Milton Taverner Elijah Horne (1764-1839)

By Muriel Bristol | August 7, 2022

Elijah Horne was born in Rochester, NH, May 4, 1764, son of Peter and Mercy (Wentworth) Horne.

(The known children of Peter and Mercy (Wentworth) Horne were: Daniel Wentworth Horn (1761–1843), Moses Horne (1762–1800), Elijah Horne (1764–1839), Rebecca Horne (1766–1800), Peter Horne (1768–1815), Edmund Horne (1769–1843), Jacob Horne (1771–1858), Rachel Horne (1773–1852), Abra Horn (1775–1862), and Richard Horne (1777–1854)).

Horn, Peter, Signature - 1762Father Peter Horn was one of the one hundred and one Rochester, NH, inhabitants that petitioned, February 8, 1762, for Rochester to be represented in the NH Provincial Legislature. Barnabas Palmer, John Plumer, and [Elijah Horn’s future father-in-law] Ichabod Corson were also among those that signed the petition.

The house he [Lewis B. Twombly] occupied, which is now owned by his son, is one of the oldest in Milton, and was originally the property of Lieutenant Elijah Horn. In an upper room, which was then unfinished, were held the first town meetings of Milton; and for some years it was customary for the people of the North-east Parish to hold religious services here on Sundays. Here old Parson Hasy, of Lebanon, and Parson Haven, of Newbury Plains, delivered eloquent discourses on the Word and taught the way to salvation. The children of the settlers and the early converts were baptized in this room (Biographical Review, 1897).

Father Peter Horn was among the one hundred ninety-eight men who signed the revolutionary Association Test in Rochester, NH, June 1, 1776.

WE, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our Lives and Fortunes, with ARMS, oppose the Hostile Proceedings of the British Fleets, and Armies, against the United American COLONIES (Batchellor, 1910).

Twenty-two Rochester men “refused” to sign. Another twenty-two Rochester Friends, i.e., “Quakers,” did not “choose” to sign, i.e., they were conscientious objectors.

Sister Rebecca Horne married in Rochester, NH, October 20, 1783, John Wentworth. He was born in Milton, April 14, 1762, son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Hodgdon) Wentworth.

Elijah Horn married in Rochester, NH, October 7, 1784, Anna Corson, both of Rochester, NH. Rev. Joseph Haven performed the ceremony (NEHGS, 1907). She was born circa 1765, daughter of Ichabod and Abigail (Roberts) Corson. (Ichabod Corson had been on Rochester’s Committee of Correspondence in 1775, and its military recruiting committee in 1778-79).

[The known children of Elijah and Ann (Corson) Horn were: Abigail R. Horne (1785–1834), Mercy Wentworth Horne (1788–1862), Charlotte Horne (1790–1809), James H. Horne (1793-1877), Anna Horn (1796–1838), Rachel Horne (1799–1840), Ichabod C. Horne (1801–1829), Elijah Horne, [Jr.] (1805–1842), and Daniel Wentworth Horne (1809–1876)].

Peter Horn was one of three hundred ten Rochester inhabitants that petitioned the NH legislature, August 30, 1785, seeking repeal of an act requiring milled boards to be square-edged and an inch thick (and other lumber in proportion). Those inhabitants described themselves then as being “largely Concerned in Lumber.” They sought also repeal of an act forbidding transport of lumber to the British West Indies, and seeking the issuance of a new paper money (Hammond, 1884). (See Rochester Lumber Remonstrance – August 1785).

Elijah Horn was doubtless the first blacksmith [at Milton], but was soon followed by Isaac Worster at the [Milton Three] Ponds, and later by Solomon Land and Joseph Rines at Milton Mills (Scales, 1914).

Lt Elijah Horne - 1770
Lt. Elijah Horne House, “c1770” (Photo: Google Maps).

Daughter Abigail R. Horne was born in Milton, March 24, 1785.

Elijah Horn signed the Rochester lumber remonstrance of August 1785. (See Rochester Lumber Remonstrance – August 1785).

Sister Rachel Horne married in Rochester, i.e., Farmington, NH, September 14, 1786, Richard Randlett. He was born in Rochester, i.e., Farmington, NH, August 16, 1764, son of Jacob and Abigail (Plummer) Randlett.

Daughter Mercy Wentworth Horne was born in Milton, July 20, 1788. (She was a namesake for her paternal grandmother, Mercy (Wentworth) Horne).

Elijah Horne headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], three females [Anna (Corson) Horne, Abigail R. Horne and Mercy Wentworth Horne], and one male aged under-16 years [James H. Horne]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Enoch Hayes and Gilbert Pirkins.

Daughter Charlotte Horne was born in Milton, December 18, 1790. Son James Howe Horne was born in Milton, June 18, 1793. (He was likely a namesake for Dr. James Howe (1755-1807) of Rochester, NH).

Father Peter Horn died in Farmington, NH, May 26, 1795. Sister Abra Horn married in Rochester, NH, October 11, 1795, Joseph Corson. He was born in Rochester, NH, December 11, 1772, son of Ichabod [Jr.] and Mary (Allen) Corson.

Daughter Anna Horn was born in Milton, April 18, 1796. Anna Horn, daughter of Elijah Horn, was baptized by Rev. Joseph Haven in Rochester, NH, June 30, 1796. Samuel, Peter, and Abigail Wallingford, children of David Wallingford, were baptized at that same time (Tibbetts, 1910). (The Wallingford children were cousins of Anna Horn, as their respective mothers were sisters).

Rachel Horn, daughter of Elijah Horn, was born in Milton, January 26, 1799. She baptized by Rev. Joseph Haven in Rochester, NH, April 27, 1800. (She was a namesake for her paternal aunt, Rachel (Horne) Randlett).

Brother Richard Horn married in Rochester, NH, May 9, 1799, Lucy Scates. She was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1778, daughter of Benjamin and Lydia Scates.

Sister Rebecca (Horne) Wentworth died in Milton, in 1800.

Lt. Elijah Horn (1764-1839), Capt. Samuel Nute, and Lt. Jotham Nute (1760-1835) were identified by their militia ranks in the Second (1800) Federal Census.

Lt. Elijah Horn headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Anna (Corson) Horn], one female aged 10-15 years [Mercy W. Horn], three females aged under 10-years [Charlotte Horn, Anna Horn, and Rachel Horn], and one male aged under-10 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Moses Davis and Mark Miller. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Brother Moses Horn died in Farmington, NH, October 20, 1800.

Brother-in-law David Corson (1761-1843) sold land in Rochester, NH, i.e., in Milton that would be, to Ephraim Drew (c1760-1845) in November 1801. It adjoined land he had sold formerly to Elijah Horn, and was situated north of the pond, i.e., Meetinghouse Pond, and south of the Wakefield road, i.e., what is now NH Rte. 125.

David Corson, husbandman of Rochester, for $50 sold Ephraim Drew, cordwainer of Rochester, 12¼ acres in Rochester, 3rd Division, drawn to original right of John Trickey, et al., lying between that of Jonathan Dorr and land David sold Elijah Horn, joining on north side of pond and south side of road leading to Wakefield. The deed was witnessed by John Fish and Pelatiah Hanson; deed dated November 16, 1801, and recorded June 14, 1802 (Strafford County Deeds, 40:34, as abstracted by TAL Publications, 1991).

A “division” was a division of common land. Original settlers of – in this case Rochester – would generally receive an original house or farmstead lot from an original township grant. They would have also rights in any undivided common land. People who had such rights were termed “commoners.” Commoners might have a sort of parallel government of only those that had such rights, in which they might decide on issues related to their commonly owned land and its management, including any further divisions of it into separate privately owned parcels.

Those having common rights were allowed use of that common land. (From which practice the economic concept of the “Tragedy of the Commons” arises). If a division of that common land were to be made at any point, only commoners were entitled to a share or lot drawn at random from the land being divided. (There might be successive divisions over a period of years until the common land had all been dispersed). Their division rights were separable. It would be possible for one to sell one’s original house lot, while still retaining one’s division rights. It might be possible to sell one’s share in a first division, while retaining one’s rights in future divisions. In this case, Corson sold Third Division land to Drew (as he had earlier to Horn) that he had acquired from John Trickey, et al., who had original division rights.

Son Ichabod Corson Horne was born in Milton, November 18, 1801. (He was a namesake for his maternal grandfather, Ichabod Corson, who had died earlier in that same year).

Horn, Elijah - Signature - 1802Elijah Horn signed the Rochester division petition (or Milton separation petition) in what was then Rochester, NH, May 28, 1802, as did his brother Richard Horn (1777-1854), and brother-in-law Joseph Corson (1772-1852) (husband of sister Abra (Horn) Corson).

This meeting convened at the tavern of Lieut. Elijah Horne, August 30, 1802, only a short time after the charter, which gave Milton its independent existence, had been signed by Governor Gilman. This instrument had been granted at the June session of the legislature of New Hampshire at the petition and largely through the efforts of Capt. Beard Plumer, one of the representatives from Rochester, who, with others, felt that the time had come for Milton to sever the ties which bound her to the mother town.

The very first act of the original Milton selectmen was to license Elijah Horn’s tavern, August 30, 1802. The first annual town meeting was held March 14, 1803, purportedly in the tavern, and presumably the second annual town meeting was held there also in March 1804. The Milton town house was completed “on or before” October 3, 1804 (Scales, 1914). So, the third and subsequent annual town meetings presumably took place in the new structure.

State of New Hampshire. Strafford, ss: We, the Selectmen of Milton, do by these presents license to Elijah Horn to keep a public tavern at his house in Milton from this date under such Rules and Regulations as the law directs. Given under our hand at Milton, this 30th day of August 1802. William Palmer, John Fish, John Remick. Jr. } Selectmen.

James L. Twombly, the subject and source of the quoted biography, was born there in 1840. (The younger Twombly would serve in the Civil War (See Milton in the Veterans Schedule of 1890)).

The house he [Lewis B. Twombly] occupied, which is now owned by his son [James L. Twombly], is one of the oldest in Milton, and was originally the property of Lieutenant Elijah Horn. In an upper room, which was then unfinished, were held the first town meetings of Milton; and for some years it was customary for the people of the North-east Parish to hold religious services here on Sundays. Here old Parson Hasy, of Lebanon, and Parson Haven, of Newbury [Norway] Plains, delivered eloquent discourses on the Word, and taught the way to salvation. The children of the settlers and the early converts were baptized in this room (Biographical Review, 1897).

Plummer's Ridge - Detail - 1892
Milton in 1892 (Detail of Plummer’s Ridge). The farmhouse of “F. Jones” (Fred P. Jones, grandson of Levi Jones), now the NH Farm Museum, is indicated at the upper left, and the Milton Town House of 1803 is indicated at the lower right. Between them, but closer to the Town House, is indicated the house of “L.B. Twombly” (Lewis B. Twombly, father of James L. Twombly), the occupant from c1840 to 1892 of what had been originally the Elijah Horn Tavern. Just beyond it, on the righthand side when heading towards the Jones farmhouse, is a “Sch.” (the still extant District One Schoolhouse) just before what is now called Bolan Road. (There seems to be yet another schoolhouse a bit further on beyond Bolan Road).

Apart from its primary function as tavern, Northeast Parish church services had been held also in the unfinished upper room of the Horn Tavern, by Rev. Isaac Hasy (1742-1812) of neighboring Lebanon, ME, and Rev. Joseph Haven (1747-1825) of the Norway Plains in Rochester, NH. (Norway Plains Road lies opposite what is now the Lilac Mall).

Son Elijah Horne [Jr.], was born in Milton, September 15, 1805.

Son Daniel Wentworth Horne was born in Milton, May 29, 1809. He was a namesake for his paternal uncle, Daniel Wentworth Horne (1761-1843)). “Elijah & Daniel Wentworth, Sons of Elijah Horn of Milton,” were baptized by Rev, Joseph Haven, October 8, 1809.

Daughter Charlotte Horne died in Milton, November 2, 1809, aged eighteen years, ten months, and fifteen days (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Daughter Mercy W. Horne married November 23, 1809, John Nute, she of Milton and he of Dover, NH. He was born in Rochester, NH, November 26, 1787, son of Samuel and Phoebe (Pinkham) Nute.

Elijah Horne headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Anna (Corson) Horne], one male aged 16-25 years [James H. Horne], two females aged 16-25 years [Abigail R. Horne and Charlotte Horne], two females aged 10-15 years [Anna Horn and Rachel Horne], and three males aged under-10 years [Ichabod C. Horne, Elijah Horne, Jr., and Daniel Wentworth Horne]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Thomas Nutter and Gilbert Perkin.

Son James Howe Horne married in Milton, February 13, 1814, Huldah Roberts. She was born in Somersworth, NH, June 26, 1794, daughter of James and Martha (Goodwin) Roberts.

Elijah Horn and his father, Peter Horn, were among forty-two Milton inhabitants that petitioned for incorporation of a Milton Congregational society, in June 1814.

Elijah Horn and his son, James H. Horn, were among the seventy-nine Milton inhabitants that petitioned to have James Roberts appointed as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, April 3, 1820. (James Roberts (1783-1839) was Elijah Horn’s nephew, a son of his sister, Rebecca (Horn) Wentworth).

A dispute arose in 1820 regarding Milton’s militia company (of which Jones had formerly been the captain). Milton’s area encompasses 34.3 square miles. Those required to attend periodic company training – they being all males aged 18-45 years – found the long distances to be traveled to musters burdensome. They asked that their largish (140% of standard size) town-delineated militia company be split into two companies. When their regimental field officers refused them, they sought to accomplish their objective by circulating a petition seeking instead to simply divide the town into two parts.

Some one hundred twenty-seven Milton men filed a competing remonstrance petition opposing a division of the town. It was intended for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature. Company officers Jeremy Nute, James Hayes, Jr., and Norton Scates all signed this remonstrance, as did former company officers Elijah Horn, Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, and future officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes. Jones’ brother, Joshua Jones, subscribed also to this petition (One may note that none of Milton’s then selectmen signed this petition).

Some eighty-eight Milton men filed a militia company division petition intended for the November 1820 session of the NH legislature. Captain Jeremy Nute signed this proposal, as did former company officers Elijah Horn, Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, future company officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes, and Milton selectman Hopley Meserve. A division of the company would have obviated the need or desire to divide the town in order to divide the company.

Daughter Anna Horne married in Boston, MA, February 20, 1822, Charles Flint. Rev. Sereno E. Dwight performed the ceremony (MA VRs; Columbian Centinel, February 23, 1822).

Daughter Rachel Horn married in Boston, MA, April 18, 1822, Emmanuel Chisholm. Rev. Hosea Ballou performed the ceremony.

 Elijah Horn married in Wakefield, NH, November 18, 1825, Nancy Durrell, he of Wakefield, BH, and she of Shapleigh, Me.

Mother Mercy (Wentworth) Horn died in Farmington, NH, before 1826.

Son Daniel W. Horne married (1st) in Milton, September 27, 1829, Sarah Ann Dore, both of Milton. Stephen M. Mathes, Justice-of-the-Peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Lebanon, ME, in 1811, daughter of Daniel G. and Margaret “Peggy” (Clark) Dore.

Son Elijah Horn [Jr.] married in Dartmouth, MA, November 8, 1829, Delila Brownell Tripp, both of New Bedford, MA. She was born in Westport, MA, January 7, 1812, daughter of Howard and Thankful Tripp.

Son Ichabod C. Horne died in Lebanon, ME, December 13, 1829 (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Elijah Horne headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one female aged 60-69 years [Anna (Corson) Horne], one female aged 40-49 years [Abigail R. Horne], and one male aged 10-14 years. Just beneath him was the household of Jas [James H.] Horne. His household included one male aged 30-40 years [himself], one female aged 30-40 years [Huldah (Roberts) Horne], one male aged 10-14 years, one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged 5-9 years, and one female aged under-5 years. Their households appeared in the enumeration between those of Nahum Tasker and Matthias Nutter.

Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. Her household included one female aged 40-49 years [herself], one male aged 15-19 years [Isaac M. Nute], one male aged 10-14 years [Joseph Plummer Nute], and one male aged 5-9 years.

Emanuel Chishole headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], two females aged 30-39 years [Rachel (Horne) Chisholm], one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged 5-9 years, two males aged under-5 years, and one female aged under-5 years.

Daughter Abigail R. Horne died in Lebanon, ME, August 9, 1834, aged forty-nine years, four months, and sixteen days (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Daughter Anna (Horne) Flint died in Lebanon, ME, March 16, 1838.

Elijah Horne died in Milton, NH, August 17, 1839, aged seventy-five years, three months, and thirteen years.

Daughter Rachel (Horne) Chisholm died in Lebanon, ME, in May 1840 (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. Her household included one female aged 40-49 years [herself], one male aged 20-29 years [Isaac M. Nute], one female aged 20-29 years [Mary A. (Jenkins) Nute], one male aged 10-14 years, one female aged under-5 years [Anne E. Nute], one male aged under-5 years [John H. Nute]. Two members of her household were engaged in Agriculture.

James H. Horn headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Huldah (Roberts) Horne], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 20-29 years, two males aged 15-19 years, one female aged 10-14 years, one male aged under-5 years, and one female aged 70-79 years [Anna (Corson) Horn]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Matthias Nutter and Edward Ellis. (And three entries below that of Lewis B. Twombly).

Elijah Horn headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Delia (Tripp) Horne], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 5-9 years [Mary A. Horne], one male aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in Commerce, and two members of his household were engaged in Navigation of the Ocean.

Daniel W. Horn headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years, one female aged 30-39 years, one male aged 15-19 years, two males aged 5-9 years, two males aged under-5 years, and one male aged 50-59 years, one female aged 50-59 years. Two members of his household were engaged in Manufacture and the Trades.

Son Elijah Horne [Jr.] died in New Bedford, MA, March 2, 1842. (He was the husband of Delilah B. Tripp) (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Son-in-law Charles Flint died in Boston, MA, June 25, 1847. Brother-in-law John Wentworth died in Milton, February 13, 1849.

Isaac M. Nute, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Jenkins)] Nute, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Ann Elisa Nute, aged thirteen years (b. NH), John H. Nute, aged eleven years (b. NH), Sarah D. Nute, aged six years (b. NH), and Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). Isaac M. Nute had real estate valued at $1,000.

James H. Horn, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Huldah Horn, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), Anna Horn, aged eighty-four years (b. NH), Rachel Horn, aged twenty years (b. NH), Roxann Scates, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Thomas M. Cheswell, aged fourteen years (b. NH). James H. Horn had real estate valued at $1,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of William S. Ellis, a shoemaker, aged forty-four years (b. MA), and Benjamin Scates, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Delilah B. Horne, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Mary Ann Horne, aged sixteen years (b. MA), Elijah H. Chisole, a sailor, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), Abby A. Chisole, aged nineteen years (b. MA), Thomas John, a rigger, aged fifty years (b. England), Panor B. Vaildell, a machinist, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and Cathrine Davis, aged thirty-six years (b. Gotenburg).

Daniel W. Horne, a farmer, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sarah A. Horne, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), Elijah Horne, a blacksmith, aged nineteen years (b. ME), Henry Horne, a shoemaker, aged sixteen years (b. ME), James W. Horne, aged thirteen years (b. ME), George S. Horne, aged five years (b. ME), Daniel G. Dorr, a farmer, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and Margaret Dorr, aged sixty-five years (b. ME). Daniel W. Horne had real estate valued at $1,000.

Brother Richard Horne died in Milton, February 16, 1854.

Daughter-in-law Sarah A. (Dore) Horn died in Lebanon, ME, October 29, 1855, aged forty-four years, two months, and fourteen days.

Son Daniel W. Horn married (2nd) in Lebanon, ME, December 22, 1855, Rachel DeMerritt Berry. She was born in Strafford, NH, February 19, 1820, daughter of Nicholas and Hannah (Atkins) Berry.

Delilah B. Horne appeared in the New Bedford, MA, directory of 1856, as a widow, keeping a boarding house at 97½ Middle Street, at its corner with Purchase Street.

Anna (Corson) Horne died in Lebanon, ME, March 19, 1857.

Isaac M. Nute, a farmer, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Jenkins)] Nute, aged forty-two years (b. NH), John H. Nute, aged twenty years (b. NH), Sarah D. Nute, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Mary A. Nute, aged six years (b. NH), and Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute, aged seventy years (b. NH). Isaac M. Nute had real estate valued at $3,000 and person estate valued at $550.

James H. Horne, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Huldah Horne, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), Charlotte A. Horne, aged forty years (b. NH), Rachel Horne, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Martha A. Horne, aged five years (b. NH), and Alfred D. Dore, a shoemaker, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). James H. Horne had real estate valued at $2,000 and person estate valued at $1,000.

Daniel W. Horn, a smith, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon (“West Lebanon P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Rachel D. Horn, aged forty-four years (b. NH), James W. Horn, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Sarah Horn, aged three years (b. ME), Mary A Horn, aged five months (b. ME), Daniel Dore, a laborer, aged seventy-six years (b. ME), Margaret Dore, aged seventy-one years (b. ME), Tamsund Bery, aged fifty years (b. NH). Daniel W. Horn had real estate valued at $2,000 and person estate valued at $500.

Daughter Mercy W. (Horne) Nute died in Lebanon, ME, November 16, 1862. (She was the wife of John Nute) (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Dehlia B. Horn, a boarding-housekeeper, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the MA Census of 1865. Her household included Mary A. Horn, a dressmaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), Charles M. Tripp, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Lizzie Tripp, aged twenty-one years (b. RI), Sarah B. Brush, a clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Martha A. Dagget, a clerk, aged twenty years (b. MA).

James H. Horne, a farmer, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Huldah Horne, aged seventy-six years (b. NH), Charlotte A. Horne, aged fifty years (b. NH), and Martha A. Horne, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NH). James H. Horne had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $1,150.

Delilah B. Hall [Horn], keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included Mary A. Hatt [Horn], a dressmaker, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Maria H. Francis, a dressmaker, aged twenty-four years (b. MA).

Daniel W. Horne, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon (“Lebanon P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Rachel Horne, keeping house, aged fifty years (b. NH), Sewell S. Horne, works for shoe manfy., aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Sarah A. Horne, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Mary A. Horne, aged ten years (b. ME), and Tamson Bery, aged sixty years (b. NH).

Daughter-in-law Huldah (Roberts) Horne died of dropsy in Milton, March 25, 1871, aged seventy-six years, nine months.

Son Daniel W. Horne died in Lebanon, ME, March 7, 1876, aged sixty-six years, nine months. (He had been, in succession, the husband of Sarah Ann Horne and Rebecca D. Horne) (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Son James H. Horne died of old age in Milton, February 22, 1877, aged eighty-three years, nine months. He was a widowed farmer.

Charles H. Fuller, a cigar dealer, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sophronia Fuller, keeps house, aged forty-six years (b. MA), his niece, Lusina Hallett, at home, aged twenty years (b. MA), and his lodgers, Clara W. Thompson, at home, aged sixty-four years (b. MA), Delila B. Horn, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and her daughter, Mary A. Horn, at home, aged forty-two years (b. NH). They resided at 129 Purchase Street.

Daughter-in-law Delila B. (Tripp) Horne died of pneumonia in New Bedford, MA, February 16, 1892, aged eighty years. She was the widow of Elijah Horne.

Daughter-in-law Rachel D. (Berry) Horne died of chronic bronchitis in Lebanon, ME, March 23, 1895, aged seventy-five years, one year, and four months. Charles Blazo, M.D., of Rochester, NH, signed the death certificate.


References:

Batchellor, Albert S. (1910). Miscellaneous Revolutionary Documents of New Hampshire: Including the Association Test, the Pension Rolls, and Other Important Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MIhQAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA127

Find a Grave. (2016, May 26). Ichabod Corson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/163301301/ichabod-corson

Find a Grave. (2020, November 10). Daniel W. Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/218383005/daniel-w-horne

Find a Grave. (2013, January 24). Edmund Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/104095651/edmund-horne

Find a Grave. (2015, March 16). Elijah Horne [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/143780583/elijah-horne

Find a Grave. (2022, February 3). Elijah Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236457865/elijah-horne

Find a Grave. (2010, April 19). Jacob Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/51357448/jacob-horne

Find a Grave. (2010, February 20). Moses Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/48404133/moses-horne

Find a Grave. (2014, December 6). Peter Horne [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/139643614/peter-horne

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Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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