Public BOS Session Scheduled (July 13, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | July 12, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a BOS meeting to be held Monday, July 13.

The BOS meeting is scheduled to begin with a quasi-Public session beginning at 6:00 PM.


Covid-19 restrictions have been lifted to the limited extent that an audience limited to nine persons – apart from the BOS itself – will be permitted to attend.

The quasi-Public portion of the agenda has New Business, Old Business, Other Business, and some housekeeping items.


Under New Business are scheduled two agenda items: 1) Swearing-In of Select-Board appointee – Claudine Burnham, and 2) Workshop to Discuss Budget Scheduling & Guidance Development for Departments.

Swearing-In of Select-Board appointee – Claudine Burnham. The two Selectmen remaining appointed Ms. Claudine Burnham at their last meeting to replace outgoing Chairwoman Erin Hutchings.

Workshop to Discuss Budget Scheduling & Guidance Development for Departments. Last year’s BOS “guidance” was both a surprise and a disappointment for taxpayers, who expressed their displeasure through voting instead a second default budget. Let us hope they need not do so a third time running.


The GOFERR reimbursement and “Other” appear at the bottom of the agenda, but would seem to be there in error, as merely continued from the prior agenda.


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

Town of Milton. (2020, July 10). BOS Meeting Agenda, July 13, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/agendas/07-13-2020_workshopagenda.pdf

Last Will of John Townsend (1807-1891)

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | July 9, 2020

Here follows a transcription (with annotations) of the last will and testament of Milton Mills woolen manufacturer John Townsend.

John Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, October 22, 1807, son of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend, and was baptized there January 8, 1808. He died in Brookline, MA, May 21, 1891, and this last will, which was dated November 1, 1890, was proved in Norfolk County Probate Court, in Dedham, MA, May 27, 1891 (Norfolk County Probate, 167:54).

Townsend was twice married. He married (1st) in Dorchester (Boston), MA, January 14, 1834, Jane Matilda Townsend, both of Dorchester, MA. She was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, September 18, 1815, daughter of Thomas B. and Jane (Randall) Townsend. Their children were Jane Randall “Jennie” Townsend (1835-1869), Caroline Frances Townsend (1840-1897), and Henry Herbert Townsend (1842-1904). Jane M. (Townsend) Townsend died in Dorchester, MA, December 24, 1843.

He married (2nd) in Boston, MA, April 22, 1844, Eliza Ann Townsend. She was born in Milton, MA, April 8, 1823, daughter of Thomas B. and Jane (Randall) Townsend, i.e., she was a younger sister of his deceased first wife. Their children were Emma M. Townsend (1848-1875), William B. Townsend [II] (1850-1878), Frank Albert Townsend (1855-1913), and Flora G. Townsend (b. 1863). Eliza A. (Townsend) Townsend survived him and died in Needham, MA, September 19, 1896.

Townsend started his Milton Mills woolen mill in or around 1846. He and his second wife, Eliza, and the children of both marriages resided in Milton Mills from then until the early to mid 1860s. (His eldest son, Henry H. Townsend, would run the rebuilt mill there in later years).

GREAT FALLS, N.H., Saturday, Oct. 19. The flannel factory of JOHN TOWNSEND, at Milton Mills, N.H., was burnt this evening. Loss about $30,000, which is partially insured. The factory was running on a Government contract (NY Times, October 20, 1861).

John Townsend, a merchant, aged fifty-five years (birthplace omitted), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA Census. His household included his wife, Eliza Townsend, aged forty-two years (b. Milton, ME [SIC], Jane R. Townsend, aged twenty-nine years (b. Dorchester), Caroline F. Townsend, aged twenty-five years (b. Dorchester), Henry H. Townsend, a clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. Dorchester), Emma M. Townsend, aged nineteen years (b. Milton, NH), William B. Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. Milton, NH), Frank A. Townsend, aged ten years (b. Milton, NH), Flora G. Townsend, aged two years (b. Milton, NH), and Mary Welsh, aged twenty years (b. Ireland). John Townsend and Henry H. Townsend were ratable polls and legal voters.

Will of the Late John Townsend Filed. DEDHAM, May 27. This afternoon the will of John Townsend, late of Brookline, the deceased woollen manufacturer, was filed for probate in the Norfolk registry at Dedham. He left about $400,000, of which amount all but $700 is bequeathed to his family and other relatives. The instrument was drawn November 1, 1890, and his sons, Henry H. and Frank A. Townsend, are named as his executors and trustees (Boston Globe, May 27, 1891).

Note that $400,000 in 1891 would be worth about $36,000,000 today. (Each $20 might be taken as a one-ounce gold “double eagle” coin, and that one ounce of gold is worth about $1,800 in Federal Reserve notes at their present value).


John Townsend – Will – Proved May 27, 1891

I, John Townsend of the Town of Brookline, County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Woolen Manufacturer, make this my last will and testament hereby revoking all other wills.

Item 1st. I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Eliza Ann Townsend sixty thousand dollars to be held in trust and five thousand dollars in cash and all the furniture and horse or horses, harnesses, carriages, and sleighs at her disposal to sell or otherwise as she may think best, and for her benefit the income or interest on her bequest of sixty thousand dollars may be paid at any time she may desire provided the trustee or trustees have cash on hand received by them for or on account of income or interest on their investments.

Eliza A. (Townsend) Townsend died in Needham, MA, September 19, 1896. (Her son, Frank A. Townsend, lived then in Needham).

Item 2nd. I give and bequeath to my son Frank Albert Townsend one hundred thousand dollars in cash, and all my office furniture excepting the small desk, and I trust he will make good use of the above as his father has done before him. I also give him five thousand dollars in cash extra to be paid him for his services rendered me.

Frank Albert Townsend was born in Milton Mills, NH, July 5, 1855, son of John and Eliza A. (Townsend) Townsend. He died at his home at 371 Walnut Street, Brookline, MA, July 29, 1913, aged fifty-eight years, twenty-four days. (He was buried in Forest Hills Cemetery, in Jamaica Plain, Boston, MA).

Frank A. Townsend, own income, aged fifty-eight [fifty-five] years (b. MA), headed a Needham, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Anna L. Townsend, aged sixty years (b. NH), and his servants, Rose G. Lufkin, a private family waitress, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), and Bessie G. McGlone, a private family cook, aged thirty-five years (b. Ireland (English)).

Item 3rd. I give and bequeath to my son Henry Herbert Townsend one hundred thousand dollars in cash, also my small desk in the counting room, if the said Henry Herbert Townsend owes my Estate either by note or on account it is to be deducted from his cash amount.

Henry Herbert Townsend was born in Dorchester, MA, August 12, 1842, son of John and Jane M. “Matilda” (Townsend) Townsend. He died in Milton Mills, June 25, 1904, aged sixty-one years, ten months, and thirteen days.

Henry H. Townsend married in Milton, June 7, 1870, Agnes J. Brierley, he of Boston and she of Milton, NH. She was born in Lowell, MA, May 17, 1844, daughter of Edward and Margaret M. (Thompson) Brierley. (See also Milton Mills’ Brierley Mill – c1864-18). He was a merchant, aged twenty-seven years; she was aged twenty-six years. Rev. N.D. Adams of Union, NH, performed the ceremony. (This record appeared also in Boston vital records).

Item 4th. I give and bequeath to my beloved daughter Caroline Frances Townsend forty five thousand dollars to be held in trust, the interest or income to be paid to her semiannually. I also give and bequeath to the aforementioned Caroline Frances Townsend in cash one thousand dollars, and at her decease the amount held by the trustee or trustees shall be paid one half to Henry Herbert Townsend and the other half to Frank Albert Townsend of their heirs.

Caroline Frances Townsend was born in Dorchester, MA, May 2, 1840, daughter of John Townsend and his first wife, Jane Matilda (Townsend) Townsend.

Caroline F. Townsend of Milton Mills appeared in a list of first and second year women taking the English course of studies at the New Hampton Literary & Biblical Institution, in New Hampton, NH, during the 1856-57, when she was called “Carrie F.,” 1857-58, 1858-59 academic years. She majored in Modern Languages. Her elder sister, Jennie R. Townsend, was a student there also during the 1856-57 academic year.

Caroline F. Townsend boarded for many years with another legatee, Mary W. Robinson of Dorchester.

Caroline F. Townsend married in the Bromfield Street Methodist Church in Boston, MA, June 27, 1894, John W. Wellman, she of Dorchester, MA, and he of Wakefield, MA. He was a cotton broker, aged seventy-four years (b. Farmington, ME), and she was at home, aged fifty-four years (b. Boston); it was his third marriage and her first.

Caroline F. (Townsend) Wellman died in Wakefield, MA, December 26, 1897, aged fifty-seven years, seven months, and twenty-four days. Her husband died in Wakefield, MA, January 30, 1900, aged eighty-one years.

Item 5th. I give and bequeath to my grandchild John Townsend son of Henry Herbert and Agnes Townsend five thousand dollars to be held in trust and Gracy Townsend daughter of Henry Herbert and Agnes Townsend two thousand dollars to be held in trust until they arrive at the age of twenty-one years when there shall be paid to them the forenamed legacies and accrued income thereon.

John E. Townsend was born in Milton Mills, September 9, 1872, son of Henry H. and Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend. He died in Milton Mills, September 8, 1914, aged forty-two years, eleven months, and thirty days. He married in Milton, January 28, 1896, Eda B. Lowd.

His sister, Grace Maud “Gracie” Townsend, was born in Milton Mills, November 14, 1873. She died September 7, 1953. She married in Milton Mills, June 19, 1896, John C. Townsend, she of Milton, and he of Saugus, MA. He was a clerk, aged twenty-four years, and she was aged twenty-two years. He was born in East Wilton, ME, September 17, 1871, son of Joseph and Ruth P. (Wentworth) Townsend. He died in Milton Mills, February 14, 1916.

Item 6th. I give and bequeath to my brother James Townsend two thousand dollars to be held in trust, also to my sister Eliza, also Charles Townsend son of my brother Thomas, one thousand dollars each, also to Ruth widow of Joseph Townsend two thousand dollars, all of the above mentioned to be held in trust.

James Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, June 2, 1802, son of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend. He married in Dorchester, MA, June 12, 1826, Sarah Kilham. He died in Marlborough, NH, August 6, 1892, aged ninety years, one month, and twenty-eight days.

Townsend, Charles Thomas
Charles T. Townsend (1810-1881)

Eliza J. Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, February 2, 1814, daughter of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend. She died in Saugus, MA, January 22, 1894, aged seventy-nine years, eleven months, and twenty days.

Charles Thomas “Thomas” Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, January 17, 1810, son of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend. Charles Thomas Townsend was “now residing at Milton Mills,” NH, when he made his will on May 20, 1879. Charles T. Townsend of Peterborough, NH, died on Walnut Street in Brookline, MA, January 27, 1881, aged seventy-two years, one month. (John Townsend had his home at 371 Walnut Street in Brookline).

He married in Gilsum, NH, in 1837, Elsea M. Bingham. They had children Ellen A. Townsend (1838-1908), Elsea R. Townsend (1839-1932), the legatee Charles Horace Townsend (1842-1899), Edward P. Townsend (1846-1879), Adelaide M. Townsend (1848-1935), and Alfred B. Townsend (1853-1879).

Joseph Townsend was born in England, in 1823. He died in 1887. He married in Milton, January 6, 1850, Ruth Paul Wentworth, he of Milton and she of Acton, ME. She was born in 1826. She died in 1901.

Item 7th. I give and bequeath to Martha Townsend widow of William B. Townsend two thousand dollars to be held in trust and in case of the decease of the parties named in Items 6 + 7 or either of them then their proportions shall be equally distributed between the families of John and Matilda and John and Eliza Ann Townsend.

William B. Townsend was born in Wilton, Wiltshire, England, October 21, 1803, son of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Townsend. He died in Milton Mills village, November 23, 1847, aged forty-four years.

William B. Townsend married in Canton, MA, December 13, 1832, Martha W. (Holden) Townsend, both of Canton. She was born in Boston, MA, circa 1808, daughter of Stephen and Martha (Niles) Holden. They had children Mary E. Townsend (1833-1906), Anna A. Townsend (1836-1861), Harriet Townsend (1840-), and William E. Townsend (1844-). Martha W. (Holden) Townsend died in Worcester, MA, February 5, 1896, aged eighty-eight years, five months, and nineteen days.

Item 8th. I give and bequeath to Agnes wife of Henry H. Townsend three thousand dollars to be held in trust the income or interest to be paid to her semiannually and at her decease the amount held by the trustee shall be paid to her husband Henry H, the trust ceasing at her death.

Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend did not long survive the testator. She died December 26, 1891, aged forty-seven years.

Item 9th. I give and bequeath to my brother-in-law Joseph Whitehead one thousand dollars in cash.

Joseph Whitehead was born in Yorkshire, England, May 20, 1823. He died in the Masonic Home in Charlton, MA, November 17, 1912, aged eighty-nine years, five months, and twenty-seven years.

Joseph Whitehead married in Saugus, MA, November 18, 1849, Sarah M. Townsend, both of Saugus. (He was of Milton, NH, in the marriage intentions). He was a spinner, aged twenty-four years (b. England), and she was aged twenty-five years. She was born in England, circa 1821, daughter of Joseph and Sarah “Sally” (Palmer) Whitehead. She died of consumption in Saugus, MA, February 28, 1869, aged forty-eight years, six months.

Joseph Whitehead, a trader, aged thirty-seven years (b. England), headed a Saugus, MA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah Whitehead, aged thirty-nine years (b. England), Ralph S. Whitehead, aged three years (b. MA), Ann Townsend, aged forty-eight years (b. England), Eliza Townsend, aged forty-six years (b. England), and Elizabeth Townsend, aged forty-four years (b. England). Joseph Whitehead had real estate valued at $2,200 and personal estate valued at $1,800.

Item 10th. I give and bequeath to my friend Aaron S. McIntosh five hundred dollars in cash.

Aaron S. McIntosh was born in Needham, MA, August 22, 1819, son of Samuel and Priscilla (Smith) McIntosh. He died in Boston, MA, November 4, 1895, aged seventy-six years.

Aaron S. McIntosh appeared in the Boston directory of 1885, as a bookkeeper at 25 Tremont Temple, with his house at 2859 Washington street.

Item 11th. I give and bequeath to my faithful employee John Young two hundred dollars in cash provided he is in my employ at my decease.

John W. Young was born in Barrington, NH, April 8, 1851, son of John B. and Mary J. (Buzzell) Young. He died in Brookline, MA, January 21, 1901, aged fifty-one years.

John W. Young appeared in the Brookline directory of 1891, as a coachman for John Townsend, at Walnut street, with his house on Sewall street, corner of Chestnut street.

Item 12th. I give + bequeath to my kind friend Miss Mary W. Robinson of Dorchester in consideration of her great kindness to my daughter Caroline Frances the sum of five hundred dollars in cash.

Mary Withington Robinson was born in Dorchester, MA, April 30, 1819, daughter of Stephen and Hannah (Withington) Robinson. She died in her home at 33 Brent Street, Boston, MA, September 16, 1905, aged eighty-six years, four months, and sixteen days.

Mary W. Robinson, keeping house, aged sixty-one years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her boarder, Caroline F. Townsend, aged forty years (b. MA). They resided on Washington Street.

Miss Mary W. Robinson of Dorchester, MA, was a vice-president of the New England Wheaton Seminary Club in May 1891 (Boston Globe, May 10, 1891).

Mary W. Robinson appeared in the Boston directory of 1893 as having her house at 33 Brent street. Caroline F. Townsend appeared as boarding with her. The property was described when sold by Robinson’s estate as being a frame house, with 5,186 square feet of land, situated between Talbot avenue and Washington street in Dorchester (Boston Globe, April 17, 1908).

I also direct that after all my just debts and expenses and all the hereinbefore mentioned legacies have been fully paid the remainder of my estate if any shall be equally divided between the families of John and Matilda and John and Eliza Ann Townsend.

I appoint as my Executors and Trustees of this my last will and testament my sons Henry Herbert and Frank Albert Townsend without giving surety or sureties on their official bonds as Executors or Trustees.

In witness whereof I have signed + sealed this instrument and published and declared the same as + for my last will and testament at Boston in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts this first day of November in the year A.D. one thousand eight hundred and ninety.

John Townsend (Seal)

The said John Townsend at Boston, on the first day of November signed and sealed this instrument and published and declared the same as and for his last will and testament and we at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other have written our names as subscribing witnesses. John G. Wetherell. Chas L. Lane. W.W. Martin.

Atlas Bank Five Dollar Note of 1862
A $5 Note of the Atlas Bank of Boston (Redeemable in Gold Coin)

Witness John G. Wetherell (1822-1897) was president and a director of the Atlas National Bank of Boston. Charles L. Lane (1828-1891) was an Atlas National Bank cashier. (He did not long survive the testator). William W. Martin (1854-1908) was an Atlas National Bank clerk and messenger.

References:

Find a Grave. (2015, December 23). Aaron S. McIntosh. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/156311366/aaron-s_-mcintosh

Find a Grave. (2010, June 5). Mary W. Robinson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/53292471/mary-w-robinson

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Agnes J. Brierley Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352199/agnes-j-townsend

Find a Grave. (2014, July 25). Charles Thomas Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/133322411

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Henry H. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115352239/henry-h-townsend

Find a Grave. (2007, October 23). James Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/22412532

Find a Grave. (2018, February 16). Jane Matilda Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/187367942/jane-matilda-townsend

Find a Grave. (2018, February 16). Jane Randall Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/187367952/jane-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Joseph Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115343080/joseph-townsend

Find a Grave. (2013, August 12). Ruth W. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115343108/ruth-w-townsend

Find a Grave. (2018, February 16). Thomas B. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/187367919/thomas-b-townsend

Find a Grave. (2015, January 28). William B. Townsend. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/141904441

Find a Grave. (2016, April 10). John W. Young. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/160833788/john-w-young

Wikipedia. (2020, March 28). Wilton, Wiltshire. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilton,_Wiltshire

Non-Public BOS Session Scheduled (July 6, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | July 3, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a BOS meeting to be held Monday, July 6.

The BOS meeting is scheduled to begin with a Non-Public session beginning at 6:00 PM. That agenda has one Non-Public item classed as 91-A3 II (a).

(a) The dismissal, promotion, or compensation of any public employee or the disciplining of such employee, or the investigation of any charges against him or her, unless the employee affected (1) has a right to a meeting and (2) requests that the meeting be open, in which case the request shall be granted.

This likely has to do with compensation, rather than the other possibilities. (The Town government has posted four positions).


Due to their concerns regarding Covid-19, there will be no public in attendance and, therefore, no public comment. The session may be watched remotely through the usual YouTube means or by teleconference. The links for both are in their original agenda, for which there is a link in the References below.

The quasi-Public portion of the agenda has New Business, Old Business, Other Business, and some housekeeping items.


Under New Business are scheduled four agenda items: 1) Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Operational Activities / Plans, 2) Ira Miller’s General Store – Tax Abatement Agreement in lieu of RSA 79-E application, 3) Jones Brook Discussion, 4) Vote to Authorize Tax Exempt Drawdown Basis Tax Anticipation Note for Fiscal Year 2020.

Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Operational Activities/Plans. One supposes, by the very terms of the meeting announcement, that the Covid-19 is still among us. We will evidently hear an update on those things with which the BOS has been active.

There will be a fifth ReopenNH rally at the State House in Concord, NH, July 4, from noon until 2 PM. This one will include a prayer, a reading of the Declaration of Independence, children’s activities, and a parade.

Ira Miller’s General Store – Tax Abatement Agreement in lieu of RSA 79-E application. Under the Community Revitalization Tax Relief Incentive (RSA 79-E), a redevelopment project resulting in a substantial rehabilitation (at least $75,000 or 15% of the total existing assessed value), any new taxable value directly generated by the renovation can be freed from the levying of property taxes for five years (for a substantial renovation), with an additional four years possible for a property listed or eligible to list on the National Register of Historic places.

Jones Brook Discussion. A bit cryptic. Either the watershed, conservation area, or partnership of that name is to be discussed.

Vote to Authorize Tax Exempt Drawdown Basis Tax Anticipation Note for Fiscal Year 2020. In which Milton’s Town government plumbs the depths: borrowing in order to spend. Taxpayers will henceforth pay not only their taxes, but interest on those taxes. Do you want to pay more in taxes than need be in order to pay interest on borrowed money? I know I don’t.

Aah, but is bond interest in the default budget? Probably not.

Tax Anticipation Note (TAN): “A municipal bond, usually with a maturity of less than one year, issued on the assumption that the debt will be paid back on future tax revenue. Municipalities issue tax anticipation notes to provide cash for immediate or time sensitive needs.”

Tax Exempt: “Federal tax laws require an analysis of a governmental unit’s cash flow needs if the borrowing is to be done on a tax-exempt basis. The need is demonstrated by preparing month-by-month cash flow estimates for the funds for which the borrowing will be made. … The statutes under which notes and warrants are authorized are likely to include a formula or dollar amount limiting the amount of notes or warrants that may be lawfully issued. They are typically payable solely from the taxes or revenues being anticipated.”

Major Hogan: What do you do when you’re short of cash? Lt. Sharpe: Do without, sir. Hogan: You borrow, Richard, from a bank.


Under Old Business are scheduled three items: 5) Request for a One-year Extension for Completion of Project on Tax Deed Auction Property Located at 1121 White Mountain Highway (Issuance of Certificate of Occupancy), 6) Status of following tax deeded structures: 20 Dawson, 79 Charles and 565 White Mountain Highway, and 7) Possible Conservation Commission Appointment.

Request for a One-year Extension for Completion of Project on Tax Deed Auction Property Located at 1121 White Mountain Highway (Issuance of Certificate of Occupancy). The owner of the so-called Blue House, which sold at auction last year, with covenants for repair within the year, has requested an extension.

Status of following tax deeded structures: 20 Dawson, 79 Charles and 565 White Mountain Highway. Properties not disposed of when the prior one sold at auction.

Possible Conservation Commission Appointment. Another “selection” (see next agenda item).


Under Other Business That May Come Before the Board is scheduled one item: 8) Open submissions for Select Board Vacancies and Announcement of Applicant Names.

Open submissions for Select Board Vacancies and Announcement of Applicant Names. Herein lies a tale, no doubt, likely one we will not hear. It would seem that one or more of the selectmen (“vacancies” being the plural form) is to be replaced, per statute, by a special “selection” rather than a special election. Those doing the selecting were themselves elected by a plurality of a minority of the electorate, but they did at least face an election.

The only statute alternative is to have a judge make the “selection” rather than the remaining selectmen. Hmm.


There will be the approval of prior minutes (from the quasi-Public session of June 15, 2020, the quasi-Public session of June 30, 2020, the non-Public session of June 30, 2020, an expenditure report, administrator comments, and BOS comments.

The administrator comments will address the first meeting report of the Local Government Efficiency Task Force™; the receipt of the GOFERR grant reimbursement; and “other.”

The Milton recipients of $288,319.13 in grants from the Governor’s Office for Emergency Relief and Recovery (GOFERR) were Eastern Boats, Inc. ($190,067.26), Shortridge Academy, LLC ($78,393.22), Aerial NDT Inspection Inc. ($11,150.72), Milton Associates, LLC ($4,534.26), and Mary V`S Unique Creations ($4,173.67).


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

GOFERR. (2020). Main Street Relief Fund. Retrieved from www.goferr.nh.gov/

State of New Hampshire. (2016, June 21). RSA Chapter 91-A. Access to Governmental Records and Meetings. Retrieved from www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/VI/91-A/91-A-3.htm

Town of Milton. (2020, July 3). BOS Meeting Agenda, July 6, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/agendas/07-06-2020_bosagenda_final_0.pdf

Town of Milton. (2020, June 22). Milton Select-Board Vacancy Needs to Be Filled. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/g/files/vyhlif916/f/news/milton_select_board_vacancy_needs_to_be_filled_003.pdf

Youtube. (1965). Cone of Silence. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1eUIK9CihA&feature=youtu.be&t=19

Milton in the News – 1862

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | June 28, 2020

A southern newspaper, published just days before the second Battle of Bull Run (Manassas), took notice of an accident involving a Federal troop transport. Among the victims were the wives of several officers of the Sixth NH Regiment.

LATER FROM THE NORTH. Northern papers of the 16th instant have been received in Richmond. On the night of the 13th inst. the steamer West Point, with 197 convalescent troops from Newport News, for Burnside’s army, was run into at Aqula Creek by the steamer George Peabody. Capt. Travers. and sunk in a few minutes. Seventy-three lives were lost, including the wives of Major Dort, Lieut. Col. Scott, and Capt. Cummings, of the 6th N.H. regiment (Weekly Raleigh Register (Raleigh, NC), August 27, 1862).


Previous in sequence: Milton in the News – 1861; next in sequence: Milton in the News – 1863


 

Milton’s Benefactor: Lewis W. Nute

By Muriel Bristol | June 14, 2020

Nute, Lewis W. - Detail
Lewis W. Nute

Lewis Worster Nute was born in Milton, February 17, 1820, son of Ezekiel and Dorcas (Worster) Nute. (The Worcester surname is sometimes rendered as Worster or Wooster).

Mr. Nute was born in Milton Feb. 17, 1820. He was son of Ezekiel and Dorcas (Worster) Nute, natives of Milton, and grandson of Samuel Nute, a native of Back River, Dover, who settled in what is now Milton, soon after the close of the Revolution. His ancestors were among the early settlers in Dover. Ezekiel Nute was a good farmer and for many years a deacon in the Congregational Church at Milton. His wife was one of the best of women. They had four sons, the second of whom was named Lewis Worster (Scales, 1914).

Lewis Worster Nute was a namesake for his maternal uncle, Lewis Worster, who was born in Milton, NH, April 4, 1815, but died there as an infant, December 18, 1815. Another maternal uncle, Isaac Worster, Jr., was an early and ardent Milton abolitionist. His maternal grandfather, Isaac Worster, was a proprietor of the Milton Social Library.

He attended the Nute school in West Milton, i.e., the Nute Ridge school. One of his teachers was John Brewster (1813-1886), for whom Wolfeboro’s Brewster Academy is named. Brewster was hired, just before he turned sixteen years of age, to teach the 1828-29 academic year at the Nute Ridge school. He ultimately became Wolfeboro’s benefactor to a similar extent as Nute became that of Milton (Parker, 1901).

He worked on the farm with his father until he was nineteen years old. When he was a small boy he went to school summer and winter, six weeks each; when he was a big boy he went to the winter school only; all big boys attended winter school. Those who think the “six weeks” schools were not of account are greatly mistaken. The best of them like that in Mr. Nute’s district were kept by college boys and the work done was first class and thorough. The boys went to these schools until they were eighteen or twenty years old. Mr Nute made good use of the time and easily mastered all the textbooks then available for school use. When he was nineteen years old he commenced teaching winter schools in the back districts and the committee said he did good work (Scales, 1914).

It was said of him also that he was “… not highly favored as regards educational privileges, being permitted to attend school only about six weeks each winter. He was so studious, however, and made such use of the limited opportunities offered that at the age of nineteen he engaged in teaching, continuing that occupation during two terms” (Hurd, 1882).

When he was twenty years old he left the farm and went to work in Boston as clerk in Mr. Simmons’ ship-chandler store (Scales, 1914).

Simmons, Thomas - NDP620708Thomas Simmons (1791-1866) appeared in the Boston directories of 1839, 1840 and 1842, as a ship chandler at 7 India street. Simmons resided on Highland street in Roxbury, MA.

When he was twenty-one he commenced work in the boot and shoe business with Elmer Townsend (Scales, 1914).

Elmer Townsend (1807-1871) appeared in the Boston directories of 1840 and 1842, as a leather dealer at 4 Blackstone street, with his house at 17 Louisburgh square (on Beacon Hill).

There was also Elmer Townsend, whose connection with the trade began early in the ’40s, and who was as largely instrumental as any one man could be in laying a firm foundation for our present enormous business. He it was who, seeking new methods to extend the trade, introduced leather sewing machines and other improvements. William W. Wickersham, the inventor, in company with Messrs. Butterfield and Stevens, came to Mr. Townsend with the first model of a wax-thread sewing machine, and so pleased him with the possibilities of its usefulness that the firm of Townsend & Mallard became owners of the patent and set to work manufacturing and introducing the machines. Mr. Townsend eventually became the sole proprietor of the interest. It was an enterprise that required both pluck and perseverance, for the machine was comparatively rude when Mr. Townsend bought it, and as it stood when perfected it was covered by 100 or more patents for improvements, each one of which Mr. Townsend valued at $1000. The royalty paid to Elias Howe for a very simple attachment was disheartening in its burden, but it had a compensation in a corresponding royalty gained from McKay for his infringement. Mr. Townsend was also interested in many other improvements (Boston Globe, June 15, 1885).

Townsend, Elmer - BP420624
AUCTION SALES (Boston Post, June 24, 1842)

A large dealer in babies’ shoes. – On Wednesday, a young stupid-looking fellow, named George Dewing, went into the store of Mr. Elmer Townsend, in Blackstone street, and lifted a package containing 26 pairs of children’s shoes, and was caught going out with them. Constable Hunt was sent for, and, after his arrest, Dewing confessed that he had stolen another package before, and told where they could be found. This lot contained 27 pairs of small shoes, and one pair of men’s. The first lot were valued at five dollars, which gave the court final jurisdiction, and Dewing was sentenced to two months in the House of Correction for stealing. The second lift was valued at eight dollars, which made the theft beyond the jurisdiction of the court, and the case was sent up to the Municipal Court. In the meantime he will reside in comfortable quarters at South Boston, subject to further orders. A third complaint has been preferred against him, for stealing shoes from another person, but the court did not think it necessary to go through another examination, as he was securely held upon the two first cases. The complainant was directed to lay his case before the grand jury, with the other two cases, and if he does, Dewing must be indicted and convicted of being a common and notorious thief. He tried to cry, but he couldn’t make it go – his lachrymal ducts refused to discount a single tear, and it was a dead dry cry that he made of it (Boston Post, May 22, 1840).

Lewis W. Nute married in Cohasset, MA, August 3, 1845, Priscilla N. Farrar [or Farrow], he of Boston, MA, and she of Cohasset. She was born in Cohasset, MA, December 6, 1819, daughter of Thomas and Priscilla A. (Nichols) Farrar. Both were aged twenty-five years.

His wife, to whom he was married Aug. 1 [SIC], 1845, was Priscilla Farrow of Cohasset, Mass. They had no children (Scales, 1914).

Quaker brothers T.P. & O. Rich formed a partnership in December 1841 (Boston Post, December 7, 1841). Lewis W. Nute began to work for them at about that time.

Later he worked with the firm of T.P. and O. Reit [Rich] & Company, remaining with them until 1848 (Scales, 1914).

Younger brother Otis Rich (1806-1876) had been active in the Boston leather trade from the 1830s.

LOST. – On Saturday, 28th Sept. was dropped from a truck coming from schooner Reeside, at Mercantile wharf to Otis Rich’s store, No. 38 Broad street, four sides red Leather, marked O. The finder will he suitably rewarded by leaving them at said store. oct8 3t (Boston Post, October 11, 1833).

The partnership of T.P. and O. Rich appeared in the Boston directory of 1846, as wholesale boot, shoe & leather dealers, at 38 Broad street. Otis Rich retired from the partnership about 1848, in order to engage in the California shipping trade (Boston Post, June 27, 1876).

Elder brother Thomas P. Rich (1803-1875) appeared in the Boston directories of 1848 and 1849, as a wholesale boot, shoe and leather dealer, and auctioneer, at 45-47 Pearl street. His passport described him as being 5′ 9″ tall, with brown hair, blue eyes, and a “blonde” complexion. He had also a high forehead, full chin, and a “prominent” nose. He became a Democrat state representative from Boston in November 1858. He and his wife died in their residence at the Parker House hotel, in Boston, some few months apart, in 1875.

Rich, TP-O - BP420706
AUCTION SALES (Boston Post, June 24, 1842)

The business portion of Pearl street in 1848 was of very limited extent. The shoe trade at first took the southern side of the street. The largest business house here was undoubtedly that of T.P. & O. Rich, which was merged into those of T.P. Rich, Warren Mallard; Townsend & Mallard; Townsend, Mallard & Cowing; Rich, Cowing & Hatch and Cowing & Hatch. It is now extinct, but at one period of its existence this house led the trade in the amount of sales (Boston Globe, June 15, 1885).

Lewis W. Nute went to work next for Allen, Harris & Potter in 1848. Allen, Harris & Potter appeared in the Boston directory of 1846 as boot, shoe, and leather dealers at 57-59 Pearl street.

… then with Allen, Harris & Potter, with whom he remained until May 1, 1853, when he purchased an interest in the business, and the new firm became Potter, Elder & Nute (Scales, 1914).

Its partners were Freeman Allen (1800-1861), whose house was at 29 Pemberton square, Nathaniel Harris (1812-1880), whose house was at Brookline, MA, and John Cheney Potter (1812-1870), whose house was at Newton, MA. Franklin B. White (1830-1885) was an employee there from 1847. Silas Potter (1820-1891) joined as a silent partner in 1848 (he was no relation to the other Potter). He boarded at 3 Bowdoin street.

It looks like a contradiction, but it is the fact that while the amount of business done was very small compared with its present proportions, the Pearl street of the early days was very much the busiest, noisiest and most crowded place. It was choked with frequent blocks of vehicles, and wore altogether an air of enterprise and activity that would astonish many of the sedate denizens of the street of today. It was customary to extend business hours into the evening, and many a big sale was made “after supper” (Boston Globe, June 15, 1885).

Lewis Nute, a trader, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Pris. Nute, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA). They shared a two-family dwelling in Ward Six with the separate household of William Spurden, a trader, aged thirty years (b. England).

Allen, Harris & Potter paid $800 in Boston taxes on its $125,000 in personal estate, i.e., their stock in trade, in 1852 (Boston Assessing Department, 1853).

P.A. Ames (1826-1909) proposed Lewis W. Nute for membership in Boston’s Columbian Lodge of Masons, to which he was initiated February 5, 1852. He was passed there, March 4, 1852, and raised there, April 9, 1852. (The Columbian Lodge, A.F. & A.M., was instituted by Paul Revere in 1795).

BAH! – The facility with which a class of Americans make themselves ridiculous, is just now receiving an illustration. A company of gentlemen from Massachusetts, calling themselves Knights Templars, are now paying a visit to Richmond and Virginia, and it is formally announced that the officers accompanying them are “Sir William Parkman, Sir John S. Tyler, Sir P. Adams Ames, Sir John A. Cumming, Sir Benjamin Dean,” etc. Yes, Sir-ee, Bob! (Berkshire County Eagle, May 27, 1859).

Preston A. Ames, a merchant, aged twenty-six years (b. MA), was a tenant in Isaac Little’s [Union House] hotel, in Hingham, MA, at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census.

In an alternate telling of this period in his life, we learn that Lewis W. Nute was taken ill about this time and nearly died. Upon recovering, he was taken into a partnership with “Potter & Co.”

When a young man Mr. Nute went to Boston to work for the leather firm of Potter & Co. He worked there for several years, when he was taken sick and nearly died. When he recovered he found that all his bills were paid and he was a silent partner in the firm. He was considered the best judge of leather in Boston (Boston Globe, September 6, 1888).

Allen, Harris & Potter appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1853, as dealers in boots, shoes & leather, at 57 Pearl street. Silas Potter, William H. Elder, and Lewis W. Nute formed a new partnership, May 1, 1853. Potter, Elder & Nute paid $608 in Boston taxes on its $80,000 in personal estate, i.e., their stock in trade, in 1853 (Boston Assessing Department, 1854).

Potter, Elder & Nute appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1854, as dealers in boots, shoes & leather, at 57 Pearl street. Potter, Elder & Nute paid $828 in Boston taxes on its $90,000 in personal estate, i.e., their stock in trade, in 1854 (Boston Assessing Department, 1855).

Potter, Elder & Nute had a letter awaiting pickup at the Charleston, SC, post-office in February 1854 (Charleston Daily Courier, February 17, 1854). The firm had perhaps a “drummer,” i.e., a traveling salesman, active in the area.

In those days before they had the present financial arrangement for exchanges, buyers used to bring their money here [to Pearl Street], buy their goods and pay for them if they were able to do so, and if not to take them on eight months’ time with the privilege of renewing for eight months more if they wanted to. Very few of the dealers in town had any concern in the manufacture of goods. It was not the custom of buyers from abroad to visit the factories as at present, nor was the convenient drummer then to be found. In order to meet the demand, the traders were forced to carry larger and more varied stocks than now. Then stocks had consigned goods but smally represented, and these were gathered by a system of barter then in vogue which necessitated the carrying of a stock of leather as well as of shoes. For this stock of leather the goods of Southern and Western merchants were often hypothecated in payment, and frequent purchases of leather were made upon the arrangement of turning over goods in payment for it before a shoe had been sold. The manufacturers made weekly visits to the towns, usually on Saturday preceding their stocks of shoes, which came from the railways and baggage wagons later. Small manufacturers sometimes came in with their one or two cases upon their shoulders. The goods were examined and a price set upon them, after which an adjournment was made to the cellar, where other prices were made for the leather stock, and the trade was then consummated by settlement, generally on the basis of two-thirds stock to one-third cash. It was not an uncommon thing to exact a round profit on the stock and then sell the shoes at another good profit above their normal cost; but this was thought to be fair, for the manufacturer was never at a loss to regain the cost of his productions, and the dealer had to run the risk of a Southern or Western repudiation. which was the curse of the times (Boston Globe, June 15, 1885).

Charles Brewster (1813-1893) kept a dry goods store in Ft. Madison, IA, and made periodic buying trips “in the east,” where he filled some of his inventory at Potter, Elder & Nute. In this transaction, and in several lawsuits against others that “repudiated” their debts, i.e., defaulted on them, the shoe dealers’ methods may be glimpsed.

In that [1854] year, he started his purchasing in Boston on February 28 with an order for shoes, boots, and leather trunks from Potter, Elder & Nute, totaling $760.38. Four days later, he completed purchases totaling $1339.85 in yard goods and men’s’ clothing from two other Boston houses (Pilcher, 1979).

Potter, Elder & Nute appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1855, as dealers in boots, shoes & leather, at 57 Pearl street, with partners Silas Potter, who had his house at 103 Harrison avenue, William H. Elder, who had his house at 1 Bulfinch street, and Lewis W. Nute, who had his house at 33 Myrtle street.

Lewis W. Nute, a boot and shoe dealer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Newton, MA, household at the time of the 1855 MA State Census. His household included Priscilla Nute, aged thirty-five years (b. MA).

Potter, Elder & Nute donated $100 to the Seaman’s Friend Society in April 1855. They were one of the larger Boston donors. (Allen, Harris & Potter donated also $100) (Wilmington Daily Herald (Wilmington, NC), April 25, 1855)).

Goods were sent to St. Louis by water from here [Pearl Street] by the way of New Orleans. St. Louis was then the extreme Western market. There were other distributing points, like Louisville, Memphis, New Orleans and other points on the Mississippi. Chicago was not then known as a point of distribution. and competition was all in a southern direction. It took in those days two or three months to get goods from Boston to St. Louis. When gold was discovered in California [in 1848] a large market was opened there for boots and shoes, and they were taken around the horn, requiring six months for the delivery. To this day, notwithstanding the fact that goods are now so largely manufactured in California, a considerable trade remains with the Pacific slope, and not a few buyers from San Francisco, Oregon and other extreme Western points are seen during a year in Boston (Boston Globe, June 15, 1885).

Potter, Elder & Nute sued Richard Ritter in Sangamon County (IL) Circuit Court, in November 1855, to recover a debt. Ritter had given Potter, Elder, and Nute a promissory note but then failed to pay.  Ritter retained the Illinois law firm of Lincoln & Herndon to represent him. Yes, Abraham Lincoln’s law firm, although this case was handled by his partner, William H. Herndon. Ritter agreed to a judgment against himself for $353.37. The court sold 280 acres of land that belonged to him to satisfy the judgment (Papers of Abraham Lincoln, 2006).

The firm of Potter, Nute, White & Bayley paid $800 in Boston taxes on its $100,000 in personal estate, i.e., their stock in trade, in 1856 (Boston Assessing Department, 1857). Potter, Nute, White & Bayley appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1856, as dealers in boots, shoes & leather, at 57 Pearl street, with partners John C. Potter, Jr., who boarded at Newton corner, Lewis W. Nute, who had his house at Newton corner, Franklin B. White (1830-1885), who had his house at Milton, MA, and James C. Bayley (1832-1883), who had his house at 14 Avon place.

POTTER, WHITE & BAYLEY, Manufacturers of Boots, Shoes and Brogans, Nos. 128 and 130 Summer Street; Factories Cochituate, Farmington, and North Abington. – One of the oldest-established and leading firms of boot and shoe manufacturers in New England is that of Messrs. Potter, White & Bayley, whose salesrooms and warehouse are so centrally located at Nos. 128 and 130 Summer Street. The business was established in 1839 by Mr. Amassa Walker, succeeded in 1848 by the firm of Emerson, Harris & Potter, in 1847 it became that of Allen, Harris & Potter, succeeded by Potter, Elder & Nute in 1853, and, then, again in 1856 by the firm of Potter, Nute, White & Bayley. In 1862 Mr. Nute retired and Mr. John C. Potter, Mr. Franklin B. White, and Mr. James C. Bayley organized the well-known firm of Potter, White & Bayley and who did so to advance their quality of product, and introduce fine hand-made and machine-sewed goods that are fully the equal of custom work. The decease of Mr. Bayley occurred in 1873 [1883], and of Mr. White in 1885, since which date Mr. Potter has actively conducted this immense in co-partnership with his son, Mr. F.C. Potter, a young man of great executive ability and sterling integrity, and Mr. H.M. Stephens, a popular salesman. The honored old name and style, a veritable trade mark, has been permanently retained and the house maintains its lead in the van of progress, with perfected and ample resources at command. Their factories are three in number, and situated respectively at Cochituate, Farmington, and North Abington. They are unusually extensive, substantial structures, fitted up with the latest improved machinery and appliances, and afford employment to upwards of fifteen hundred hands, engaged in the manufacture of the finest and medium grades of men’s and youth’s boots, shoes and brogans. The proprietors exercise closest personal supervision over their large concern, and are recognized authorities in their line, exercising the soundest judgment and the utmost care in the selection of leather and findings and noted for the elegance of cut and perfection of finish, as well as the essentials of strength and durability. These are the handsomest and most popular lines of men’s fine and medium wear on the market today, and the firm’s trade therein has attained proportions of great magnitude. They have three floors at Nos. 128 and 130 Summer Street, devoted to salesroom and carrying of a heavy stock. The importance of this to buyers is evident. These are not special sample lines, but the goods as will be shipped, every box subject to inspection, while, as regards price and quality the firm challenge competition. Their goods are in growing demand throughout the entire United States, and the interests developed are of appreciated value in maintaining Boston’s supremacy in this important branch of trade (American Publishing, 1889).

Potter, Nute, White & Bayley appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1857, as dealers in boots, shoes & leather, at 57 Pearl street.

L.W. Nute of the firm of Potter, Nute, White & Bayley, shoe & leather dealers, of 57 Pearl Street, appeared in a lengthy list of members of the Boston Board of Trade, in 1858 (Boston Board of Trade, 1858).

Lewis Nute, a shoe merchant, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Newton (West Newton P.O.), MA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Priscilla Nute, aged forty years (b. MA), and Eliza Morgan, a servant, aged thirty-five years (b. Nova Scotia). He had personal estate valued at $1,000.

Potter, Nute, White & Bayley appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1861, as dealers in boots, shoes & leather, at 57 Pearl street, with partners John C. Potter, Jr., who had his house at Roxbury, Lewis W. Nute, who had his house at Newton Corner, Franklin B. White, who had his house at Milton, MA, and James C. Bayley, who had his house at 15 Union Park.

The Sheriff of Boone County, IL, held a sale of real estate seized from Henry L. Crosby of Belvidere, IL, August 28, 1861. The seizure and sale sought to satisfy an older court  judgment against Crosby in favor of Nute’s prior firm of Potter, Elder and Nute. This would seem to be another case, similar to the Ritter case of 1855, in which footwear had been supplied to a merchant on credit, and that merchant then defaulting or “repudiating.”

SHERIFF’S SALE. BY VIRTUE of an alias Execution and Fee Bill, issued out of the Clerk’s office of the Circuit Court of Boone County and State of Illinois, and to me directed, whereby I am commanded to make the amount of a certain Judgment recently obtained against Henry L. Crosby, in favor of Silas Potter, William H. Elder, and Lewis W. Nute, out of the lands, tenements, goods and chattels of the said Henry L. Crosby, I have levied on the following property, to wit: Lots No. two and three, in Block No. forty in the Original Town of Belvidere, Boone County, Illinois, and the tenements thereon. Therefore, according to said command, I shall expose for sale, at public auction, all the right, title and interest of the above named Henry L. Crosby in and to the above described property, on Wednesday, the 28th day of August, 1861, at one o’clock, P.M., at the Court House, in Belvidere, Boone County, Illinois. Dated at Belvidere, this 6th day of August, 1861. HENRY F. JENNISON, late Sheriff of Boone County, Illinois (Belvidere Standard, August 20, 1861).

H.L. Crosby, a merchant, aged forty years (b. NY), headed a Belvidere, IL, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. He had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $500.

Brogan Shoes - Civil War
American Civil War Brogan Shoes (Battlefield Trust)

Lewis W. Nute’s particular market niche was inexpensive Brogan and plow shoes. The term Brogan derives from the Irish Gaelic word bróg, meaning simply “shoe,” and its diminutive brógán, meaning “little shoe.” They were “little” in the sense that they rose only to or above the ankle, but not so high as boots. Brogans were an Army shoe style, from as early as the English Civil War, and were widespread in both armies of the American Civil War. (Thomas Jefferson wore Brogans to his 1801 inauguration). Generally, civilian Brogan and plow shoes were cheaper grades of work shoes popular especially in the south and west. Some Brogan-style shoes featured waxed uppers, presumably to make them water-resistant. Kip Brogans were made from calfskin.

Potter, Nute, White & Bayley sold 1,236 pairs of Army shoes to the Massachusetts Commissary General, for $1,335.60, in 1861. The Commissary General purchased at this time 45,113 pairs in all, from 17 different vendors, for a total of $73,986.60 (MA Adjutant General, 1862).

BOSTON BOOT AND SHOE MARKET. Saturday, October 12, 1861. No change in the general features of the market. The aggregate of sales has been fair for the season, but they are principally confined to one specialty, that of army goods; for these, rates of both stock and work are advancing, and while leather adapted for this purpose is eagerly sought for and sold readily for cash, there is no less inquiry for workmen, to whom good wages and constant employment are being given. The manufacture of sewed army shoes is now firmly established in Norfolk, Plymouth and a portion of Middlesex counties, but in other parts of the State it has not been so generally introduced and is not so flourishing. Government has recently been paying considerable sums to parties here holding contracts, and the effect is already visible in the trade. The shipments for the week compare favorably with those of the corresponding week of last year. New York has taken 5551 and Cincinnati 2262 cases, a considerable portion of which are army goods. – Shoe and Leather Reporter (New England Farmer, October 19, 1861).

The Town of Newton, MA, charged William Thomas $21.12 in property taxes for his house valued at $3,200 in 1862. (A “mil” rate of $6.60 per thousand [!]). Thomas owned three houses; this was the one “occ. by L.W. Nute” (Newton Auditing Department, 1863).

The shoe dealers of Pearl street had a visit from well-known and controversial Methodist minister and Whig newspaper editor, William G. Brownlow, of Knoxville, TN, in June 1862. He mounted a counter in the store of Nute’s former partners and delivered a speech.

Parson Brownlow was recently called upon to address a large assemblage of the shoe dealers in Pearl street, Boston. He entered the store of Messrs. Allen, Harris, & Potter, and, the fact becoming known a large number of his admirers rushed in en masse and filled the principal room. The Parson thereupon mounted the counter and delivered a characteristic address, which was listened to throughout with the most earnest attention and elicited deafening applause (Louisville Courier Journal, June 4, 1862).

Parson Brownlow’s daughter was famous also for having refused a demand by Confederate soldiers to remove a U.S. flag hanging at their Knoxville home. She held them off with a pistol. The family was expelled from Tennessee in April 1862. Brownlow would eventually be post-war Governor of Tennessee and a U.S. Senator from there.

Thomas Officer & W.H.M. Pusey, bankers, tax-paying & collecting agents, of Council Bluffs, IA, included Potter, Nute, White & Bayley, of Boston, Mass., among their references in a newspaper advertisement of November 1862 (Council Bluffs Nonpareil, November 29, 1862).

Lewis W. Nute continued with Potter, Nute, White & Bayley until, as one source had it, he “retired,” i.e., he left the partnership, in 1862, or, as in the following, he “took the entire business,” i.e., he bought out the others, in 1863.

In 1857 the firm changed to Potter, Nute, White & Bayley. In 1863 Mr. Nute took the entire business and held it as long as he lived. His specialty for a long time was the manufacture of brogans and plow-shoes. For a long time his wholesale store was at 27 High street, Boston. He had an extensive manufactory at Natick, Mass. His career was a remarkable one; strict in his business methods, honest in his dealings with his employees, and a large-minded citizen who loved and did not forget his old home in Milton (Scales, 1914).

Potter, Nute, Elder and Bayley were among the Boston contributors that collectively donated $35,000 to a fund for the benefit of the Western Sanitary Commission, in January 1863. Silas Potter gave individually (Forman, J.G, 1864). The Western Sanitary Commission funded medical supplies and nurses for Union soldiers in the western theater, as well as assistance to freedmen. (Nute’s nephew, George A. Nute (1842-1891), served in Company C of the Thirteenth NH Volunteer Infantry, from September 19, 1862, until June 21, 1865).

L.W. Nute signed a remonstrance addressed to the Massachusetts General Court (House and Senate) in April 1863. It opposed the establishment of a proposed Metropolitan Police force under the direction of the Massachusetts Governor.

To the Honorable the Senate and the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in General Court: The undersigned, citizens of Boston, or doing business therein, respectfully remonstrate against the passage of the Bill now pending in the General Court, providing for the establishment of a Metropolitan Police. George W. Messinger, Thomas H. Russell, Eben. Jackson, Wm. J. Hubbard, Patrick Donahoe, John Lee Watson, Herman Lincoln, Jas. O. Watson, James Paul, Wm. T. Eustis, E.L. Cunningham, Paul Adams, Jr., George E. Brown, John T. Clark, Jas. H. Beal, Theo. A. Gore, J.W. Tyler, Jas. G. Smith, Jno. S. Blatchford, Geo. K. Stevens, E.R. Seccomb, Nathan Crowell, Jonas Fitch, Fred. Howe, Hallet, Davis & Co., Wm. P. Ellison, Jos. T. Brown, I.C. Howes, L.B. Harrington, Otis Everett, Frank’n B. White, W.C. Crane, L.W. Nute, Sam’l C. Nottage, James C. Bayley, N.K. Skinner, John C. Potter, Jr., Henry E. Cobb, S.B. Smith, C.C. Batchelder, Benjamin Callender, Horace G. Tucker, Geo. E. Learnard, J. Edwin Hunt (MA Senate, 1863).

A “remonstrance” differs somewhat, if only in tone, from a petition, in that it seeks to correct officials who are engaged in making an error. Hundreds of prominent citizens, as well as the Boston aldermen, submitted remonstrances opposing this proposed police establishment. On this one signed by Nute, we may readily recognize the names of Thomas H. Russell, then a senior partner in the law firm that would craft Nute’s will (but later to be a senior Massachusetts judge); John C. Potter, Jr., Franklin B. White, and James C. Bayley, who were Nute’s partners in the firm of Potter, Nute, White & Bayley; and Henry E. Cobb, a prominent banker, who would be named later as a Nute executor.

L.W. Nute of Newton, MA, registered for the Civil War Class II military draft in Middlesex County, MA, June 20, 1863. He was a mechanic, aged forty-three years (b. NH), with no military experience.

Lewis W. Nute appeared in the Boston directory of 1867, as a wholesale dealer in boots, shoes and leather at 53 Pearl street.

Lewis W. Nute appeared in the Boston directories of 1869 and 1870, as dealing in boots, shoes and leather, at 55 Pearl street, with his house at 92 Worcester street.

L.W. Nute appeared frequently in newspaper financial columns that featured lists of Receipts of Leather and Hide deliveries. L.W. Nute was reported, on August 3, 1872, as having received 3 rolls of leather; and 10 rolls via the Boston & Providence Railroad in November 1872 (Boston Globe, August 3, 1872; November 7, 1872).

The Pearl Street “Colony” of boot, shoe and leather dealers, including Lewis W. Nute & Co.’s Pearl Street premises, was completely destroyed in the Great Boston Fire of 1872. Only some safes were saved. The 55-59 Pearl Street building was listed among those destroyed. Its owners were the Freeman Allen heirs and its assessed value was $25,000. The named tenants were Hofmes, Harlowe & Co, boots; Potter, White & Bailey, boots; and B.B. Blanchard & Co., boots. This fire of November 9-10, 1872 was Boston’s largest fire ever and remains one of the largest in U.S. history.

Boston Great Fire - Map
The Sixty-Acre Burnt District (in Red)

DEVASTATION! Pearl Street. All the magnificent stone buildings on Pearl street, throughout its entire length from Milk to Broad streets, are now but unsightly, misshapen heaps of ruins (Boston Globe, November 11, 1872).

Pearl Street - 1872 - Detail
Effects of Fire on Granite Walls – Pearl Street

Condition of Safes. A number of safes were taken out of the building on the left hand side of Milk street below the new Post-office, yesterday. These safes were of iron, lined, enclosed by a thick brick wall and protected by boiler iron. The contents were found intact. Johnson, Rust & Co., Nos. 85 and 87 Pearl street; L.W. Nute & Co. and Samuel W. French & Co., in the same building, preserved their books and papers. The contents of the safe belonging to Dunbar, Hobart & Whidden, Pearl street, were also found all right yesterday forenoon. Other parties were less fortunate. A safe belonging to J.M. Beebe & Co., Winthrop square, which was opened yesterday morning, contained nothing but a few charred books and papers. Another safe was taken from the site of Smith’s express office, corner of Water and Kilby streets, and on being opened the contents were found to be in a very bad condition. Messrs. Horswell, Kinsley & French, Winthrop square, recovered from their safe a small portion of gold coin which had been melted like lead, and a set of diamonds bedded in a shapeless mass in what had been the gold of an elegant brooch. Two vaults belonging to J.R. Bigelow, No. 43 and 45 Federal street, preserved their contents in fine condition (Boston Globe, November 16, 1872).

One of the ironies of this serious fire lies in its being fueled partly by taxation or, at least, by the desire to avoid taxation. It seems that materials and products stored in the attics and eaves of buildings were not subject to taxation, which occasioned those tax-free spaces being stuffed “to the rafters,” so to speak, with flammable materials.

L.W. Nute was elected to the Transportation committee of the New England Shoe and Leather Association, at its annual meeting held at 91 State Street in Boston, MA, January 15, 1873. He served with A.L. Coolidge, C. Coon, C.W. Hersey, and C.F. Parker (Boston Globe, January 16, 1873).

Yellow Fever raged in Memphis, TN, in October 1873, and donations were collected for its victims in Boston, MA, and throughout the country. (Milton’s Ice Industry sent five train cars full of ice (about six hundred tons) for a similar outbreak in September 1878).

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE. THE CITY. The following additional contributions have been received for the Memphis sufferers by Geo. J. Dockray. agent of the Great Western Despatch Company, No. 25 Water street; L.W. Nute, $25; Moore, Smith & Co., $20. Previously reported, $1285. Total $1330 (Boston Globe, October 13, 1873).

Lewis W. Nute had some sort of business arrangement or relationship with the J.O. Wilson & Co. shoe factory of Natick, MA, by which he served apparently as its exclusive sales agent. Its partners were John O. Wilson (1821-1906) and his son, Edward H. Wilson (1845-1882), until the son’s death, and thereafter, Henry G. Wood (1853-1895). Nute might have been some sort of silent partner, investor, or contracting customer. (Some accounts go even so far as to imply that Wilson worked for him).

J.O. Wilson & Co., Manufacturers of Men’s, Boys’ and Youths’ Brogans and Plow Shoes. – The well and favorably known establishment of J.O. Wilson & Co., manufacturers of men’s, boys’ and youths’ brogans and plow shoes, is in all respects the leading, largest and best equipped firm in this branch of industrial activity hereabouts, and which since the inception of enterprise thirty-two years ago has maintained record of steady progress. This flourishing business was established in 1855 by the present senior member, the style changing ten years to J.O. Wilson & Son, who conducted it up 1881, when the firm name changed to J.O. Wilson & Co., and as such it has since been continued with uninterrupted success. The factory is a huge four-story structure 30×200 feet in superficial dimension, with two wings, each 30×60 feet in area, supplied with full steam power and equipped with the most improved machinery, devices and appurtenances, including a one hundred-horse power boiler and a sixty-horse power engine, forty stitching-machines, etc. (over two hundred machines of all kinds being in service), while employment is afforded to from three hundred and fifty to four hundred and twenty-five hands. The average daily output runs from five thousand to six thousand pairs, however, the shop having a capacity to turn out as high as seven thousand pairs a day when required, and a heavy and excellent stock is constantly carried. The trade extends all over the United States, the products being strong, coarse wear, entirely, and altogether an enormous business is done. The ownership consists of Messrs. J.O. Wilson and H.G. Wood, natives of Massachusetts and New Hampshire respectively, the founder of the business being now a gentleman of sixty-seven but active and vigorous, while Mr. Wood is a young man of push and enterprise. Mr. Wilson is the popular and respected president of the Five Cents Savings Bank, and is also a director of the Natick Gas Company and the Horse R.R. Company and a trustee of the Public Library, and deacon of the Orthodox Church. Lewis Nute & Co., No. 27 High street, are the firm to whom all orders for the above goods should be sent (International Publishing, 1887).

The young and enterprising Mr. Wood died suddenly in 1895, and Nute’s surviving partner, Charles H. Moulton, was a pallbearer at his funeral (Boston Globe, October 21, 1895).

J.O. WILSON & SON appeared in the Natick directory of 1873, as shoe manufacturers, on North Avenue, at its corner with Walnut street. His house was at Walnut street, corner of Grove street. J.O. Wilson received 11 rolls of leather from the Merritt & Company’s Express, and L.W. Nute received 4 rolls, in December 1873 (Boston Globe, December 10, 1873).

Mrs. L.W. Nute appeared in a list of subscribers to “Our Dumb Animals,” a publication of the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (MSPCA), in May 1873 and May 1874 (MSPCA, 1874). Lewis W. Nute appeared in a list of subscribers to “Our Dumb Animals,” in May 1876 (MSPCA, 1876).

The following Boston Globe article cites L.W. Nute (and his contract manufacturer, J.O. Wilson & Son of Natick, MA) as being an exception to the general run of closures and business failures of the prevalent financial Panic of 1873. This worldwide economic recession was at its worst between 1873 and 1877. (The Globe article included also some snide allusions to Reconstruction-era southern black legislators, as being men of small understanding and oversized feet, for which they ordered from Nute the shinier variety of cheap work shoes).

NATICK. Shoe Business. The shoe business in Natick remains quite dull. Some factories are doing nothing. and others are making a half or a quarter their usual amount of goods. The only exception to this stagnant condition of things is the factory of J.O. Wilson & Son, who manufacture for L.W. Nute of Boston. Mr. Nute has kept his business going on as usual, and since November 1, 1873, Wilson & Son have manufactured for him 2457 cases of “brogans” and “plough shoes,” and are still at work filling orders at the rate of 130 cases a week. Their pay roll ranges from $8000 to $10,000 per month. which is punctually paid. Last year, they manufactured 4627 cases. This firm has just manufactured three pairs of “wax brogans,” No. 16, for a couple of colored Representatives-elect to the Mississippi Legislature. It speaks well for the future of Mississippi that she elects to her high places of trust men of large “understanding,” and if these are representative men of that ilk, whenever Mississippi “puts her foot down,” it behooves the people of adjoining States to look out for their corns (Boston Globe, March 23, 1874).

American House - BPL
American House (per BPL)

L.W. Nute was elected to the Transportation committee of the New England Shoe and Leather Association, at its annual meeting held at 91 State Street in Boston, MA, January 30, 1874. He served with C. Coon, E. Hutchinson, H.H. MacWhinney, and C.F. Parker (Boston Globe, January 31, 1874).

The Mayor of New Orleans, LA, appealed to the Mayor of Boston, MA, April 18, 1874, for help in dealing with Mississippi River flooding. Over ten thousand acres were inundated. “Many thousands of families are ruined in their fortunes, and threatened with starvation.” Lewis W. Nute subscribed $50 for the “Louisiana sufferers” in April 1874. Over $30,000 was raised (Boston Globe, April 27, 1874).

L.W. Nute, and H.A. Turrel, both of Boston, were guests at the Maxwell House hotel in Nashville, TN (The Tennessean (Nashville, TN), November 29, 1874). Lewis W. Nute appeared in the Boston directory of 1875 as a wholesale boot and shoe dealer, on High street, at its corner with Federal street. H.A. Tirrill also appeared as such also, but at 45 Hanover street. (These were their post-fire addresses, both had been at 55 Pearl street in 1871).

Lewis W. Nute appeared in the Boston directory of 1878, as dealing in boots, shoes and leather, at 27 High street, and boarding at the American House.

American House Advertisement - BG750604
Fires and Recessions Reduce Prices (Boston Globe, June 4, 1875)

Lewis W. Nute is here identified – either correctly or not – as owner of the Natick factory, which was being run by J.O. Wilson & Son. There seems to have been operating a rather complicated arrangement by which some employees had their own separate sub-employees or sub-contractors, who were paid out of the contracting employee’s check. Mr. Nute seems to have become involved in some dispute between two employees and, if the Boston Globe’s follow-on correction was more correct than their original article, he would seem to have judged incorrectly.

NATICK. Caught in the Act. C.O. Wilson, looked upon as being an honorable man of this place, was caught in the act of stealing from his employer yesterday, pay-day. It is not his first theft, but heretofore be has been successful. Wilson was foreman of the stitching-room in the factory of Lewis W. Nute, run by J.O. Wilson & son, and was hired by the month. John Moran is hired by the day in the same department, taking the place of his brother Andrew, who had the riveting by the case and paid two boys out of his pay. Since Andrew has left, Wilson has clipped the coupons and, at the end of the month, sent them into the office, representing the work being done as piecework. He would let Moran go to the office and collect the money, and turn the same over to him, he then paying Moran by the day and the boys by the week, putting the remainder in his pocket. Last month it amounted to $7.50, this month $22, and Moran would not give it up as was demanded. Mr. Moran saw Mr. Nute and told him the story, when he was told to keep the money and he should see Wilson in the morning. He did so, and [Wilson] told him to take his departure forever more (Boston Globe, August 7, 1879).

NATICK. A Correction Cheerfully Made. The Globe of yesterday contained an article which represented that Charles O. Wilson of Natick had been detected in stealing. The Globe reporter had the report of the theft, as he supposed at the time, from responsible parties, but an investigation of the case shows that be was seriously misled. The substantive facts are as follows: Mr. C.O. Wilson, the party charged with wrong-doing, is a middle-aged man who has from childhood resided in Natick and bears an unblemished reputation. Mr. Wilson worked in the factory of J.O. Wilson & Son and was foreman of the stitching room. One Andrew Moran had a job in the same room and employed a number of hands to rivet and eyelet shoes. Moran went to the office monthly with coupons on which he drew his pay by the case and paid his hands by the day, making a profit on his help. Moran was under Mr. Wilson, the foreman, and his habits became so bad that Mr. Wilson virtually discharged him. Mr. C.O. Wilson then proposed to J.O. Wilson & Son to add to his previous duties of foreman the duties of Moran, provided he could hire the help by the day and set the margin of profit Moran had previously received. This proposition was accepted, and C.O. Wilson then hired Moran’s brother John, who performed most of the duties formerly performed by his brother. Mr. L.W. Nute, the real proprietor of the factory, made the price for work, and of course Mr. Wilson did not steal from Mr. Nute. Wilson agreed to pay Moran $1.75 per day for his labor. and Moran informed The Globe reporter that Wilson paid him as per agreement. Moran said to the reporter that he found he had a chance to go for Wilson, and put up the job out of pure revenge. By repeated representations to Mr. L.W. Nute that things were going wrong, Moran secured his end in the discharge of Wilson by Nute. People who knew all the parties and the facts do not question the integrity of Wilson (Boston Globe, August 9, 1879).

Lewis W. Nute, aged sixty years (b. NH), and Priscilla Nute, aged sixty years (b. MA), were lodgers at the American Hotel on Hanover Street in Boston, MA, at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Henry Rice, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), was its proprietor. There were twenty-one lodgers, and one hundred thirteen resident servants of various types. (The census enumerator complained of the difficulty of gathering accurate information regarding the American Hotel’s resident staff).

Lewis W. Nute commissioned artist Frank Henry Shapleigh (1842-1906) to paint a picture of his Nute Ridge farmstead, which is dated 1880, and of the view from that farmstead. Shapleigh was an artist of the White Mountain School.

THE FINE ARTS. Frank Shapleigh has divided his time between the White Mountains, his old stamping grounds in Maine, and Cohasset. From these localities he has brought home a crowded portfolio – memories of “the green and pleasant places” of interior New England and of the rough and wind-beaten coast of the Old Commonwealth. Mr. Shapleigh seems to have found an inexhaustible source of artistic inspiration in and about the places of his Summer’s sojourn. He shows us shady nooks in the fields and forests of Maine and New Hampshire, long stretches of sunny landscapes, glimpses of old-fashioned country farm-houses and grass-bordered country roads; and, turning from these, we have the scraggy cedars that cling to the rocks and bluffs of the South Shore, the sands and rocks and the long line of ocean with its burden of white sails. Mr. Shapleigh has worked earnestly and industriously, tbe past season, and has something to show for it worth the showing (Boston Globe, October 20, 1874).

One wonders how they met. Shapleigh’s paintings certainly appeared in exhibitions and galleries in Boston. The article above demonstrates some familiarity at least with Cohasset, MA, from which Mrs. Nute came. Shapleigh was a Boston native – and resident – but he and his parents had also life-long connections with Lebanon, ME.

Lewis W. Nute took Charles H. Moulton (1847-1915) as his partner in 1880, under the name Lewis W. Nute & Company. Moulton was born in Dover, NH, September 2, 1846, son of Josiah and Harriet (Allen) Moulton. Moulton had worked as paymaster for the Cocheco Manufacturing Company in Dover, NH, before he “came to Boston in 1871 and entered the employ of L.W. Nute, shoe manufacturer” (Chilton Company, 1915).

CHARLES H. MOULTON, Manufacturer of Boots and Shoes, No. 27 High Street. – Boston has long been noted as being the centre of the wholesale boot and shoe trade of the United States, and the command of large capital, coupled with the well-known energy and enterprise of the representative members of the trade, has permanently retained this supremacy. Prominent among the reliable and progressive houses extensively engaged in this important trade is that of Mr. Charles H. Moulton, whose office and salesroom are located at No. 27 High Street. Mr. Moulton owns and operates two spacious and well-equipped factories, one being at Dover, N.H., and the other at Natick, Mass. These factories furnish constant employment to 600 skilled operatives who turn out daily 1000 pairs of plow shoes and brogans. This extensive business was established twenty years ago, by Mr. L.W. Nute. In 1880 Mr. Charles H. Moulton became a partner the firm being known by the style and title of “L.W. Nute & Co.” On October 1888 Mr. Nute died after a successful career, when the business became the property of Mr. Moulton, who has since associated with him Mr. Charles E. Bigelow of New York, as special partner. Mr. Bigelow is president of the Bay State Shoe Company, and is a resident of New York City. The brogans, plow shoes, etc., manufactured by Mr. Moulton are general favorites with the trade and public, and are unrivalled for quality, durability, strength, and workmanship. All orders are carefully and promptly filled at the lowest possible prices, and the trade of the house now extends throughout all sections of the United States and Canada. Mr. Moulton was born in New Hampshire, and is a resident of Waltham, where he filled the office of alderman for several years. He is an enterprising and honorable business man, liberal and just in all transactions, and is achieving a substantial and well-merited success (American Publishing, 1889).

L.W. Nute & wf. [wife], of N.H., were arrivals at the American House hotel in Boston, MA, in November 1881 (Boston Post, November 2, 1881). Mr. & Mrs. Lewis W. Nute appeared in the Clark’s Blue-Book editions of 1882 and 1884, as residents of the American House hotel, in Boston’s West End.

American House Advertisement - BP810524
An Unexceptional Table? (Boston Post, May 24, 1881)

Lewis W. Nute was a “special” partner in the Boston firm of Hersey, Whittier & Wyman, to the tune of $100,000, when it failed in August 1883. Hersey, Whittier & Wyman appeared in the Boston directory of 1882, as hide and leather dealers, at 276-78 Purchase street. Its partners were Charles W. Hersey (1837-1885), whose house was at 69 Newbury street, Justin Whittier (1848-1897), whose house was at Newton, MA, and Walter Forestus Wyman (1854-1919), whose house was at Chelsea, MA.

Hersey, Whittier & Wyman. – BOSTON, MASS., August 4. – The announcement will be made in the morning that the large shoe and leather firm of Hersey, Whittier & Wyman, doing business on Federal street. has failed with liabilities of half a million. The suspension, it is stated, is not brought about by the recent heavy failures in that line of trade, but is due entirely to other causes. The firm were sole-leather tanners and dealers in upper leather, 278 Purchase street,-and made an assignment of their property, for the benefit of creditors, to Wm. F. Mullin, of the firm of Mullin & Brown. The failure became known to but very few persons Saturday, and the announcement will be a surprise not only to the general public, but to the greater part of the shoe and leather trade. The firm have as branches Hersey & Co., tanners, of Moose River, N.Y., and George M. Botchford, tanner, of Glensdale, N.Y., and all three concerns go down together. Moose River branch consists of Mr. Hersey and Mr. Wyman, and the Glensdale branch of Botchford & Hersey. The firm have done a large business both in sole leather and in wax and kip, and combined liabilities of the main and branch houses aggregate $500,000. Indebtedness almost entirely to banks, very few notes having been given for merchandise. The assets are large, and the failure, the firm state, is due to the refusal of the banks, on account of the feeling of distrust which at present prevails in reference the shoe and leather trade, to take the firm’s paper as liberally as they have been accustomed to do. The firm is not involved at all in the affairs of F. Shaw & Bros., or any concern which has failed within the last few days. Lewis W. Nute, Natick, boot and shoe manufacturer, is a special partner for $100,000 until February 28, 1885. The firm has been considered worth $200,000 or $300,000, and its failure will tend to check the restoration of confidence which had begun to take place of distrust induced by the Shaw failure and those growing out of it (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 5, 1883).

Another Despatch. The suspension of Hersey, Whittier & Wyman naturally causes considerable uneasiness, as on the surface it seemed to indicate a general tendency to demoralization in the shoe and leather trade of the city. A careful analysis of the situation, however, leaves no cause for a panic or general alarm. It is possible that the firm will pay all their liabilities in full, and that Lewis W. Nute, of Natick, the special partner to the amount of $100,000, will be able to save a portion of his capital (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), August 6, 1883).

BUSINESS REVERSES. Hides and Leather. Hersey, Whittier & Wyman, Boston, Mass., commission and tanners, failed; debts $493,747; assets $307,322 (Countin Room Company, 1883). 

Nute might have preserved in this loss as much as $62,000 to $70,000 of his original $100,000 investment (Daily City News, September 7, 1883).

But as Shakespeare had it, “When sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions.” The shoe market was experiencing generally a serious downturn, due to which Nute sought a wage reduction in Natick, MA. The J.O. Wilson & Co. workers went out on strike. In response, Nute sought to relocate a part of his manufacturing at least to Dover, NH.

Gleanings in New England. The McKay lasting machine operators in the shoe factory of L.W. Nute, 14 in number, at Natick, Mass., have left work, refusing to instruct green hands who have been employed to fill the places of former “linkers,” who left because of a reduction in prices (St. Johnsbury Index (St. Johnsbury, VT), November 22, 1883).

NATICK. There seems to be no change as yet in the condition of affairs at the shoe factory of J.O. Wilson & Co. Neither have there been the least signs or anything ungentlemanly on the part of the strikers. It is yet maintained that Mr. Nute will take his business to Dover, N.H., to the E.C. Keenear factory, which, it is said, he will have in operation a week from Monday (Farmington News, December 3, 1883).

The Dover City Council sought to “encourage” Nute’s proposed relocation from Natick, MA, to Dover, NH, by exempting him from taxation for a period of ten years. It passed the following resolution to that effect, December 6, 1883:

Resolved, &c. That the firm of Lewis W. Nute & Co., are hereby exempted from taxation for the term of ten years from date – providing they do a business amounting to $100,000 per year in the manufacture of boots and shoes in Dover, meaning hereby to exempt all machinery, stock, and all new buildings which shall be built and used by Messrs. L.W. Nute & Co. for the manufacture of boots and shoes in this city. Passed December 6 (City of Dover, 1883).

Lewis W. Nute & Co. took up some factory space at 10 Grove street in Dover, NH, which had been vacated or partially vacated by John H. Hurd & Co. (It passed to Bradley & Sayward after Nute’s death. Nute’s operation continued under the name of his surviving partner, Charles H. Moulton, in a new factory built by the Dover Improvement Association in 1892).

Bradley & Sayward; factory owned by the Kenney estate; built in 1861; dimensions, 60 x 40; built of wood; four stories; steam power; cost, $4,000; kind of goods manufactured, mens’ and boys; heavy brogans and plow shoes; number of hands employed, forty; yearly pay roll, $10,000. This factory was successively occupied by Goodwin & Kenney, Ira W. Nute, J.H. Hurd & Son, Lewis Nute & Co., Bradley & Sayward (NH Bureau of Labor, 1896). 

Lewis W. Nute (Nute & Co.) appeared in the Dover, NH, directories of 1884, 1886, and 1888, as boot and shoe manufacturers, at [10] Grove street, corner of Third street. HORACE T. BABB, husband of Nute’s niece, Carrie A. (Nute) Babb, appeared as the agent for L.W. Nute & Co, boarding at Mrs. Hannah [(Nute)] Hatch’s, at 11 Sixth street, in 1884-88. Babb was a mill foreman and manager of long experience.

TELLING ANOTHER STORY. A Statement of the Natick Troubles from the Manufacturers’ Point of View. (Special Despatch to The Boston Globe). NATICK, April 14. A representative of the McKay & Copeland Machine Company gave today the following statement in regard to the trouble between the firm of J.O. Wilson & Co. and the Lasters’ Union: “The trouble,” said he, “began last fall When L.W. Nute tried to bring about a reduction of the cost of his machine lasting. He had fourteen machines in the shop. It took two men and a boy about 18 years old to operate each machine. That there might be no injustice to his men he discharged the fourteen young men who had outgrown their occupation, proposing to employ fourteen lads who would be willing to work for its wages. By this move be ensured his operators an advance of two cents and his fitters the same price as before. He hired one or two new nickers. but they were run out of the factory by the disaffected operatives. His machine operators and fitters joined issue with the discharged nickers, and refused to enter his employ again. The machine operators incited the hand lasters, between whom and the firm there was no issue at all, to join them and form a lasters union. The union was formed and the hand lasters left the shop. ‘This caused the shutting up of the factory for some five or six weeks. The unaffected operators began to be anxious to resume work. They gave the hand lasters to understand that unless they pulled out from the machine lasters and went to work again they should obtain friends of theirs to do Mr. Nute’s lasting. and should protect them. “The result of this was that the hand lasters came back to work. The machine lasters were also anxious to come back if they could come at the old price. But the result was a cut-down, because the firm proposed to pay nothing extra for extra sizes or plow shoes; hut it is probable that the two cents advance offered the machine operators would have nearly compensated for the loss. Mr. Nute refused to allow the machine operators to come back at the old price, but did furnish employment to some of them at hand lasting. “The situation remained the same until the close of the present season. The firm in the meantime moved three of its lasting machines to Dover, N.H. Two of the remaining machines were run more or less by boys. At the close of the present season Mr. Nute discharged all his lasters and shut down his factory. “I want it distinctly understood that the boot and shoe trade do not recognize a man’s right to consider himself an employe after he has been paid off at the end of the season. The lasters claim that they are still employes. But we say that they are not. “The firm then procured some twenty new men from other places. Of this number. the Lasters’ Union was successful in gaining over only two or three. Last Thursday night there were five machines running and the new operators were doing good work. The Lasters’ Union used all means to buy off, drive off and intimidate the new men. They left the next day. The town authorities thus far have shown no disposition to afford the new men any protection. There is only one simple issue in this matter and it is this: Has Mr. Nute the right to employ twenty-two men and eleven lads at day wages to fill the place of his discharged help? Must he shut up his factory or employ his old discharged help? The firm employs a large number of men altogether, and the present policy which tends to drive them out of town is not exactly propitious for the business interests of Natick.” (Boston Globe, April 15, 1884).

WHAT THE LASTERS SAY. Statement of the Employes’ Side of the Story in the Natick Difficulty. (Special Despatch to The Boston Globe). Natick, April 17. – A member of the Lasters’ Union voiced the sentiment of his fellows today by making the following statement of the past difficulty at J.O. Wilson & Co.’s: “At the beginning of last fall’s sale, Mr. Wood of the firm called the ‘nickers’ to his office, and told them the firm was going to pay thirty cents per case for ‘nicking.’ They considered it boys’ work, and unless the men were willing to work at that price they would obtain boys. The men refused to accept, because it was a reduction from forty-five cents for regular sizes, fifty-five cents for extra ones, and sixty cents for ‘plows.’ “After discharging the ‘nickers’ Mr. Wood offered to let out to the operators by contract the lasting of the shoes for $1.40 per case, each operator to employ his own ‘fitter and nicker’ and to be responsible for the work. He suggested to them that they could have sixty cents by paying thirty cents to ‘nickers’ and fifty cents to ‘fitters.’ They informed Mr. Wood they would not accept of the contract under any’ conditions. He then told them the firm would hire ‘nickers,’ whereupon three men were put on. The operators were at their posts ready to work. One ‘nicker’ left of his own free will, on account of not being able to do the work, while the other two knew nothing of how to begin, and left in disgust. This obliged all operators to be idle, and they asked for work at handlasting and were refused. “The handlasters were interested in the actions between the firm and machine men. They saw that if the firm was successful in reducing the machine men, it was only a question of time when a similar state of affairs would follow for them. and they induced the men to join the Lasters’ Union for protection. The advisory board of the union sent a committee to the firm to make some adjustment. Not being successful they reported to the board a statement of J.O. Wilson to the effect that if the machine men would return to work he would give 55 cents per case to operators, 50 cents to fitters and 40 cents to nickers for all orders, which left a reduction of eight cents per case. The advisory board deemed it inexpedient to accept the compromise and ordered the lasters out, when the factory was closed for three weeks. At the end of this time the firm sent for the advisory board, to which they said in writing: ‘We will put all the lasters to hand lasting, machine men or not, at the price paid at last sale.’ This was accepted by the board and the men were ordered to resume work, and all machine men were soon at work except those who had obtained work elsewhere. The factory has since run till about the first of April, when they closed to take an account of stock, paying off their help as usual. “All was supposed to be harmonious until about ten days ago, when a new complication was the employment of out-of-town men to run the machines at a reduction, as these men told the Lasters’ Union. they were told by members of the union of the circumstances existing, when the new men stated that they were misinformed as to the condition of affairs and as they now understood the matter, were willing to leave town. The Thursday eight affair was condemned by the union, as they used their every effort to suppress the crowd. “Now, as to a few statements in Tuesday’s GLOBE from the firm’s point of view. The unaffected operatives in the factory had little, if any, stock taken in what they said. They were not recognized by the union in any way. The representative states that Mr. Nute discharged all his lasters and shut down his factory. His statement can be refuted by the language of J.O. Wilson, senior member of the firm, who, so long as any man has left his kit in his factory, does not consider him discharged any more than he does his uppers or sole leather ‘clicks’; but when he discharges a man tells him to remove his kit. It is acknowledged that the firm has a right to employ new help, but the Union claims a right to induce employes, in a legitimate way, to leave the shop when they are working tor a reduction. “He further slates that the officials show no disposition to protect the hew men. This statement is refuted by the Board of Selectmen. who claim orders were given for an extra force if needed, but as the chief of police did not see the necessity of it, he did not call for any help. “While the union men do not care to have any controversy with the McKay & Copeland Machine Company, they purpose to tell things just as they are, not to surprise the citizens with such statements as have appeared from the company. They were in substance contradicted the day before by J.O. Wilson in the local press.” (Boston Globe, April 18, 1884).

Full details have not come to hand as yet, but Nute’s newly-established Dover, NH, operation seems to have had a fire on May 1884 that damaged the factory and destroyed some of his materials.

New England Notes. The damage to L.W. Nute & Co. of Dover is considerably larger than at first supposed. Fifty cases of fitted uppers and 150 sides of whole stock were totally destroyed and the building slightly damaged. In all the amount will be near $7000, covered by insurance. Work will not be resumed till next week (Boston Globe, May 20, 1884).

New England Notes. Lewis W. Nute & Co.’s shoe factory at Dover, N.H., started up on full time yesterday forenoon (Boston Globe, May 12, 1885).

Franklin B. White, who had been one of  Lewis W. Nute’s partners in Potter, Nute, White & Bayley, died in Milton, MA, June 10, 1885.

Death of Franklin B. White. Mr. Franklin B. White, of the firm of Potter, White & Bayley, died at his residence in Milton at 8 o’clock this morning after a brief illness of peritonitis. He was born in Quiney in 1831. Coming to Boston In 1847, he entered the boot and shoe house of Allen, Harris & Potter as a boy, and remained in the trade up to time of his death. The firm of Potter, Elder & Nute succeeded the house of Allen, Harris & Potter, and was in turn succeeded by the firm of Potter, Nute, White & Bayley. The present firm of Potter, White & Bayley was organized in the spring of 1865. James C. Bayley died about a year and a half ago. Mr. White was a director of the Bank of North America, and a director of the Boot and Shoe Exchange. He was also one of the most popular members of the Commercial Club. He has left a widow and one son (Boston Globe, June 10, 1885).

Lewis W. Nute & Co.’s new Dover, N.H., shop was highlighted as doing well by the beginning of 1886.

Dover, N.H. The shoe shops are now doing a good business. L.W. Nute & Co. have 125 employes, whose weekly pay averages $1500. They turn out 180 cases of brogans and plough shoes per week, valued at about $50 per case (Boston Globe, January 1, 1886).

L.W. Nute & Co.’s shoes were still popular and well regarded in its key southern and western markets. Goodbar, Love & Co. of Memphis, TN, but with a branch office at 24 High street, Boston, MA, advertised its shoes for sale.

Also, L.W. Nute & Co.’s Kip Brogans and Plow Shoes – the best Brogans made in the United States – heretofore handled by Goodbar & Co. (Memphis Appeal, February 5, 1886).

Priscilla N. (Farrow) Nute died at the American House hotel in Boston, MA, April 2, 1886 aged sixty-six years.

Another Factory Shut Down. Dover, N.H., May 1 – L.W. Nute & Co.’s shoe factory which resumed work last Monday after four weeks’ shut down has been closed indefinitely. This action resulted from the presentation by the Lasters’ Protective Union to the shoe factories here of a price list demanding an average increase of twenty-five per cent over old wages (Chattanooga Commercial, May 1, 1886).

FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 14, 1886. The Nute shoe factory, in Dover, started up Monday forenoon after a brief shut down. The Hurd shoe factory, which was expected to start up also, did not but will some day this week (Farmington News, May 14, 1886).

The Boston City Council voted, in January 1887, to seek the elimination of the tolls paid on harbor ferries running between East Boston and the main Boston peninsula. Many “modern” arguments were deployed in favor of this. Mr. Foss said it was a matter of “justice”; Mr. Morrison (Ward 1) thought East Boston’s residents were “entitled” to this service; Mr. McEnaney did not think that East Boston residents should be “compelled” to pay; and Mr. Whittemore thought it an opportunity for the legislature to decide. There being no such thing as a “free lunch” or, in this case, a “free ferry,” these councilors were proposing that the costs be paid instead by others that did not use the ferries (Boston Globe, January 21, 1887).

Mr. Frost thought it would set a bad precedent; Mr. Morrison (Ward 9) did not think the city should have to establish “free” ferries; and Mr. Webster observed rightly that if the tolls were removed, then East Boston housing rents would rise as an inevitable consequence. This misguided “free ferry” motion passed by forty votes (62.5%) in favor to twenty-four votes (37.5%) opposed (Boston Globe, January 21, 1887). Boot and Shoe Reporter, in its March 3, 1887 issue, included L.W. Nute & Co. among the sixty Boston boot and shoe companies that “… signed a remonstrance against any legislation giving the City Council authority to abolish the tolls on the East Boston ferries.” His former firm of Potter, White & Bayley signed too.

Lewis W. Nute was suffering by June 1888 – if he had not been before – from Bright’s Disease, i.e., an acute or chronic nephritis (kidney disease), with heart complications. He made out his last will and testament in Boston, MA, June 15, 1888. Shortly thereafter he returned to his Nute Ridge farmstead in West Milton. He experienced there what newspaper obituaries usually characterize as “a lengthy illness.”

LOCALS. Lewis Nute, the well-known shoe manufacturer, lies dangerously ill at his farm in Milton. His is a complicated case, being Bright’s disease, a valvular trouble of the heart, together with congestive symptoms. His recovery is improbable (Farmington News, August 10, 1888). 

LOCALS. There is no improvement in Lewis Nute’s condition, and it seems that it must be only a question of a few days when he passes away (Farmington News, August 17, 1888).

LOCALS. There seems to be no change in Lewis Nute’s condition. Deacon Hussey is reported about the same as last week (Farmington News, August 24, 1888).

The Boston Globe and other papers reported falsely that Lewis W. Nute died on Wednesday, September 5, 1888. He was not a well man but, as with Mark Twain, the reports of his death were greatly exaggerated. (However, their erroneous report did provide an interesting anecdote of his early career).

LEWIS W. NUTE DEAD. Boston’s Big Leather Dealer Expires at His Home. Dover, N.H., Sept. 5. Lewis W. Nute died this morning at the homestead at Milton. When a young man Mr. Nute went to Boston to work for the leather firm of Potter & Co. He worked there several years, when be was taken sick and nearly died. When he recovered he found all his bills paid and he was a silent partner in the firm. He was considered the best judge of leather in Boston. Shortly afterwards the name of the firm was changed to Nute, Potter, White, & Bailey. He stayed with them some years then sold out and went into business for himself with an office in Boston and manufactory in Natick, and five years ago he started the shop in Dover (Boston Globe, [Wednesday,] September 5, 1888).

LEWIS W. NUTE NOT DEAD. The report current, Wednesday, of the death of Lewis Nute proves to be unfounded, as he is still living. This is the second time that the press has had Mr. Nute dead, and we would advise our daily brethren down the river to be a little more cautious how they kill us off up here. We are all human, and all expect to die eventually, but let us do so of our own accord, please (Farmington News, September 7, 1888).

LOCALS. Mr. Geo. Nute of Massachusetts, with other relatives, came Thursday noon under the supposition that his uncle, Lewis Nute, was dead, having seen the account of his death in the daily press (Farmington News, September 7, 1888).

Lewis W. Nute actually died six weeks later in the Nute farmstead on what is now the Nute Ridge Road, in West Milton, NH, October 20, 1888, aged sixty-eight years, nine months, and three days.

LOCALS. Lewis W. Nute died at his residence at Nute’s ridge, Milton, Saturday morning, Oct 20. The remains will be buried in the Mount Auburn cemetery to-day, Thursday (Farmington News, October 26, 1888).

LOCALS. Lewis W. Nute left an estate of over a $1,000,000 (Farmington News, November 2, 1888).

TELEGRAPHIC SUMMARY, ETC. The late Lewis Nute, of Milton, N.H., left $25,000 for building a schoolhouse at that place, and $100,000 as a permanent fund for maintaining the school, in addition to numerous other public bequests (Baltimore Sun, November 6, 1888).

The public bequests of his last will included the Nute High School and Library, and the Nute Memorial Chapel.

The Lewis W. Nute estate appeared in the Boston, MA, directories of 1890, 1894, and 1898, as having its office at 35 Congress street, rm. 20.


References:

American Publishing & Engraving Company. (1889). Illustrated Boston, the Metropolis of New England. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=wNFAAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA109

Boston Assessing Department. (1853). List of Persons, Co-Partnerships, and Corporations Who Were Taxed on Six Thousand Dollars and Upwards, in the City of Boston, in the Year 1852. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=Xf9JAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA05

Boston Assessing Department. (1854). List of Persons, Co-Partnerships, and Corporations Who Were Taxed on Six Thousand Dollars and Upwards, in the City of Boston, in the Year 1853. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Xf9JAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA100

Boston Assessing Department. (1855). List of Persons, Co-Partnerships, and Corporations Who Were Taxed on Six Thousand Dollars and Upwards, in the City of Boston, in the Year 1854. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Xf9JAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA3-PA105

Boston Assessing Department. (1857). List of Persons, Co-Partnerships, and Corporations Who Were Taxed on Twenty Thousand Dollars and Upwards, in the City of Boston, in the Year 1856. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3SVNm1xEuVQC&pg=PT543

City of Dover. (1883). Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Dover. Retrieved from www.google.com/books/edition/Annual_Report_of_the_Receipts_and_Expend/YWovAQAAMAAJ?&pg=RA1-PA113

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Public BOS Session Scheduled (June 15, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | June 12, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a quasi-Public BOS meeting to be held Monday, June 15, at 4:30 PM.

Due to their concerns regarding Covid-19, there will be no public in attendance and, therefore, no public comment. The session may be watched remotely through the usual YouTube means or by teleconference. The links for both are in their original agenda, for which there is a link in the References below.


The Public portion of the agenda has a Limited Agenda, and some housekeeping items.

Under New Business is scheduled a single agenda item, albeit with two parts: 1) Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Operational Activities/Plans. a). Beach and Summer Camp Operations Discussion with Possible Action, b). Town Hall Hours and Operations Discussion with Possible Action.

ReopenNH
Third ReopenNH Rally at NH State House, May 16 (Milton Observer)

Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Operational Activities/Plans. One supposes, by the very terms of the meeting announcement, that the Covid-19 is still among us. We will evidently hear an update on those things with which the BOS has been active.

Governor Sununu announced yesterday, June 11, that his “Stay at Home” order expires Monday, June 15, i.e., the day of the BOS meeting. Gatherings will no longer be limited to ten people. Gyms, racetracks, charitable gaming facilities, libraries and funeral homes will be allowed to reopen, with modifications. Indoor movie theaters, amusement parks, performing arts venues and adult day centers may reopen Monday, June 29, with some restrictions.

a). Beach and Summer Camp Operations Discussion with Possible Action. Newspapers have published photographs of fair-sized crowds at Jenness State Beach in Rye, NH, from Friday June 5. In Milton, the BOS discussion might feature red tape X’s on the beach at six-foot intervals?

b). Town Hall Hours and Operations Discussion with Possible Action. As of today, open “by appointment.”


There will be the approval of prior minutes (from the Workshop session of May 20, 2020, the quasi-Public session of May 29, 2020, the quasi-Public session of June 1, 2020, and the Non-Public session of June 1, 2020), and BOS comments.


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

Town of Milton. (2020, June 12). BOS Meeting Agenda, June 15, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/miltonnh/files/agendas/06-15-2020_bosagenda_final.pdf

Last Will of Lewis W. Nute (1820-1888)

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber), June 7, 2020

Here follows a transcription (with annotations) of the last will and testament of Milton benefactor Lewis W. Nute. It may have been written in the American House hotel on Hanover Street in Boston, MA, which was then his principal residence, or in the nearby State Street office of his attorneys. It is dated [Friday,] June 15, 1888.

Walker Map, Boston, 1883, w American House
Downtown Boston in 1883, with the American House

Nute died on his family farm on Nute Ridge in West Milton, NH, on Saturday, October 20, 1888, and this last will was proved in Suffolk County Probate Court, in Boston, MA, on Monday, November 19, 1888 (Suffolk County Probate, 608:62).


Lewis W. Nute – Will – Proved Nov. 19, 1888

I, Lewis W. Nute, of Boston, in the county of Suffolk, and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, do hereby make and publish this my last will and testament hereby revoking all wills heretofore made by me.

I. I constitute and appoint as executors of this my will and as trustees whenever a trust in herein created, Charles H. Moulton, of Waltham, John Q. Henry, of Newton, and Henry E. Cobb, of Newton, all of Massachusetts; and I direct that they be exempt from giving surety on their bonds in either capacity.

Requiring a surety bond for executors of such a large estate – even a bond based upon posting a percentage only – would have imposed a significant financial burden on them. Even propertied men might have struggled to raise so much liquid cash. (Every $1,000 Nute bequeathed would be worth today about $90,000. (A $20 “double eagle” gold piece from 1888 would have today the gold value of about $1,800 in modern Federal Reserve paper money)).

Boot & shoe merchant Charles Henry Moulton (1847-1915) of Waltham, MA, had been Lewis W. Nute’s partner in the firm of Lewis W. Nute & Company since 1880. He was born in Dover, NH, September 2, 1846, son of Josiah and Harriet M. (Allen) Moulton. He  was a fellow Mason, having joined Waltham’s Monitor lodge in 1883. He was a banker when he died in Waltham, MA, June 7, 1915, aged sixty-eight years, nine months, and five days.

Boot & shoe merchant John Quincy Henry did not long survive Nute, dying of apoplexy, i.e., a stroke, in Boston, MA, December 21, 1888, aged sixty-six years, one month, and twenty-three days. He was born in Rutland, VT, circa 1822, son of William and Catherine A. Henry. The will’s provisions for replacing an executor and/or trustee would have been employed right from the start.

Banker Henry Eddy Cobb was born in Hartford, CT, June 21, 1839, son of Andrew B. and Lydia M. (Eddy) Cobb. He would be later mayor of Newton, MA, in 1896-98. He died in Newton, MA, February 2, 1908, aged sixty-eight years.

II. I give and bequeath unto my beloved brother, Samuel F. Nute, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars.

Nute’s younger brother, Samuel Freeman Nute, was born in Milton, July 8, 1827. He died in Peabody, MA, August 14, 1893, aged sixty-six years, one month, and six days.

Samuel F. Nute married in Portland, ME, August 25, 1853 Josephine Wyatt Page, he of Milton and she of Wakefield, NH. She was born in Wakefield, NH, April 7, 1832, daughter of David and Caroline (Jones) Page. Josephine W. (Page) Nute survived her husband, dying in Melrose, MA, May 12, 1913, aged eighty-one years, one month, and five days.

In his own last will, dated April 23, 1891, Samuel F. Nute of Wakefield, NH, appointed his wife, Josephine W. Nute, as his executor and left her all his estate, both real and personal, excepting $5, which he left to their son, Frank I. Nute. “My reason for not providing more for my said son is he being financially in condition not to be in need of further provision by me” (Essex County Probate, 497:319).

III. I give and bequeath unto my beloved nephew, George A. Nute, the sum of twenty-five thousand (25,000) dollars & to his wife, Ann J. Nute, the sum of twenty thousand (20,000) dollars.

George Albert Nute was born in Charlestown (Boston), MA, March 17, 1842, son of Lewis W. Nute’s elder brother, Cyrus W. Nute (1817-1876), and his wife, Almira (Banfield) Nute (1817-1890). He died in Natick, MA, January 22, 1891, aged forty-eight years, ten months, and five days.

George A. Nute married (2nd) in Natick, MA, April 12, 1877, Anna J. (McDavid) Henderson, he of Natick and she of Augusta, ME. He was a shoe cutter, aged forty-three years, and she was aged thirty-six years. It was the second marriage for each of them. She was born in Augusta, ME, August 15, 1851, daughter of John and Margaret (Bunting) McDavid. She died February 9, 1925.

IV. I give and bequeath unto my beloved nephew, Frank I. Nute, the sum of ten thousand (10,000) dollars; and to his wife, Lizzie F. Nute, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars; and I give to each of the children of said Frank I. Nute and Lizzie F. Nute, who shall be living at my decease, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars.

Frank Isaac Nute was born in Milton, March 22, 1854, son of Lewis W. Nute’s younger brother, Samuel F. Nute (1827-1893), and his wife, Josephine W. (Page) Nute (1832-1913). He died in Melrose, MA, January 25, 1918.

Frank I. Nute married in Goshen, NH, May 30, 1880, Elizabeth Frances “Lizzie” Trow, both of Goshen. He was a minister, aged twenty-five years, and she was aged twenty-four years. She was born in Goshen, NH, July 19, 1855, daughter of Perkins and Elizabeth F. (French) Trow.  She died in Salem, MA, December 25, 1922.

Frank I. and Lizzie F. (Trow) Nute had children Samuel F. Nute (1881-1907), Willie S. Nute (1885-1885), and Harold W. Nute (1891-1918).

V. I give and bequeath unto my beloved niece, Carrie A. Babb, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars; and to her husband, Horace T. Babb, the sum of three thousand (3,000) dollars.

Carrie Ann Nute was born in Boston, MA, August 28, 1844, daughter of Lewis W. Nute’s elder brother, Cyrus W. Nute (1817-1876), and his wife, Almira (Banfield) Nute (1817-1890). She died in Dover, NH, February 7, 1911.

Carrie A. Nute married in Farmington, NH, June 12, 1871, Horace T. Babb, both of Farmington. He was a mechanic, aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-five years. He was born in Barrington, NH, September 8, 1842, son of Joseph T. and Mary B. (Tibbetts) Babb. He died in Dover, NH, November 26, 1911.

VI. I give and bequeath unto Harriet Souther, of Cohasset, Massachusetts, sister of my late wife, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars; and to Edward T. Souther, of said Cohasset, nephew of my said wife, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars; to Thomas R. Farrar, of said Cohasset, brother of my said wife, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars; to Sarah F. Maxwell, of Melrose, Massachusetts, sister of my said wife, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars; to Lewis N. Maxwell, of Winchester, Massachusetts, nephew of my said wife, to Sarah Priscilla Mason, of New York, niece of my said wife,  the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars; to Edwin R. Maxwell, of said Melrose, nephew of my said wife, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars.

Lewis W. Nute’s late wife had been Priscilla N. Farrar (1819-1886). (Her surname was often spelled as Farrow). She was born in Cohasset, MA, December 6, 1819, daughter of Thomas and Priscilla A. (Nichols) Farrar. Her siblings, all younger than she, were Mary Farrar (b. 1821), who apparently died young, Elizabeth Harriet “Harriet” Farrar (1825-1902), Sarah Farrar (1828-1903), and Thomas R. Farrar (1831-1916).

Harriet Farrar married in Cohasset, MA, February 8, 1846, Edwin F. Souther (1822-1901). They had two children, Edwin F. Souther, Jr. (1846-1929), who was named in the will, and George F. Souther (1851-1856).

Sarah Farrar married in Boston, MA, March 6, 1848, Richard F. Maxwell (1821-1923). They had children Lewis Nute Maxwell (1849-1932), who was named in the will, Sarah P. Maxwell (1851-1921), (wife of William W. Mason) who was named in the will, Edwin R. Maxwell (1854-1932), who was named in the will, and Mary H. Maxwell, who died young.

Frodsham Gold Watch
A Victorian-era Frodsham Gold Watch (Catherine Southon)

VII. I devise and bequeath to Lewis W. Nute, son of my said nephew George A. Nute, if he shall survive me, and to his heirs forever, my farm with the buildings thereon situate in the Town of Milton in the State of New Hampshire, and consisting of about two hundred acres, except such lot as shall be selected and set apart out of said farm by my trustees for the purpose of erecting a chapel as hereinafter provided and for the grounds attached thereto not exceeding one acre with suitable approaches thereto, together with all the household furniture, fixtures, stock, horses, carriages, harnesses, wagons, tools, farming implements of every description, and all the personal property pertaining to or used with said farm at the time of my decease. Also my Frodsham gold watch and chain, and all my jewelry and articles of personal and household use and ornament.

Lewis Worster Nute [2nd] was born in Natick, MA, October 25, 1880, son of George A. Nute (1842-1891) and his wife, Anna J. (McDavid) Nute (1851-1925). He died in Boston, MA, March 6, 1943.

This grandnephew and namesake of Lewis W. Nute was only eight years of age when he inherited the Lewis W. Nute farm, its stock, tools, appurtenances, furniture, and his granduncle’s gold watch. The Middlesex County court – he lived in Natick, MA – appointed a guardian for him in 1889 to protect his interests, as distinct from those of his parents.

Lewis W. Nute [2nd] married, circa 1908, Florence M. Seaverns. She was born in Cambridge, MA, September 4, 1874, daughter of William H. and Susan L. (Guffney) Seaverns. She died in Brookline, MA, January 31, 1928.

VIII. I give and devise to the said Town of Milton, the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars; the same to be invested by said Town and the income thereof to be expended from year to year by the Selectmen of said Town to keep in repair the Cemetery of said Town and the lot therein where my parents are buried; the first care to be of said lot.

Parents Ezekiel Nute (1794-1859) and Dorcas (Worster) Nute (1797-1869) are buried in the Hayes Cemetery, which is situated on the north side of Farmington Road (NH Route 75) in Milton, between Governor’s Road and the Hare Road.

IX. I give and bequeath to said Town of Milton, the sum of fifty thousand (50,000) dollars; the same to be invested by said Town and the income thereof used by the Town for the maintenance and support of the common or district schools therein; but one-tenth of the income of said fifty thousand dollars and any increase thereof shall be annually used for the support of a school in the district in that part of said Town where said farm is situated.

Milton’s common or district schools would later be closed one by one, mostly in the 1920s. One supposes that the Milton Grammar school might be defined as a sort of continuation or successor to those district schools. It might be more difficult to stretch the definitions for the Nute Ridge school, which was particularly identified as being entitled to its own dedicated 10% of the annual interest money. A later school superintendent fretted in his annual report about possibly having to forfeit that 10% if the Nute Ridge school were to be closed, which is likely why it was the very last of them to be shuttered (save the Milton Mills school, which was not a district school, as such).

X. I give and bequeath to the Orthodox Congregational Church and Society occupying the Meeting-House at Milton Three-Ponds, so called, in said Town of Milton, the sum of ten thousand (10,000) dollars, the same to be invested and the income thereof to be applied to the support of preaching by said Church and Society; but no part of the principal of said ten thousand dollars shall ever be used by said Church and Society for building purposes, but a portion of said income may be used from time to time for the repairs of said Church and Society’s Meeting-House and Parsonage.

Rev. Frank E. Haley (1835-1904) was then in his second pastorate as Congregational minister at Milton Three Ponds. He would later be the first librarian at the Nute High School and Library (to be succeeded after his death by his widow and then his daughter).

Nute Chapel - Nute Chapel
Nute Chapel

XI. If during my life I shall not have done so, I direct my executors to erect a chapel with a suitable library room therein, near or on my said farm in said Town of Milton, at a cost not exceeding the sum of ten thousand dollars; and I hereby give to my said Trustees and their successors the further sum of thirty thousand dollars, the income of which shall be forever used for the support, care and maintenance of said chapel, and for the providing of preaching, and the purchase of books for the use of the minister and Sabbath School for the library in said library room. And I hereby authorize my said Trustees to set apart out of my said farm and to designate my [by] marks and bounds a lot for said chapel with grounds attached thereto, not exceeding one acre, with suitable approaches, the title to said chapel and lot to remain with said Trustees and their successors.

The term “viz.” (or “vizt.”) used in sections XII and XIV below is an abbreviation of the Latin term or phrase vidēre licet (“it is permitted to see”). It was used commonly to introduce a list or series. In this case, Lewis W. Nute is about to list semi-annual allowances (or life estates in interest money), which he has labeled (a) through (g). They are to be interest payments only on principal amounts held for the time being in trust, as distinct from the outright bequests that he detailed above for many of the same parties.

XII. I give to my said Trustees the following named sums upon the Trusts hereinafter set forth: – viz.;

(a). The sum of fifty thousand (50,000) dollars in trust to pay over the net income as often as once in six months to my said brother, Samuel F. Nute, during his life; and at his death in trust to pay over and distribute the said net income at their discretion to the deserving poor of said Town of Milton, employing therein such individuals or corporate agencies as they shall see fit; and with power at any time to transfer and convey the principal of the trust fund to any corporation which may be organized with the approval of my trustees for the time being for the purpose of providing charitable relief to the poor of said town.

The “deserving poor” would have been thought to encompass those that could not work, such as the elderly, the infirm, and the disabled, as distinct from those whose poverty arose from their own vices and failings, such as imprudence, sloth, gambling, drunkenness, etc. (We should note that he intended the charitable relief to be dispensed via private entities, such as individuals, churches, incorporated charities, etc., rather than governmental ones).

(b). The sum of thirty-five thousand (35,000) dollars in trust to pay over the net income thereof as often as once in six months to my said nephew, George A. Nute, during his life; and at his death to pay over and distribute the principal of said trust fund in equal shares to and among his then surviving children and the issue of any child or children deceased, such issue taking by right of representation.

Per Stirpes. Distributing assets per stirpes (sometimes called “by right of representation”) means that assets will be divided evenly among heirs, but if one of the heirs predeceases the testator, their children (if any) will split their deceased parent’s share. The surviving child or children “represent” the deceased parent in the division.

(c). The sum of twenty thousand (20,000) dollars in trust to pay over the net income thereof as often as once in six months to Ann J. Nute, the wife of my said nephew, George A. Nute, during her life, and at her death to pay over the net income thereof as often as once in six months, to Ann J. Nute, the wife of my said nephew, George A. Nute, during her life; and at her death to pay over and distribute the principal of said trust fund in equal shares to and among her then surviving children and the issue of any child or children deceased, such issue taking by right of representation.

This section above had some duplicate wording stricken out and initialed by the registrar, as having been stricken out also in the original.

(d). The sum of thirty thousand (30,000) dollars in trust to pay over the net income thereof as often as once in six months to my nephew, Frank I. Nute, during his life; and at his death to pay over and distribute the principal of said trust fund in equal shares to and among his then surviving children and the issue of any child or children deceased, such issue taking by right of representation.

(e). The sum of ten thousand (10,000) dollars in trust to pay over the net income thereof as often as once in six months to Lizzie F. Nute, wife of my said nephew, Frank I. Nute, during her life; and at her death to pay over and distribute the principal of said trust fund in equal shares to and among her then surviving children and the issue of any child or children deceased, such issue taking by right of representation.

(f). The sum of twenty-five thousand (25,000) dollars in trust to pay over the net income thereof as often as once in six months to my niece, Carrie A. Babb, during her life; and at her death to pay over and distribute the principal of said trust fund in equal shares to and among her then surviving children and the issue of any child or children deceased, such issue taking by right of representation.

And upon the decease of either the said George A. Nute, Ann J. Nute, Frank I. Nute, Lizzie F. Nute, or Carrie A. Babb, leaving no issue him or her surviving, then I direct that the principal of the trust fund held for his or her benefit during his or her lifetime be added to and become a part of the Nute High School and Library Fund, hereinafter created. And I direct that none of the beneficiaries for life to whom the income of any trust fund is herein given shall have any power of assignment or anticipation of such income, and that no part of such income shall in any way be subject to the chain of any creditor of such beneficiary.

One may have seen advertised occasionally modern arrangements by which one may sell a pension, annuity, or structured settlement for lesser amounts of immediate cash. That is to say, one sells one’s “anticipation” of future payments to someone with a longer economic “time preference,” or one uses the anticipated future payments as collateral for an immediate loan. Nute herein forbade such arrangements.

(g). I give to said trustees the sum of one hundred and twenty-five thousand (125,000) dollars in trust for the benefit of Lewis W. Nute, son of the said George A. Nute, and in trust to expend so much of the income thereof from time to time for the support, maintenance and education of the said Lewis W. Nute, as in their judgment shall seem best; and when he shall reach the age of twenty-five years, to pay over to him the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars of the principal of said trust fund; and when he shall arrive at the age of thirty years, to pay over to him the further sum of twenty-five thousand dollars; and after he becomes of the age of twenty-one years, to pay over to him the net income of said fund & of any increase thereof but without any power of assignment or anticipation on the part of said Lewis W. Nute; and upon his death to pay over the remaining trust fund equally to his children and the issue of any deceased child or children, such issue taking by right of representation. If he shall decease leaving no issue him surviving, then said Trustees shall pay over the remainder of said trust fund to be added to the Nute High School and Library Fund as hereinafter created.

Nute High School - BWXIII. After the payment of the above legacies I give out of the residue of my estate, in case the same shall suffice therefor, to the said Town of Milton, the sum of one hundred and twenty-five thousand (125,000) dollars as a fund for the purpose of erecting, establishing, and maintaining in said Town a Free High School and Library for the free use of the inhabitants thereof; to be known as the Nute High School and Library; said fund with the addition to be made thereto as hereinbefore provided to be kept as a separate fund and known as the Nute High School and Library Fund. And I direct that of said fund no more than twenty-five thousand dollars be expended in the erection of any building or buildings, and that the same be erected, and that said School and library be established and maintained in that part of the Town of Milton known as Milton Three Ponds. And that no part of any such fund be at any time loaned to said Town or invested in its notes or obligations. And if at any time the said Town shall see fit to have said School and Library incorporated, the fund herein given and all additions thereto and any and all property acquired for said school and library may be by said Town or by my said Trustees paid over and transferred to the corporation so formed; provided however, that the same shall always remain as a High School and Library for the free use of the inhabitants of said Town and shall preserve the name above given.

XIV. All the rest, residue and remainder of my estate and property of whatever nature and wherever situated, including all lapsed legacies, I give and bequeath in equal shares to and among such of the following named four persons as shall survive me, viz.: – George A. Nute, Ann J. Nute, Frank I. Nute, and Lizzie F. Nute; provided however that if either of the four shall decease before me leaving children, his or her share shall go equally among such of said children as shall survive me, and the issue of any such child deceased, such issue taking the share of such child taking the share by right of representation.

XV. I empower my said Executors and the survivor of them to sell any of my real or personal estate except that which is herein specifically devised or bequeathed, either by public or private sale, without the aid of any Court, and to make the requisite deeds and transfers; and I empower my Trustees in like manner at their discretion to sell, exchange, invest or reinvest any and all the property which shall at any time be held upon the trusts hereof, investing the proceeds of such sales upon the like trusts; and my executors or trustees and their successors may continue in any of the trusts herein created any investments made by me during my life and it is my desire that they be continued unless in their judgment they ought not to be so, and, in case by reason of sales or otherwise they shall have occasion to make new investments, I direct that they may be made in those securities in which the Savings Banks or other institutions in this Commonwealth are from time to time authorized to invest their deposits. My trustees shall be entitled to a fair compensation for their services; they shall be chargeable only for such moneys, stocks, funds and securities as they shall respectively actually receive, not withstanding their respectively signing any receipt for the sake of conformity, and shall be answerable and accountable only for their own acts, receipts, neglects or defaults, and not for those of each other, nor for any banker, broker, or other person with whom trust moneys or securities may be deposited, nor for the insufficiency or deficiency of any stocks, funds, or securities nor for any other loss, unless the same shall happen through their own willful default respectively. Upon all sales by my trustees or executors, their receipts shall exempt the purchasers from all liability as to the application of the purchase money.

The words “my trustees,” or “my trustee,” in this my will, shall be construed and taken to mean the trustees or trustee for the time being whether original or substituted; and the words “children” and “issue,” shall be construed and taken to mean children and issue by blood and not by adoption. In case of any vacancy in the number of my trustees by reason of death, declination, resignation, or otherwise, and so often as the same shall occur, the same shall be filled by appointment by my surviving or remaining trustees or trustee by a writing signed and sealed by them or him, and any trustee so appointed shall be exempt from giving surety on his bond; and if such appointment be not made within ninety days after such vacancy occurs a new trustee shall be appointed by the Court having jurisdiction for that purpose, and I give the remaining or surviving trustees or trustee all the powers herein given to my trustees.

The section above suggests that – after a thorough re-reading of the whole – some points were thought to be unclear or open to other interpretations than those intended and were here clarified.

XVI. I authorize my executors to continue my business of manufacturing and selling boots and shoes until the first day of May or November which shall next follow my decease.

The Dover Improvement Association had built a factory in Dover, NH, for Lewis W. Nute, in 1886. After his death they rented it to the Charles H. Moulton Shoe Company, who occupied it until about 1903.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this fifteenth day of June, A.D. Eighteen hundred and eighty-eight. Lewis W. Nute (Seal).

50 State Street - 1886-95 - BPL
50 State Street, Boston, 1886-95 (BPL)

Signed, sealed, published, and declared by the above-named Lewis W. Nute as and for his last will and testament, in presence of us, who, at his request, and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto set our hands as witnesses. W.G. Russell. Thomas Russell. H.H. Sanborn.

William G. Russell and [his son,] Thomas Russell, appeared in the Boston directory of 1889, as lawyers with the law firm of Russell & Putnam, whose offices were at 50 State street, rm. 59, and who had their house at 178 Beacon street. Miss H.H. Sanborn appeared as being employed at 50 State street, rm. 59, with her house at 41 Circuit street. (She was likely their stenographer).

A true record, Attest: Elijah George, Register.


References.

Find a Grave. (2020, May 10). Carrie A. Nute Babb. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/209951052/carrie-a-babb

Find a Grave. (2015, June 16). Henry Eddy Cobb. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147927767

Find a Grave. (2016, August 21). Thomas R. Farrar. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/168770408/thomas-r_-farrar

Find a Grave. (2016, July 5). John S. [Q.] Henry. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/166494124/john-s_-henry

Find a Grave. (2020, March 1). Lewis Nute Maxwell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/207538483/lewis-nute-maxwell

Find a Grave. (2020, March 1). Sarah Farrar Maxwell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/207538806/sarah-maxwell

Find a Grave. (2015, January 14). Charles H. Moulton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/141322856

Find a Grave. (2016, September 14). Dorcas Worcester Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169916475/dorcas-nute

Find a Grave. (2016, September 14). Ezekiel Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169916392/ezekiel-nute

Find a Grave. (2016, September 14). Frank Isaac Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169916300

Find a Grave. (2015, March 9). George A. Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/143534695/george-a-nute

Find a Grave. (2014, March 21). Lewis Worster Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/126657931/lewis-worster-nute

Find a Grave. (2015, March 9). Lewis W. Nute [2nd]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/143534724

Find a Grave. (2016, September 14). Samuel Freeman Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169916641

Find a Grave. (2010, August 3). Edwin Francis Souther, Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/55822196/edwin-francis-souther

Find a Grave. (2020, August 3). Harriet Farrar Souther. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/55821884/harriet-souther

Wikipedia. (2020, May 28). American House (Boston). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_House_(Boston)

Wikipedia. (2019, October 14). Charles Frodsham. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Frodsham

Wikipedia. (2019, December 7). Per Stirpes. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Per_stirpes

Wikipedia. (2020, May 30). Viz. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viz.

Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1912-52

By Muriel Bristol | June 2, 2020

Continued from Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1875-11

The building occupied now by the Milton Free Public Library was originally Milton Mills’ “Little Red Schoolhouse” building. (The library was then situated where the historical society is now). In this period it taught students at the primary, intermediate, and grammar levels.

Milton Free Public Library - WikipediaLittle Red School House Library. The Milton Free Public Library (“Little Red School House”) is located on half an acre in the center of Milton Mills. The architecture is French Second Empire style with a mansard style roof and dormer windows upstairs. The foundation is brick. The style is unique to Milton Mills – no other buildings in town have the same style – however it was popularly used in public buildings at the time of its construction. There have been no significant exterior renovations other than maintenance (i.e., painting and replacing rotten boards). It contains two rooms downstairs which currently operate as the library. As one enters the building, the first thing seen is a beautiful staircase that branches off in two directions. The upstairs consists of one very large room, and a bell tower with a functioning bell. The floors are hardwood and the walls are plaster (Milton Free Public Library Trustees, n.d).

The Milton Mills school teachers identified in this 1912-1952 period were Mary E. (Wilson) Hill, Ethel E. Jeffers, Herbert H. Trufant, Norma M. Page, Helen G. Snow, Jessie L. (Tinker) Walsh, Margaret E. Durgin, Etta R. Thurston, Helen M. Dunnells, Manora T. (Tuttle) Clayton, Rosamond E. (Piper) Pike, Carolyn H. Eaton, Elinor I. Leonard, Marion L. (Goodwin) Stanley, Doris E. (Rowell) Lowd, Ellen G. (Hannaford) Akers, Richard D. Gale, Leslie E. Lowry, Jr., Martha E. Hefler, Paul G. Spilios, and Elizabeth J. Lambert.

Mary E. (Wilson) Hill – 1912

Mary Eleanor Wilson was born in Farmington, NH, in November 1864, daughter of Henry W. and Lucy A. (Whitehouse) Wilson.

Mary E. Wilson graduated from Rochester High School with its Class of 1884. She appeared later with other graduates in an 1884 graduation program rediscovered in 1941. She was said to have become since “… Mrs. Canney, mother of Ralph W. Canney, who conducts a poultry farm in the Meaderboro section” (Portsmouth Herald, December 19, 1941).

Mary E. Wilson married (1st) in Farmington, NH, October, 2, 1895, Henry J. Canney. He was born in New Durham, NH, in June 1863, son of Thomas H. and Isabel R. (Dolby) Canney. She divorced him in Strafford County Superior Court, October, 13, 1897. (He died in Concord, NH, May 26, 1948 (Farmington News, June 4, 1948)).

Henry Wilson, a farmer, aged sixty-one years (b. PA), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Lucy A. Wilson, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), his daughter, Mary E.W. Canney, a school teacher, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and his grandson, Ralph W. Canney, aged three years (b. NH). Henry Wilson owned their farm, free-and-clear. Lucy A. Wilson was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Mary E.W. Canney, who was divorced, was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Mary W. Canney married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, January 19, 1907, Horace G. Hill, she of Farmington and he of Lee, NH. Both were forty years of age, she was a school teacher, and he was a farmer. He was born in Lee, NH, circa 1866, son of John W. and Mary J. (Coldwell) Hill.

LOCAL. Henry Wilson of Merrill’s Corner, an old member of Sampson Post, G.A.R., of Rochester, who for a long time had been suffering from cancer, died Jan. 29, in a hospital in Boston, and his body was brought home Sunday evening. He was a farmer and for over a quarter of a century had lived on his farm; his native place was Philadelphia. He was 72 years of age and is survived by a wife, a son, Joseph Wilson of North Adams, Mass., and a daughter, Mrs. Mary Hill, who lives at home (Farmington News, February 4, 1910).

Henry W. Locke, a lumber operator, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Barrington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Hattie B. Locke, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and his boarders, Elizabeth E. McNeff, a primary school teacher, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Mary W. Hill, a primary school teacher, aged forty-five years (b. NH). Henry W. Hill owned their farm, free-and-clear. Mary W. Hill, twice married (fourteen years in present marriage), was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Mary W. Hill appeared in the Farmington directory of 1912, as a teacher at the Merrill’s corner school in Farmington, boarding at Mrs. L.A. Wilson’s house, near the school. Mrs. Mary Hill appeared or appeared also in the Milton directory of 1912, as a teacher at the Milton Mills Grammar School, boarding at 27 Western avenue, in Milton Mills. (John Lowd appeared as retired, with his house at 27 Western avenue).

Horace G. Hill divorced Mary W. Hill in Strafford County Superior Court, March 29, 1917. He alleged abandonment.

Ralph Canney, a general farmer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his mother, Mary W. Canney, a county school teacher, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), his grandmother, Lucy A. Wilson, a widow, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), and his great uncle, Mr. Whitehouse, a widower, aged eighty-five years (b. NH). Ralph Canney owned their farm, with a mortgage.

Sarah Twombly, a fibre mill bookkeeper, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her servant, Mary Canney, a private family housewife, i.e., housekeeper, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). Sarah Twombly owned their house on the Wakefield Road, which was valued at $2,000. They had a radio set.

She may have been the Mary Canney that was living in Rochester, NH, as late as 1939.

Ethel E. Jeffers – 1912

Ethel E. Jeffers was born in Tamworth, NH, August 27, 1890, daughter of Fred L. and Gertrude M. (Gilman) Jeffers.

Fred L. Jeffers, a lumber wagon driver, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Tamworth (“South Tamworth Village”), NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Gertrude M. Jeffers, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), and his daughter, Ethel E. Jeffers, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Fred L. Jeffers owned their house free-and-clear. Gertrude M. Jeffers was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

South Portland, ME, paid Ethel Jeffers $198 in salary between September 16, 1907, and January 31, 1908, as a teacher in its Ward Four school.

During the year of 1907 there has been but one change in the teaching force of the Knightville schools. Miss Jeffers taking the place of principal’s assistant left vacant by the resignation of Miss Percival (Receipts and Expenditures, South Portland, ME, 1907-08).

ETHEL E. JEFFERS appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a teacher at the M. Mills school, who boarded at 27 Western ave., M. Mills. (John Lowd appeared as retired, with his house at 27 Western avenue).

Ethel E. Jeffers married in Tamworth, NH, December 2, 1917, Frederick H. Whiting, both of Tamworth. She was a teacher, aged twenty-eight years, and he was a farmer, aged twenty-two years. He was born in Boston, MA, June 6, 1896, son of Frank A. and Abbie C. (Hobson) Whiting.

Fred Whiting, a farm laborer, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), headed a Tamworth, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ethel Whiting, a school teacher, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and his daughter, Elenor Whiting, aged one year (b. NH). Fred Whiting rented their portion of a two-family house from his parents, Frank A. Whiting, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), and Abbie H. Whiting, aged sixty-four years (b. MA).

Fred H. Whiting, a construction carpenter, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), headed a Madison, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Ethel J. Whiting, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Elenor R. Whiting, aged eleven years (b. NH), Fred H. Whiting, aged nine years (b. NH), Jean A. Whiting, aged five years (b. NH), Virginia Whiting, aged three years (b. NH), Shirley Whiting, aged two years (b. NH), and Mary Whiting, aged one year (b. NH). Fred H. Whiting owned their house, which was valued at $2,500. They had a radio set.

Fred H. Whiting, a finish mill salesman, aged forty-five years (b. MA), headed a Madison, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Ethel J. Whiting, aged forty-six years (b. NH), Fred H. Whiting, auto mechanic trade school, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Jean A. Whiting, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Virginia Whiting, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Shirley Whiting, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Mary Whiting, aged eleven years (b. NH). Fred H. Whiting owned their house at Silver Lake, which was valued at $2,500. They had all lived in the same house in 1935.

Fred H. Whiting died in 1964. Ethel E. (Jeffers) Whiting died in Conway, NH, in March 1983.

Herbert H. Trufant – 1912-17

Herbert Harold Trufant was born in Hackettstown, NJ, May 24, 1874, son of Isaiah and Sarah R. (Gross) Trufant.

SITUATIONS WANTED. WANTED – Situation as companion or nurse by educated young man. Address H.H. TRUFANT, care J.C. Churchill, Winthrop, Mass., daTu7t au22 (Boston Globe, August 22, 1894).

Herbert H. Trufant married in Boston, MA, November 19, 1899, Grace E. Towle, he of 14 Kelton Street, Boston, and she of North Parsonsfield, ME. He was a R.R. gateman, aged twenty-five years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-three years. She was born in Effingham, NH, August 23, 1876, daughter of George W. and Clara M. (Pierce) Towle.

Herbert H. Trufant, a R.R. gateman, aged twenty-six years (b. NJ), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Grace E. Trufant, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Herbert H. Trufant rented their house at 14 Kilton Street.

Herbert H. Trufant, with his wife Grace E. (Towle) Trufant, appeared in the Wakefield, NH, directory of 1908, as a teacher.

H.H. Trufant, a public school teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. NJ), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Grace E. Trufant, aged thirty-three years (b. NH). Grace E. Trufant was the mother of one child, of whom none were still living.

THE REAL ESTATE MARKET. New Hampshire Farm. FOR SALE, 185 acres, well divided. will carry 15 head, buildings first-class condition, 1¼ miles to RR, P.O., store, etc., on R.F.D., telephone in house, near neighbors; no brokers; price reduced to $2200 for immediate sale. H.H. TRUFANT, Sanbornville, N.H. (Boston Globe, May 29, 1910).

Herbert H. Trufant appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a teacher, and principal, of the Milton Mills Grammar School, with his house 1 mile south of Milton Mills.

Herbert H. Trufant of Milton Mills registered (No. 1654) his 10 h.p. Cadillac automobile with the NH Secretary of State, between January 1 and August 31, 1912.

Herbert H. Trufant appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a principal of the Milton Mills Grammar School, with his house at 41 Church street, Milton Mills.

Herbert H. Trufant appeared in the Quincy, MA, directory of 1918, as a superintendent, with his house at 31 Appleton street, A.

Herbert H. Trufant, a R.R. clerk, aged forty-five years (b. NJ), headed a Quincy, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace E. Trufant, aged forty-three years (b. NH), and his son, Robert S. Trufant, aged nine years (b. MA). Herbert H. Trufant owned their house at 100 Charles Road, with a mortgage.

Herbert H. Trufant became next principal of the Parsonsfield Seminary, a private boarding school in Parsonsfield, ME. (Parsonsfield is bounded on the west by Effingham and Wakefield, NH. Kezar Falls is a village of Parsonsfield).

THE REAL ESTATE MARKET. FOR SALE – New Hampshire farm, nice all-year or Summer home; eight-room house, piazza, white (with green blinds), large barn, icehouse, excellent well and spring, situated on hill, fine view of the mountains, land slopes to ford, 10 minutes’ walk to village, mail delivered, nine miles to Burleyville railroad station, near neighbors. Address Owner, H.H. TRUFANT, Kezar Falls, Me. (Boston Globe, June 19, 1921).

SCHOOLS. Co-Educational Schools. PARSONSFIELD SEMINARY. North Parsonsfield, Maine. For boys and girls. In the foothills of the White Mountains. 209 acres, 4 buildings. Invigorating air. All sports. College preparatory course with certificate privilege. Domestic Science. Endowment permits $450 to cover all expenses. Booklet. Herbert H. Trufant, Principal. Box E, Kezar Falls, Me. (Harper’s Bazaar, May 1922 (also July 1922)).

History of Parsonsfield Seminary. Fourth Quarter Century. Mr. [Wesley A.] Sowle was principal for the Spring of 1919 and for the next school year. Then came Herbert H. Trufant, son of the much loved Isaiah Trufant of the preceding period. Near the end of his fourth year, not being in a suitable physical condition to withstand the duties as a principal of Parsonsfield Seminary, he was advised by his doctor to discontinue his work. Much to the regret of both teachers and pupils he left a short time before the end of the school year 1924. Under his management the school prospered and I am sure all students at that time will recall how kind and helpful Mr. Trufant always was to them, yet firm when occasion called. No matter how busy with his own duties he was always ready to help the most humble student with a knotty problem in algebra or give counsel and advice when needed. He did not regain his heath and on March 25, 1925, he passed away at his home in Effingham, N.H. (Towle, 1932).

MISCELLANEOUS. LOST – A Knight Templar’s watch chain between Little Building and Atlantic, Mass.; reward. H.H. TRUFANT, 37 Faxon road, Atlantic, Mass. (Boston Globe, May 2, 1924).

Herbert H. Trufant died in Effingham, NH, March 25, 1925, aged fifty years, ten months, and one day. (He had been resident there only ten weeks, having previously resided in Boston, MA. His occupation was teacher).

SANBORNVILLE. Word has been received here of the death of H.H. Trufant in Massachusetts. Mr. Trufant was a teacher in the Grammar school for several terms (Farmington News, April 17, 1925).

Mrs. Grace Trufant appeared in the Boston directories of 1926, and 1927, as assistant matron at 232 Centre street, in Dorchester, MA, residing on the premises. The Industrial School for Girls was at 232 Centre street in the Dorchester section of Boston, MA. (Mrs. Ethel C. Barry was the matron).

Grace E. (Towle) Trufant died in Kankakee, IL, October 24, 1964.

Norma M. Page – 1926-28

Norma M. Page was born in Milton, NH, in 1903, daughter of Robert and Ida (Sibley) Page.

Robert Page, a barber, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ida S. Page, aged forty-five years (b. MA), and his children, Norma M. Page, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Irma S. Page, aged eleven years (b. NH), Robert W. Page, aged nine years (b. NH), Ruth E. Page, aged seven years (b. NH), and Charlene A. Page, aged four years, ten months (b. NH). Robert Page owned their farm on Upper Main Street, in Milton Village, free-and-clear.

Norma M. Page appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1926-27 academic year as teacher of the Primary grades at the Milton Mills school. She had thirteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1928).

Norma M. Page appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1927-28 academic year as teacher of the Primary grades at the Milton Mills school. Margaret Durgin appeared with her in the same capacity, which implies a succession from Page to Durgin during the year. They had seventeen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1929).

Norma Page was a teacher in the Shatswell school in Ipswich, MA, in the 1928-29 academic year. Thereafter, she appeared as Norma Paige. Norma Paige was a teacher in the Shatswell school in Ipswich, MA, in the 1929-30, 1930-31, 1931-32, 1932-33, 1933-34, 1936-37, and 1937-38, and 1939-40 academic years.

Norma Page appeared in the Milton directory of 1930, as a teacher, with her house at Robert Page’s, at Milton Mills. ROBERT PAGE (Ida S.), appeared as a barber, at Milton Mills.

MILTON MILLS. Miss Norma Page and her friend, Miss Leah Wilson, teachers in the public schools near Boston, spent the week-end at Miss Page’s camp near Lovell lake (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

ELECTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS. Miss Gertrude Ciolek was employed as a substitute in the first grade at the Shatswell school, due to a heavy enrollment in Grade One. This grade was divided, with Miss Ciolek in charge of one division. Miss Norma Paige is the other first grade teacher (Report of the Town Officers of Ipswich, For the Year Ending December 31, 1937).

PERSONALS. Miss Norma Page of Ipswich, Mass., was the weekend guest of Miss Elena Wilson of Rye (Portsmouth Herald, October 25, 1939).

PERSONALS. Miss Norma Paige, a teacher at the Shatswell school in Ipswich, Mass., spent the weekend as the guest of Miss Elena Wilson of Rye (Portsmouth Herald, December 12, 1939).

PERSONAL MENTION. Miss Norma Paige of Ipswich Mass., spent the weekend as the guest of Miss Elena Wilson of Rye (Portsmouth Herald, January 23, 1940).

Henry Merson, a granite works manager, aged fifty-four years (b. Scotland), headed an Ipswich, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Isabelle S. Merson, aged fifty-two years (b. Scotland), his son, James S. Merson, a lithograph co. researcher, aged twenty-eight years (b. Scotland), and his lodger, Norma Page, a grade school teacher, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH). Henry Merson owned their house at 22 East Street, which was valued at $6,000. Norma Page and James S. Merson had attended three years of college, and Henry Merson and Isabelle S. Merson had attended four years of high school.

Norma Paige was a teacher in the Shatswell school in Ipswich, MA, in the 1940-41, 1941-42, 1942-43, 1943-44. 1944-45 academic years.

CHANGES IN PERSONNEL. Norma Paige, who has been a teacher in Grade I in the Shatswell school since her coming to this community seventeen years ago, resigned in June to accept a position in the school of Malden, Massachusetts. Miss Paige has done an extraordinary amount of in-service training while she was in Ipswich. Her departure is regrettable (Report of the Town Officers of Ipswich, For the Year Ending December 31, 1946).

Norma Page appeared in the Malden, MA, directories of 1948 and 1949 (Paige), as a teacher at the Glenwood School, resident in Melrose, MA.

Helen G. Snow – 1926-27

Helen G. Snow was born in Eaton, NH, March 22, 1903, daughter of Mark R. and Annie M. (Dennett) Snow.

Mark R. Snow, a spool mill teamster, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Conway, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie M. Snow, aged forty years (b. ME), and his children, Russell P. Snow, a shoe factory laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Helen G. Snow, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Mark R. Snow rented their farm.

Helen G. Snow graduated from Plymouth State College, in Plymouth, NH,  with its Class of 1923.

Helen G. Snow appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1926-27 academic year as teacher of the Intermediate grades at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-three enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1928).

Helen G. Snow, a public school teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), resided at the Y.W.C.A., on Chatham Street in Worcester, MA, at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. She was one of sixty-six residents there, one of three residents who were public school teachers, and one of four residents that had their own radio sets.

Josephine E. Cawley, a widow, aged seventy-two years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed a Worcester, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her daughters Bessie Cawley, an electric light stenographer, aged forty-nine years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and Mary L. Cawley, a grammar school teacher, aged thirty-seven years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and her lodger, Helen Snow, a grammar school teacher, aged thirty-two [thirty-seven] years (b. NH). Josephine E. Cawley rented their house at 2 Avalon Place, for $35 per month. Mary L. Cawley and Helen Snow had attended three years of college, and Josephine E. Cawley and Bessie Cawley had attended four years of high school. They had all resided in the same place, i.e., Worcester, MA, in 1935.

Helen G. Snow died in Brookline, MA, October 16, 1990.

In Memoriam. Helen G. Snow, [Class of] ’23, Madison, N.H., October 16, 1990 (Plymouth State Update, 1991).

Jessie L. (Tinker) Walsh – 1926-35

Jessie Louise Tinker was born in Wolfeboro, NH, July 1, 1895, daughter of Charles L. and Elizabeth (Whiteworth) Tinker.

Jessie Louise Tinker married in Wolfeboro, NH, April 7, 1917, Earle Leonard Walsh, both of Wolfeboro. She was a teacher, aged twenty-one years, and he was a machinist, aged nineteen years. He was born in Lebanon, ME, May 18, 1897, son of George L. and Carrie M. (Briggs) Walsh.

George L. Walsh, a general farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie Walsh, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), his children, Earle L. Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), Charles B. Walsh, an electric co. electrician, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Ralph W. Walsh, aged thirteen years (b. NH), his grandson, Earling Walsh, aged one year (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Jesse L. Walsh, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and his boarder, Jeremiah Hodsdon, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH). George L. Walsh owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Jessie L. Walsh appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1926-27 academic year as teacher of the Grammar grades at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1928).

Jessie L. Walsh appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1927-28 academic year as teacher of the Grammar grades at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1929).

Jessie L. Walsh appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1928-29 academic year as teacher of the Grammar grades at the Milton Mills school. She had nineteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1930).

Earle Walsh, a garage mechanic, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Jessie L. Walsh, a grammar school principal, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), his children, Leonard Walsh, aged eleven years (b. MA), and Marilyn Walsh, aged seven years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Charles A. Tinker, a widower, aged seventy-five years (b. ME). Earle Walsh rented their house on Church Street, for $10 per month. They had a radio set.

Jessie L. Walsh appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1931-32 academic year as teacher of the Grammar grades at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-one enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1933).

Jessie L. Walsh appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1932-33 academic year as teacher of the Grammar grades at the Milton Mills school. She had sixteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1934).

Jessie L. Walsh appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1933-34 academic year as teacher of the Grammar grades at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-four enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1935).

Jessie Walsh appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1934-35 academic year as teacher of the Grammar grades at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-one enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1936).

MILTON MILLS. Teachers of the local grammar school, Mrs. Jessie Walsh, Mrs. Manora Clayton and Mrs. Rosamond Pike, went to Manchester last Thursday to attend the teachers’ institute. They report interesting sessions, with splendid speakers (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

At Milton Mills Mrs. Walsh resigned to accept a position in the Wolfeboro Union and Mrs. Etta M. Thurston, who had formerly taught in the same school, was elected (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1936).

Earle L. (Jessie L.) Walsh appeared in the Wolfeboro, NH, directory of 1940, as a funeral director, on North Main street (412), with his house there too.

Earle L. Walsh, an undertaker, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Jessie L. Walsh, a public school teacher, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his children, Earle L. Walsh, Jr., aged twenty-one years (b. MA), and Marilyn Walsh, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his father, George L. Walsh, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH). Earle L. Walsh owned their house on North Main Street. Jessie L. Walsh, Earle L. Walsh, Jr., and George L. Walsh had all attended four years of high school, Earle L. Walsh and Marilyn Walsh had attended one year of high school.

Jessie L. (Tinker) Walsh died in Wolfeboro, NH, in March 1969.

Margaret E. Durgin – 1927-28

Margaret Ethel Durgin was born in Concord, NH, October 11, 1890, daughter of Luther W. and Ida A. “Annie” (Lockhart). Durgin.

L.W. Durgin, an iron foundry manager, aged sixty-three years (b. MA), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-nine years), Annie L. Durgin, aged forty-nine years (b. Canada), and his daughter, Margaret Durgin, aged nineteen years (b. NH). L.W. Durgin rented their house at 13 Summit Street. Annie L. Durgin was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Luther W. Durgin, a cast iron foundry manager, aged seventy-two years (b. MA), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie Durgin, aged fifty-eight years (b. New Brunswick, Canada), his daughter, Margaret Durgin, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his boarder, Elsie Alexander, a State hospital social worker, aged thirty years (b. NH). Luther W. Durgin owned their house at 13 Summit Street.

Miss Margaret E. Durgin appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1924, as a teacher at the Concord High School, boarding at 13 Summit street. Annie L. Durgin appeared as the widow of Luther W. Durgin, with her house at 13 Summit.

Margaret E. Durgin was secretary of the Mount Holyoke Collège Class of 1913. Her entry in its 1924 alumni catalog gave her career to date:

MARGARET E. DURGIN. 13 Summit Ave., Concord, N.H. Tchr 13-14 Waterbury, Vt., 14-15 Concord, N.H.; clerk 20- New Haven, Conn.; Rumford Press 21 Concord, N.H.; supervisor instruction 24 Boston Rubber Shoe Co., Malden (Mount Holyoke College, 1924). 

Miss Margaret E. Durgin appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1926, as having her house at 13 Summit street. Annie L. Durgin appeared as the widow of Luther W. Durgin, with her house at 13 Summit.

Margaret Durgin appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1927-28 academic year as teacher of the Primary grades at the Milton Mills school. Norma M. Page appeared with her in the same capacity, which implies a succession from Page to Durgin during the year. They had seventeen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1929).

Annie L. Durgin, a widow, aged seventy-nine years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Margaret E. Durgin, marketing manager of the League of New Hampshire Arts & Crafts, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Annie L. Durgin owned their house at 13 Summit Street, which was valued at $5,000. Margaret E. Durgin had attended five years of college, and Annie L. Durgin had attended eight years of school.

Margaret E. Durgin died in February 1980.

Etta M. (Richards) Thurston – 1927-28, 1935-44

Etta May Richards was born in Owl’s Head, ME, September 15, 1881, daughter of William E. and Climena J. Richards.

Albert F. Richardson of the Eastern State Normal School at Castine, ME, recommended that twenty-eight persons of the Class of 1906, including Etta M. Richards, of Rockport, ME, be granted their diplomas. He noted that they were already teachers of experience, having taught an average of sixty-five weeks (Maine Department of Education, 1907).

Climena J. Richards, (a widow) own income, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), headed a Rockport, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Walter G. Richards, a barge engineer, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Anna M. Richards, a private family servant, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), and Etta M. Richards, a public school teacher, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), and her grandchildren, Fred D. Achorn, an odd jobs laborer, aged thirty years (b. ME), and his wife, Carrie I. Achorn, aged twenty-five years (b. ME). Climena J. Richards owned their house on Mechanic Street, free-and-clear; she was the mother of ten children, of whom eight were still living.

Etta Mae Richards married in Auburn, ME, June 25, 1918, Jason Francis Thurston, she of Newport, ME, and he of Auburn. She was a school teacher, aged thirty-six years, and he was a grocer, aged forty-six years. (She was his third wife). He was born in Middleborough, MA, April 16, 1872, son of Francis T. and Marcia E. (Weston) Thurston.

Jason F. Thurston, a minister, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Belmont, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta M. Thurston, a school teacher, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), his son, Dwight P.B. Thurston, aged fifteen years, and his boarder, Clara L. Davis, retired, aged sixty-one years (b. ME). Jason F. Thurston rented their portion of a two-family house on Depot Street.

Etta R. Thurston appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1927-28 academic year as teacher of the Intermediate grades at the Milton Mills school. She had fifteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1929).

ACTON CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH REOPENED. ACTON, Me., Nov. 6. Reopening services of the Acton Corner Congregational Church, which has been closed for many years, were held today, beginning with a service this afternoon at which Rev. J.F. Thurston of Milton Mills delivered the address of welcome. He was followed by Rev. Dr. Caswell of Laconia, N.H., and Rev. J.C. Bearse of Sanford, speakers. In the evening a praise service and dedication took place, with a sermon by Rev. Ernest Seymour of the New England Evangelistic Association of Boston. Etta May Thurston was soloist (Boston Globe, November 7, 1927).

Etta R. Thurston appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1928-29 academic year as teacher of the Intermediate grades at the Milton Mills school. She had seventeen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1930).

Jason F. Thurston, a Congregational clergyman, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Etta M. Thurston, aged forty-eight years (b. ME). Jason F. Thurston rented their house, for $60 per month.

At Milton Mills Mrs. Walsh resigned to accept a position in the Wolfeboro Union and Mrs. Etta M. Thurston, who had formerly taught in the same school, was elected (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1936).

Etta Thurston appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1935-36 academic year as teacher of Grades 7-8 at the Milton Mills school. She had fifteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1937).

Etta Thurston appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1936-37 academic year as teacher of Grades 7-8 at the Milton Mills school. She had thirteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1938).

Etta Thurston appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1937-38 academic year as teacher of Grades 5-6-7-8 at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-one enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1939).

Etta Thurston appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1938-39 academic year as teacher of Grades 5-6-7-8 at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-three enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1940).

Etta Thurston appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1939-40 academic year as teacher of Grades 5-6-7-8 at the Milton Mills school. She had fifteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1941).

Jason F. Thurston, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta M. Thurston, a public school teacher, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME). Jason F. Thurston owned their house on Main Street, in Milton Mills, which was valued at $500. They had resided in the same house in 1935. Jason F. Thurston had attended three years of college, and Etta M. Thurston had attended two years of college.

Superintendent Howard L. Winslow noted Mrs. Thurston’s departure from the Milton Mills School in his report on the 1943-44 academic year:

We secured a good teacher locally to succeed Mrs. Thurston at Milton Mills. Mrs. Thurston resigned late in the summer to take a more advantageous position in her home town in Maine. Mrs. Marion Stanley took her place (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1944).

Mrs. Thurston may have taken a more advantageous position in her hometown of Lebanon, ME, but only for a single year. She appeared in a list of Alton, NH, teachers for the 1945-46 academic year. She and her husband took up residence in the Congregational parsonage there.

ALTON AND ALTON BAY. Alton schools will reopen next Wednesday, September 5, with the following list of teachers: Headmaster of the Alton high school, Henry Hastings; assistants, Miss Anne Garguilo, Miss Ellamarie Nourse, Mrs. Eleanor Hayes; 7 and 8 grades, Mrs. Annie Harris; 5 and 6 grades, Mrs. Etta Thurston; 3 and 4 grades, Mrs. Elizabeth Parker; 1 and 2 grades, Mrs. Una Dearborn (Farmington News, August 31, 1945).

ALTON AND ALTON BAY. Mr. and Mrs. Jason Thurston have moved into the Congregational parsonage (Farmington News, October 12, 1945).

Jason F. Thurston [of Alton, NH,] died in Concord, NH, December 16, 1945.

ALTON AND ALTON BAY. Much sympathy is extended to Mrs. Jason Thurston, teacher of the fifth and six grades in the Central school in the death of her husband, Rev. Jason Francis Thurston, which occurred at a Concord hospital last Sunday afternoon He was a native of Middleboro, Mass., and was born April 16, 1882, and graduated from Greenwich, R.I., academy and ordained Methodist minister. Besides his wife, a daughter and four sons survive him. Funeral services were held at Milton Mills, Wednesday; burial will be in Middleboro (Farmington News, December 21, 1945).

ALTON AND ALTON BAY. Mrs. Etta Thurston received word last week of the death of her brother (Farmington News, June 14, 1946).

ALTON AND ALTON BAY. Mrs. Etta Thurston left town Tuesday for her home in Milton Mills (Farmington News, June 21, 1946).

Etta M. (Richards) Thurston died February 14, 1966.

Helen M. Dunnells – 1928-29

Helen Martha Dunnells was born in Newfield, ME, March 31 1905, daughter of Lester M. and Mable G. (Chick) Dunnells.

Miss Helen M. Dunnells was a friend or acquaintance of Miss Ferne C. McGregor of West Milton’s Nute Ridge school.

WEST MILTON. Miss Helen Dunnells of Newfield, Maine, spent the holiday with Miss Feme McGregor (Farmington News, June 3, 1927).

Helen M. Dunnells appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1928-29 academic year as teacher of the Primary grades at the Milton Mills school. She had eighteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1930).

Helen M. Dunnells married June 27, 1929, Norman L. Wentworth, she of Newfield, ME, and he of Acton, ME. He was born in Acton, ME, July 25, 1903, son of Harold E. and Hattie M. (Lowd) Wentworth.

Norman L. Wentworth, a B&M file clerk, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Helen M. Wentworth, aged twenty-five years (b. ME). Norman L. Wentworth rented their house. They had a radio set.

Norman Wentworth, a steam railway telegrapher, aged thirty-six years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Helen D. Wentworth, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), and his children, Joyce E. Wentworth, aged nine years (b. ME), Harlan E. Wentworth, aged four years (b. NH), and Erlan C. Wentworth, aged four years (b. ME). Norman Wentworth rented their house on Fox Ridge, in South Acton, for $12 per month. Helen D. Wentworth had attended one year of college, Norman Wentworth had attended four years of high school, and Joyce E. Wentworth had attended four years of school (to date).

Helen Wentworth of Acton, ME, was one of fifty additional jurors called to Alfred, ME, for October 20, 1964, for the York County murder trial of Joseph R. McDonald. The State accused McDonald of having killed Maine State Trooper Charles C. Black in a South Berwick, ME, bank robbery, July 9, 1964 (Biddeford-Saco Journal, October 16, 1964).

Norman L. Wentworth died in Acton, ME, December 15, 1991. Helen M. (Dunnells) Wentworth died in Sanford, ME, March 28, 2012, aged one hundred six years.

Manora T. (Tuttle) Clayton – 1931-37

Manora Tuttle was born in Wakefield, NH, October 3, 1890, daughter of Daniel N. and Ora F. (Tibbetts) Tuttle.

William W. Berry, a general farmer, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-two years), Elizabeth C. Berry, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and his boarder, Manora Tuttle, a public school teacher, aged nineteen years (b. NH). William W. Berry owned their farm free-and-clear. Elizabeth C. Berry was the mother of no children.

UNION. Miss Manora Tuttle of Wakefield spent a few days with Mrs. Hilton Goodwin last week (Farmington News, January 6, 1911).

Manora Tuttle married in Wakefield, NH, June 29, 1919, Frederick W. Clayton, she of Wakefield and he of Madison, NH. He was born in Dewsbury, Yorkshire, England, in 1870, son of George and Sarah (Wilson) Clayton. She was a teacher, aged twenty-eight years, and he was a widowed machinist, aged forty-eight years.

Fred (Manora) Clayton appeared in the North Andover directory of 1920, as a mechanic, with his house at 111 Main street. Albert W. Clayton, who had an auto repairs business in Haverhill, MA, resided at 111 Main street.

Fred Clayton, a machine operator, aged forty-nine years (b. England), headed a North Andover, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Menora Clayton, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). Fred Clayton rented their house at 111 Main Street. He had immigrated into the US in 1893 [1883], and had been naturalized in 1899.

Frederick W. Clayton, a general laborer, aged fifty-nine years (b. England), headed a Madison, NH. household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Minora T. Clayton, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Frederick W. Clayton, Jr., aged nine years (b. NH), and Mary F. Clayton, aged one year (b. NH). Frederick W. Clayton owned their house, which was valued at $1,500. They did not have a radio set.

Manora T. Clayton appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1931-32 academic year as teacher of the Intermediate grades at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-seven enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1933).

Frederick W. Clayton died on Main Street, in Milton Mills, March 7, 1932, aged sixty-two years.

Manora T. Clayton appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1932-33 academic year as teacher of the Intermediate grades at the Milton Mills school. She had nineteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1934).

Manora T. Clayton appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1933-34 academic year as teacher of the Intermediate grades at the Milton Mills school. She had sixteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1935).

Manora Clayton appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1934-35 academic year as teacher of the Intermediate grades at the Milton Mills school. She had fourteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1936).

MILTON MILLS. Teachers of the local grammar school, Mrs. Jessie Walsh, Mrs. Manora Clayton and Mrs. Rosamond Pike, went to Manchester last Thursday to attend the teachers’ institute. They report interesting sessions, with splendid speakers (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

MILTON MILLS. Mrs. Daniel N, Tuttle and Miss Abbie Tuttle of Wakefield were callers at the homes of Mrs. Manora Clayton and Mrs. Ralph Hurd, recently (Farmington News, November 23, 1934).

MILTON MILLS. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hurd had their son John, Mervyn Hurd and son, Mrs. Manora, Clayton and two children, Frederick and Mary Francis Clayton for Thanksgiving (Farmington News, December 7, 1934).

Manora Clayton appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1935-36 academic year as teacher of the Grades 4-5-6 at the Milton Mills school. She had nineteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1937).

Milton Mills has at present only 34 pupils and unless there is a considerable increase there the State Department will insist that only two teachers be employed next year (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1937).

Manora Clayton appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1936-37 academic year as teacher of the Grades 4-5-6 at the Milton Mills school. She had sixteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1938).

The only change in teachers since the last report is at Milton Mills. Three rooms have been consolidated into two, and Mrs. Manora Clayton released because of illness (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1938).

Manora T. Clayton, a public school teacher, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Frederick W. Clayton, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Mary F. Clayton, aged eleven years (b. NH). Manora T. Clayton rented their house at 10 “State Road Heading West from E. Wakefield to Wakefield,” for $8 per month. They had resided in a Rural place, i.e., one having less than 2,500 inhabitants, in Strafford County in 1935. Manora T. Clayton and Frederick W. Clayton had attended one year of college, and Mary F. Clayton had attended five years of school.

Manora T. (Tuttle) Clayton died in September 1964.

Rosamond E. (Piper) Pike – 1930-40, 1963-64

Rosamond Elizabeth Piper was born in Wakefield, NH, October 6, 1888, daughter of James A. “Arnold” and Laura A. (Evans) Piper.

Rosamond E. Piper appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a teacher at the Plummer’s Ridge School, with her home at J.A. Piper’s. James A. Piper appeared as a farmer, with his house five miles north of the Milton depot, and two miles south of the Union depot.

Arnold Piper, an odd jobs carpenter, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Laura Piper, aged forty years (b. NH), his children, Rosanna Piper, a town school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Grover C. Piper, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Melvina Evans, aged sixty years (b. NH). Arnold Piper owned their house free-and-clear. Laura Piper was the mother of fur children, of whom three were still living. Melvina Evans was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

Rosamond E. Piper appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as having her home at J.A. Piper’s. James A. Piper appeared as a farmer, with his house five miles north of the Milton depot, and two miles south of the Union depot. (Philip G. Pike appeared as a meat peddler, boarding at 18 Highland street, Milton Mills).

Rosamond E. Piper married in Portsmouth, NH, January 3, 1912, Phillip G. Pike, both of Milton. She was a teacher, aged twenty-three years, and he was a butcher, aged twenty-one years. He was born in Milton, May 28, 1890, son of Robert S. and Fannie (Roberts) Piper.

Philip G. Pike, a retail butcher, aged twenty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Rosamond E. Pike, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and his children, Louise E. Pike, aged seven years (b. NH), and Philip D. Pike, aged four years (b. NH). Philip G. Pike rented their house.

Philip G. Pike, a retail grocery merchant, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Rosamond E. Pike, a grammar school teacher, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and his children, Louise E. Pike, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and P. Damon Pike, aged fifteen years (b. NH). Philip G. Pike owned their house on Highland Street, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set. (They lived next door to his parents).

Rosamond Pike appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1931-32 academic year as teacher of the Primary grades at the Milton Mills school. She had nineteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1933).

Rosamond Pike appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1932-33 academic year as teacher of the Primary grades at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-five enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1934).

Rosamond Pike appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1933-34 academic year as teacher of the Primary grades at the Milton Mills school. She had eighteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1935).

Rosamond E. Pike appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1934-35 academic year as teacher of the Primary grades at the Milton Mills school. She had eighteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1936).

MILTON MILLS. Teachers of the local grammar school, Mrs. Jessie Walsh, Mrs. Manora Clayton and Mrs. Rosamond Pike, went to Manchester last Thursday to attend the teachers’ institute. They report interesting sessions, with splendid speakers (Farmington News, October 19, 1934).

MILTON MILLS SCHOOL NOTES. Grades I, II, III. Marion and Daniel McGrath are absent because of illness. Margaret Hale, Roger Pike, Norman Valley, Wilson Dunbar, Harvey Fletcher, Gloria Wentworth, Jane Woodbury, Stephen Woodbury, Mary Clayton, Lillian Goldthwaite, Ann Goodrich and June Runnels were neither absent nor tardy during the six weeks’ period. Mrs. Pike is reading “Folk Tales Every Child Should Know” during morning exercise this week. Miss Northway, R.N., visited the primary room Monday morning. Grades IV and V Report cards were given out Monday for the first time in six weeks. June Wentworth, Roland Pike and Charles Downes received 10 in both columns of spelling on Friday. Alfred Patch, Ann Woodbury, Paul Valley, Fred Clough and Ruth Nute received 100 in one column and 96 In the other. Grades four and five made attractive Indian rug designs in drawing last Friday. Alfred Patch visited a dentist, Monday forenoon. Mrs. Clayton has finished reading “Anton and Trine,” a story of the Alpland during morning exercises. Grade five drew maps in history on Monday, showing tbe routes of Magellan and Columbus. Grade four drew a map of the voyages of the North men and also a Viking ship. Grade five is memorizing some very good proverbs. Mr Winslow visited us Monday afternoon. Grades VI, VII VIII. Marilyn Walsh and Maurice Fletcher had 91, Nathalie Willey, Parker Spinney, Jenney Ramsay and Kathleen Thomas had 83 in their arithmetic Monday. Virginia Laskey did the best in her self-testing drill in grade seven. Miriam Willey, Harold Roberts, Fred Spencer and Harry Fletcher had superior work In their problems in grade eight, Monday. Those who had 100 in spelling Monday, were Jennie Ramsay and Kathleen Thomas. In grade six Virginia Laskey, Elizabeth Ramsay, Leon Clough, Leon Hersom and Willard Feeney, in grade seven; Miriam Willey, Fred Spencer, Clifton Hersom and Harold Roberts, in grade eight. Mrs. Spinney visited us Friday noon. We are learning the poem “America for Me.” The sixth grade drew maps of Italy in their study of Europe in geography. The seventh grade had a test on Asia last Thursday. Virginia Laskey, Elizabeth Ramsay and Leon Clough got E. They also had a test in history last Friday. Those who got 80 or more were Virginia Laskey Elizabeth Ramsay Leon Clough, Leon Hersom and Willard Feeney. For writing we have the word “Vie.” Reports will be given out for the first time this week. Mr. Winslow visited us Monday afternoon. Miss Northway, our school nurse, visited us Monday and Friday afternoons. Arnold Nash drew some good witches on our blackboards, Monday, and also colored them well (Farmington News, October 26, 1934).

Rosamond E. Pike appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1935-36 academic year as teacher of Grades 1-2-3 at the Milton Mills school. She had thirteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1937).

Rosamond Pike appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1936-37 academic year as teacher of Grades 1-2-3 at the Milton Mills school. She had twelve enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1938).

Rosamond Pike appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1937-38 academic year as teacher of Grades 1-2-3-4 at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-five enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1939).

Rosamond Pike appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1938-39 academic year as teacher of Grades 1-2-3-4 at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-four enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1940).

Rosamond Pike appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1939-40 academic year as teacher of Grades 1-2-3-4 at the Milton Mills school. She had eighteen enrolled students (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1941).

Philip G. Pike, a retail meat market clerk, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Rosmon E. Pike, aged fifty years (b. NH), and his son Damon Pike, an auto factory mechanic, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Beatrice Pike, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and his grandson, Wayford Pike, aged nine months (b. NH). Philip G. Pike owned their house on Highland Street, which was valued at $700. Damon Pike had attended four years of high school, Philip G. Pike had attended two years of high school, and Rosmon E. and Beatrice Pike had attended eight years of grammar school. (One might suspect that Philip G. and Rosmon E. Pike’s educational attainments were reported in reverse order, as were their ages).

During the summer Mrs. Rosamond Pike moved from Milton Mills and resigned to take another position near her new home. Miss Carolyn Eaton, of Salisbury, Mass., a graduate of Salem Teachers’ College, was secured to take the vacant position (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1941).

Phillip G. Pike died January 16, 1960.

There was one change at Milton Mills, Mrs. Doris Lowd could not return to her teaching position because of ill health. A number of factors, i.e., shortage of teachers, three classes in one room, and low salary scale prevented the hiring of a teacher qualified to teach the three primary grades. Mrs. Rosamond Pike is teaching the primary grades at the present time and will fill out the year (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1963).

Rosamond E. (Piper) Pike died in January 1972.

Milton Mills. We extend our sincere sympathy to the family of Mrs. Rosamond Pike who passed away at a nursing home last Wednesday (Farmington News, [Thursday,] January 27, 1872).

Carolyn H. Eaton – 1941-43

Carolyn Hervey Eaton was born in Newburyport, MA, March 19, 1915, daughter of Charles A. and Annie M. (Ryan) Eaton.

Charles A. Eaton, a garage mechanic, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Salisbury, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie M. Eaton, aged forty-two years (b. MA), and his children, Anne M. Eaton, aged sixteen years (b. MA), Caroline H. Eaton, aged fifteen years (b. MA), and Charles A. Eaton, Jr., aged ten years (b. MA). Charles A. Eaton owned their house on Fourth Street, which was valued at $2,000. They did not have a radio set.

Miss Carolyn H. Eaton appeared in the Salisbury, MA, directory of 1932-34, as boarding at 3 Fourth street, P.O. Newburyport, MA. Charles A. (Annie M.) Eaton appeared there as a night watchman, with his house at 3 Fourth street, P.O. Newburyport, MA.

Charles A. Eaton, a shoe shop stationary fireman, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Salisbury, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie M. Eaton, aged fifty-two years (b. MA), and his children, Anne M. Eaton, a shoe shop shoe worker, aged twenty-six years (b. MA), Caroline H. Eaton, a public school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and Charles A. Eaton, Jr., a new worker, aged twenty years (b. MA). Charles A. Eaton owned their house at 3 Fourth Street, which was valued at $1,800. They had all resided in the same house in 1935. Caroline H. Eaton had attended four years of college, her mother, Annie M. Eaton had attended three years of college, her sister, Anne M. Eaton, had attended four years of high school, her brother, Charles A. Eaton, Jr., had attended three years of high school, and her father, Charles A. Eaton, had attended eight years of grammar school.

During the summer Mrs. Rosamond Pike moved from Milton Mills and resigned to take another position near her new home. Miss Carolyn Eaton, of Salisbury, Mass., a graduate of Salem Teachers’ College, was secured to take the vacant position (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1941).

Carolyn H. Eaton appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1940-41 academic year as having taken over for the 1941 portion of the year from Rosamond E. Pike, as teacher of grades 1-4 at the Milton Mills school. She had seventeen enrolled students.

Carolyn H. Eaton appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1942-43 academic year as teacher of grades 1-4 at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-five enrolled students. His report also noted in his report that

Miss Carolyn Eaton was regretfully released to take a more lucrative position of one grade at Durham. A graduate of Keene Teachers’ College, Miss Elinor Leonard of Rochester, has taken her place (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1944).

Boston University conferred a M. Ed. degree upon Carolyn H. Eaton at its summer commencement in Boston, MA, August 16, 1952 (Boston Globe, August 17, 1952).

Carolyn H. Eaton returned to Boston, MA, on a P.A.A. [Pan-American Airlines] flight from Shannon, Ireland, April 9, 1958. Her address was 3 4th St., Ring’s Is., Newburyport, Mass., her age was forty-three years.

Elinor I. Leonard – 1943-45

Elinor Iola Leonard was born in Dover, NH, November 12, 1922, daughter of George R. “Raymond” and Alice L. (Pike) Leonard.

Leon L. Brock, an automotive salesman, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice L. Brock, a restaurant dietician, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), his step-daughter, Elinor I. Leonard, aged seventeen years (b. NH), George W. Leonard, aged seventy years (b. NH), and his housekeeper, Nellie V. Bodwell, a private family housekeeper, aged forty-five years (b. MA). Leon L. Brock owned their house at 261 High Street, which was valued at $3,500. Leon L. Brock had lived in Dover, NH, in 1935, Alice L. Brock and her daughter, Elinor I. Leonard had lived in Brattleboro, VT, in 1935, George W. Leonard had lived in the same house in 1935, and Nellie V. Bodwell had lived in Salmon Falls in 1935. Leon L. Brock and Alice L. Brock had attended four years of high school, and Elinor I. Leonard had attended three years of high school (as yet).

Miss Carolyn Eaton was regretfully released to take a more lucrative position of one grade at Durham. A graduate of Keene Teachers’ College, Miss Elinor Leonard of Rochester, has taken her place (Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1944).

Elinor Leonard appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1944-45 academic year as teacher of grades 1-4 at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-five enrolled students.

Superintendent Howard L. Wilson explained in his 1944-45 report that

Miss Leonard resigned to be married, and Mrs. Doris Dowd [Lowd] succeeded her at the Milton Mills Primary School.

ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED. Mrs. Alice Leonard Brock of the Crown Point section of Strafford announces the engagement of her daughter, Miss Elinor Iola Leonard, to Lt. Robert H. Rollins, son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Rollins of Keene. Miss Leonard attended school in Farmington and is a graduate of Somersworth high school and Keene Teachers’ College. She has been teaching in Milton Mills. Lt. Rollins is a graduate of Keene high school and was attending the University of New Hampshire when he entered the U.S. army air corps. For the next three years he has been in the Burma-India theatre (Farmington News, August 31, 1945).

Elinor Iola Leonard married in Rochester, NH, October 13, 1945, Robert Harrison Rollins, she of Strafford, NH, and he of Keene, NH. She was a teacher, aged twenty-two years, and he was a lieutenant in the U.S. army air corps, aged twenty-two years. He was born in Nashua, NH, in 1923, son of Raymond H. and Leona M. (Lazett) Rollins.

Robert H. Rollins died in 1991. Elinor I. (Leonard) Rollins died in Clearwater, FL, October, 10, 2010.

ROLLINS, Elinor Iola Leonard 87, of Clearwater for 20 years, formerly of North Easton, MA, passed away peacefully on Oct. 10, 2010 with her loving family by her side. She was the beloved wife of the late Robert H. Rollins. Born in Dover, NH on Nov. 12, 1922, she was the daughter of the late Raymond and Alice (Pike) Leonard and the step-daughter of the late Leon K. Brock. She was the loving mother of Richard D. Rollins and his wife, Carol, of Piscataway, NJ, William R. Rollins and his wife, Michelle, of Blackstone, MA, the late Leonard Rollins and his wife, Margaret Rollins of Carlisle, MA; her cherished seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. A graduate of Keene State Teachers College in 1944, she taught at the Milton Mills Elementary School, Milton Mills, NH. She was a member of the VNA-Visiting Nurse Association of North Easton, and a member of the Eastern Star. Elinor enjoyed golfing and was an active member of the Brockton Country Club, and also was a member of the Bridge Club for 37 years. Devoted to her family, she will be greatly missed. Graveside service will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 11 am at the Massachusetts National Cemetery, Bourne, MA. In lieu of flowers donations in memory of Elinor may be sent to the Shriners Hospitals for Children, 51 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114-2699, would be appreciated. Cartier’s Funeral Home, Bellingham, MA (St. Petersburg Times (St. Petersburg, FL, October 24, 2010).

Marion L. (Goodwin) Stanley – 1943-46

Marion Louise Goodwin was born in Lebanon, ME, July 14, 1906, daughter of Charles B. and Mary A. Closson (Morrison) Goodwin.

Charles B. Goodwin, a general farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-three years), Mary A. Goodwin, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), his daughter, Marion L. Goodwin, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and his sister-in-law, Minnie E. Closson, aged fifty-six years (b. NH). Charles B. Goodwin owned their farm. They had a radio set.

Marion L. Goodwin married in Lebanon, ME, September 12, 1939, Harold B. Stanley. He was born in Lebanon, ME, November 12, 1910, son of Edwin S, and Elizabeth A. (Mason) Stanley.

Superintendent Howard L. Winslow note Mrs. Marion Stanley’s arrival at the Milton Mills School in his report on the 1943-44 academic year:

We secured a good teacher locally to succeed Mrs. Thurston at Milton Mills. Mrs. Thurston resigned late in the summer to take a more advantageous position in her home town in Maine. Mrs. Marion Stanley took her place (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1944).

Marion Stanley appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1944-45 academic year as teacher of grades 5-8 at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-eight enrolled students.

Marion Stanley appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1945-46 academic year as teacher of grades 5-8 at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-eight enrolled students.

Superintendent Austin J. McCaffrey explained in his 1945-46 report that

Mrs. Ellen Akers of Sanbornville, last year of Newmarket, succeeded Mrs. Marion Stanley, who left teaching Grades V-VIII at Milton Mills. We were fortunate indeed to have such little turnover in a year which brought many changes to out New Hampshire schools (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1946).

Elementary: As principal and teacher of Grades 5-8 of the Milton Mills school, Mr. Richard Gale was selected to replace Mrs. Ellen Akers who resigned in February 1949. (We were fortunate to procure the services of Mrs. Marion Stanley to complete the last school year). Mr. Gale was graduated from Clark University in 1948 and attended the University of New Hampshire during the summer of 1949 (Annual Report, For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1949).

John B. Folsom, combined principal of both the Milton Mills and the Milton Elementary schools, noted in his second report (of the 1956-57 academic year), Mrs. Marion Stanley’s return to teaching, but this time at the Milton Elementary School.

PERSONNEL. Mrs. Marion Stanley, known to all of you, replaced Mrs. Foster as teacher of Grades 6 and 7, and Mrs. Zoe Wormwood, who formerly taught in Maine, replaced Mrs. Kimball of Grades 4-7, at Milton Mills (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 19**).

Harold B. Stanley died in Milton, June 29, 1962.

MILTON. TEMPORARY PRINCIPALS. Milton – The Milton School Board has named Miss Marjorie E. Goodwin to take over the principal’s duties at Nute High School until a new principal is elected. Mrs. Marion Stanley is in charge at Milton Elementary School and Mrs. Doris Lowd at Milton Mills (Farmington News, September 13, 1962).

Marion L. (Goodwin) Stanley died in Rochester, NH, January 4, 2002.

MILTON – Marion Louise (Goodwin) Stanley, 95, of Milton died Friday, Jan. 4, 2002, at the Rochester Manor. The daughter of Charles B. and Mary Closson Goodwin, she was born at the family home, Pine Grove Farm, in West Lebanon, Maine, on July 4, 1906. She graduated from West Lebanon High School in 1924, attended the University of New Hampshire, majoring in French, and graduated in 1928 with a bachelor of arts degree in liberal arts. She married Harold Bradley Stanley on Sept. 12, 1939, in West Lebanon, Maine, and had been widowed since 1962. Marion started her teaching career at West Lebanon Grammar School, walking from Milton early each morning to start the fire in the wood stove at the school. She later taught for 15 years at Milton Mills and Milton, retiring after 27 years of service to the community. She continued to serve the community through her activities in the Milton Women’s Club and Milton Women’s Union, where she served in various leadership positions, including president and recording secretary. She has been a member of the Order of the Eastern Star sine April 18, 1944. Marion was an adventurous spirit who loved to travel, enjoyed the outdoors, and knitting, crocheting and making crafts. She continued to knit and crochet caps, mittens, scarves and slippers for nursing home residents and other local charities. Marion will be remembered as a wonderful teacher, for her unselfish acts of kindness and for her work at the annual summer bazaars. Marion is survived by her cousin, Alice Hodsdon of Yarmouth, Maine. Family and friends may call Monday, Jan. 7, 2002, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the R.M. Edgerly and Son Funeral Home, 86 South Main St., Rochester. A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. in the chapel of the funeral home with the Rev. Linda Rackliffe officiating. Burial will take place at the Rochester Cemetery in the spring. Memorial donations may be made to the New Hampshire Farm Museum, Milton, or the Milton Community Church Building Fund.

Doris E.A. (Rowell) Lowd – 1944-49, 1955-63

Doris E.A. Rowell was born in Solon, ME, June 13, 1902, daughter of Perley A. and Myrtle B. (Cooley) Rowell.

Perley A. Rowell, a saw mill laborer, aged forty-two years (b. ME), headed a Solon, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Myrtle B. Rowell, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), and his daughter, Doris E.A. Rowell, aged seventeen years (b. ME). Perley A. Rowell owned their farm on Pleasant Street.

She married August 29, 1925, Albert P. Lowd, she of Solon, and he of Acton, ME. He was born in Acton, ME, January 11, 1902, son of Archie T. and Clara M. (Page) Lowd.

Albert Lowd, a general farmer, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of four years), Doris Lowd, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), his children, Enid Lowd, aged three years, four months (b. ME), and Lois Lowd, aged one year, nine months (b. ME). Albert Lowd rented their house. They resided next to the household of Archie Low, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. ME).

Albert Lowd, a dairy farmer, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Doris Lowd, a public school teacher, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), his children, Enid Lowd, aged thirteen years (b. ME), and Lois Lowd, aged eleven years (b. ME), his mother, Clara Lowd, a widow, aged seventy years (b. NH), and his sister, Marion Lowd, a public school teacher, aged thirty-two years (b. ME). Albert Lowd owned their farm, “near Milton Mills,” which was valued at $2,500. They had all lived in the same place, i.e., Acton, ME, in 1935.

Doris Lowd appeared in the Milton School Superintendent’s report for the 1945-46 academic year as teacher of grades 1-4 at the Milton Mills school. She had twenty-four enrolled students.

For reasons, upon which we have no control, it has been necessary to transfer Miss Elizabeth J. Lambert to the Milton Grammar School, Grades III and IV. Mrs. Lowd has replaced Miss Lambert at the Milton Mills school, Grades I-IV (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1955).

MILTON. TEMPORARY PRINCIPALS. Milton – The Milton School Board has named Miss Marjorie E. Goodwin to take over the principal’s duties at Nute High School until a new principal is elected. Mrs. Marion Stanley is in charge at Milton Elementary School and Mrs. Doris Lowd at Milton Mills (Farmington News, September 13, 1962).

Mrs. Doris Lowd retired from the Milton Mills School after the 1962-63 academic year.

There was one change at Milton Mills, Mrs. Doris Lowd could not return to her teaching position because of ill health. A number of factors, i.e., shortage of teachers, three classes in one room, and low salary scale prevented the hiring of a teacher qualified to teach the three primary grades. Mrs. Rosamond Pike is teaching the primary grades at the present time and will fill out the year (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1963).

Doris E. (Rowell) Lowd died in Milton Mills, in April 1965. Albert P. Lowd died in Milton Mills, in December 1975.

Ellen G. (Hannaford) Akers – 1947-49

Ellen Gertrude Hannaford was born in Roxbury, ME, circa 1894-95, daughter of Orlando and Emma (Ladel) Hannaford.

Ellen Gertrude Hannaford married in Roxbury, ME, December 22, 1915, Lewis Webster Akers, she of Roxbury and he of Andover, ME. She was a school teacher, aged twenty-one years, and he was a laborer, aged twenty-four years. He was born in Andover, ME, circa 1890, son of Lewis G. and Annie (Andrews) Akers.

Superintendent Austin J. McCaffrey explained in his 1945-46 report that

Mrs. Ellen Akers of Sanbornville, last year of Newmarket, succeeded Mrs. Marion Stanley, who left teaching Grades V-VIII at Milton Mills. We were fortunate indeed to have such little turnover in a year which brought many changes to out New Hampshire schools (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1946).

Elementary: As principal and teacher of Grades 5-8 of the Milton Mills school, Mr. Richard Gale was selected to replace Mrs. Ellen Akers who resigned in February 1949. (We were fortunate to procure the services of Mrs. Marion Stanley to complete the last school year). Mr. Gale was graduated from Clark University in 1948 and attended the University of New Hampshire during the summer of 1949 (Annual Report, For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1949).

Richard D. Gale – 1949=50

Richard David Gale was born in Providence, RI, May 15, 1921, son of Frank H. and Janet M. (Goulburn) Gale.

Frank Gale, a utility salesman, aged fifty-six years (b. MA), headed a Pawtucket, RI, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Janet Gale, aged fifty-five years (b. RI), and his son, Richard D. Gale, a post office clerk, aged eighteen years (b. RI). Frank Gale owned their house at 78 North Bend Street, which was valued at $4,000. Frank Gale had attended four years of college, Janet Gale had attended three years of high school, and Richard D. Gale had attended two years of high school. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

Richard D. Gale appeared in the Pawtucket, RI, directory of 1947, as a student, residing at 78 North Bend street. Frank H. (Janet M). Gale, a collector for BVG&E Co, had their house at 78 North Bend street. He appeared in the Pawtucket, RI, directory of 1949, as having removed to New Durham, NH.

Elementary: As principal and teacher of Grades 5-8 of the Milton Mills school, Mr. Richard Gale was selected to replace Mrs. Ellen Akers who resigned in February 1949. (We were fortunate to procure the services of Mrs. Marion Stanley to complete the last school year). Mr. Gale was graduated from Clark University in 1948 and attended the University of New Hampshire during the summer of 1949 (Annual Report, For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1949).

Richard D. Gale died February 27, 2015, aged ninety-three years.

Gale, Richard D - 2015
Richard D. Gale

Richard D. Gale. Richard D. Gale formerly of Endicott and Hebron, CT passed away of natural causes at the age of 93 on February 27, 2015 surrounded by family. Dick (as he was known by his many friends) was born in Providence, RI to Frank and Janet (Goulburn) Gale in 1921 and was predeceased by his wife of 67 years, Eleanor F. (Baxter) Gale. Dick was the proud father of his children Janet, Mary, David, George and proud grandfather of his grandsons. Dick and Eleanor met while serving in the Navy during World War II and were lifetime members of the American Legion. Their joint interest led them to be active participants in the local and Dunkeswell, England preservation of B-24’s in which Dick flew over 60 missions as a crew member. Dick attended the University of Rhode Island, completed his Bachelor’s degree at Clark University and received his Master’s degree in Education at Plymouth University. Dick began his lifelong career in education first in one-room school houses in NH; then serving as school Principal in CT; followed by a move to Endicott where served as Principal and later as an Assistant to the Superintendent. Dick cherished his family and friends. He enjoyed outdoor adventures in the White Mountains; hiking the Long Trail with his son; climbing Mount Rainier; and playing tennis with colleagues and friends. After living a continuously active, productive and engaged lifetime, Dick will be remembered for his enthusiasm for life, engagement with community issues, lifetime interest in the education of children; long lists of “things to do” and for always planning ahead. Dick Gale’s Celebration of Life was held in NH where he was buried alongside his wife, Eleanor Gale (Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin, May 17, 2015).

Leslie E. Lowry, Jr. – 1950-52

Leslie Erwin Lowry, Jr., was born in Chicago, IL, September 17, 1920, son of Leslie E. and Anne A. (Watt) Lowry.

Leslie E. Lowry, a fire alarms co. salesman, aged sixty years (b. VA), headed a Newton, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anne Lowry, aged fifty-four years (b. VA), and his children, Leslie Lowry, Jr., aged nineteen years (b. IL), and Richard Lowry, aged fifteen years (b. IL). Leslie E. Lowry rented their house at 21 Royce Road, for $70 per month. They had all resided in Chicago, IL, in 1935.

Leslie E. Lowry, Jr., appeared in the Newton, MA, directory of 1948, as a student, resident at 146 Lincoln street, in NH [Newton Highlands]. Leslie E. (Annie A.) Lowry appeared as foreign office manager, for the Gamewell Co. (UF), with their house at 146 Lincoln street, NH. (Jean Lowry, widow of William Lowry, resided there too).

Leslie E. Lowry, Jr., married in Newton, MA, in 1949, Jane Hill. She was born in Newton, MA, February 23, 1923, daughter of Donald M. and Katherine L. (Gage) Hill.

Leslie E. Lowry, Jr., was principal of the Milton Mills school for the 1950-51 and 1951-52 academic years.

At Milton Mills School Martha Hefler and Leslie Lowry replaced Mrs. Doris Lowd and Richard Gale (Annual Report, 1951).

Brookline. Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Lowry and son of Milton Mills was an Easter guest of her mother, Mrs. Katherine Hill, at her home here (Nashua Telegraph, April 5, 1951).

Brookline. Mrs. Leslie Lowry and son Milton Mills are spending the summer with her mother, Mrs. Katherine Hill, in West Brookline (Nashua Telegraph, July 7, 1951).

Mr. Paul Spilios, a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, replaces Leslie Lowry who accepted a teaching position in Attleboro, Mass. Miss Elizabeth Lambert, also a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, with experience in Hebron, Me., replaces Martha Hefler, who is now teaching in Goffstown (Annual Report, For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1952).

Jane (Hill) Lowry died at Lady Lake, FL, March 28, 2007. Leslie E. Lowry, Jr., died at Lady Lake, FL, October 5, 2007.

Martha E. Hefler – 1950-52

Martha Ellen Hefler was born in Milton, MA, in 1928, daughter of William A. and Geraldine M. (Doyle) Hefler.

William A. Hefler, a baker, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Geraldine M. Hefler, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA), and his children, William A. Hefler, Jr., aged fifteen years (b. MA), Ann P. Hefler, aged fourteen years (b. MA), Martha E. Hefler, aged twelve years (b. MA), James R. Hefler, aged ten years (b. MA), and David O. Hefler, aged two years (b. MA). William A. Hefler rented their house at 29 Smith Road, for $110 per month. They had all, except the toddler, resided in the same place, i.e., Milton, MA, in 1935. William A. Hefler had attended four years of college, Geraldine M. Hefler had attended two years of college, and the others various year of school.

Miss Martha E. Hefler of Milton, MA, appeared in a group photograph of camp counselors and staff at Camp Watnananock, on Sunset Lake, in Greenfield, NH, in August 1947. She was a senior counselor (Nashua Telegraph, August 7, 1947). [Very grainy image].

At Milton Mills School Martha Hefler and Leslie Lowry replaced Mrs. Doris Lowd and Richard Gale (Annual Report, 1951).

Boston University conferred a Master of Education (M. Ed.) on Martha E. Hefler, August 16, 1952 (Boston Globe, August 17, 1952).

Mr. Paul Spilios, a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, replaces Leslie Lowry who accepted a teaching position in Attleboro, Mass. Miss Elizabeth Lambert, also a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, with experience in Hebron, Me., replaces Martha Hefler, who is now teaching in Goffstown (Annual Report, For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1952).

Martha Hefler appeared in another photo from Camp Watananock, on Sunset Lake, in Greenville, NH, in August 1953, She was by now the head counselor (Nashua Telegraph, August 21, 1953).

Martha E. (Hefler) Verville.

Paul G. Spilios – 1952-53

Paul George Spilios was born in Milwaukee, WI, January 28, 1924, son of George and Anna (Syrios) Spilios.

George Spilios, a retail candy store merchant, aged fifty-two years (b. Greece), headed a Milwaukee, WI, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Antonia Spilios, aged fifty-five years (b. Greece), his children, Anne Spilios, aged eighteen years (b. WI), Paul Spilios, aged sixteen years (b. WI), his brother, Daniel Spilios, a suitcase factory sewer, aged fifty-five years (b. Greece), and his granddaughter, Elizabeth Tararelus, aged three years (b. NY). George Spilios rented their house at 3105 South 11th Street, for $40 per month. They had all resided in the same place, i.e., Milwaukee, WI, in 1935.

Paul G. Spilios of New York, NY, enlisted in New York, NY, as a private (branch immaterial (warrant officers)), February 27, 1943. He was single, with one year of college. He was 67″ tall and weight 156 pounds.

Mr. Paul Spilios, a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, replaces Leslie Lowry who accepted a teaching position in Attleboro, Mass. Miss Elizabeth Lambert, also a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, with experience in Hebron, Me., replaces Martha Hefler, who is now teaching in Goffstown (Annual Report, For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1952).

Paul G. (Helen A.) Spilios appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1953, as a teacher, at Milton Mills, with his house at Wilbrod avenue.

The School Board of Portsmouth, NH, named Paul Spilios of Somersworth, NH, as an English teacher at the Portsmouth junior high school, at a salary of $4,115 (Portsmouth Herald, May 14, 1958).

DHS AV Club - 1962 - Detail
Paul G. Spilios – 1962

Paul (Helen) Spilios appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1960, as an employee of the Cocheco Manufacturing Co. in Dover, with his house on High street, near Central park, P.O. Dover, R.D. 3.

The University of New Hampshire planned a six-week summer institute for elementary teachers in the summer of 1966. Paul Spilios was to be a guest lecturer.

UNH faculty and staff members who will serve as guest lecturers include William A. Brady, director of instructional services for WENH-TV; Keith Nighbert, manager of WENH-TV; Dr. Walter N. Durosi, director of the UNH Bureau of Educational Research and Testing Services; and Paul Spilios, UNH Audio-Visual Center coordinator (Portsmouth Herald, March 9, 1966).

Paul G. Spilios died in Richmond, NY, January 22, 1970, aged forty-five years.

Paul G. Spilios. DOVER – Paul G. Spilios, 45, of 4 Willard Ave., audio-visual coordinator and lecturer in education at the University of New Hampshire, died unexpectedly yesterday at the home of his mother in Richmond, N.Y. Born in Milwaukee, Wis., Jan. 28, 1924, he was the son of George and Anna (Syrios) Spilios. He was an Army veteran of World War II and a member of the Christian Believers Fellowship of Dover. He attended Columbia University and the Army Specialized Training Program at Princeton University. He was awarded a bachelor of arts degree by UNH in 1951 and his master’s in 1961. He was a teaching fellow in 1962-63, and pursuing doctoral studies al Boston University m 1963-69. He taught English and history at Portsmouth High School, English at Dover High, and also was principal of the Garrison Elementary School in Dover. Mr. Spilios was past president of the Dover Teachers Association. He had attended a professional conference in Miami, Fla., and was visiting on the return trip with his mother and sister in Richmond Hill. Survivors include his mother; his wife, Mrs. Helen (Polychronis) Spilios; a daughter, Miss Mary Ann Spilios, and a son, James D., both of Dover; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Taxarthis of Miami. Fla., and Mrs. Ann Barone of Richmond Hill; and several nieces and nephews (Portsmouth Herald, January 23, 1970).

Fund Assisted. Dover High School students recently contributed nearly $201 to the Paul Spilios Memorial Fund, established in memory of the University of New Hampshire Audio-Visual Center official who died earlier this year. To date more than $1500 has been given to the fund established to assist needy UNH students. From left arc: Merrill Chasse and Sterling Jordan, Dover High students; Mrs. Marsha Kennedy, fund chairman; Thomas Munson, director for Dover public schools; Marie Donahue, chairman of the Dover High School English department and Raymond Havey, Dover High School projectionist (UNH Photo) (Portsmouth Herald, June 3, 1970).

Elizabeth J. Lambert – 1952-55

Elizabeth Lambert was born in Norwich, CT, circa 1929, daughter of Gustave and Beatrice S. (Freeman) Lambert.

Gustave Lambert, a truck driver, aged thirty-eight years B. CT), headed an Norwich, CT, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Beatrice S. Lambert, aged thirty-four years (b. CT), and his children, Elizabeth J. Lambert, aged eleven years (b. CT), and Sallyann Lambert, aged ten years (b. CT). Gustave Lambert owned their house on the Old Canterbury Turnpike, which was valued at $4,500. They had all resided in the same house in 1935. Beatrice S. Lambert had attended four years of high school, Gustave Lambert had attended eight years of school, Elizabeth J. Lambert had attended five years of school, and Sallyann Lambert had attended four years of school.

Lemont Children Give Party for Schoolmates. A Hallowe’en party was given for a group of schoolmates by Virginia and Mason Lemont at their home on Woodlawn avenue recently. With a background of decorations in orange and black, children performed traditional stunts of the season, including bobbing for apples and eating doughnuts from a string. Feature of the refreshments was a 50-pound pumpkin centerpiece filled with flowers. Those attending were Sally and Elizabeth Lambert, Natalie Paul, Phyllis Tilton, Janet Trefethen, Harvey and Richard Matt, Roy Armsden and Irvin Lawler (Portsmouth Herald, November 4, 1943),

Miss Elizabeth A. Lambert appeared in the Exeter, NH, directory of 1949, as a student (U. of N.H.), boarding at Gustave Lambert’s, at r.f.d. 2 in Kensington, NH. Gustave (Beatrice) Lambert appeared as a farmer, with his house on Moulton Ridge road, at r.f.d 2 in Kensington. Miss Sally Ann Lambert, appeared also as a student (U. of N.H.), boarding also at Gustave Lambert’s.

Mr. Paul Spilios, a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, replaces Leslie Lowry who accepted a teaching position in Attleboro, Mass. Miss Elizabeth Lambert, also a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, with experience in Hebron, Me., replaces Martha Hefler, who is now teaching in Goffstown (Annual Report, For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1952).

Miss Elizabeth J. Lambert was transferred from Milton Mills School to the Milton Elementary School, where she taught Grades 3-4 in the 1955-56 and 1956-57 academic years.

For reasons, upon which we have no control, it has been necessary to transfer Miss Elizabeth J. Lambert to the Milton Grammar School, Grades III and IV. Mrs. Lowd has replaced Miss Lambert at the Milton Mills school, Grades I-IV (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1955).

Miss Lambert resigned from her position at the Milton Elementary School at the conclusion of the 1956-57 academic year.

Mrs. Frances Scott, with experience in Rochester and Maine, replaced Miss Lambert, who resigned at the end of last year to accept a position in her home town (Annual Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1958).

Miss Elizabeth Lambert taught Grades 1-2 in Kensington, NH, in the 1957-58 academic year. Her students and those of Mrs. Pearl Marston (Grades 3-5) participated in the Memorial Day program at the Town Hall (Kensington Town Report, For the Year Ending December 31, 1959).

Miss Elizabeth J. Lambert appeared in the Exeter and N.H. directory of 1960, as a teacher at the Kensington Elementary School, resident on Moulton Ridge Road in Kensington, NH, RD 2 in Exeter, NH. Gustave (Beatrice C) Lambert appeared as a Kensington Selectman and farmer, with his house on Moulton Ridge road, in Kensington, NH, RD 2 in Exeter, NH.


Continued in Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1953-68. (The Milton Mills School closed after the 1967-68 academic year).


See also Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47Milton’s South Milton Teachers, 1886-29Milton’s West Milton Teachers, 1885-23; and Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1875-11.


References:

Beers, J.H. and Company. (1900). Educators of Michigan. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vaygAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA304

Boston University. (1902). Journal of Education. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=zEshAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA126

Find a Grave. (2013, July 30). Abbie Buck Berry. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114645310

Find a Grave. (2013, October 31). Albert E. Millett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/119604836

Find a Grave. (2012, February 14). Asa Clinton Crowell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/84971101

Find a Grave. (2010, October 24). Elinor Iola Leonard Rollins. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/60561553

Find a Grave. (2014, August 14). Etta May Richards Thurston. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115482477/etta-may-thurston

Find a Grave. (2011, September 18). Helen G. Snow. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/76733254

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Helen Martha Dunnells Wentworth. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938262

Find a Grave. (2012, September 7). Rev. James Oscar Emerson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/96694786

Find a Grave. (2019, July 11). Manora Tuttle. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/201055428

Find a Grave. (2011, February 15). Marion Louise Goodwin Stanley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/65676925

Find a Grave. (2013, August 11). Rosamond E. Pike. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115287686

Find a Grave. (2013, July 6). William Coleman McCue. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/113424611

Find a Grave. (2009, July 13). William Edwin Hatch. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/39396250

Heirlooms Reunited. (2019, January 26). 1873, 1874 and 1876 Diaries of Ida Isadore Reynolds (1860-1946) of Acton, Maine; Future Wife of John Jotham Shapleigh (1856-1923). Retrieved from www.heirloomsreunited.com/2019/01/1873-1874-and-1876-diaries-of-ida.html

NH State Board of Education. (1876). Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=c18aAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA338

Remington, P.S., and Company. (1895). Historical Catalogue of Brown University. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=xdXNAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA293

UMB. (2016). Dorchester Industrial School for Girls. Retrieved from dorchesterindustrialschoolforgirls.wordpress.com/

Wikipedia. (2020, April 24). Parsonsfield Seminary. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsonsfield_Seminary

 

Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1875-11

By Muriel Bristol | May 24, 2020

The building occupied now by the Milton Free Public Library was formerly Milton Mills’ “Little Red Schoolhouse” building. It taught students at the primary, intermediate, grammar, and high school levels.

Although this period black-and-white picture does not seem to have the proper tonal “value” to have been then a “red” schoolhouse. That must have come later. (The library was then situated where the historical society is now).School Building, Milton Mills, NH, 32

SCHOOL BUILDINGS. MILTON – M.V.B. Cook. During the past year an excellent wooden school-house has been erected in district No. 7, situated in the thriving village of Milton Mills. The main building is 40×40 ft., one and a half stories high, with French roof, and basement; also, tower in front, 10×12 ft. It contains two school-rooms, four ante-rooms, and a library, and is finished with western pine and black walnut. The furniture is of the latest improvements. The entire cost exceeds $6,000, besides some valuable presents, – among which was a bell, presented by Hon. John Townsend, of Brookline, Mass. The dedication consisted of music and an address by Rev. Geo Michael (NH State Board of Education, 1876).

The Milton Mills school teachers identified in this 1875-1911 period were Abbie D. Buck, William E. Hatch, James O. Emerson, Edward Whitney, Charles E. Hussey, William P. Ferguson, Albert E. Millett, Rufus E. Donnell, Asa C. Crowell, Charles S.F. Whitcomb, Minetta R. Anderson, Vernon E. Rand, William C. McCue, Jacob E. Wignot, Gilman H. Campbell, Amy E. Clark, and George E. Leatherbarrow.

(The sources for this list have lacunae for some years, which likely represent other teachers not yet identified. Revisions will be made if additional source material comes to hand).

Abbie D. Buck – c1870-80

Buck, Abbie D
Abbie D. Buck (per Katherine Ayers)

Abbie D. Buck was born in Milton, in 1851, daughter of Jeremiah C. and Eunice C. (Swasey) Buck.

Jeremiah C. Buck, a physician, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Eunis C. Buck, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. NH), Abbie D. Buck, a school teacher, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Hattie A. Buck, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Charles S. Buck, aged fifteen years (b. ME), and Willie C. Buck, aged three years (b. ME). Jeremiah C. Buck had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000.

Young Acton, ME, diarist Ida Isadore Reynolds (1860-1946) mentioned her four-week Spring 1876 stint with the Milton Mills school and Miss Buck. (Her landlady, Mrs. Cowell, would teach later at the Milton Classical Institute in 1886-87).

Monday, May 8, 1876:  Cloudy. Came to the Mills to school. Miss Abbie Buck, teacher. Charlie Hanscomb & Mr. Dillon called here. Tried for a school here; am not sure I shall get it or stay here to school.

Monday, May 8th. Began school at Milton Mills. Board at Mrs. Cowell’s. Pay $2.00 per week.

Friday, June 2nd. Finished school at the Mills. Went four weeks (Heirlooms Reunited, 2019).

When Edward Whitney, A.B., took over as Milton Mills principal in 1877, Abbie D. Buck was said to have been his assistant, a position she had held for “many years” (Bicknell, 1877).

Abbie D. Buck married in Milton, March 22, 1880, Jeremiah E. Berry, she of Milton, and he of Wakefield, NH. He was a stablekeeper, aged forty-one years, and she was aged twenty-nine years. He was born in Wakefield, NH, in March 1839, son of Francis and Temperance (Wiggin) Berry.

James E. Berry, keeps livery stable, aged forty years (b. NH), and Abby D. Berry, at home, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), were two of the fifteen boarders at Hiram I. King’s Washington, DC, hotel at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. They had been married within the year. The hotel stood at 1203 F Street Northwest.

They had two daughters, born in New Hampshire, circa 1881 and 1883. Abbie D. (Buck) Berry died in 1893.

Embezzlement Charged. Yesterday afternoon George A. Ball, said to have been employed as cashier for the Ebbitt House stables, was convicted in Criminal Court No. 2 of embezzling a certain sum of money from James E. Berry, the proprietor of the stables. Several charges, aggregating $1424, were made against him, but the others were nolle prossed. Judge Cole remanded Ball to jail to await sentence (Evening Star (Washington, DC), April 11, 1895).

James E. Berry, a (widowed) livery stable keeper, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Washington, DC, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his daughters, Emma Berry, at school, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Alice Berry, attending school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), his housekeeper, Iva Richards, aged thirty-one years (b. MD), and his boarder, James M. Allison, a journalist, aged forty-nine years (b. KY). James E. Berry owned their house at 1338 G Street, free-and-clear.

James E. Berry died in 1917.

William E. Hatch – 1875-76

William Edwin Hatch was born in Jeffersonville, GA, June 8, 1852, son of Samuel and Malinda M. (Decker) Hatch. (Both parents were natives of Maine).

Malinda Hatch, keeping house, aged forty-six years (b. ME), headed a Brunswick, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included William E. Hatch, a store clerk, aged seventeen years (b. GA), Laura Hatch, aged fifteen years (b. GA), and Walter D. Hatch, aged thirteen years (b. GA). Malinda Hatch had personal estate valued at $500.

William E. Hatch graduated from Bowdoin College with the Class of 1875 (Boston Globe, July 9, 1875). He taught at the Milton Mills school for a “single term” of the 1875-76 academic year that fell between his Bowdoin College graduation and the beginning of his lengthier six-year teaching stint at Branford, CT.

William E. Hatch, a teacher, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), was one of the six boarders at Burton T. Buell’s Branford, CT, hotel at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census.

William E. Hatch married (1st), circa 1883, Emily Norton (Rogers) Mabbat. She was born in Branford, CT, circa 1846, daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth (Norton) Rogers. She was the widow of Samuel R. Mabbatt, who had died in 1876. She was fatally injured when a train struck the surrey carriage in which she and the family were riding at Niagara Falls, NY, August 3, 1893.

WERE WELL KNOWN HERE. Mrs. Wm. E. Hatch Instantly Killed at Niagara Falls. Her Husband and Two Daughters Were Badly Shaken. Mrs. William E. Hatch of New Bedford and her husband and two daughters, Miss Millie Mabbatt and Miss Josephine Mabbatt, the first of whom was killed in the accident on the New York Central railroad crossing at Niagara Falls and the others badly bruised and shaken up, were well known in Branford and in this city. Mrs. Hatch, who was instantly killed, was the daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Rogers of Branford, who is still living, being eighty-three years old. Her first husband was named Mabbatt, and up to the time of his death they resided in New York. After his death Mrs. Mabbatt and her daughters went to live in Branford with Mrs. Rogers. About ten years ago Mrs. Mabbatt married William E. Hatch, who is superintendent of schools in New Bedford. Mrs. Hatch’s oldest daughter is the wife of Walter B. Nichols, son of John W. Nichols, the well known and prominent insurance man. Miss Millie Mabbatt, who was one of the party injured, is well known here, having spent more or less time in this city since her sister was married. Mrs. Hatch came of a very well known family, being a cousin of Timothy Blackstone and a niece of Mrs. Lorenzo Blackstone of Norwich. The cause of the accident so far as can be ascertained was due to the grossest carelessness of the gate tender. When the carriage containing the party drove up to the gate crossing, the gates were down for a passing train. Ax soon as the train had passed, the gates were opened and the party started to drive across the tracks. Before the carriage was half way over the crossing, another train from the opposite direction swept upon them and struck the team. Mrs. Hatch was instantly killed and the other members of the party thrown some distance and more or less bruised. The body of Mrs. Hatch is expected to arrive in Branford today. The party left this city for Chicago three weeks ago, and were on their way home when they stopped at Niagara Falls (Daily Journal-Courier (New Haven, CT), August 5, 1893).

William E. Hatch married (2nd) in New Bedford, MA, December 10, 1895, Elizabeth H. (Hawes) Taylor, both of New Bedford. He was superintendent of schools, aged forty-three years, and she was at home, aged thirty-two years. She was born in New Bedford, circa 1863, daughter of William G. and Ann M. (Eldridge) Hawes.

Hatch-Taylor. William E. Hatch, superintendent of schools in New Bedford, and Mrs. Elizabeth H. Taylor were married yesterday afternoon at 2 o’clock. The ceremony took place at Mr. Taylor’s residence, Grove street, Rev. E.S. Rousmaniere officiating. Mr. and Mrs. Hatch will be absent from the city for a brief period and on their return will reside on Grove street (Fall River Globe (Fall River, MA), December 11, 1895).

William E. Hatch, superintendent of schools, aged forty-seven years (b. GA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Elizabeth H. Hatch, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), his son, Frank N. Hatch, at school, aged sixteen years (b. MA), and his step-daughter, Wilhelmina Taylor, at school, aged eight years (b. MA). William E. Hatch rented their house at 83 Ash Street. Elizabeth H. Hatch was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Operation for Fractured Spine. Portland, Me., July 16 – Frank N. Hatch, son of William E. Hatch, superintendent of schools in New Bedford, Mass., was operated upon at the Maine General hospital this afternoon for a fractured spine. The accident occurred last week and was caused by young Hatch diving into shallow water at his summer home at Mere Point and striking the bottom with such force as to produce the result mentioned. The chances for his recovery are regarded as very slight (Boston Globe, July 16, 1900).

NEW BEDFORD. F. Norton Hatch, son of William E. Hatch, superintendent of schools, died at Portland, Me., Monday night from the effects of an operation at the Maine general hospital. He sustained an injury to his spine last week while diving. The remains of the young man will be taken to Branford, Conn., for burial (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), July 17, 1900).

Hatch, Wm E
William E. Hatch

A Boston University educational periodical outlined William E. Hatch’s career up to 1902, including his brief time at the Milton Mills school:

William E. Hatch, superintendent of New Bedford since 1888, prepared for college at the high school of Brunswick, Me., graduated from Bowdoin College, 1875, A.M. Bowdoin, taught in school of Milton Mills, N.H., Branford, Conn., 1876-82, declined principalship of high school of Leavenworth, Kan., 1881, superintendent of Milford, Mass., 1883-85, Haverhill, 1885-88, New Bedford since 1888, president of New England Superintendents’ Association, and is now a vice-president of the American Institute of Instruction, and president of the Bristol County Teachers’ Association. Mr. Hatch is much sought after as an officer of social, literary, religious, and philanthropic associations, and as a writer and speaker on various subjects (Boston University, 1902). 

William E. Hatch, a textile school president, aged fifty-four years (b. GA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. He rented his house at 83 Ash Street. He was a widower.

William E. Hatch died in Portland, ME, June 26, 1923, aged seventy-one years.

WILLIAM E. HATCH. General Manager of the New Bedford Textile School for Past 14 Years Passes Away — Retired Last Year — Superintendent of Schools for 20 Years. BRUNSWICK, Me., June 28 — William E. Hatch, for many years a well known figure in Massachusetts educational circles, and who had lived here since his retirement over a year ago, died Tuesday night at a hospital in Portland. William E Hatch, a native of Georgia, was born in Jeffersonville, Twiggs County, June 8, 1852. Although born in Georgia he considered himself a New Englander, as both his father and mother and their ancestors were all New Englanders. He was educated until 13 years of age in private schools and academies in Georgia. Coming North in 1865, he attended the High School at Brunswick, Me., and fitted for college there. He graduated from Bowdoin in the class of 1875, and received the degree of A.M. from the same institution in 1878. Before entering Bowdoin he attended a commercial school, and during the whole of his college course was officially connected with the engineering department of the Maine Central Railroad. Mr. Hatch was president of the New England Association of School Superintendents in 1887, and chairman of the executive committee in 1894; was also a vice president of the American Institute of Instruction in 1885, and was assistant secretary of the Massachusetts Teachers’ association in 1894. He was a member of the Wamsutta and Dartmouth clubs of New Bedford, of the University end Schoolmasters’ clubs of Boston. From 1888 to 1908 he was superintendent of schools in New Bedford and in the latter year he became general manager of the Textile school. Mr. Hatch’s connection with the New Bedford Textile school began in 1899, when he became a trustee of the school ex-officio. From 1899 he remained trustee ex-officio for four years, and then became a trustee by appointment of the governor. For 18 years he was president of the school, and for the last 14 years general manager. The board of retirement reported that Mr. Hatch had been longer in service than any other educator on the state retirement list. Mr. Hatch was twice married. His first wife was Emily N. Rogers of Branford, Conn., who died at Niagara Fall in August 1893, the second wife being Mrs. Elisabeth H. Taylor whom he married in New Bedford, December 11, 1895. He was formerly senior warden in the vestry of Grace Episcopal church in New Bedford (Fall River Globe (Fall River, MA), [Thursday,] June 28, 1923).

James O. Emerson – 1876-77

James Oscar Emerson was born in Pittsfield, NH, July 1, 1852, son of Simeon and Mahala L. (Adams) Emerson.

Simeon Emerson, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Pittsfield, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mahala Emerson, keeping house, aged forty-three years (b. NH), James O. Emerson, a farm laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Elbridge S. Emerson, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), Clarence O. Emerson, aged ten years (b. NH), and Aura L. Emerson, aged seven years (b. NH). Simeon Emerson had real estate valued at $3,500 and personal estate valued at $1,100.

Simeon Emerson, a farmer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Barnstead, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mahala Emerson, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and his children, James O. Emerson, a clergyman, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Simeon E. Emerson, a farm laborer, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Clarence O. Emerson, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. NH), and Aura Emerson, a teacher, aged seventeen years (b. NH).

James O. Emerson was principal of the Milton Mills school in the 1876-77 academic year that fell between his graduation from Bates College and the beginning of his graduate studies at Yale. He would seem to have been the first principal in the new building. Veteran Milton Mills teacher, Abbie D. Buck, and William E. Hatch (see both above), would have been his assistant teachers.

James I. Emerson married in Eldon, Wapello, IA, February 14, 1884, Anna Mather, both of Eldon, IA. He was a clergyman, aged thirty-two years, and she was aged twenty-nine years. She was born in OH, circa 1855, daughter of Francis and Adeline C. (Bell) Mather.

CLASS OF 1876. JAMES OSCAR EMERSON. B.D., Yale Coll., 1880. Son of Simeon and Mahala L. (Adams) Emerson. b. Pittsfield, N.H., July 1, 1852. Fitted for college at Academy, Pittsfield. Prin. of High Sch., Milton Mills, N.H., 1876-77. Graduate student at Yale Div. Sch., New Haven, Conn., 1877-80. Home Missionary at Wahpeton, Richland Co., No. Dakota, and Breckenridge, Wilkin Co., Minn., 1880-83. Pastor of Cong. Ch., Bunker Hill, Ill., 1883-87, ditto Pittsfield, Ill., 1887. He was the only clergyman in the counties above mentioned when he went there. Organized a church at Wahpeton and erected a church building at Breckenridge. m. Anna Mather, Feb. 14, 1884, four children (Bates College, 1893). 

James O. Emerson, a preacher, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Concord, IL, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Anna M. Emerson, aged forty-four years (b. OH), and his children, Nellie A. Emerson, at school, aged fourteen years (b. IL), Frank M. Emerson, at school, aged twelve years (b. IL), Grace Emerson, at school, aged ten years (b. IL), and Aura B. Emerson, at school, aged eight years (b. IL), and his mother-in-law, Adaline Mather, a widow, aged seventy-three years (b. PA). James O. Emerson owned their farm, free-and-clear. Anna M. Emerson was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

James O. Emerson, a Congregational minister, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Roxbury, CT, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Anna M. Emerson, aged fifty-two years (b. OH), and his children, Nelie A. Emerson, aged twenty-three years (b. IL), Frank M. Emerson, aged twenty-two years (b. IL), Grace Emerson, a district school teacher, aged twenty years (b. IL), and Aura B. Emerson, aged eighteen years (b. IL). James O. Emerson owned their farm, free-and-clear. Anna M. Emerson was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

James O. Emerson, a Congregational clergyman, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Roxbury, CT, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna Mather Emerson, aged sixty-four years (b. OH), and his daughter, Grace Emerson, a public school teacher, aged thirty years (b. IL). James O. Emerson owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Rev. James O. Emerson died in Westfield, MA, April 2, 1928, aged seventy-five years.

REV. JAMES O. EMERSON IS DEAD AT WESTFIELD. Westfield, April 2. Rev. James Oscar Emerson, 75, a graduate of Bates college in 1876, and of Yale Theological school in 1880, died today at the home, 64 Orange street. He was born at Barnstead, N.H., the son of Simeon and Mahala Adams Emerson. He was a member of all the Masonic bodies of Pittsfield, Ill., and had been a resident of this city for about a year, coming from Roxbury, Ct., where he had held his last pastorate. Besides his widow, he leaves three daughters, Mrs. Ernest Guild of Weston, Ill., Miss Grace Emerson of Cleveland, O., and Mrs. Charles J. Sibler of New York city; a son, Frank M. of this city; two brothers, Simeon of Barnstead, N.H., and C.O. Emerson of Concord, N.H.; and one sister, Mrs. Charles Price of Gilmanton Iron Works, N.H. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2, Revs. R.G. Pavey and Williams Robertson officiating. Burial will be in Pine Hill cemetery (April 2, 1928).

Edward Whitney – 1877-78

Edward Whitney was born in Harrison, ME, August 19, 1851, son of Edward K. and Arvilla (Caswell) Whitney.

Educational Intelligence. Milton Mills, N.H., has recently built a high school building. Edward Whitney, A.B., succeeds Mr. Emerson as principal, assisted by Miss Abbie D. Buck, who has held that position many years (Bicknell, 1877).

Edward K. Whitney, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), headed a Harrison, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Arvilla Whitney, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), his children, Edward Whitney, a school teacher, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), Harrison Whitney, a student, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Fairfield Whitney, works at home, aged seventeen years (b. ME),Mary F. Whitney, aged fourteen years (b. ME), his father-in-law, Marquis D. Caswell, a farmer, aged eighty-eight years (b. ME), and his hired help, Samuel A. Kneeland, a laborer, aged thirty-four years (b. ME).

Edward Whitney married in Orange, MA, March 7, 1888, Mary Eliza Stone, both of Orange. He was a stenographer, aged thirty-six years, and she was a milliner, aged thirty-six years. She was born in Windsor, CT, September 27, 1851, daughter of David and Mary A. Stone.

Edward Whitney, a stenographer, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Washington, DC, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Mary E. Whitney, aged forty-eight years (b. CT), and his children, Robert B. Whitney, at school, aged ten years (b. MA), and Clifford C. Whitney, at school, aged nine years (b. MA). Edward Whitney rented their house at 1122 B Street. Mary E. Whitney was the mother of four [two] children, of whom four [two] were still living.

Edward Whitney, a commerce and labor clerk, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Washington, DC, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Mary E. Whitney, aged fifty-eight years (b. CT), and his children, Robert B. Whitney, at school, aged twenty years (b. MA), and Clifford C. Whitney, at school, aged eighteen years (b. MA). Edward Whitney owned their house at 1128 B Street, free-and-clear. Mary E. Whitney was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Class of 1876. Edward Whitney. b. 19 Aug. 1851, Harrison, Me. Son of Edward Kendall and Arvilla (Caswell) Whitney. Teacher, Naples, Harrison and Springfield, Me., Milton Mills, N.H., and Merrimac, Mass., 1877-80. Newspaper work, Holyoke, Northampton, and Boston, Mass., 1880-82. Stenographer, Mass. Smelting and Refining Co., Boston, Mass., 1882-83; New Home Sewing Machine Co., Orange, Mass., 1883-98; in office of Comptroller of the Currency, Treasury Dept., Washington, D.C., 1898-11. Employed in various positions in Bureau of Statistics, Dept. of Commerce and Labor, Washington, D.C. Chief, Library and Foreign Statistics Division, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce, Washington, D.C., 1912- . Address, Oct.-May, 1128 B St. N.E., Washington, D.C. May-Oct., Glenn Dale, Prince George’s Co., Md. (Bates College, 1915).

(Note the separate winter and summer addresses. Prior to air conditioning, Washington, DC, was insufferably hot and humid in the summer).

Edward Whitney, a Dep. Commerce employee, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Bowie, Prince George’s Co., MD, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. Whitney, aged sixty-eight years (b. CT), and his sister-in-law, Sarah Dickenson, aged seventy-six years (b. CT). Edward Whitney owned their house at Glendale, free-and-clear.

Edward Whitney died at Ft. Sam Houston, in San Antonio, TX, September 20, 1924, aged seventy-three years. His death certificate explained that he was the civilian father of an Army officer, presumably visiting his son.

Mary E. (Stone) Whitney died in Bradenton, FL, August 30, 1937.

Charles E. Hussey – 1878-79

Charles Edwin Hussey was born in Rochester, NH, June 16, 1856, son of Charles W. and Nancy B. (Davis) Hussey.

He attended Bates College, graduating with its Class of 1877, and succeeded Edward Whitney as principal of the Milton Mills school in the 1878-79 academic year. He was a principal in Rochester, NH, for five years afterwards, 1879-84.

George W. Preston, a house carpenter, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma L. Preston, keeping house, aged nineteen years (b. ME), nd his boarders, Charles S. Buck, a store clerk, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Charles E. Hussey, a high school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. NH).

Charles E. Hussey married in Rochester, NH, December 25, 1884, Carrie H. Wallace, he of Farmington, NH, and she of Rochester. He was a school master, aged twenty-eight years, and she was a lady, aged twenty-two years. She was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1862, daughter of Ebenezer G. Wallace.

CLASS OF 1877. CHARLES EDWIN HUSSEY. A.M. Son of Charles William and Nancy Bickford (Davis) Hussey. b. Rochester, N.H., June 16, 1856. Fitted for college at High Sch., Farmington, N.H., and Nichols Latin Sch., Lewiston, Me. Principal of High Sch., Milton Mills, N.H., 1878-79, ditto Rochester, N.H., 1879-84. Principal Grammar Sch., Newton Upper Falls, Mass., 1884. m. Carrie Helen Wallace, Dec. 25, 1884, two children. Address Newton Upper Falls, Mass. (Bates College, 1893).

Annie Wallace, own income, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her brother-in-law, Charles E. Hussey, shoe factory superintending agent, aged forty-three years (b. NH), her sister (and his wife (of fifteen years)), Carrie H. Hussey, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), her nephew, Wallace Hussey, aged fourteen years (b. MA), her niece, Helen N. Hussey, aged twelve years (b. MA), and her servant, Katie McKown, a servant, aged twenty-six years (b. Ireland). Annie Wallace owned their house at 73 So. Main Street, free-and-clear. Carrie H. Hussey was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Charles E. Hussey, own income, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Carrie H. Hussey, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), his children, Wallace Hussey, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), and Helen Hussey, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), his sister-in-law, Annie Wallace, own income, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and his servant, Julia Kelleher, a houseworker, aged twenty-five years (b. Ireland (immigrated in 1899)). Charles E. Hussey owned their house at 73 So. Main Street, free-and-clear. Carrie H. Hussey was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Local. Charles E. Hussey of Rochester has so far recovered from the effects of shock he received some time ago as to be able to ride out (Farmington News, September 22, 1911).

Charles E. Hussey died at 73 So. Main Street in Rochester, NH, October 17, 1915, aged fifty-nine years, four months, and one day.

Local. Charles E Hussey, a native of this town, passed away at his home in Rochester, Monday, after an illness of four years, aged 59 years. Mr. Hussey was a graduate of Farmington high school, finishing his education at Bates college. He made education a profession and taught high school in Rochester; also in Newton and Wakefield, Mass., where later, he was elected as superintendent of schools. For many years, be was identified with the Wallace Bros. shoe firm in Rochester, as a part owner. He leaves a widow, one son and a daughter. Funeral was held at the home, Wednesday afternoon, in charge of Palestine Commandery, Knight Templars, of which he was a past eminent commander. Interment was made in the family lot at Pine Grove cemetery in this town (Farmington News, October 22, 1915).

William P. Ferguson – c1880-81

William Proctor Ferguson was born in Shapleigh, ME, February 9, 1853, son of Nathaniel and Mary Ferguson.

Nathaniel Ferguson, a farmer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Hos household included hos wife, Mary Ferguson, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), his children, John F. Ferguson, work at farming, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and William P. Ferguson, a teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), and his servant, Charlies Brand, aged fifteen years (b. ME).

William Proctor Ferguson, A.M., 1883, b. 9 Feb, 1853, Shapleigh, Me. Teacher, Milton Mills, N.H., Sanford, Me. US Civil Service, Washington, D.C., 1884-93. Maine Leg., 1909-10. Farming, Shapleigh, Me. (Bowdoin College, 1912). 

William P. Ferguson married, circa 1887, Hattie May Earle. She was born in North Berwick, ME, November 23, 1861, daughter of Isaac and Sarah J. (Horne) Earle.

William P. Furgeson, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. ME), headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Hattie M. Furgeson, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), his children, Willie P. Furgeson, at school, aged twelve years (b. ME), Bessie M. Furgeson, at school, aged nine years (b. ME), George F. Furgeson, at school, aged seven years (b. ME), Lawrence E. Furgeson, aged two years (b. ME), Wendell Furgeson, aged ten months (b. ME), and his father, Nathaniel Furgeson, aged eighty-six years (b. ME). William P. Furgeson owned their farm, free-and-clear. Hattie M. Furgeson was the mother of five children, of whom five were still living.

William P. Ferguson, a farmer (home farm), aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Hattie E. Ferguson, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), his children, Will P. Ferguson, a retail grocery clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), Bessie M. Ferguson, aged eighteen years (b. ME), George F. Ferguson, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Lawrence E. Ferguson, aged twelve years (b. ME), Wendell Ferguson, aged ten years (b. ME), and Mary B. Ferguson, aged six years (b. ME). William P. Ferguson owned their farm, free-and-clear. Hattie M. Ferguson was the mother of six children, of whom six were still living.

William C. Ferguson, a general farmer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Hattie E. Ferguson, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), his children, Lawrence E. Ferguson, a laborer, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), Wendell Ferguson, a Sanford Mills weaver, aged twenty years (b. ME), and Mary B. Ferguson, aged sixteen years (b. ME). William P. Ferguson owned their farm, free-and-clear.

William P. Ferguson died in Shapleigh, ME, March 26, 1929. Hattie M. (Earle) Ferguson died in Shapleigh, ME, December 17, 1955.

Albert E. Millett – 1882

Albert E. “Bert” Millett was born in Hebron, ME, October 3, 1858, son of Lemuel T. and Mary A. (Milliken) Millett.

Millett, AE - nd
Bert Millett

Thomas Millett, a farmer, aged thirty-three years (b. ME), headed a Minot (“18th Enumeration District”), ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household include his son, Ralf L. Millett, at home, aged one year (b. ME), his mother, Mary A. Millett, keeping house, aged sixty-two years (b. ME), and his brothers, George F. Millett, a farm laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), and Albert E. Millett, a farm laborer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME).

Albert E. Millett taught a spring-summer term at Milton Mills school in 1882, while he was still an undergraduate student at Bates College.

Albert E. Millett married in Richmond, MI, August 2, 1887, Nora L. Perkins, both of Richmond. He was a teacher, aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-two years. She was born in Richmond, MI, August 6, 1864, daughter of Charles H. and Adelaide L. (Selleck) Perkins.

A.E. MILLETT, A.M., Principal of the Public Schools at Utica, and member of the Board of Examiners of Macomb county, was born in 1858 at Hebron, Oxford county, Maine, a son of Lemuel T. and Mary A. (Milliken) Millett. His father died in 1868, and his mother still resides in Maine. During boyhood our subject attended a district school in Androscoggin county, and the academics at Hebron and Bridgton, graduating from the latter in 1879. He then entered Bates College, at Lewiston, Maine, and in 1883 was graduated with the degree of A.B., the Master’s degree being conferred in 1886 by the same institution. While attending Hebron Academy he began teaching in order to meet expenses, and at different times he had charge of district schools in Androscoggin county and elsewhere in Maine. He taught in Minot in 1877, Sumner in 1878, in West Minot in 1879, in West Scarborough, Maine, in 1880, 1881, and 1882, and the summer of 1882 he spent in teaching at Milton Mills, New Hampshire. On graduating from Bates College he came to Michigan as Principal of the high school at Richmond, where he remained four years, and after one year at Rochester and seven years at Armada in a similar position, he was elected principal of the schools at Utica, upon his duties in September, 1895. Five teachers are employed in the school, Miss Maude Caswell being Assistant Principal, and the enrollment of the high school is about seventy, with twenty-three nonresident pupils. The school is on the Normal College list and has a good library of five hundred volumes and a equipped physical and chemical laboratory. Twelve grades are maintained, enrollment being two hundred and fourteen in all. Mr. Millett is a member the Macomb County Teachers Association, of which he was president in 1893, and since October 1894 he has served on the County Board of Examiners (Beers, 1900).

Albert E. Millett, a school teacher, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Shelby (“Utica Village”), MI, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Nora Millett, aged thirty-five years (b. MI), and his children, Marie Millett, aged six years (b. MI), and Ethel Millett, aged five years (b. MI). Albert E. Millett owned their house, with a mortgage. Nora Millett was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Albert E. Millett, a retail furniture merchant, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed an Armada, MI, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Nora P. Millett, aged forty-five years (b. MI), and his children, Ethel A. Millett, aged fifteen years (b. MI), and Bert P. Millett, aged five years (b. MI). Albert E. Millett owned their house on Burk Street, free-and-clear. Nora Millett was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living.

Albert E. Millett, Armada postmaster, aged sixty-one years (b. ME), headed an Armada, MI, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nora P. Millett, aged fifty-five years (b. MI), and his son, Bert P. Millett, aged seventeen years (b. MI). Albert E. Millett owned their house on Burk Street, with a mortgage.

Albert E. Millett, a furniture trader, aged seventy-one years (b. ME), headed an Armada, MI, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-three years), Nora P. Millett, aged sixty-five years (b. MI). Albert E. Millett owned their house on Burk Street, which was valued at $1,800. They did not have a radio set.

Albert E. Millett died in Ann Arbor, MI, March 12, 1937. Nora (Perkins) Millett died in Armada, MI, March 14, 1955.

MILLETT DIES IN HOSPITAL. Rites Friday For Prominent Armada Resident. Armada, March 18. Albert E. Millett, 78, undertaker here, member of the school board, former superintendent of Armada and Richmond schools, and well known in educational circles for 26 years, died Friday in University hospital, Ann Arbor. Mr. Millett was born in Maine, Oct. 3, 1858, and attended Hebron and Brighton academies. He received his A.B. degree from Bates college, Lewiston, Me., and his masters degree in 1886. It was more than 50 years ago that Mr. Millett became superintendent of Richmond schools after coming to Michigan. While in Richmond he married Miss Norah Perkins, a Richmond girl. After serving four years in Richmond he served in a similar capacity in Rochester, Mich., for a time before coming to Armada where he served as head of the school system seven years. Later he served in Utica, and rounded out 26 years of educational work. He then returned to Armada and entered the undertaking business 32 years ago. Mr. Millett served 10 years as a member of Macomb county school board of examiners and also on the village council. He was president of the Armada school board at the time of his death. He was also active in Masonic work. He was a Knight Templar. Besides his widow, he is survived by one son, Bert Millett, and a daughter, Mrs. A.M. Tiffney, all of Armada. His son-in-law was in business with him here. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday in the Congregational church. Rev. Jonathan Turner, pastor of First Congregational church, Port Huron, will officiate. Burial will be in Willow Grove cemetery (Times Herald (Port Huron, MI), [Thursday,] March 18, 1937).

Rufus E. Donnell – 1882-83

Rufus Edwin Donnell was born as Rufus Edwin Bubier in Webster, ME, April 16, 1859, son of William and Philena W. (Donnell) Bubier. His mother died in December 1865, when he was six years of age, and his father died in August 1875, when he was sixteen years of age. He had his surname changed from Bubier to Donnell by a special act of the Maine legislature, February 13, 1878.

Henry L.B. Smith a physician, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Middleborough, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ophelia Smith, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. NH), Orrin R. Smith, at school, aged thirteen years (b ME), Arthur T. Smith, at school, aged eleven years (b. ME), and his boarders, Rufus Donnell, a school teacher, aged twenty years (b. ME), Emma T. Curtis, works in shoe factory, aged nineteen years (b. ME), Ella F. Curtis, works in shoe factory, aged nineteen years (b. ME), and Abby M. Curtis, works in shoe factory, aged seventeen years (b. ME), and his servant, Timothy Flynn, a servant, aged fifty years (b. Ireland).

R.E. Donnell, a Bates College undergraduate student, taught at the Milton Mills High School in the 1882-83 academic year.

ALUMNI HISTORY. Class of ’84. R.E. Donnell has been teaching the Milton Mills High School (Bates Student, January 1883).

He graduated with the Bates College Class of 1884. He married, circa 1886, Evelina, whose maiden name remains a bit of a mystery. She was born in 1860.

R.E. Donnell graduated from the Dartmouth Medical School in November 1888. He is usually listed as a member of the Class of 1889. He was an allopathic physician.

SWEET BOY GRADUATES. Annual Exercises of the Dartmouth Medical College. HANOVER. N.H., Nov. 20. The annual graduating exercises of the Dartmouth Medical College occurred tonight in the College Church. The exercises were preceded by a concert by Eastman’s orchestra of Manchester. The programme was as follows: Prayer by President Bartlett: salutatory. R.E. Donnell; oration. E.F. Abrams; address. M.H. Felt, M.D., of Hillsboro Bridge, delegate from the New Hampshire State Medical Society; valedictory, M.E. Kean; address by President Bartlett: presentation of diplomas, Professor C.P. Frost. The new M.D.’s are: E.T. Abrams. Michigan; E. Bernier. New Hampshire: S.H. Carney. Jr., New York: D.B. Coxe. New Hampshire; G.M. Davis. New Hampshire; R.E. Donnell. Maine: W.T. Elsmore. Alabama; S.W. Ford. New Hampshire; E.G. Fosgate, New Hampshire: L.J. Frink, Maine; Henry Gauss, New York; Daniel Goodenow, Maine; R.A. Greene, Massachusetts, Honore A. Herbert. Massachusetts; M.E. Kean. New Hampshire; J.A. Meara, New York; W.R. Morrow, Vermont; C.J. Nickerson, Massachusetts: H.F. Preston. New York: Normas St. George. Massachusetts: Gillis Stark. New Hampshire; D.L. Stokes. New Hampshire: A.S. Wiley. Minnesota; G.B. Wilson. Maine; S. Woodbury, New Hampshire; M.S. Woodman. New Hampshire (Boston Globe, November 21, 1888).

Dr. Rufus E. Donnell removed from Whitman, MA, to Lewiston, ME, in June 1889, and Gardiner, ME, thereafter.

WHITMAN. Dr. R.E. Donnell of this place has moved to Lewiston, Me., where he will practice (Boston Globe, June 27, 1889).

GARDINER. A novel entertainment in the form of a worlds fair will be given by the Y.M.C.A. A committee as follows was chosen to complete arrangements: W.F. Studley, Daniel Longfellow, Dr. R.E. Donnell, G.W. Murphy. H.M. Hamlin. F.W. Armes, W.R. Gay, J.L.M. Bates, C.H. Bean (Boston Globe, January 22, 1894).

GARDINER. The graduation of the class of 94 of the South Gardiner grammar school will take place June 13 in the Congregational church. The salutatory will be given by Susie E. Brown, the history by Lulu C. Stanford, valedictory by Annie Louise Moore, recitations by Verda E. Phillips, Geo. A. Spencer, Nellie Brown, Merl V. Eastman, Everett Arthur Erskine, Annie G. Beard. Dr. R.E. Donnell will address the class, and the diplomas will be presented by Judge J.M. Larrabee of Gardiner. (Boston Globe, June 5, 1894).

GARDINER. The teachers will meet this. evening in the high school building . Papers will be presented, as follows: “Arithmetic; How Shall We Teach the Children?” by Miss Bertha L. Gay; “Reading: How Taught in the Primary Grades,” by Miss Sadie M. Jewett; “Physiology: How Shall It be Taught in Our Primary Schools?” by Dr. R.E. Donnell; “Ethics for the Young,” by Rev. J.L. Quimby (Boston Globe, January 13, 1896).

Richard [SIC] E. Donnell, a physician, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Gardiner, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Evelina Donnell, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME). Rufus E. Donnell rented their house at 99 Brunswick Avenue.

GARDINER, ME. The following ladies presided over the tables at the Christmas sale given by the parish league of the Congregational church Friday evening: Mrs. F.E. McCausland, Mrs. F.D. Loring, Mrs. Lucy Harlow and Mrs. W.S. McDuffy, A large number of people were in attendance. Those who presided over the supper table were: Mrs. A.G. Haley, Mrs. R.E. Donnell, Mrs. F.E. McCausland, Mrs. F.D. Loring, Mrs. A.F. Smith, Mrs. E.A. Beede, Mrs. G.H. Harrington, Mrs. J.F. Holt, Mrs. C.J. Bragdon and Mrs. E.P. Ladd. The affair was a great success (Boston Globe, November 26, 1905).

Rufus E. Donnell, a medical physician, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed a Gardiner, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Evelina Donnell, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), and his boarder, True C. Morrill, a school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. ME). Rufus E. Donnell owned their house at 168 Brunswick Avenue, free-and-clear.

Rufus E. Donnell, a medical physician, aged sixty-one years (b. ME), headed a Gardiner, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Evelina Donnell, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), and his roomer, Anna Riley, a dry goods store milliner, aged thirty years (b. ME). Rufus E. Donnell owned their house at 168 Brunswick Avenue, free-and-clear. It was a two-family building, which they share with the household of tenant Fred B. Barstow, a leather buyer for the R.P.H. shoe factory, aged forty-two years (b. NH).

Rufus E. Donnell died in his home at 168 Brunswick Avenue, Gardiner, ME, May 16, 1920, aged sixty-one years, and one month. Evelina Donnell died in 1928.

Obituary Notes. Dr. Rufus E. Donnell a graduate of Dartmouth Medical College in 1888, and for several years a member of the City Council of Augusta, Me., died at his home in that city on May 16, aged 61 years (Medical Record, June 6, 1920). 

Asa C. Crowell – 1885-86

Asa Clinton Crowell was born in Pawtucket, RI, May 20, 1862, son of Asa and Eliza A. (Huntress) Crowell.

Asa Clinton Crowell (1862-1936) believe taken c. 1910
Asa C. Crowell

Asa C. Crowell graduated from Brown University in 1882. He was principal of the Milton Mills school during the 1885-86 academic year. He then went on to be an assistant teacher for several years at Governor Dummer Academy in Byfield, MA. He received his A.M. degree from Brown University in 1889.

Asa Clinton Crowell, A.M., Ph.D. upon examination 1894. Principal, high school, Milton Mills, N.H., 1886; assistant teacher, Dummer academy, South Byfield., Mass., 1887-90; instructor French, Brown university, 1890-91, French and German, 1891-92, German, 1892-94, assistant professor, Germanic languages and literatures, 1894. Address Box 296, Pawtucket R.I. (Remington, 1895).

COMMENCEMENT AT BROWN. Degrees Conferred at the 126th Annual Graduation Today. PROVIDENCE, June 20. – The 126th annual commencement of Brown university was held today with clouded skies. At 9.30 the long line of alumni, faculty and college officers marched from the campus to the First Baptist church. The professors wore their doctors’ hoods for the second time on such an occasion. After the program of orations and music was rendered at the church the commencement theses were heard. Two candidates, both men, were admitted to the degree of doctor of philosophy. Seventeen candidates received the degree of master of arts. Of these, three were women. Two of these women received the degree “summa cum laude,” there being but two of the 14 men who were honored with this designation. The other young woman graduated “magna cum laude.” an honor which only two of the remaining 12 young men received. The following degrees for work done under the direction of the college were conferred: The degree of doctor of philosophy on Asa Clinton Crowell, A.M., Brown ’89, and Arthur Newton Leonard, A.M., Brown ’93 (Boston Globe, June 20, 1894).

A. Clinton Crowell, a professor, aged thirty-eight years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Hos household included his mother, Eliza A. Crowell, a widow, aged seventy-two years (b. MA). A. Clinton Crowell owned their house at 345 Hope Street, free-and-clear. Eliza A. Crowell was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living.

THE PEDAGOGUE. Dr. Asa Clinton Crowell, assistant professor at the German department of Brown university, will become professor of that department in place of the late Professor Williams (North Adams Transcript, April 6, 1901).

Asa C. Crowell married in Boston, MA, August 9, 1904, Carrie E. Provan, he of Providence, RI, and she of 397A Broadway, Boston. He was a teacher, aged forty-two years, and she was at home, aged twenty-five years. She was born in Boston, MA, circa 1879, daughter of Harry F. and Minnie S. (Warren) Provan.

PROVIDENCE. In the South Baptist church, Boston. Miss Carrie Ethel Provan, only daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Frost Provan, was united in marriage to Prof. Asa Clinton Crowell, of this city, Tuesday afternoon, at 4 o’clock. On account of the recent death of the bridegroom’s mother the wedding was simple and only a few relatives and intimate friends were present. The bride is a graduate of Boston University class of 1903 and received the Master’s degree from Brown University at the last commencement. Prof Crowell is the acting head of the Germanic department of Brown University. He is enjoying his “sabbatic year” and after a year’s absence in Europe for the purpose of study and travel Prof. and Mrs. Crowell will reside in this city (Fall River Daily Evening News, August 11, 1904).

A. Clinton Crowell, a university teacher, aged forty-seven years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Carrie E. Crowell, aged thirty years (b. MA), his son, Robert H. Crowell, aged one year, four months (b. RI), and his servant, Alma J. Johnson, a private family servant, aged twenty-eight years (b. Sweden). A. Clinton Crowell owned their house at 345 Hope Street, free-and-clear. Carrie E. Crowell was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

A. Clinton Crowell, a college professor, aged fifty-seven years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Carrie E. Crowell, aged forty years (b. MA), his son, Robert H. Crowell, aged eleven years (b. RI), and his mother-in-law, Minnie S. Provan, a widow, aged sixty-two years (b. MA). A. Clinton Crowell owned their house at 66 Oriole Avenue, free-and-clear. Carrie E. Crowell was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

A. Clinton Crowell, a college professor, aged sixty-seven years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Carrie E. Crowell, aged fifty years (b. MA), his son, Robert H. Crowell, aged twenty-one years (b. RI), and his mother-in-law, Minnie S. Provan, a widow, aged seventy-two years (b. MA). A. Clinton Crowell owned their house at 66 Oriole Avenue, free-and-clear.

Asa C. Crowell died in Providence, RI, June 26, 1936.

Carrie E. Crowell, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her mother, Minnie S. Provan, a widow, aged eighty-two years (b. MA). Carrie E. Crowell owned their house at 66 Oriole Avenue, which was valued at $10,000.

Carrie E. (Provan) Crowell died in 1950.

Charles S.F. Whitcomb – 1890-91

Charles Sumner Fremont Whitcomb was born in Henniker, NH, July 18, 1864, son of Luther H. and Anna J. (Welch) Whitcomb.

Luther Whitcomb, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Henniker, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna J. Whitcomb, keeping house, aged forty-eight years (b. Canada East), and his children, Marietta J. Whitcomb, a school teacher, aged twenty years (b. NH), Jennie W. Whitcomb, at home, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Charles S.F. Whitcomb, at home, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Carrie A. Whitcomb, attending school, aged thirteen years (b. NH).

Charles S.F. Whitcomb was one of twenty-four students who received their A.B. degrees from Bates College, in Lewiston, ME, in June 1890 (Boston Globe, June 26, 1890). He was principal at the Milton Mills school during its 1890-91 academic year.

CLASS OF 1890. CHARLES SUMNER FREMONT WHITCOMB. Son of Luther Hale and Anna Jane (Welch) Whitcomb. b. July 18, 1866 [1864]. Fitted for college at High Sch., Hillsboro Bridge, N.H., and Academy, Francestown, N.H. Prin. High Sch., Milton Mills, N.H., 1890-91. Address Henniker, Merrimac Co., N.H. (Bates College, 1893).

Cecil A. True, a painter, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Minot, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Marion True, aged forty-one years (b. ME), his daughter, Inez G. True, aged seventeen years (b. ME), his mother, Frances E. True, a widow, aged fifty years (b. ME), and his boarder, Charles F. Whitcomb, a physician, aged thirty-three years (b. NH). Cecil A. True owned their house free-and-clear. Marion True was the mother of one child of whom one was still living. (Frances E. True was also the mother of one child, of whom one was still living).

Charles S.F. Whitcomb married (2nd) in Piermont, NH, February 6, 1907, Ada G. (Goodwin) Abbott, he of Contoocook, NH, and she of Piermont. He was a physician, aged forty-two years, and she was a saleslady, aged thirty-five years. She was born in Warren, NH, circa 1876, daughter of John and Hannah (Sherwell) Goodwin.

Charles S.F. Whitcomb, a family physician, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Hopkinton, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Ada G. Whitcomb, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH). Charles S.F. Whitcomb rented their house on Maple Street.

ASHLAND. Dr. Charles S.F. Whitcomb has purchased the Thayer estate on Main st., and will occupy (Boston Globe, January 13, 1911).

Class of 1890. Charles Sumner Fremont Whitcomb. M.D., Med. Sch., Me., 1895. b. 18 July 1866, Henniker, N.H. Son of Luther Hale and Anna Jane (Welch) Whitcomb. Prin., High Sch., Milton Mills, N.H., 1890-91. Physician, Milton Mills, N.H., 1895-97; Minot, Me., 1897-04; Contoocook, N.H., 1904-10; Ashland, Mass., 1910- (Bates College, 1915).

Charles S.F. Whitcomb, a physician, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed an Ashland, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ada G. Whitcomb, aged forty-eight years (b. NH). Charles S.F. Whitcomb rented their house on Main Street.

ASHLAND CLUB TO DEBATE SUPPRESSION OF KLAN. ASHI.AND, Oct. 21 – The meeting of the Men’s Club of the Federated Church, scheduled for Friday night has been postponed to Thursday, Oct. 29 at the Baptist Church, when there will be a debate on the question, “Should the Ku Klux Klan Be Suppressed?” The committee in charge will be Clinton B. Wilbur, chairman; James F. Clements, Perry O. Holden, Charles H. Thayer and Charles S.F. Whitcomb (Boston Globe, October 25, 1925).

ASHLAND TO HAVE A MOCK BREACH OF PROMISE TRIAL. ASHLAND, May 6. North Star Lodge, A.F. & A.M., will hold a mock trial of a breach of promise case next Friday. Doors will open at 7:30 and court will be called at 8 o’clock. It Is many years since Ashland has witnessed a mock trial. Mrs. Ruth Bean of Cordaville will be the much-abused plaintiff, who is suing Walter G. Whittemore, well-known local town clerk. Edward Carr, prominent Hopkinton attorney, will act as the judge, while Mr. Newton will be the plaintiff’s attorney and Maxim Nash of Framingham the defendant’s. Witnesses will be Mrs. Frances V. Richards and Mrs. Clara Prescott, Nathaniel P. Sears, Warren M. MacNear and Dr. Charles S.F. Whitcomb. William B. Johnson will be the clerk of the court and Charles W. Olson the officer of the court. On the jury are Henry C. Burnham, Theodore P. Hall, Ralph D. Harriman, Arthur L. Hogan, Henry E. Kelley, Chester W. MacNear, Robert L. Phelps, James R, Scott, Albert J. Stirk, Allan S. Farwell, Channing F. Grout and James E. Taylor (Boston Globe, May 6, 1927).

Charles S.F. Whitcomb, a physician, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed an Hopkinton, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Ada G. Whitcomb, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH). Charles S.F. Whitcomb rented their house on Maple Street, for $25 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Charles S.F. Whitcomb died instantly, of a cerebral hemorrhage, while driving his car on Maple Street in Contoocook, NH, January 2, 1938, aged seventy-three years, six months, and fourteen days.

NEW HAMPSHIRE DOCTOR DIES WHILE DRIVING CAR. CONTOOCOOK, N.H., Jan. 3 (AP). Dr. Charles Whitcomb, 72, died suddenly while driving his car here late yesterday. A native of Henniker, he had practiced medicine here for about 10 years. He was a graduate of Bates College in 1896 and took a graduate course at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Whitcomb practiced medicine in Massachusetts and Maine before coming to New Hampshire. He leaves his widow (Boston Globe, January 3, 1938).

Minetta R. Anderson – 1899-00

Minetta Rose “Minnie” Anderson was born in Parsonsfield, ME, August 29, 1876, daughter of Ebenezer G. “Gilman” and Mehitabel R. “Rose” (Burnell) Anderson.

Miss Minnie R. Anderson appeared in the Westbrook directory of 1897, as a teacher, resident at 29 Haskell street. Ebenezer G. Anderson, a carpenter, had his house at 29 Haskell street.

WESTBROOK. Miss Winnetta [Minetta] R. Anderson of Haskell street has secured a position as teacher at Milton Mills, N.H., and will commence work at the opening of the fall term (Portland Daily Press (Portland, ME), July 14, 1899).

Minetta R. Anderson appeared in the Westbrook, ME, directory of 1902, as a teacher at the Saco st. school, boarding at 29 Haskell street (P.O. C.M.). Ebenezer Anderson, a carpenter (Port.), had his house at 28 Haskell street.

Minetta R. Anderson appeared in the Westbrook, ME, directory of 1904, as a teacher at the Saco st. school, boarding at 57 Haskell street. Ebenezer Anderson, a carpenter (Port.), had his house at 57 Haskell street.

Ninetta R. Anderson married in Chelsea, MA, June 20, 1905, Ernest A. Legg, she of 55 Heard street, Chelsea, and he of Brownsville, VT. He was a clergyman, aged thirty years, and she was aged thirty years. He was born in Dover, NH, March 18, 1875, son of Frank W. and Mary C. “Carrie” (Warren) Legg.

Ernest A Legg, a Methodist clergyman, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Bradford, VT, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of four years), Minetta R Legg, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), Marion E Legg, aged nine months (b. VT), and his mother-in-law, Rose M Anderson, a widow, aged sixty-four years (b. ME).

Ernest A. Legg, a church clergyman, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Norwich, CT, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minetta R. Legg, aged forty-four years (b. ME), his children, Marion E. Legg, aged ten years (b. VT), and Grace M. Legg, aged four years, two months (b. MA), and his servant, Ada M. Bushey, a private family servant, aged twenty-five years (b. VT). Ernest A. Legg rented their house at 67 Lafayette Street.

Ernest A. Legg, a humane society educational director, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Manchester, CT, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Minetta A. Legg, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), his children, Marion E. Legg, aged a public school teacher, twenty years (b. VT), and Grace M. Legg, aged fourteen years (b. MA). Ernest A. Legg rented their house at 15 Delmont Street, for $55 per month. They had a radio set.

Grace Legg, a radio station secretary, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), headed a Manchester, CT, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her mother, Minetta Legg, a widow, aged sixty-four years (b. ME). Grace Legg rented their house at 4 North Fairfield Street, for $40 per month. They both had lived in the same place in 1935. Both had attended two years of college.

Rev. Ernest A. Legg died August 2, 1934. Minetta R. (Anderson) Legg died October 5, 1945.

Legg Funeral. Services for Mrs. Minetta A. Legg, widow of Rev. Ernest A. Legg, who died Saturday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Walter J. Holman of 8 Newman Street, will be held Monday at 2 p.m. at South Methodist Church. Rev. Ralph W. Ward, Jr., pastor, will officiate and burial will be in Stafford Springs Cemetery. Mrs. Legg came here 17 years ago from Stafford Springs where her husband was pastor of the Methodist Church. She was born in Parsonsfield, Me., on August 29, 1875. She was a member of South Methodist Church, the Willing Workers Group and the Ever Ready circle of King’s Daughters Besides Mrs. Holman, she leaves another daughter, Mrs. Francis K. Burr of Cambridge, Mass.; a brother, Perle G. Anderson of South Hamilton, Mass., and three grandchildren Funeral arrangements are being made by Watkins Funeral Home, 142 East Center Street (Hartford Courant, October, 7, 1945).

Vernon E. Rand – 1901-02

Vernon Elmer “Vernie” Rand was born in Ripley, ME, September 30, 1878, son of Frank E. and Nancy C. (Holt) Rand.

BATES COMMENCEMENT. Several Honorary Degrees Awardd and Prizes Granted to Students – Commencement Dinner. LEWISTON, Me., June 29. – Bates college was honored today, commencement day, by the presence of Gov. Powers. Congressman-Elect Littlefield, state Superintendent of Schools Stetson, Prof. W.E.C. Rich of Boston Arthur Given of Providence and others. The commencement exercises were held in the Main St Free Baptist church. The following prizes were awarded: Junior exhibition prize, $75, Alison G. Catheron, Manchester, Mass; junior exhibition prize, $20, Miss Bertha O. True, New Gloucester; sophomore champion debate, two divisions, Vernie E. Rand, Leo C. Demack. The following honorary degrees were announced: Rev. Carter E. Cate. Providence, D.D.; Edward R. Goodwin, Worcester, Mass., D.C.L.; Prescott Keyes, Bar Harbor, A.M.; Frank E. Hanscom, East Bethel, Me, A.M. The commencement dinner was served in city hall at 2 p.m. (Boston Globe, June 30, 1899).

[——] Rand appeared in the Milton directories of 1902 and 1904-05, as a teacher, M.M. High school, with his home at Dexter, Me. (The 1904-05 entry was inaccurate, merely carried forward from 1902).

Vernie E. Rand married in Dixfield, ME, March 6, 1907, Eva Laverne Holman, he of Dexter, ME, and she of Dixfield. He was a teacher, aged twenty-eight years, and she was a clerk, aged twenty-four years. She was born in Carthage, ME, March 12, 1882, daughter of George S. and Hannah (Hutchinson) Holman.

Vernon A. Rand, a high school principal, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), headed a Millinocket, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Eva L. Rand, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), and his children, John S. Rand, aged two years (b. ME), and Eleanor Rand, aged six months (b. ME). Vernon A. Rand rented their house on Main Avenue. Eva L. Rand was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Class of 1901. Vernie Elmer Rand. b. 30 Sept 1878, Ripley, Me. Son of Frank E. and Nancy C. (Holt) Rand. Prin., High Sch., Milton Mills, N.H., 1901-02; Exeter, Me., 1902-03; Dexter, Me., 1903-04; Litchfield Acad., 1904-05; Int. Correspondence, N.H., 1905-07; Prin., High Sch., Milbridge, Me., 1907; Monson Acad., Me., 1907-08; High Sch., Millinocket, Me., 1908-11; Camden, Me., 1911-12; Salesman International Textbook Co., Rockland, Me., 1912; Coal Land & Securities Co., 1914. Address, 9 Rockland street, Rockland Me. (Bates College, 1915).

Vernon E Rand, a bond salesman, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Dixfield, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Verna E. Rand, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), his children, John F. Rand, aged twelve years (b. ME), and Virginia Rand, aged four years, one month, and his sister-in-law, E. Etta Holman, aged forty-eight years (b. ME). Vernon E. Rand rented their house on High Street, for $25 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Vernon E Rand, a dry goods salesman, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed a Dixfield, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Laverna H. Rand, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), his children, John S. Rand, a real estate agent, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), and Virginia Rand, aged fourteen years. Vernon E. Rand rented their house on High Street, for $25 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Vernon E Rand, a brokerage co. security salesman, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Dixfield, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Verna Rand, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), his children, John Rand, a life insurance salesman, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and Virginia Rand, aged twenty-four years, and his sister-in-law, Etta Holman, aged seventy years (b. ME). Vernon E. Rand owned their house at 74 High Street, which was valued at $4,000. Vernon E. Rand had attended four years of college, Verna Rand had attended four years of high school. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

Vernon E. Rand died in February 1948.

William C. McCue – 1902

William Coleman McCue was born in Boston, MA, April 7, 1875, son of Bernard and Mary McCue.

George W. Lord, a farmer, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-two years), Eunice Lord, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), his children, Roxy [(Lord)] Pray, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Clara Lord, a teacher, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his boarders, William McCue, a teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), and Samuel Hill, a machinist, aged fifty-three years (b. NH). George W. Lord owned their farm free-and-clear. Eunice Lord was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

William Coleman McCue married in Berwick, ME, August 14, 1900, Clara Allen Lord, both of Berwick. Both were teachers, he was aged twenty-five years, and she was aged thirty-years. She was born in Somersworth, NH, circa 1870, daughter of George W. and Eunice (Hill) Lord.

William McCue appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a teacher at Milton Mills High School. William C. McCue appeared also in the Somersworth, NH, directory of that same year, as a farmer, boarding at 54 Berwick street, B.S. [Berwick Side].

Berwick, Me., Principal Resigns. BERWICK, Me, May 1 – William C. McCue, principal of the Sullivan grammar school, has tendered the school board his resignation, to take effect at the close of the school year. He has been elected district superintendent for the towns of Parsonsfield, Cornish and Porter (Boston Globe, May 31, 1909).

William C. McCue, superintendent of schools, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Clara A. McCue, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Eleanor L. McCue, aged seven years (b. ME), Allen L. McCue, aged four years (b. ME), and Eunice H. McCue, aged three years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law,  Eunice H. Lord, a widow, aged seventy-one years (b. NH). William C. McCue owned their farm on Berwick Street, free-and-clear. Clara A. McCue was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living. Eunice H. Lord was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

William C. McCue, superintendent of schools, aged forty-four years (b. MA), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Clara A.L. McCue, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Eleanor L. McCue, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Allen L. McCue, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and Eunice H. McCue, aged thirteen years (b. ME), and his nephew, Walter Mahoney, a machine shop laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA). William C. McCue owned their farm at 54 Berwick Street, free-and-clear.

William C. McCue, superintendent of schools, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty years), Clara L. McCue, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), and his aunt, Anna R. Guptill, aged eighty years (b. ME). William C. McCue owned their farm on Berwick Street, free-and-clear. They had a radio set.

Clara A. (Lord) McCue died in 1952. William C. McCue died in 1969.

Jacob E. Wignot – 1902-04

Jacob Ernest Wignot was born in Natick, MA, February 16, 1876, son of John and Malvina (Lindenue) Wignot.

Jacob E. Wignot married in Medway, MA, August 6, 1902, Mary Alena Carmichael, he of Wayland, MA, and she of Medway. He was a teacher, aged twenty-six years, and she was at home, aged thirty years. She was born in Nova Scotia, Canada, circa 1872, daughter of James T. and Susan (Roberts) Carmichael.

The newlyweds would have moved to Milton Mills, where Jacob E. Wignot was principal of the Milton Mills school for the academic years 1902-03 and 1903-04. (They acquired at some point a summer home at Lovell Lake, and are buried in the Milton Mills cemetery).

Jacob E. Wignot, a public school superintendent, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), headed a Salem, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Mary A. Wignot, aged thirty-six years (b. Canada (Eng.)), his child, Richard G. Wignot, aged five years (b. MA), and his brother, John Wignot, a meat store manager, aged thirty-six years (b. MA). Jacob E. Wignot rented their house on Main Street. Mary A. Wignot was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Class of 1899. Jacob Ernest Wignot. b. 16 Feb. 1876, South Natick, Mass. Teacher, Billerica, Mass., 1900-01. Prin., High Sch., Milton Mills, N.H., 1902-04; Wellfleet, Mass., 1904-07. Supt. Schools, Salem, Hudson and Atkinson, N.H., 1907- (Bates College, 1912).

Jacob E. Wignot, a public school superintendent, aged forty-three years (b. MA), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary A. Wignot, aged forty-nine years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and his children, Richard G. Wignot, aged fifteen years (b. MA), and Robert S. Wignot, aged four years (b. NH). Jacob E. Wignot rented their house at 211 Central Avenue. Mary A. Wignot was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Concord, N.H. Pending the breaking of the deadlock in the Dover school board, the state board of education has exercised it authority by continuing Superintendent of Schools Wignot in office until the local board makes some other choice. This is a situation which has not arisen before in this state (Farmington News, August 8, 1924).

Jacob E. Wignot, a public school superintendent, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary A. Wignot, aged sixty years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and his child, Robert S. Wignot, aged fourteen years (b. NH). Jacob E. Wignot rented their house at 35 Silver Street, for $35 per month. They had a radio set.

Jacob E. Wignot died in Wakefield, MA, July 6, 1937. Mary A. (Carmichael) Wignot died in 1963.

Jacob E. Wignot. Sanbornville, N.H., July 6. (AP.) Jacob E. Wignot, 61, superintendent of schools for five nearby towns, tonight dropped dead in front of his summer home at Lovell Lake. Dr. Louise Paul said that he had suffered a heart attack (Hartford Courant, July 7, 1937).

Gilman H. Campbell – 1905-06

Gilman H. Campbell was born in Allston, MA, November 2, 1884, son of John E. and Eliza F. (Hutchins) Campbell.

Gilman H. Campbell married (1st) in Scarboro, ME, September 2, 1908, Annie Merserve, he of South Portland, ME, and she of Scarboro. Both were teachers, he aged twenty-three years, and she aged twenty-four years. She was born in Westbrook, ME, circa 1885, daughter of Freedom and Sarah E. (Moulton) Meserve.

Gilman H. Campbell, a high school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), headed a Natick, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Annie M. Campbell, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), and his brother-in-law, Harlan R. Meserve, aged sixteen years (b. ME). Gilman H. Campbell rented their house at 24 Florence Street.

Rochester School Given Piano. ROCHESTER, N.H., Sept 14. At the chapel at the Rochester High School yesterday Frank Bobst, in behalf of the class of ’12, presented the school a new $350 piano, purchased from the proceeds of an entertainment given by the class at the Opera House last Spring. Principal Gilman H. Campbell received the gift for the school, after which Miss Marion Stevens rendered piano solos (Boston Globe, September 14, 1912).

Class of 1904. Gilman Hutchins Campbell. b. 2 Nov. 1885 [SIC], Allston, Mass. Teacher, Brewer, Me., 1904-05. Prin., High Sch., Milton Mills, N.H., 1905-06; Limerick Acad., Me., 1906-09. Teacher, Natick, Mass., 1909-12. Prin., High Sch., Rochester, N.H., 1912- (Bates College, 1912).

Gilman H. Campbell, a public school teacher, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), headed a Needham, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie M. Campbell, aged thirty-six years (b. ME). Gilman H. Campbell rented their house at 47 Maple Street.

Gilman H. Campbell, a public school teacher, aged forty-five years (b. MA), headed an Easton, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Annie M. Campbell, aged forty-six years (b. ME). Gilman H. Campbell rented their house on Spooner Avenue, for $36 per month. They had a radio set.

Annie (Meserve) Campbell died in Easton, MA, in early 1935.

NEEDHAM. Word has been received of the death of Mrs. Annie (Meserve) Campbell of North Easton, wife of Graham [Gilman] H. Campbell, formerly principal of Needham High School (Boston Globe, March 21, 1935).

One of Principal Campbell’s high school students remembered him in their autobiography entitled “When I Was Growing Up.” High school students being what they are, it should not surprise us overmuch that they associated his surname with the popular brand of canned soup.

The principal at the [Easton] high school was Gilman H. Campbell. Amongst the students he was known as Soup. Soup Campbell was a bit stodgy and had a slight impediment in his speech. I think at the time he was a widower. Besides being principal he also taught some classes. He was an excellent teacher. I had him for geometry. He was always sneezing but always was able to get his handkerchief out of his pocket just in the nick of time to catch the sneeze. We neither liked nor disliked Soup Campbell. He was a really pretty nice guy (Keith, 2008).

Gilman H. Campbell, a public high school principal, aged fifty-five years (b. MA), headed an Easton, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his sister-in-law, Ella A. Meserve, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Sarah E. Meserve, a widow, aged eighty-four years (b. ME). Gilman H. Campbell rented their house at 32 Spooner Street, for $35.50 per month. Gilman H. Campbell had attended five years of college, and his two in-laws had attended eight years of grammar school.

Gilman H. Campbell married (2nd) in Easton, MA, in 1941, Ruth Janet Hussey. She was born in Rochester, NH, June 21, 1895, daughter of  Frank H. and Teresa F. (Burger) Hussey.

Catholic. Rev. George P. Benaglia,. C.S.C., president of Stonehill College, North Easton, announces the appointment of Gilman H. Campbell as an instructor in mathematics. Mr. Campbell has served as high school principal at Rochester, N.H., and Needham and, for 22 years, principal of the Easton High School. He holds an A.B. degree from Bowdoin College, class of 1904, an E.M.D. from Harvard University, 1925, and joins the faculty of Stonehill in the second year of its operation (Boston Globe, June 25, 1949).

Gilman H. Campbell died in April 1966. Ruth J. (Hussey) Campbell died in Quincy, MA, in February 1976.

Amy E. Clark – 1909

Amy Elizabeth Clark was born in Concord, MA, January 18, 1888, daughter of Edgar F. and Mary A. “Agnes” (Godfrey) Clark.

Amy E. Clark appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a teacher at the M.M. [Milton Mills] school, with her home at Concord, MA. She was also identified in the same directory as a Primary school teacher at Milton Mills.

Edgar F. Clark, a general farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. MA), headed a Concord, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his (second) wife (of eleven years), Agnes N. Clark, aged fifty-two years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and his children, Amy E. Clark, a public school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Morton D. Clark, a railroad fireman, aged twenty years (b. MA), Edgar G. Clark, aged eighteen years (b. MA), Allison F. Clark, a home farm farmhand, aged seventeen years (b. MA), and Wilfred H. Clark, a home farm farmhand, aged fifteen years (b. MA). Edgar F. Clark owned their farm on Lowell Road, with a mortgage. Agnes N. Clark was the mother of no children.

Edgar Bennett, a machine shop machinist, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-four years), Alice R. Bennett, furnishes meals (at home), aged sixty-four years (b. MA), his daughter, Mabel E. Bennett, a grocery store bookkeeper, aged forty years (b. MA), and his lodgers, Marcus M. Allen, an outside house painter, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), and Amy Clark, a public school teacher, aged thirty-one years (b. MA). Edgar Bennett rented their house at 191 Summer Street.

Edgar Bennett, retired, aged seventy-nine years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-four years), Alice R. Bennett, aged seventy-four years (b. MA), his daughter, Mary A. Bennett, aged fifty years (b. MA), and his lodgers, Amy E. Clark, a public school teacher, aged forty-two years (b. MA), and Markus M. Allen, a house painter, aged forty-seven years (b. MA). Edgar Bennett rented their house at 191 Summer Street, for $30 per month. They had a radio set.

Amy E. Clark appeared in the New Bedford, MA, directories of 1941 and 1943, as a teacher at the H.M. Knowlton school, residing at 241 Summer street.

She was living, in Brookline, NH, as late as September 1948.

George E. Leatherbarrow – 1909-11

Leatherbarrow, George E - Bowdoin, 1905
George E. Leatherbarrow, Bowdoin College, 1905

George Edward Leatherbarrow was born in Portland, ME, December 29, 1879, son of John and Elizabeth (Rogers) Leatherbarrow.

George Edward Leatherbarrow married in Rochester, NH, April 10, 1905, Harriet Pauline Gilman, he of Buxton, ME, and she of Patten, ME. Both were school teachers, aged twenty-five years. She was born in Patten, ME, circa 1880, daughter of Charles H. and Octavia (Reed) Gilman.

George E. Leatherbarrow appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as teacher (and (principal) of the Milton Mills High and Grammar schools. Harriet Leatherbarrow was his assistant (principal and teacher), and Amy E. Clark taught the Primary grades.

George Leatherbarrow, a town school teacher, aged twenty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Harriet Leatherbarrow, aged thirty years (b. ME), his son, Damon Leatherbarrow, aged four years (b. ME), his father-in-law, Charles H. Gilman, retired (own income), aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and his niece, Martha Mc[illegible], aged six years (b. NH). George Leatherbarrow rented their house in Milton Mills. Harriet Leatherbarrow was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

George E. Leatherbarrow appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as having moved to No. Middleboro, MA.

George Leatherbarrow, a chemistry teacher, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Saco, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Harriet Leatherbarrow, aged fifty years (b. ME), George Leatherbarrow rented their house at 42 North Street, for $50 per month. They had a radio set.

George Leatherbarrow, an academy instructor, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Saco, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet Leatherbarrow, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), George Leatherbarrow rented their house at 42 North Street, for $50 per month. Both George and Harriet Leatherbarrow had attended four years of college.

Harriet P. (Gilman) Leatherbarrow died in Saco, ME, December 12, 1963, aged eighty-four years.

Deaths. Mrs. H.G. Leatherbarrow. Mrs. Harriet G. Leatherbarrow, a former resident of North Street, Saco, died yesterday in a local nursing home. Born in Patten, Aug. 21, 1879, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gilman, she was a member of the First Parish Congregational Church, Saco, the Madisses of the church, the Women’s Educational and Industrial Union, Saco, a member of the board of directors of Wardwell Home, Saco, and for many years headed the Missionary Fellowship of her church. Survivors include her widower, Prof. George Leatherbarrow, Biddeford; a sister. Mrs. Alice Loring, Gonzales, Tex., and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be conducted at 2 p.m. tomorrow from the Dennett and Craig Funeral Home, 365 Main St., Saco, with interment In Laurel Hill Cemetery, Saco (Biddeford-Saco Journal, December 13, 1961).

10. Strayed, Lost, Found. HAMILTON WATCH with chain Bowdoin Seal lost in vicinity Biddeford-Saco. Reward. Return George E. Leatherbarrow, Thacher Hotel (Biddeford-Saco Journal, July 26, 1966).

George E. Leatherbarrow died in Saco, ME, January 5, 1973, aged ninety-three years.

Leatherbarrow, George E - BJ730106
George E. Leatherbarrow

Leatherbarrow Dies In Home At Age Of 93. Prof. George Edward Leatherbarrow, 93, a former resident of 48 North St., Saco, died last night at a local nursing home, following a brief illness. Born in Portland, Dec. 29, 1879, he was the son of John and Elizabeth (Rogers) Leatherbarrow. Educated in Portland schools, he graduated from Buxton High School in 1900 and from Bowdoin College in 1904. He taught school in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, prior to coming to Thornton Academy, Saco in 1917. Prof. Leatherbarrow was head of the chemistry and physics departments at Thornton Academy, retiring in 1947 after 32 years of service. While at Thornton Academy, he was a football referee for 20 years. He was associated with an insurance company during the summer recesses and following his retirement worked as a full time insurance man for 45 years. A life deacon of the First Parish Congregational Church (United Church of Christ), Saco, Prof. Leatherbarrow was a charter member of the Biddeford-Saco Country Club and a member of Unity Lodge of Masons A.F. and A.M at Madison, N.H. There are no known survivors. Funeral services will be Monday at 2 p.m. from the First Parish Congregational Church (United Church of Christ), corner of Main and Beach streets, Saco. Rev. Paul K. Weimer, pastor, will officiate and interment will be in the family lot at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Saco. Friends may call at the Dennett and Craig Funeral Home, 365 Main St., Saco. (Biddeford-Saco Journal (Biddeford, ME), January 6, 1973).

Positions Wanted

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts established a Teacher’s Registration Bureau list in 1911 by which those teachers seeking their next teaching position and those school districts seeking their next teacher might find each other.

Here follow two examples from the 1914 list of teachers with experience at the Milton Mills school:

2100.31. Man.Position desired: Grammar principalship. Salary expected: Over $675. Graduated from Worcester High School, 1906, Clark University, 1909. Teaching experience: Milton Mills, N.H., 1910-11; Hamden, Conn., 1911-12; Egg Harbor Township, N.J., 1913.

*2216.38. Woman.Position desired: Grammar grades. Salary expected: $500 up. Graduated from Rochester High School, N.H., 1884. Teaching experience: Rochester, 1885-93; Farmington, N.H., four years; Wakefield, 1910-11; Milton Mills, 1911-13; Exeter, N.H., 1913-14.

1. The asterisk throughout this list indicates that teachers are not available for a change in position prior to June 1915. 

Continued in Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1912-52


See also Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47 Milton’s South Milton Teachers, 1886-29, and Milton’s West Milton Teachers, 1885-23


References:

Beers, J.H. and Company. (1900). Educators of Michigan. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vaygAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA304

Boston University. (1902). Journal of Education. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=zEshAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA126

Find a Grave. (2013, July 30). Abbie Buck Berry. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114645310

Find a Grave. (2013, October 31). Albert E. Millett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/119604836

Find a Grave. (2012, February 14). Asa Clinton Crowell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/84971101

Find a Grave. (2009, February 22). Gilman Hutchins Campbell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/34122347

Find a Grave. (2012, September 7). Rev. James Oscar Emerson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/96694786

Find a Grave. (2013, August 5). Jacob Ernest Wignot. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114938085

Find a Grave. (2015, June 19). Minetta R. Anderson Legg. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/148048962

Find a Grave. (2013, June 10). Dr. Rufus Edwin Donnell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/112111518

Find a Grave. (2013, July 6). William Coleman McCue. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/113424611

Find a Grave. (2009, July 13). William Edwin Hatch. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/39396250

Find a Grave. (2013, September 22). William Proctor Ferguson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/117452337

Heirlooms Reunited. (2019, January 26). 1873, 1874 and 1876 Diaries of Ida Isadore Reynolds (1860-1946) of Acton, Maine; Future Wife of John Jotham Shapleigh (1856-1923). Retrieved from www.heirloomsreunited.com/2019/01/1873-1874-and-1876-diaries-of-ida.html

Keith, Harold. (2008). When I was Growing Up. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=w_Td4YT86qMC&pg=PA115

NH State Board of Education. (1876). Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=c18aAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA338

Remington, P.S., and Company. (1895). Historical Catalogue of Brown University. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=xdXNAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA293

MA Board of Education. (1914, April). Teachers’ Registration Bureau. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=UE0ZAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA5-PA5

Wikipedia. (2020, April 19). Allopathic Medicine. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allopathic_medicine

Non-Public BOS Session Scheduled (May 18, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | May 17, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a quasi-Public BOS meeting to be held Monday, May 18, at 4:00 PM. (Followed by Workshop meeting and a Non-Public session at the conclusion of the meeting).

Due to their concerns regarding Covid-19, there will be no public in attendance and, therefore, no public comment. The session may be watched remotely through the usual YouTube means or by teleconference. The links for both are in their original agenda, for which there is a link in the References below.


The Public portion of the agenda has New Business, Old Business, Other Business, and some housekeeping items.

Under New Business are scheduled two agenda items: 1) Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Operational Activities/Plans, and 2) Accept a Donation of up 58 chairs from Target in Somersworth (rec’d 30, possible that we could get an additional 28 chairs) (Karen Brown).

Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Activities. One supposes, by the very terms of the meeting announcement, that the Covid-19 is still among us. We will evidently hear an update on those things with which the BOS has been active.

People are becoming restive. Wisconsin’s Supreme Court struck down the Wisconsin Governor’s stay-at-home orders. A third End the Lockdown rally was held at the Statehouse in Concord, NH, on Saturday, May 16. This one focused on opposing church closures.

Accept a Donation of up 58 chairs from Target in Somersworth (rec’d 30, possible that we could get an additional 28 chairs) (Karen Brown). Accepting, bet on the BOS accepting the chairs. But where will they put them?


Old Business has two items: 1). Final Review and Possible Adoption of Select Board By-laws, and 2) Review of Letters of Interest Received for the Local Government Efficiency Task Force and possible appointments.

Final Review and Possible Adoption of Select Board By-laws. Possible adoption? Hanging on the cliff edge, as the suspense mounts.

Review of Letters of Interest Received for the Local Government Efficiency Task Force and possible appointments. Chairwoman Hutchings’ disquisition spoke of a hiring freeze, followed immediately by job postings. This is not the way to get better, people.

If this “task force” were to be successful, i.e., successful in its task of discovering the efficiencies that have eluded the Milton Town government for years, should it then simply replace the Milton Town government? You know, as having just proven themselves more capable and efficient.

No, Cincinnatus would then return to his plow. And that assumes that the Town government would actually implement any efficiencies such a task force might find, which is a big assumption.


Other Business That May Come Before the Board has no scheduled items.

There will be the approval of prior minutes (from the quasi-Public sessions of May 4, and May 7, 2020), the expenditure report, Town Administrator comments (regarding Headstart Building Correspondence), and BOS comments.


There will be a follow-on BOS Workshop Meeting without a named subject.


The BOS meeting is scheduled to conclude their meeting with a Non-Public Session. That agenda has one Non-Public item classed as 91-A3 II (c).

(c) Matters which, if discussed in public, would likely affect adversely the reputation of any person, other than a member of the public body itself, unless such person requests an open meeting. This exemption shall extend to any application for assistance or tax abatement or waiver of a fee, fine, or other levy, if based on inability to pay or poverty of the applicant.


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

State of New Hampshire. (2016, June 21). RSA Chapter 91-A. Access to Governmental Records and Meetings. Retrieved from www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/VI/91-A/91-A-3.htm

Town of Milton. (2020, May 16). BOS Meeting Agenda, May 18, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/miltonnh/files/agendas/05-18-2020_bosagenda_final.pdf

Wikipedia. (2019, November 19). Washington Monument Syndrome. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Monument_Syndrome

Youtube. (1965). Cone of Silence. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1eUIK9CihA&feature=youtu.be&t=19