Milton Seeks a Magistrate – 1813

By Muriel Bristol | February 13, 2022

Milton’s NH State Representative William Palmer (1757-1815), speaking for a “respectable number of inhabitants,” petitioned NH Governor John Taylor Gilman and his Executive Council in 1813, seeking appointment of a Milton justice-of-the-peace. (Gilman was a Federalist, as opposed to a Democratic-Republican).

The nominee, John Remick, “Jr.,” was born in Kittery, ME, April 17, 1777, son of Sergeant William and Lydia (Staples) Remick. (He acquired the appellation “Junior” in Milton to distinguish him from his older cousin, John Remick, who was a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Deed) Remick and who came to Milton after him, in 1799).

John Remick married (1st) in Kittery, ME, August 17, 1794, Mary “Polly” Butler. She was born in Portsmouth, NH, May 18, 1770, daughter of Captain Edward and Elizabeth (Langdon) Butler.

John and his wife, Mary, bought land in Rochester, 1795, 1798 and 1799. 7 June 1799 he signed a deed as “Jr.,” and also in 1800 (Remick, 1933).

John Remick, Jr., headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Mary (Butler) Remick], one female aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, one male aged under-10 years [Edward B. Remick], and two females aged under-10 years [Lydia S. Remick and Eliza Remick].

John Remick, Jr., signed the petition seeking to divide what would be Milton from its parent Rochester, NH, in 1802. He was one of the newly established town’s first three Selectman in 1802, along with William Palmer and John Fish. He served in that capacity in 1802, 1804, 1805, 1807-11, and 1819-20 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

He served as a selectman from 1802 to 1812 and again in 1820 and was a Justice of the Peace from 1814 to 1838 (Remick, 1933).

In May 1806, he bought land in Wakefield of which he sold part to Andrew Libby of Kittery, 12 Apr 1809. He sold property in Milton Mills in January 1810 and April 1821, and in both deeds is called “Jr.” (Remick, 1933).

John Remick, Jun., headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], two females aged 26-44 years [Mary (Butler) Remick], one male aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years [Edward B. Remick], two females aged 10-15 years [Lydia S. Remick and Eliza Remick], and one female aged under-10 years [Mary B. Remick]. Their household appeared first in the enumeration, just before those of Moses Paul and Joseph Libby.

In 1813 former selectman and then NH State Representative William Palmer penned his personal petition recommending John Remick, Jr., for appointment as justice-of-the-peace. (In it he alluded to several business entities then active in the Northeasterly part of Milton, i.e., Milton Mills).

To His Excellency the Governor And the Honorable Council of the State of New Hampshire

Wm Palmer, A Representative from the town of Milton, respectfully beg leave to represent, that a respectable number of Inhabitants who live in the Northeasterly part of said town, experience many inconveniencies by reason of there not being any Justice of the peace living within three or four miles of them, that it is a considerable place of trade – 3 Sawmills, 3 Gristmills and one carding machine in the village, where much business is done, and where much company resorts – that it would be very convenient and gratifying to the inhabitants to have some suitable person, who resides among them, appointed to that office ~ that it would have a happy tendency to preserve peace, insure tranquility and promote the public good ~ I therefore ask leave to recommend Mr John Remick, Junr, as a suitable person for that office ~ A man in my opinion whose natural and acquired abilities are good, of correct morals and temperate habits ~ And if appointed it will be Gratifying to the town at large ~ And in particular to your Excellency and Honors.

Humble Petitioner

Wm Palmer

Palmer’s petition was labeled on its reverse side:

For a Justice
In Milton
Nominated 1813

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 18, 1813.

The Records of Elder Joseph Spinney of Wakefield from 1835 to 1898 have been preserved and among the items contained therein were a list of marriages performed by John Remick, Jr., Justice of the Peace of Milton, N.H., from 1814 to 1838, and an extract of the will of [his father-in-law,] Captain Edward Butler (Remick, 1933).

John Remick, Jr., was Milton’s State Representative during the 1816-17 biennium.

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 18, 1818.

Remick was at the center of the dispute that arose over Milton’s militia company in 1820.

… in 1820 an effort was made by the people living in this town below Lovell’s pond with others living in the Northerly part of Milton, to have that part of Wakefield south of Lovell’s pond and the northerly portion of Milton incorporated into a new town, Luther Dearborn of this town and John Remick, Jr., of Milton headed petitions to the legislature for the new town which was to be called Lisbon. The Rev. Mr. Piper favored the project and suggested the name Milfield for the new town (Thompson, 1886).

The NH Register and Farmer’s Almanac of 1822 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum, which was the higher or senior office, as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and James Roberts (Claremont Manufacturing Co, 1822).

In 1822 he acted as the administrator of the estate of Mark Langdon Butler of Portsmouth, his brother-in-law (Remick, 1933).

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 10, 1823.

His older cousin, John Remick (son of Corporal Benjamin Remick), the existence of whom had caused him, the younger cousin, to be identified for many years as “Junior,” died in Milton, June 25, 1823. The elder cousin’s widow, Susanna (Cole) Remick, died in Milton, August 28, 1824.

The NH Political Manual and Annual Register of 1824 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and J. Roberts. Jotham Nute was also identified as being Milton’s coroner (Farmer, 1824).

Mary (Butler) Remick died in Milton, sometime before February 1826.

The NH Annual Register and US Calendar of 1826 identified Milton’s Justice of the Peace and Quorum as being Levi Jones, and its Justices of the Peace as being Jotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remick, Jr., and J. Roberts, Hanson Hayes, and Stephen M. Mathes (Farmer & Lyon, 1826).

John Remick, Esq., married (2nd) in Wakefield, NH, February 9, 1826, Sally Nudd, he of Milton and she of Wakefield, NH.

In his second marriage record he had the appellation of “Esq.” given to him, because of this latter [justice-of-the-peace] office (Remick, 1933).

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 14, 1828.

John Remick headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Sally (Nudd) Remick], one female aged 15-19 years [Salome Remick], and one male aged 10-14 years. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Nathl Dearborn and Francis Chapman. (Milton Mills merchant B.U. Simes appeared on the other side of Nathl Dearborn).

Court Rosters indicate that John Remick, Jr., of Milton, received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 15, 1833. He did not continue as a justice beyond the June 1838 expiration of this last appointment.

John Remick headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], two females aged 60-69 years [Sally (Nudd) Remick and her sister, Betsy Nudd], and one male aged 20-29. One person in the household was engaged in Agriculture.

John Remick made out his last will, May 29, 1840. In it he devised a life estate in all of his real estate, as well as two cows, six sheep, furniture and personal property, to his beloved wife, Sally Remick, and her sister, Betsy Nudd, while they remained unmarried. Should either die or marry, their share in the life estate would pass to the survivor or, in the event of a marriage, to the one that remained single. Once both had either passed or married, the property was to pass to his children or trusts set up on their behalf. Daughter Lydia S. Page was to have a life estate, which would pass eventually to grandson J.W.R. Page at her decease. Of the remainder, daughter Eliza L. Copp was to receive one-third outright. Amasa Copp was to hold one-third in trust in order to pay an allowance to son Edward B. Remick. John Wingate of Wakefield, NH, was to hold one-third in trust in order to pay an allowance to daughter Mary Copp, widow of William Copp. He appointed his wife, Sally Remick, and James Berry, as joint executors. David Witham, Josiah Farnham, and Josiah Hussey signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 58:325).

John Remick died in Milton, September 12, 1840. His will was proved in Somersworth, NH, October 6, 1840.

Sally (Nudd) Remick died in Milton, November 23, 1845, aged sixty-seven years, seven months.


References:

Find a Grave. (2015, October 17). Sgt. William Palmer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/153850898/william-palmer

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA96

NH Department of State. (n.d.). New Hampshire, Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 42: June 1812-1813

NH Secretary of State. (1920). Laws of New Hampshire: Second Constitutional Period, 1811-1820 [1816 Representatives]. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Cb9GAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA464

NH Secretary of State. (1920). Laws of New Hampshire: Second Constitutional Period, 1811-1820 [1817 Representatives]. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Cb9GAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA594

Remick, Oliver P. (1933). Remick Genealogy. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=5X5MAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA126

Thompson, Rev. Albert H. (1886). Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Organization of the First Church, and Ordination of the First Settled Town Minister of Wakefield, N.H. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EKm15quwMhsC&pg=PA42

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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