409140/enoch-w-plumer

Houghton, Frederick L. (1909). Holstein-Frisian Register. Retrieved from

Merrill, Georgia D. (1889). History of Carroll County, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=xmMKyZxlU5MC&pg=PA196

NH Constitutional Convention. (1918). Manual of the Constitutional Convention of 1918. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=jshGAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA215

NH Department of Agriculture. (1901). Report of the Board of Agriculture. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=BYgZAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA200

NH General Court. (1893). State of New Hampshire Annual Reports for 1893. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=P2obAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA241

NH General Court. (1911a). Journals of the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vmQ3AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA726

NH General Court. (1911b). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=iT8tAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA317

NH Grand Lodge. (1870). Journal of Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons, of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=smUtAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA83

NH Grand Lodge. (1879). Journal of Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons, of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EGQtAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA39

NH State Grange. (1894). Journal of Proceedings of the New Hampshire State Grange. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nmkkAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA5-PA87

Pennsylvania Prison Society. (1903). Journal of Prison Discipline and Philanthropy. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=7vI_AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA5-PA89

Wikipedia. (2021, July 30). National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Grange_of_the_Order_of_Patrons_of_Husbandry

Milton in NH Education Report, 1879

By Muriel Bristol | October 3, 2021

In his June 1879 report, the NH Superintendent of Instruction provided some statistics regarding Milton.

Milton’s town school committee members were identified as being J.V. [J.P.] Bickford (1844-1910), I.N. [J.N.] Lowell (1846-1903), and B.B. Plummer (1846-1919).

Milton had 11 school districts and 12 schools in town, 1 of which was a graded schools and 1 a town high school. There were 12 schoolhouses, and none that were unfit for use. Maps and globes were available in 2 schoolhouses. The value of schoolhouses, furnishings and sites was estimated at $8,000, and the value of apparatus was estimated at $100. Only 2 of the district schools had an average of 12 scholars of less; and none had an average of 6 scholars or less. The average run of district school classes was 16.5 weeks. (The Strafford County average was 22.64 weeks).

Milton had 1 fractional school district. It paid $51.00 in superintendence. Some 30 students had no absences during the year. It had 5 students attending private schools.

Milton had 180 male and 140 female students enrolled. Of these, 20 were aged under six years, 277 were aged between 6 and 16 years, and 23 were aged over 16 years. There were 40 students pursuing higher branches, and there were 6 students aged between 5 and 15 years that were not attending any school. Average daily attendance was 230 students.

There was 1 male teacher, making an average of $50 per month, and 17 female teachers, making an average of $25.00 per month. Of these, 2 were teaching for the first time, and 8 had been teachers for more than one term. (One might infer that the remaining 8 had been teachers already for a single prior term). Of these, 1 of them had been to Normal school. Of 242 Strafford County teachers, only 19 (7.6%) had been to Normal school).

Under the heading Private Schools of a Higher Grade, Milton had its Classical Institute, which was situated at Milton Three Ponds. It had been chartered and organized in 1866. The value of its building, apparatus and grounds was $2,800. It had a 44-week school year, which began in September. It had no male teachers and 2 female teachers; and it had 17 male and 31 female students. Of these, 37 of them were NH residents, 18 of them were pursuing higher branches.

The school committee had available to it $3,980.17; of which $1,392.89 came from the town tax for support of schools, $2,234.68 came from district school taxes, $116.45 came from the literary fund, $159.00 came from local funds and the dog tax, $77.05 came from the railroad tax, and $0.00 came from contributions.

Milton expended $910.15 for new buildings, $1,327.13 in interest, $150.00 in permanent repairs, $0.oo in miscellaneous expenses; and $1,341.85 in teacher salaries, for a grand total of $3,780.13. The average cost of salaries and miscellaneous expenses per scholar was $4.37. (The county average cost per scholar was $7.55).


Previous in sequence: Milton in NH Education Report, 1878; next in sequence: Milton in NH Education Report, 1881


References:

NH Superintendent of Public Instruction. (1879). Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=eiQlAQAAIAAJ

Milton’s N.B. Thayer & Co. Shoe Factory – 1910-34

By Muriel Bristol | September 29, 2021

Continued from Milton’s N.B. Thayer & Co. Shoe Factory – 1890-09

No indication has come to hand of any activity at the N.B. Thayer factory in Milton after 1909. But the company did persist for twenty years at its East Rochester, NH, and Roxbury, MA, locations under Noah B. Thayer’s son, Frank H. Thayer, and then, after him, for some few years under new management (that included some of N.B. Thayer’s grandchildren).

STATE NEWS. N.B. Thayer Co., of East Rochester, is making preparations for the manufacture of the paper cartons that they use in the sale of their shoes and they have already received the machinery and it is being installed (Farmington News, May 6, 1910).

James B. Edgerly, a bank cashier, aged seventy-six years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Annie Thayer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), his son-in-law (of four years), Elmer Thayer, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), his grandson, James E. Thayer, aged three years (b. NH), his servant, Nellie V. Tufton, a private family housekeeper, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and his lodger, Charles L. Osgood, a hotel hostler, aged fifty-four years (b. NH). James B. Edgerly owned their house on North Main Street, free-and-clear. Annie Thayer was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Frank H. Thayer, a shoe factory manager, aged forty-six years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Alice W. Thayer, aged thirty-nine years (b. IL), his children, Louise Thayer, aged five years (b. MA), Richard W. Thayer, aged three years (b. MA), and Robert T.B. Thayer, aged one year (b. MA), his brothers-in-law, George A. Waterman, a neurological physician, aged thirty-seven years (b. IL), and William E. Waterman, a cigar manufacturing company president, aged thirty-five years (b. IL), and his servants, Lizzie A. Hennessy, a cook, aged twenty-seven years (b. Ireland (Eng.)), Nora F. Kennelly, a 2nd maid, aged twenty-eight years (b. Ireland (Eng.)), and Sarah M. Keeley, a nursemaid, aged thirty-one years (b. CT). Frank H. Thayer rented their house at 395 Marlborough Street. Alice W. Thayer was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Carrie McBride, own income, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Weymouth, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Marjorie McBride, aged eighteen years (b. MA), and Edwin McBride, aged sixteen years (b. MA). Carrie McBride owned their house at 11 Central Avenue, free-and-clear; she was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

NB Thayer Letterhead (S-l1600) - DetailFrank E. Fernald appeared again in the Boston directory of 1911, as a superintendent, with his house at 312 Warren street, in Roxbury. By the 1912 directory, he had again “rem. to E. Rochester, NH.”

LOCAL. James Crotty, foreman of the N.B. Thayer Shoe factory, will take a similar position with the H.B. Reed Company of Manchester, and his place is taken by Berthold Demeritt of Milton. Prior to leaving, Mr. Crotty was presented by his employes with a solid gold pen. Another change in the corps of foremen at the factory is the selection of John Fyfe of St Louis, Mo., foreman of the packing room (Farmington News, October 6, 1911).

(Berthold I. Demerritt appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a shoe operative in East Rochester, with house at 34 Silver street, corner of Church street. (See also Mrs. DeMerritt’s Arbutus)).

The N.B. Thayer & Co. lasters in East Rochester, NH, went out on strike briefly in December 1911. Quality control procedures and policies seem to have been at issue.

State News. The strike of the lasters at the N.B. Thayer shoe factory in East Rochester has been settled and the employees have returned to work. The company is to have an inspector examine the shoes before they leave the lasting room and any defect noticed can be remedied there before the shoe is entirely made. The company has also removed the edict of the employees buying the shoes that they damage. The wage system remains as it was before the strike (Farmington News, December 15, 1911).

Frank E. Fernald married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, April 17, 1912, Lula A. Tuttle, he of Milton and she of Farmington, NH. He was a shoe factory superintendent, aged forty-six years, and she was a houseworker, aged thirty-four years. Rev. Frank H. Libby performed the ceremony. She was born in Farmington, NH, circa 1877, daughter of Charles E. and Justina (Ham) Tuttle.

LOCAL. A marriage solemnized April 24 was made public this week, that of Frank E. Fernald of Milton, superintendent of the N.B. Thayer shoe factory at East Rochester, and Lulu A. Tuttle of Farmington. The ceremony was performed in Rochester by the Rev. Frank H. Libby. The newly wedded couple have taken up their residence at Hotel Glendon, East Rochester (Farmington News, May 3, 1912).

Frank E. Fernald appeared in the Rochester, NH, directories of 1912, and 1917, as superintendent at N.B.T. & Co., boarding at Glendon House, in East Rochester. GLENDON HOUSE, John W. Tebbets, proprietor, was at 58 Main street (“Three Minutes’ Walk from Railway Station”), in East Rochester.

NEWS OF THE BOYS. E. ROCHESTER, N.H. Frank W. Walsh has returned to his old post as foreman of the making room of the N.B. Thayer Co. (Shoe and Leather Facts, May 1917).

NEWS OF THE BOYS. E. ROCHESTER, N.H. The room of the N.B. Thayer Company will be in charge of Frank Walsh (Shoe and Leather Facts, June 1917).

(Frank W. Walsh appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1917, as a shoe operative in Farmington, NH, – i.e., prior to his return to N.B. Thayer’s making room – boarding on the Lebanon, ME, side, in East Rochester. By 1920, he resided in Cambridge, MA).

NEWS OF THE BOYS. E. ROCHESTER, N.H. L.J. Stewart, former stitching room machinist, has been promoted to the position foreman of this department in the factory of N.B. Thayer & Co., East Rochester, N.H. (Shoe and Leather Facts, November 1917).

(Lloyd J. Stuart appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1917, as a machinist for N.B.T & Co., boarding at 10 Summer street, in East Rochester).

PERSONAL. C.C. Butler has entered the employ of the N.B. Thayer Shoe Co., at East Rochester (Farmington News, November 30, 1917).

(CHARLES C. BUTLER appeared in the Farmington, NH, directory of 1917, as a Goodyear welter for the T.&O. [Thayer & Osborne, i.e., Thayer-Osborne] Co., with his house at 12 Glen street).

Thayer, NB - 1913Frank H. Thayer’s second son, Robert B. Thayer, died in Boston, MA, October 17, 1918, aged ten years.

N.B. Thayer’s granddaughter, Marjorie M. McBride, married in Weymouth, MA, in November 1919, Stanley Heald, both of Weymouth. He was born in Weymouth, MA, June 8, 1891, daughter of Arthur C. and Charlotte B. (Tower) Heald. (Her brother would marry his sister in the following year).

PERSONALS. Miss Priscilla West has returned to her home on Cottage street after spending a few days in South Weymouth, Mass., where she attended the wedding of Miss Marjorie MacBride and Stanley Heald of South Weymouth (Rutland Daily Herald, November 20, 1919).

Elmer F. Thayer, a shoe factory partner, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie E. Thayer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), his child, James E. Thayer, aged twelve years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, James B. Edgely, aged eighty-five years (b. NH). Elmer F. Thayer owned their home at 55 North Main Street, free-and-clear.

Frank H. Thayer, a shoe manufacturer, aged fifty-six years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice U. Thayer, aged forty-nine years (b. IL), and his children, Louise Thayer, aged fifteen years (b. MA), and Richard W. Thayer, aged thirteen years (b. MA). Frank H. Thayer rented their suite at the Charlesgate Hotel, at 535 Beacon Street in Boston, MA.

Carrie T. Mcbride, a widow, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a Weymouth, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her son-in-law, Stanley Heal [Heald], a shoe shop assistant superintendent, aged twenty-six years (b. MA), and her daughter, Marjorie Heal [Heald], aged twenty-four years (b. MA). Carrie T. McBride owned their house at 40 Fogg Road, fee-and-clear.

Edith M. Varney, a widow, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Edgar G. Varney, shoe factory supply man, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and her boarders, Ellen Bean, a widow, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH), and Edwin T. Mcbride, shoe factory [supply man?], aged twenty-six years (b. MA). Edith M. Varney owned their house, free-and-clear.

The NH Bureau of Labor reported in 1920 that N.B. Thayer & Co. of East Rochester, NH, had 255 employees, 155 of them male and 100 of them female. They manufactured men and boys’ shoes (NH Bureau of Labor, 1920).

N.B. Thayer’s grandson, Edwin T. McBride, married in Weymouth, MA, June 12, 1920, Dorothea Heald, both of Weymouth, MA. Rev J. Weston Atwood performed the ceremony. She was born in Weymouth, MA, February 10, 1898, daughter of Arthur C. and Charlotte B. (Tower) Heald. (His sister had married her brother in the preceding year).

MISS HEALD, WEYMOUTH, BRIDE OF E.T. MACBRIDE. WEYMOUTH, June 13 – In the presence of guests from Orange, N.J.; Nyack-on-Hudson, N.Y.: Boston, Farmington, N.H.; Cohasset, Abington, Hingham, Newton, Rochester, N.H.; Greenville, Me.; the Weymouths and nearby towns, Miss Dorothea Heald, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Heald of Main st., South Weymouth, and Edwin Thayer MacBride, son of Mrs. Edwin P. MacBride of Rochester, N.H., were married last night at the home of the bride’s parents. The ceremony was performed at 7 o’clock by Rev J. Weston Atwood of Abington, the double ring service being used. The bride was given in marriage by her father. Mrs. Albert Vinal of South Weymouth, a sister of the bride, was matron of honor. Miss Louise Sanders of Greenville, Me., the maid of honor and Charlotte T. Heald, a niece of the bride, the flower girl. The ushers were Richard H. Gould of White Plains, N.Y., Charles T. Heald, Stanley Heald and Albert Vinal of South Weymouth. The wedding marches were played by Donald T. Gammons and Burgess C. Tower of Cohasset, cousins of the bride, while an orchestra provided music during the reception. The bride was gowned in white tulle over silver cloth, wore a veil and carried lilies of the valley. The matron of honor wore blue satin, the maid of honor pink satin and they carried pink sweet peas. The flower girl was dressed in pink tulle over pink silk. A reception followed the ceremony from 7:30 to 9 o’clock, with the parents of the bride and mother of the groom assisting. A wedding lunch was served (Boston Globe, June 14, 1920).

Shoe Factory Buyers of the United States. Complete List of Buyers of Upper Leather, Sole Leather, Supplies and Other Materials, in the Shoe Industry, Arranged Alphabetically by States, Cities and Towns. NEW HAMPSHIRE. N.B. Thayer & Co., Inc., East Rochester. S.B. Stearns, supt.; E. Thayer McBride supplies; F.H. Thayer, leather. … Thayer-Osborne Shoe Co., Farmington. D.V. Osborne, pres’t; E.F. Thayer leather; Geo N. Osgood, Fremont. Geo N. Osgood, supt. and buyer (Shoe and Leather Reporter, May 18, 1922).

The NH Bureau of Labor reported in 1924 that N.B. Thayer & Co. of East Rochester, NH, had 236 employees, 168 of them male and 68 of them female. They manufactured men and boys’ shoes (NH Bureau of Labor, 1924).

N.B. Thayer’s second daughter (and youngest child), Carrie M. (Thayer) McBride, died in Weymouth, MA, April 16, 1924, aged fifty-four years.

ROBIN IS SEEN IN EAST ROCHESTER. EAST ROCHESTER, N.H., Dec. 21 – Local weather sharps were somewhat perplexed today by the unusual appearance of a robin at the shoe factory or the N.B. Thayer Company, here, shortly before 3 o’clock. Employees of the packing room were surprised on looking out the window to see the bird standing on the snow on the roof of the office. Shortly after the robin made its appearance a telephone call was received from Concord endeavoring to learn the bird’s whereabouts (Boston Globe, December 22, 1925).

N.B. Thayer’s third son, Elmer F. Thayer, who was a partner in the Thayer-Osborne Co. of Farmington, NH, died in Boston, MA, May 14, 1926, aged sixty-four years, eight months, and thirteen days.

DEATHS. THAYER – In Boston, May 14th, Elmer Francis Thayer, aged 64 years, 8 months, 13 days. Funeral services at his late residence, Main street, Farmington, New Hampshire, on Sunday, May 16th, at 1:30 p.m., Standard time. Relatives and friends invited (Boston Globe, May 14, 1926).

In August 1929, The Boston Globe published what appears to have been N.B. Thayer & Co.’s last advertisement seeking shoe workers for its East Rochester, NH, factory.

MALE HELP WANTED. VAMPERS on men’s and boys’ high-grade shoes – no labor trouble. Apply N.B. THAYER & CO., East Rochester, N.H., dSu3t au2 (Boston Globe, August 3, 1929).

Just over a month later, Frank H. Thayer, retired – he was not a well man – and new management took over.

BOSTON MAN TO QUIT E. ROCHESTER SHOE PLANT. ROCHESTER, N.H., Sept. 25 – A new organization is being formed to take over the firm of N.B. Thayer & Co., shoe manufacturers at East Rochester. The firm name will be continued, but announcement has been made that the new concern will take over the business on Nov 1. Frank H. Thayer of Beacon st., Boston, whose father originally started the company and who has been the active head of the company, will retire, and his place will be taken over by Herbert Posner of the large firm of Dr. A. Posner & Co., of New York and Brooklyn, whose shoes tor several years have been manufactured at East Rochester. Stock to the amount of $150,000 is being issued and will be taken by Roy M. McQuillen of East Rochester, the president of the company, Mr. Posner and the salesforce and employes of the company in equal amounts. No change is to be made in the executive personnel of the company. The capacity of the East Rochester factory will be greatly increased, following the reorganization after Nov 1 (Boston Globe, September 26, 1929).

ROCHESTER SHOE EMPLOYES GIVEN SHARES IN FIRM. Under a cooperative plan of manufacture and distribution of Thayer shoes, announced Tuesday at the offices of the N.B. Thayer Shoe Co., men who have been associated with the firm 30 years are taken into the company. Under the plan Frank Fernald, factory superintendent for many years, becomes vice president (Farmington News, October 4, 1929).

WEYMOUTH. Mrs. E. Thayer McBride of Main st., South Weymouth, entertained friends at whist yesterday afternoon (Boston Globe, November 2, 1929).

N.B. Thayer’s fourth (and youngest) son, the recently retired Frank H. Thayer, died in Boston, MA, December 7, 1929, aged sixty-five years.

FRANK H. THAYER. Frank H. Thayer, treasurer and general manager of N.B. Thayer & Co., Inc., shoe manufacturers of East Rochester, N.H., died at his home, 282 Beacon st, Saturday afternoon, after an illness of five weeks. He was born at South Weymouth, Mass., Jan. 4, 1864, the son of Noah Blanchard and Lucy (Newcomb) Thayer. His father was one of the pioneer shoe manufacturers of this country and he himself was very widely known in the shoe and leather trade. Surviving him are his wife, Alice (Waterman) Thayer; a son, Richard W. Thayer, and a daughter, Mrs. Francis Tilden Nichols (Boston Globe, [Monday,] December 9, 1929).

FRANK H. THAYER. Private services for Frank H. Thayer, treasurer and general manager of N.B. Thayer & Co., Inc., shoe manufacturers of East Rochester, N.H., were held yesterday. Burial was in Mt. Auburn cemetery. Mr. Thayer died at his home, 282 Beacon st., Boston, after an illness of five weeks. He was born in South Weymouth, January 4, 1864, the son of Noah Blanchard and Lucy (Newcomb) Thayer. His father was one of the pioneer shoe manufacturers of this country. Surviving Mr. Thayer are his wife, Alice (Waterman) Thayer; a son, Richard W. Thayer, and a daughter, Mrs. Francis Tilden Nichols (Boston Globe, December 10, 1929).

IN MEMOBIAM. Frank Thayer. Frank Thayer, widely known shoe manufacturer, formerly of Milton, whose large industry in more recent years has been prominently identified with East Rochester, died suddenly at his home in Boston last Saturday, December 7. He was 65 years of age and had been in failing health for some time. Complications of the heart hastened the end. He was recognized as one of New England’s foremost manufacturers and had followed the shoe Industry all his life, and with the associations of his father and brother, had wrested success from the many vicissitudes of the business. He is survived by his wife and two children, a daughter, Mrs. Francis Nichols of Great Neck, L.I., and a son, Richard Thayer, a student at the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. Funeral was held from the chapel in Mt. Auburn cemetery Monday at noon and was private to the family. Mrs. B.F. [E.F.] Thayer of this town and her son, James E Thayer, attended (Farmington News, December 13, 1929).

Thayer, NB - 1930N.B. Thayer & Co., Inc., of East Rochester, NH, registered (No. 298,915) their Thayer Shoe Combo-Arch trademark with the U.S. Patent Office, April 15, 1930 (U.S. Patent Office, 1930).

Annie E. Thayer, a widow, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her son, James E. Thayer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Annie E. Thayer owned their house at 65 North Main Street, which was valued at $80,000. They did not have a radio set.

Alice Thayer, a widow, aged fifty-nine years (b. IL), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Richard W. Thayer, aged twenty-three years (b. MA), and her servants, Mary A. Gallagher, a private family waitress, aged twenty-eight years (b. Irish Free State), Annie Murray, a private family cook, aged forty-five years (b. Irish Free State), and Belle Donegan, a private family maid, aged forty-three years (b. Irish Free State). Alice Thayer owned their home at 282 Beacon Street, which was valued at $30,000. They had a radio set.

Edwin T. Macbride, a shoe factory sales manager, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), headed a Weymouth, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Darthea H. Macbride, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), his children, Thais Macbride, aged eight years (b. NH), Edwin T. Macbride, aged five years (b. NH), and Jean Macbride, aged two years (b. MA), and his servants, Katherine Flavin, a private family maid, aged twenty-six years (b. Ireland), and Elva Derusha, a private family maid, aged eighteen years (b. MA). Edwin T. McBride rented their house at 816 Main Street, for $125 per month. They had a radio set.

N.B. Thayer’s grandson, Richard W. Thayer, died from a nine-story fall in Albany, NY, November 2, 1932, aged twenty-six years.

Thayer, RW - BG321102BOSTON MAN JUMPS TO DEATH IN ALBANY. R.W. Thayer Prominent at Harvard. ALBANY, N.Y., Nov. 2 (AP) – Richard Waterman Thayer, 26, Harvard graduate and member of a prominent Boston family, jumped to his death from a ninth-floor room of the DeWitt Clinton Hotel today. His leap was witnessed by a man who lives on the opposite side of Eagle st. from the hotel. This witness, Harry Smith, said he saw Thayer climb out of his room and cling to the window casing for a few seconds, looking down. Two men were walking below. After they had passed, Thayer leaped. He died a few minutes later in Memorial Hospital. Shortly before plunging to his death, Thayer telephoned to the manager of the hotel, John J. Hyland, and asked that the house physician be sent to his room. He complained of sickness and dizziness. Thayer was the son of Mrs. Frank H. Thayer of 1282 Beacon st., Boston. His father was a shoe manufacturer. The son was graduated in 1929 from Harvard, where he had attained prominence in athletics. Last June he was graduated from the Harvard School of of Business Administration. He left Boston for Albany a few day ago. In his baggage was found a bill for accommodations at the Capitol Hotel. Albany, dated Oct 31. He left no written message in his room. Bank books and about $80 in cash were found in his effects (Boston Globe, November 2, 1932).

ROCHESTER, N.H., Nov. 2 – Richard W. Thayer was a director of the N.B. Thayer Shoe Company of this city. He was the son of Frank H. Thayer, who for years was owner of the factory here. Young Thayer visited the local factory here about one week ago (Boston Globe, November 3, 1932).

The coroner, after a discussion with the mother, Alice A. (Waterman) Thayer, brought in a verdict of accidental death (Glen Falls Post-Star, November 3, 1932).

FUNERAL SERVICES HELD FOR RICHARD W. THAYER. Funeral services were held in Mt. Auburn Cemetery chapel this noon for Richard Waterman Thayer, Harvard graduate and member of a prominent Boston family, who was killed in Albany, N.Y., after falling from the ninth floor of a hotel. Rev. Robert L. Bull, Jr., assistant rector of Trinity Church, Boston, officiated at the services. Thayer, the son of the late Frank H. Thayer of 282 Beacon st, Boston, was a graduate of Harvard in the class of 1929 (Boston Globe, November 4, 1932).

PERSONALS. Mrs. Elmer F. Thayer and son, James E. Thayer, were called to Boston last week by the funeral of Richard Waterman Thayer, whose tragic death occurred in Albany on November 2. Richard Thayer was the son of the late Frank H. Thayer, who for years was owner of the N.B. Thayer Shoe Company in Rochester, and the young man was a director of the concern (Farmington News, November 11, 1932).

Adopts Shorter Week. East Rochester, Aug. 4–Ten per cent increases in piece work prices, and the same pay for day help for 40 hours as for 48 hours a week previously, were announced last night by the N.B. Thayer Shoe Company, first industry in the city to display the blue eagle of the National Recovery Act (Portsmouth Herald, August 4, 1933).

ROCHESTER SHOE FACTORY HEAD DENIES REPORTS. East Rochester, Aug. 17 – Despite many rumors, announcement has been made by Ross Harrison of the N.B. Thayer shoe factory at East Rochester, that it is not about to shut down. He made the following statement: “The Thayer Shoe Company is busier now than it has been for some time. We are producing more shoes than ever. Because we are producing a cheaper grade of shoes than we have heretofore, the sales force has been found to be unnecessary. We are, though, employing more people than at any time since before 1930. We are here to stay.” The announcement was highly pleasing to local shoemakers, who for many years have held excellent positions at this factory (Portsmouth Herald, August 17, 1934).

N.B. Thayer & Co. closed its doors in East Rochester, NH, and went out of business in September 1934.

SEVERAL SEEK SHOE FACTORY. Rochester, Sept. 21. – Representatives of several shoe firms from Massachusetts and New Hampshire have inspected the shoe factory of the former N.B. Thayer company at East Rochester with the idea in view of moving to East Rochester, and to manufacture shoes. It is understood that the factory will go to the highest bidder when it is disposed of by the court. One of the companies yesterday made an announcement that they wished to interview the Thayer employes at the factory Saturday morning, September 22, at 11 o’clock Eastern Standard Time (Portsmouth Herald, September 21, 1934).

SEE WHAT’S FLYING IN ROCHESTER. East Rochester, Dec. 19. – With winter but four days away, according to the calendar, a butterfly was found yesterday morning near the boiler house of the N.B. Thayer Shoe Co., by workmen (Portsmouth Herald, December 20, 1934).

NEARLY READY TO OPEN FACTORY AT ROCHESTER. East Rochester, Jan. 9 – Manufacture of men’s shoes will commence soon at the factory of the former N.B. Thayer Company here, which has been closed since last September, when the Thayer Company went out of business. The factory was purchased last November by Samuel J. Katz of Rochester, owner of the Hubbard Shoe Company. William S. Fraser of Dover, for many years connected with the Farmington Shoe Company there, has been engaged as superintendent and is now preparing the factory for the resumption of activities by Feb. 1 and possibly sooner (Portsmouth Herald, January 9, 1935).

Former N.B. Thayer & Co. Milton boss laster, Roxbury foreman, and East Rochester superintendent Frank Fernald died of an apparent heart attack in Milton, December 14, 1944, aged seventy-eight years. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

IN MEMORIAM. Frank Fernald. Frank Fernald, aged 78, well known resident of Milton, died suddenly last Thursday morning at his home in that town. Mr. Fernald was born in Melrose, Mass., January 3, 1866, the son of Eli and Eliza A (Felch) Fernald. During his active life he was identified with shoe making. For several years he was employed by the N.B. Thayer Shoe company in Roxbury and for a good many years afterward was employed as superintendent with this company at its East Rochester plant. While thus employed he lived in East Rochester. Following his retirement from this work, he removed to Milton, where he had lived since. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Lucy Fernald. Funeral services were held at the Norman L. Otis funeral parlor last Sunday afternoon, with Rev. Ralph Townsend, pastor of the Milton Community church, officiating, and the remains were taken to Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, December 22, 1944).

Annie M. (Edgerly) Thayer died in Farmington, NH, May 16, 1957, aged eighty-six years.

DEATHS. THAYER – Mrs. Annie Edgerly, widow of Elmer Francis Thayer, died in Farmington, N.H., May 16; mother of James E. Thayer, grandmother of Miss Sylvia Thayer of Wellesley College and James E. Thayer, Jr., of Yale College and Richard Perkins Thayer. Funeral will be Sunday, May 19, at 2 o’clock in the First Congregational Church, Farmington (Boston Globe, May 18, 1957).

Mrs. Annie Thayer Dies in 87th Year. A brief, simple service, marked by the poetry of Robert Brown, which she loved, was conducted by Rev. Linwood Potter for the funeral of Mrs. Annie Edgerly Thayer Sunday in the Congregational Church. Organist Elton Young played musical selections she had liked. The church seemed one mass of flowers, remembrances of hundreds. Burial, arranged by the Otis funeral home, was in the local Pine Grove cemetery. Mrs. Thayer, 86, succumbed last Thursday night at her home on No. Main street. She had suffered a stroke the previous Sunday, but had been in ill health the past two years. Interested in a variety of present-day and historical activities, Mrs. Thayer remained active, and attended out-of-town events only a few days before her death. Her husband, Elmer Francis Thayer, died in 1926. She leaves her son, James Edgerly Thayer, president of the Farmington National Bank, a granddaughter, Sylvia, now a junior at Wellesley college, Wellesley, Mass., and two grandsons, James E. Edgerly, Jr., a freshman at Yale university, New Haven, Conn., and Richard Perkins Thayer, Jr., a pupil in local schools. Mrs. Thayer was born in Farmington, Nov. 14, 1870, the daughter of James Bartlett and Maria (Fernald) Edgerly. She graduated from local schools in 1889. She became associated with the local bank, and has continued as a stockholder. She was in the middle of a 5-generation group connected with the bank. She was wed to Mr. Thayer in 1905. Mrs. Thayer was noted for her many and varied philanthropies, many of which were given in the guise of anonymous donors. During the years she helped organize such groups as the Eastern Star, Woman’s clubs and Garden clubs, and retained active interest to serve repeatedly as an officer. Her far-flung associations and friendships were cemented further during a world cruise some years ago. Her memberships included: Farmington, Alton and Rochester Woman’s clubs; Haven Hill and Farmington Garden clubs; Farmington-New Durham, Wakefield-Brookfield, and New Hampshire Historical societies; Mary Torr Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution; Farmington and Boston Browning societies; Pewter Collectors club of America; Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America; Daughters of Colonial Wars in America; Fraternal Chapter, O.E.S.; Piscataqua Pioneers; the board of Children’s Aid society; First Congregational church and Ladies aid; trustee of the Goodwin Public library; Frisbie Hospital aid association; Society for Preservation of New England Antiquities; the Rushlight club of Boston; Colonial Dames of America in New Hampshire; local and state Republican clubs. Bearers were Carl Thomas, Norman Fall, Everett Emerson, Dr. George Quinn, Eugene Nute, and Norman Hartfield (Farmington News, May 23, 1957).

Alice A. (Waterman) Thayer died in Boston, MA, May 16, 1965, aged ninety-four years.

DEATHS. THAYER – In Boston, May 16, in her 95th year, Alice Waterman Thayer, resident of Brooklin, Me., widow of Frank Herbert Thayer. Survived by her daughter Mrs. Francis T. Nichols. Funeral service at Bigelow Chapel, Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, on Wednesday. May 19 at 11 a.m. (Boston Globe, May 17, 1965).

N.B. Thayer’s grandson, Edward T. McBride, died in Hingham, MA, August 17, 1965, aged seventy-two years.

E. Thayer MacBride, 72, Shoe Industry Leader, Dies. E. Thayer MacBride. 72, shoe industry leader, died today at his home, 13 Clark rd., Hingham. Born in South Weymouth, he attended schools there, the Chauncy School, Boston, and graduated from M.I.T. in 1915. He served as a pilot in World War I. He was former president of the N.B. Thayer Shoe Co., Rochester, N.H., first President of the Kiwanis in Rochester, member of the Masonic Temple in Rochester, and the recently retired president of the Stetson Shoe Co., South Weymouth. He is survived by his wife Darthea (Heald) MacBride, two daughters, Thais, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Mrs. Robert O. Hoss, of Hingham, a son Edwin T., Jr., of Braintree, a sister, Mrs. Marjory Heald of Hingham, and 11 grandchildren (Boston Globe, August 17, 1965).


References:

Find a Grave. (2016, May 8). Carrie M. Thayer McBride. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/162351856/carrie-m-macbride

Find a Grave. (2015, August 7). Frank Herbert Thayer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/150294761/frank-herbert-thayer

Find a Grave. (2008, October 5). Frederick Nicholas Thayer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/30325265/frederick-nicholas-thayer

Find a Grave. (2008, October 5). Noah Blanchard Thayer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/30324570/noah-blanchard-thayer

Find a Grave. (2015, August 7). Richard Waterman Thayer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/150294778/richard-waterman-thayer

McDuffee, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rL0yAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA500

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