Celestial Seasonings – May 2020

By Heather Durham | April 30, 2020

So here we sit in our hours of darkness waiting for a light. We may very well have to become accustomed to a New Normal. I heard some wise words today … If you can’t see the light, then BE the light.

Let’s begin by reviewing and watching what the Cosmos has in store for May.


May 4. C/2017 K2 PANSTARRS, known as a comet or an interstellar object will be making its closest approach to the Sun. It will be well placed for viewing. Mercury will orbit very closely to the Sun. (Wikipedia, 2017).

May 5. The n-Aquariid meteor shower, from the Constellation Aquarius will be most prolific on this date. The Moon will appear closer than normal as it passes at its closest point to the Earth.

May 7. The Moon will be full as well as very high in the sky.

May 8. The n-Lyrid meteor shower from the Constellation Lyra will be at peak today.

May 9. Today, the Moon will orbit to it’s farthest point from the sun.

May 10. Mercury will orbit closely to the sun.

May 11. A moon-shaped cluster M4 from Serpens will be visible, but small so you may have to use a device for maximum viewing.

May 12. The moon and Jupiter as well as Saturn will rise closely.

May 14. The last quarter of the moon will rise today. The moon and Mars will rise closely to one another.

May 15. Our interstellar object or comet C/2017 K2 mentioned above, will be at its brightest.

May 18. Jupiter and Saturn will pass closely. The moon will appear somewhat smaller for its orbit will traverse at its farthest point away from the Earth.

May 20. The moon will pass closely to the sun.

May 22. Venus and Mercury will pass in close proximity. There will be a new moon today.

May 23. The moon and Venus will rise closely.

May 24. The moon and Mercury will rise close to each other.

May 28. Our M4 cluster mentioned above will orbit to its highest point in the sky.

May 29. Mercury will be at half phase. We will also be able to enjoy the first quarter of the moon.

May 30. The comet C/2019 Y4 (Atlas) will closely approach the sun.

May 31. The moon and Ceres will rise closely.


Previous in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – April 2020; next in sequence: Celestial Seasonings – June 2020


References:

In-the-Sky.org. (2020, April 29). Guides to the Night Sky. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Wikipedia. (2020, April 26). Aquarius (Constellation). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquarius_(constellation)#Meteor_showers

Wikipedia. (2020, April 9). C/2017 K2. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C/2017_K2

Wikipedia. (2020, April 29). C/2019 Y2 (ATLAS). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C/2019_Y4_(ATLAS)

Wikipedia. (2020, April 21). Lyra. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyra

Wikipedia. (2020, April 18). Serpens. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpens

Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26

By Muriel Bristol | April 26, 2020

As its name would suggest, the Hare Road schoolhouse stood on the Hare Road in West Milton, between the houses of Jacob D. Garland and John I. Cook.

Hare Road School - 1892
Hare Road School, 1892

The Hare Road school was open as late as Spring 1925. Nothing has come to hand regarding the 1925-26 academic year, but the School District reported no Hare Road school payroll or expenses for the 1926-27 academic year (Annual Report, for the Year Ending January 31, 1928).

As with the Nute Ridge school teachers, there are gaps in our sequence. At least some of those gaps might be explained away through earlier or later tenures for the teachers who have been identified. It might also be the case that the school was simply not open in some years. It was often the case, especially among the various schools in West Milton, that a school with but few students in a particular academic year might not open at all. Its students would go instead to one of the other West Milton schools.

WEST MILTON. The Hare road school will now have the few pupils from the Downingville district. In Massachusetts and Vermont the children in sparsely settled districts are carried to the village schools, the towns paying the costs, thus reducing the expenses and giving the children the advantage of better grading. The school at this place and the one at Nute Ridge are both very small (Farmington News, September 10, 1897).

DOWNINGVILLE. As Clara Downing is the only pupil here, she is conveyed to the Hare road school (Farmington News, October 14, 1898).

I retain hopes of tapping other sources once the current Covid-19 restrictions have passed, at which point improvements and revisions may be in order.

Progressive-era State education bureaucrats looked down their noses at the one-room school teachers of their day.

One hundred forty two of these schools are taught by immature girls and nearly all of these schools are rural schools. It must be apparent to all that few girls of 16 to 19 have sufficient education, maturity and judgment to hold the responsible position of teacher of a school. It will be seen that the majority of the teachers, 62 per cent, in all classes of schools are young women 20 to 34 years of age and the number of elderly persons is surprisingly small. It is assumed that the 158 teachers who have furnished no record of their age are doubtless between 35 and 44 (NH Board of Education, 1920).

The NH Board of Education did everything in its power to restrict, require and regulate them out of existence. And yet the test scores achieved by the students of these “immature girls” were higher – to the extent that they are comparable – than those achieved by students of the present day. (See also Milton’s Arithmetic Textbooks of 1878).

N.H. State News. Recent tests in 8th grades in the state schools, taken by 5,000 pupils, showed an average of 67.42 in spelling with 76 towns having an average of 75, or better. Tests in arithmetic showed that 8th graders in New Hampshire this year are better than 9th graders of Springfield, Mass., were in 1846, for they did the same examples and had an average of 49.29 against an average in Springfield in 1846 of 29.41 (Groton Times, November 28, 1924).

It remains for the reader to decide whose education, maturity and judgment was to be preferred.

The Hare Road school teachers identified in this 1890-1926 period were Vienna L. Hill, Myra L. Page, Annie J. Horne, Mary E. Tuttle, Edna N. Calkins, N. Susan Fletcher, Elfrida M. Peacock, Jessie F. Butler, Minerva R. Perry, Blanche E. McCrellis, Alice L. Patterson, Miss Whittaker, Alice M. (Brownell) Canney, Marion I. Dixon, Lizzie M. (Whittier) Drew, and Clara B. (Tozier) Miller.

(The dates given for them in their headings are the dates they are thought to have taught at the Hare Road school. Many of them taught at other Milton schools as well).

Vienna L. Hill – 1890-91

Vienna L. Hill was born, probably in Lowell, MA, November 12, 1868, daughter of John T. and Sarah A. (Locke) Hill.

If, as was later reported, Miss Hill taught at the Hare Road school at the same time as the Nute Chapel dedication, then she would have been there in at least the 1890-91 academic year.

Vienna L. Hill appeared in the Dover directory of 1892, as a teacher at the Glenwood ave. school, boarding at 21 East Brick. (John T. Hill, stoves, ranges and tinsmith, 19 Third, house 21 East Brick (see page 281)).

Vienna L. Hill appeared in the Dover directory of 1895, as a teacher at the Upper Factory school, boarding at 21 East Brick. (John T. Hill, tinsmith, house 21 East Brick). Both appeared in the Dover directory of 1898 as having moved to Greenwood, Mass.

John T. Hill, a painter, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-two years), Sarah A. Hill, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), his daughter, Vienna L. Hill, a laundry bookkeeper, aged thirty years (b. MA), and his nephew, Arthur Hill, a stenographer, aged nineteen years (b. NH). John T. Hill owned their house at 821 Main Street, with a mortgage. Sarah A. Hill was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

John T. Hill, a painter, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his (second) wife (of forty-one years), Sarah A. Hill, aged eighty years (b. NH), his daughter, Vienna L. Hill, a public school teacher, aged thirty-nine years (b. MA), and his servant, Mary E. Hupper, aged fifty-two years (b. ME). John T. Hill owned their house at 821 Main Street, with a mortgage. Sarah A. Hill was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living.

West Milton. Miss Hill of Dover, formerly a teacher on the Hare road, has been visiting Mrs. B.F. Twombley (Farmington News, September 20, 1912).

John T. Hill, a kitchen ware commercial traveler, aged eighty years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Vienna L. Hill, manager of Sperry & Hutchinson [trading stamps], aged fifty-one years (b. MA). John T. Hill owned their house at 27 Oxford Street, with a mortgage.

Vienna Hill appeared in the Haverhill, MA, directory of 1921, as having removed to California. (Her father, John T. Hill, also removed to California. He died there September 11, 1922).

Foss, Vienna L (Hill)
“Aunt Vie”

Walter E. Foss to Be Leader in New Heating Company. Announcement is made today of the retirement of Walter E. Foss from the Foss-Jones company, 28 East Union street, and the formation of a new company to be known as Foss Heating and Sheet Metal company, 34 East Holly street. With Mr. Foss in his new venture are associated J.W. Anger, David L. Shepherd, Robert F. McCullum, William H. Stewart and Percy W. Anger, all well-known in Pasadena in their respective lines of sheet metal, heating and mechanical work. Fifteen years ago Walter E. Foss and the late Frank R. Stewart formed the Foss-Jones company, with whom Mr. Foss has been associated until the present time. Mr. Foss explains that his new step has been made possible by a steady growth of business in Pasadena, and that he believes a continuation of square dealing and courteous treatment will win his new firm their share of patronage and good will (Pasadena Post, November 25, 1925).

Vienna L. Hill married, probably in Pasadena, CA, circa 1927, Walter E. Foss, both of Pasadena. He was born in Deerfield, NH, March 6, 1862, son of William J. and Jerusha (Pettingill) Foss.

Walter E. Foss, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Pasadena, CA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his (second) wife (of two years), Vienna H. Foss, aged sixty-three years (b. MA). Walter E. Foss owned their home at 312 North Raymond Avenue, which was valued at $7,000. They had a radio set.

WEST MILTON. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Ross of California called on friends on the Hare road one day last week. Mrs. Ross was formerly Miss Vienna Hill, a teacher at the Hare road school at the time Nute Chapel was dedicated (Farmington News, July 11, 1930).

Walter E. Foss died in Los Angeles, CA, May 20, 1934.

Vienna H. Foss seems to have been unfortunate in some at least of her investments.

Requisition Is Issued – A requisition on the governor of Mississippi was issued by Governor Frank F. Merriam for the return from Natchez, Miss., of Mark E. Wakefield, who is wanted in Los Angeles on three counts of grand theft. He is accused of embezzling several thousand dollars from Miss Meta C. Matthiesen, Los Angeles, and Mrs. Vienna Foss, Pasadena, in a series of stock transactions (Sacramento Bee, February 19, 1937).

LT520622-Foss, Vienna HSanta Monica Mayor Held on $2500 Bond. (Associated Press Leased Wire). LOS ANGELES. Oct. 11. —Mayor Claude C. Crawford of Santa Monica and his associate, Paul C. Murray, 48, have been held for Superior Court trial under $2500 bonds each on a charge of failing to obtain a state permit to sell interests in a Tuolumne county mining lease. Mrs. Maude Wetzel, a Santa Monica widow, testified at yesterday’s preliminary hearing she invested $6500 in the mine. Other witnesses testified they had invested in it as follows: Mrs. Ethel Flick, $1500; Mrs. Vienna H. Foss, $1500; Mrs. Mary L. Wood and William C. Lundberg, $500 each; Mrs. Mary Rizzo, $250. All said they had received no return on their money (Bakersfield Californian (Bakersfield, CA), October 11, 1941).

Vienna L. (Hill) Foss died in Pasadena, CA, July 31, 1953.

Myra L. Page – 1893-94

Myra Luella Page was born in Wakefield, NH, September 23, 1868, daughter of Charles W. and Mary Ann (Chapman) Page.

NUTE’S RIDGE. Miss Lena Reynold[s] is teaching school at Downingville and Mrs. [Miss] Myra Page on the Hare road (Farmington News, September 1, 1893).

NUTE’S RIDGE. Miss Myra Page closes a very successful term of school in the Hare road district this week. She is an excellent teacher, having taught in nearly every district in town (Farmington News, December 22, 1893).

Charles H. Page, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-nine years), Mary A. Page, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Josephine W. Page, a school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Myra L. Page, a school teacher, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Laura G. Page, aged thirty-three years (b. NH). Charles H. Page owned their farm, free-and-clear. Mary A. Page was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

WEST MILTON. Miss Myra Page of Wakefield, who was formerly a teacher of the Hare road school, is visiting Mrs. George Hurd. She is now teaching in Sanbornville (Farmington News, March 8, 1907).

WEST MILTON. Mr. and Mrs. G.H. Hurd went to Wakefield last Saturday and spent the day with Miss Myra Page. She was a successful teacher of the Hare road school for several years (Farmington News, September 13, 1907).

WEST MILTON. Miss Page, of Wakefield, a former teacher of the Hare road school, has visited Mr. and Mrs. G.H. Hurd (Farmington News, September 25, 1908).

Charles H. Page, a farmer, aged eighty-one years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-nine years), Mary A. Page, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Laura G. Page, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Myra L. Page, a school teacher, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and Josephine W. Page, aged thirty-five years (b. NH). Charles H. Page owned their farm on the South Wakefield street, free-and-clear. Mary A. Page was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

WEST MILTON. Miss Myra L. Page and sister Josephine of Wakefield, accompanied by friends, motored to West Milton, Wednesday of last week (Farmington News, August 30, 1918).

Mary A. Page, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Laura G. Page, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), Myra L. Page, a public school teacher, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and Josephine W. Page, aged forty-five years (b. NH). Mary A.Page owned their house, free-and-clear.

Myra L. Page retired from teaching in June 1926. She would have been fifty-seven years of age.

Mira L. Page, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her sisters, Laura G. Page, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), and Josephine W. Page, aged fifty-five years (b. NH). Mira L. Page owned their house at 11 Liberty Street, which was valued at $1,000.

UNION. Mrs. George W. Drew visited the Misses Myra and Josephine Page in Rochester on Friday and attended a meeting of the Ladies’ Aid (Farmington News, February 18, 1938).

Myra L. Page died in Rochester, NH, May 22, 1938, aged sixty-nine years, seven months, and thirty days. (Her elder sister, Laura Page, supplied the information for the death certificate).

Annie J. Horne – 1896-97, 1899-00

Annie Jean Horne was born in Milton, in October 1879, daughter of Frank G. and Mary C. (Weeks) Horne.

Annie J. Horne graduated from Nute High School with the Class of 1895. Her classmates included future Milton principals Robert M. Looney and Edwin S. Huse (Purple and Gold, 1941).

WEST MILTON. The Misses Horn from Plumer’s Ridge teach in West Milton and Hare road school districts and board with Mrs. John Nute. Miss Nellie Nute drives to Milton high school daily (Farmington News, May 6, 1898).

(The other Miss Horn from Plummer’s Ridge was her cousin, Miss Maude F. Horne, who was also for a time a Milton teacher (see Milton and the Horne Murder – 1939)).

WEST MILTON. Miss Annie Horne, who has taught school here [West Milton] for two years, and previously taught on the Hare road, is much loved by all and has done excellent school work (Farmington News, May 12, 1899).

WEST MILTON. The Hare Road school, taught by Miss Annie J. Horne, closed on Friday of last week (Farmington News, January 19, 1900).

Frank G. Horne, a commercial traveler, aged thirty-eight [forty-eight] years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Mary C. Horne, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), and his children, Herbert F. Horne, a commercial traveler, aged twenty-four years, Annie J. Horne, a school teacher, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Hattie E. Horne, at home, aged twelve years (b. NH). Frank G. Horne owned their farm, free-and-clear. Mary C. Horne was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

She married in Bethel, ME, September 15, 1908, Charles Lafayette Beaton, she of Milton and he of Madison, NH. He was a railroad agent, aged twenty-six years, and she was a housekeeper, aged thirty years. He was born in Jefferson, NH, May 3, 1882, son of Charles C. and Allie E. (Hill) Beaton. (He was a brother of Milton’s long-serving B&M Railroad station agent, Hugh A. Beaton).

Charles Beaton, a B&M freight agent, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Annie Beaton, aged forty-two years (b. NH).

Charles L. Beaton, a telegraph operator, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Portsmouth, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie H. Beaton, aged forty-two years (b. NH). Charles L. Beaton rented their house at 50 Orchard Street.

PH460325 - Charles L Beaton
VETERAN RAILROADER Charles L. Beaton of 50 Orchard Street is completing his 35th year in Portsmouth today sending and receiving telegraph messages at the Boston and Maine Passenger station (Portsmouth Herald photo).

R.R. Ticket Agent, Telegrapher Notes 35th Year Here. Charles L. Beaton, of 50 Orchard street, ticket agent and telegrapher at the Boston and Maine passenger station in Portsmouth, has been sending and receiving the clicking messages of the wires for 42 years now. Tonight he will have completed 35 years at the station here. His life mirrors the changes in two rail lines and two states. Born May 3, 1882, in Jefferson Mills, later named Dartmouth and now named Riverton, near Lancaster, Mr. Beaton seemed destined since childhood to have been a telegrapher. When he was only seven years old, he first heard the clacking of a telegraph key board at the local railroad station. Then and there the desire to be an operator was born. Despite the fact that he was 21 years old before he got to learn the code language of the key, the desire remained. Tried Many Jobs. Before his chance came, Mr. Beaton worked a few months each in jobs in saw mills, leather-board pulp mills and farming, till he finally got a job on the Maine railroad as a section hand and crew man. At last, in September, 1903, he started his training as a telegraph operator, in the Riverton station of the Maine Central line. His first job as a trained operator was at Beecher Falls, Vt., for that line, which he started March 17, 1904. As a Maine Central telegraph operator Mr. Beaton worked at Beecher Falls, Vt., North Conway, Willey House, Sawyer River, Glen Station and Rockland, Lewiston and Rumford Junction in Maine. Mr. Beaton resigned from his job with the Maine Central railroad in June, 1905, to go to work for Boston and Maine railroad at Ossipee, a town which is now Mt. Whittier. Since that day, the veteran operator says proudly, he has never been out of a job for a single day. He has been with the B.&M. for 41 years. For that line he has sounded telegraph keys at Mt. Whittier, Madison, Mountainview, Burleyville (for. East Wakefield), Milton, Conway Junction (now Jewett), North Conway, Hampton, East Saugus Mass., Lynn Common, Mass., and Portsmouth. Since March 25, 1911, Mr. Beaton has worked at the Portsmouth railroad station. Till May 7, 1927, he worked solely as a telegraph operator, handling the toughest bit of key work on the line. In May, 1927, he took over the work of ticket agent, and Oct. 1, 1930, he took over consolidated jobs of ticket agent and telegraph operator, which he has held down since. In 1911 Mr. Beaton rented a home at 50 Orchard street, in which he and his wife Annie (Horne) Beaton have lived ever since, although the. house has changed hands four times. Mr. Beaton was married Sept. 15, 1909. Their 38th wedding anniversary was last September. Safeguards Trains. In his work as a telegrapher Mr. Beaton has safeguarded the trains, by keeping train orders straight, and helping to clear up general tie-ups caused by storms or wrecks. When the late President Roosevelt’s special train arrived in Portsmouth, Mr. Beaton was the telegrapher on duty at the station. Crossword puzzles and jig-saw puzzles are the veteran railroader’s indoor hobbies. In his younger, he used to enjoy fishing for pickerel, bass and horn-pout in the ponds around Milton, and for trout in mountain brooks. Mr. Beaton is a member of John’s Blue lodge, the Chapter Council, and the Knights Templar Commandery of Portsmouth (Portsmouth Herald, March 25, 1946).

Charles L. Beaton, a railroad depot agent, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Portsmouth, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Annie H. Beaton, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), his niece, Gladys M. Beaton, a public school teacher aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and his roomer, Sarah A. McDonald, a public school teacher, aged twenty-two years (b. MA). Charles L. Beaton rented their house at 50 Orchard Street, for $41.50 per month. They had a radio set.

Home Closed By Investigators. Mrs. Annie Beaton, wife of Charles L. Beaton, of 50 Orchard street, who is one of four surviving cousins of the late Miss Maude Horne of Milton who was murdered at her home in that town Friday night, was informed that her aunt’s home, scene of the murder, has been closed. This, it is said, is by order of Federal investigators probing this mysterious case which is said to involve possession of a machine-gun by a suspect as well as a kidnapping of a fifteen-year-old girl. Mr. and Mrs. Beaton attended the funeral of Miss Horne today in Rochester (Portsmouth Herald, February 7, 1939).

Charles L. Beaton, a B&M R.R. ticket agent and telegraph operator, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Portsmouth, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie H. Beaton, aged sixty-one years (b. NH). Charles L. Beaton rented their house at 50 Orchard Street, for $32.50 per month. Beaton was selected randomly for several additional questions. He was not a veteran, and he did have a Social Security number.

Brother Of Local Woman Dies. Herbert Home of Farmington, brother of Mrs. Charles L. Beaton of 50 Orchard street, Portsmouth, died at Farmington yesterday. He was 65 years of age and widely known as a biscuit salesman. He retired about-a year ago. He Is survived by his wife and in addition to his sister in this city he is survived by another sister, Mrs. Ralph Cobb of Dover (Portsmouth Herald, April 11, 1941).

Charles L. Beaton died in Portsmouth, NH, in 1948.

County Probate Settles Estates. Inventories were accepted in the estates of Alfred Conner, Newfields; Charles B. Edgerly, Exeter; James P. Griffin, Portsmouth; A. Pethle, Portsmouth; Etheiyn T. Rumford, Portsmouth; Stella May Thurlow, Seabrook; Annie M. Dow, Exeter; Rene Labranche, Newmarket; Bertha E. Appleton, North Hampton; Charles L. Beaton, Portsmouth, and Elizabeth Briggs, Hampton (Portsmouth Herald, July 6, 1948).

Personal Mention. Mrs. Charles L. Beaton of Dover, formerly of Portsmouth, is a patient at Wentworth hospital (Portsmouth Herald, June 29, 1951).

Annie J. (Horne) Beaton died in Dover, NH, June 24, 1962, aged eighty-four years.

Mrs. Charles Beaton. DOVER -Mrs. Annie H. Beaton, 84, of 118 Locust St., widow of Charles Beaton and a former resident of Portsmouth, died yesterday morning. A native of Milton, she was born Oct. 26, 1877, the daughter of the late Frank and Mary (Weeks) Horne and had resided in Dover for the past 13 years. Mrs. Beaton, a retired school teacher. was a member of the North Congregational Church of Portsmouth. Survivors include a sister. Harriet Cobb of Milton; and a niece (Portsmouth Herald, June 25, 1962).

Mary E. “Mamie” Tuttle – 189?-9?

Mary E. Tuttle was born in Dover, NH, July 27, 1879, daughter of John W. and Elizabeth A. (Wilkinson) Tuttle.

WEST MILTON. The stormy week gave the school children an extra week of vacation here and on the Hare road (Farmington News, December 9, 1898).

John W. Tuttle, a teamster, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Dover household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Elizabeth Tuttle, aged forty-three years (b. RI), and his children, Mary E. Tuttle, a school teacher, aged twenty years (b. NH), Charles W. Tuttle, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and Viola C. Tuttle, aged twelve years (b. NH). John W. Tuttle rented their house at 19 Charles Street. Elizabeth Tuttle was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Mary Etta Tuttle married in Dover, NH, January 25, 1905, Herman Ross Flye, she of Dover and he of Somerville, MA. He was a train dispatcher, aged twenty-four years, and she was a school teacher, aged twenty-five years. He was born in Saugus, MA, February 14, 1880, son of John and Malvina O. (Packer) Flye.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Flye of Chelsea, Mass., who has been spending a few weeks with Mrs. Waldo Thurber, returned home Monday accompanied by her husband, who came to spend Sunday with her. Mrs. Flye was a former teacher of the Hare road school (Mamie Tuttle of Dover) (Farmington News, June 19, 1908).

Herman R. Flye, a steam railroad train dispatcher, aged thirty-nine years (b. MA), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. Flye, aged forty-three years (b. NH). Herman R. Flye rented their house at 51 South Street (which had six units or apartments).

Herman R. Flye, a steam railroad train dispatcher, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Mary E. Flye, aged fifty years (b. NH). Herman R. Flye rented their house at 56 South Street, for $40 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Herman R. Flye, a steam railroad train dispatcher, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-five years), Mary E. Flye, aged sixty years (b. NH). Both had attended four years of high school. Herman R. Flye rented their house at 56 South Street. They had resided in the same house in 1935.

TEA TABLE CHATTER. It was a Golden Wedding anniversary celebration for Mr. and Mrs. Herman R. Flye when they dined at the Skyline this week as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis G. Applegate. Others in the party were L. Mabel Harding, Mrs. W.E. Long more, Mrs. Rena Lord, Mrs. Mary C. Leland and Phineas and Mary Kinney. All are Winter Parkers except Mrs. Leland, who is visiting from Waterford, Conn. (Orlando Evening Star, February 4, 1955).

Herman R. Flye died in FL, in 1959.

Edna N. Calkins – 190?-0?

Edna Nettie Calkins was born in Trescott, ME, October 15, 1882, daughter of Henry G. and Emma M. (Lancaster) Calkins. (She was the older sister of Josie M. Calkins, who became a Nute Ridge teacher).

Edna Calkins, then a Nute High school student, aged sixteen years, suffered a serious accidental injury while working at the paper mill. (Then owned by Alvah Shurtleff). Her recovery prevented her from graduating with her own Nute High School Class of 1898. She graduated instead with the Nute High School Class of 1900.

MILTON. Bad Accident at Paper Mill. A painful and sad accident occurred Saturday at the paper mill. Miss Edna Calkins, who has been employed there the past few months, had her hand nearly severed from her wrist. She stood by a cutting machine, which was not in motion at the time, but which suddenly started, and the knife came down upon her hand. Drs. Hart and Wallace, who are attending the unfortunate young lady, hope to be able to save the thumb and one finger of this hand. Miss Calkins is a highly respected young lady, sixteen years of age. She was a member of the Nute high school, class of ’98, but owing to her delicate health her friends thought it better for her to rest from her studies for a time, and enter upon another year in September. She has the heartfelt sympathy of a host of friends (Farmington News, May 27, 1898).

Edna N. Calkins’ schoolmate and friend was Bessie A. Plummer, who was born in Milton, July 8, 1880, daughter of George H. and Mary P. (Hayes) Plummer. Edna would visit with and be visited by Mrs. Plummer and Miss Plummer (later to be Mrs. Twombly) often over the years.

WEST MILTON. Miss Bessie Plummer had been enjoying a few days with her friend Miss Edna Calkins at South Milton (Farmington News, October 20, 1899).

John W. Avery, a shoe cutter, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eleven years), aged thirty-two years (b. ME), his ward, Gertrude Gatchell, aged twelve (b. ME), and his boarder, Edna Calkins, at school, aged eighteen (b. ME). John W. Avery owned their house, free-and-clear.

WEST MILTON. Miss Edna Calkins, class of 1900 Nute high school, is visiting at the home of her friend, Miss Bessie Plummer (Farmington News, July 6, 1900).

WEST MILTON. Miss Jessie Calkins of South Milton spent the day, Tuesday, with her sister, Miss Edna Calkins (Farmington News, August 3, 1900).

WEST MILTON. The Misses Edna and Jessie Calkins are boarding at Mrs. Hersom’s (Farmington News, December 14, 1900).

MILTON. Work at the paper mill is rushing … Miss Edna Calkins is working at the paper mill (Farmington News, December 21, 1900).

Edna Calkins was described in September 1903 as being a former Hare Road school teacher. She was herself in her final year as a Nute High student during the 1899-00 academic year. Her time as a Hare Road school teacher would seem to have taken place probably in one or more of the 1900-01, 1901-02, or 1902-03 academic years.

Edna N. Calkins’ friend, Bessie A. Plummer, married in Milton, June 30, 1903, Bertrand E. Twombly, both of Milton. Rev. Myron P. Dickey performed the ceremony.

PERSONAL. Miss Edna Calkins of Milton was in town this week (Farmington News, September 11, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. George Plummer was visited last week by Miss Edna Calkins of Milton, a former teacher at the Hare road school (Farmington News, September 18, 1903).

MILTON. Miss Edna Calkins is teaching school at West Lebanon, Me. (Farmington News, April 29, 1904).

Miss Edna Calkins, W. Lebanon, had seven votes in a Boston Globe educational contest in September 1904 (Boston Globe, September 22, 1904). She appeared also early on as a teacher, Milton, with thirty-four votes, just a week later (Boston Globe, September 28, 1904). This sort of contest was a newspaper promotion. Ballots were printed in the newspaper. One might send in as many as one liked (to the extent that one could purchase newspapers). Likely many of her students and other well-wishers voted more than once. Her total, consolidated under her W. Lebanon location, rose to 2,180 votes before the contest ended (Boston Globe, December 14, 1904).

WEST MILTON. Miss Edna Calkins of Milton was the guest of Mrs. B.E. Twombly, Sunday (Farmington News, October 28, 1904).

WEST MILTON. Miss Edna Calkins was a guest of Mrs. G.H. Plumer and Mrs. B.E. Twombly over Sunday (Farmington News, November 18, 1904).

WEST MILTON. Miss Edna Calkins is the guest of Mrs. George Plumer and her daughter, Mrs. B.E. Twombly (Farmington News, February 10, 1905).

Edna L. Calkins of North Rochester appeared in the Rochester directory of 1905, as a Grade VII and VIII teacher at Rochester’s [New] High School in April 1905.

Edna N. Calkins married in Milton, June 17, 1905, Charles [W.] Tucker, she of Milton and he of Lebanon, ME. She was a teacher, aged twenty-two years; he was employed in a mill, aged twenty-nine years. Rev. Myron P. Dickey performed the ceremony. Tucker was born in Lebanon, ME, circa 1876, son of George and Augusta (Ellis) Tucker.

Charles W. Tucker, a leatherboard mill molder, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edna M. Tucker, a public school teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), his child, Raymond C. Tucker, aged two years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Emma M. Calkins, aged forty-five years (b. ME). Charles W. Tucker owned their house, with a mortgage. Edna M. Tucker was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Emma M. Calkins (married twenty-seven years) was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

Charles W. Tucker, a leatherboard mill molder, aged forty-four years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edna c. Tucker, a private school teacher, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, Raymond C. Tucker, aged twelve years (b. MH), and Avis L. Tucker, aged seven years (b. NH). Charles W. Tucker owned their house in West Lebanon Village, with a mortgage.

Edna C. Tucker, a public school teacher, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Pittsfield, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Avis L. Tucker, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Joseph G. Tucker, aged nine years (b. ME). Edna C. Tucker rented their portion of a multi-family residence at 21 Carroll Street for $15 per month.

Charles W. Tucker, a molder, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edna C. Tucker, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), and his child, Joseph G. Tucker, a shoe shop block cutter, aged nineteen years (b. ME). Charles W. Tucker owned their house, which was valued at $500. They had resided in an “R,” i.e., rural place, in Belknap County, in 1935. Charles W. Tucker and Joseph G. Tucker had graduated from the eighth grade, while Edna C. Tucker had one year of college.

Edna N. (Calkins) Tucker died January 8, 1964. Charles W. Tucker died November 23, 1966.

N. Susan “Susie” Fletcher – 1900

Nellie Susan Fletcher was born in Hollis, ME, in November 1878, daughter of Tristram H. and Emily F. (Benson) Fletcher.

Tristrum H. Fletcher, an shoe edge trimmer, aged sixty-five years (b. MA), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Emily F. Fletcher, aged sixty-four years (b. ME), and his child, Nellie S. Fletcher, a teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. ME). Tristrum H. Fletcher owned their house at 6 Mt. Pleasant street, free-and-clear. Emily F. Fletcher was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

WEST MILTON. Mr. Charles Downing is transporting pupils from Downingville to the Hare road school (Farmington News, September 29, 1899).

WEST MILTON. The spring term of the Hare Road school, taught by Miss Susie Fletcher of Farmington, closed last Friday. A program consisting of recitations and dialogues was much enjoyed by those present. The decorations were very pretty and skillful fingers deserve a word of praise. At the close of the exercises Miss Fletcher presented her pupils with dainty and useful gifts in token of her appreciation of their efforts to make the term one of the most enjoyable she had ever taught (Farmington News, July 6, 1900).

Miss Susan Fletcher appeared in the Farmington directory of 1902 and 1905, as a teacher, boarding at 6 Mt. Pleasant street. Tristram H. Fletcher, a shoe operative, had his house at 6 Mt. Pleasant street.

CHIP’S CONTRIBUTION. Miss N. Susie Fletcher, who has been teaching school at West Townsend, Vt., returned home Thursday of last week (Farmington News, February 14, 1902).

LOCAL. Miss N. Susie Fletcher has returned home after a successful term of teaching at Canobie Lake (Farmington News, July 4, 1902).

CHIP’S CONTRIBUTION. Miss N. Susie Fletcher is at Brockton, Mass., this week (Farmington News, September 12, 1902).

Miss N. Susie Fletcher was teacher of the Centre school in New Durham, NH, during the 1902-03 academic year.

NEW DURHAM. A school concert was given Friday evening, July 3, by the New Durham Centre school. The program consisted of flag and doll drills, recitations and songs, with a farce entitled “Deception,” which was given by the older members of the school, kindly assisted by Richard Miller and Winnie Miller, formerly members of the school. . (Farmington News, July 10, 1903).

Miss N. Susie Fletcher was teacher of the Grade 7 class at the Farmington Main street intermediate school in March 1905.

PERSONAL. Miss N. Susie Fletcher is visiting relatives and friends in Lynn and Brockton, Mass., for a few days (Farmington News, March 24, 1905).

N. Susie Fletcher married in Lynn, MA, February 27, 1907, Charles E. Child, both of Farmington, NH. He was a clerk, aged twenty years, and she was an operative, aged twenty-eight years. He was born in Farmington, NH, circa 1887, son of Charles E. and Elizabeth (Drew) Child. (The Lynn clerk scrambled the names, reporting the groom and his father as being named Charles E. Drew, and the groom’s mother as being named Elizabeth Child).

LOCAL. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Childs (N. Susie Fletcher) were in town over Sunday. As this was Mrs. Childs’ first visit home since her marriage, several of her young lady friends took occasion to call Saturday evening and present her with a nice picture, as a wedding gift (Farmington News, April 26, 1907).

LOCAL. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Child of Lynn were in town over Sunday, visiting relatives (Farmington News, June 14, 1907).

Charles E. Child, an electrical machinist, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Nellie S. Child, aged thirty years (b. ME), and his child, Charles E.T. Child, aged two years (b. NH). Charles E. Child owned their house on Glen Street, free-and-clear. Nellie S. Child was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Charles E. Child, a garage keeper, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nellie S. Child, aged forty-one years (b. ME), and his children, Charles E.T. Child, aged twelve years (b. MA), Florence E. Child, aged nine years (b. NH), Ethel M. Child, aged three years, six months years (b. NH). E. Charles Child owned their house at 6 Mt. Pleasant Street, free-and-clear.

E. Charles Child, a garage mechanic, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his his wife (of twenty-eight years), Susie Child, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), and his children, Charles E.T. Child, a garage mechanic, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), Florence E. Child, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Ethel M. Child, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and James H. Child, aged ten years (b. NH). E. Charles Child owned their house at 9 Mt. Pleasant Street, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set.

N. Susie (Fletcher) Child died June 12, 1933, aged fifty-four years.

IN MEMORIAM. Mrs. N. Susie Child. This community and many intimate friends sorrow with the family of Mrs. N. Susie Child, wife of Charles E. Child, whose death occurred as the result of an automobile accident early Monday morning on the state road near the Barnstead-Alton town line. Mr. and Mrs. Child and their younger son were returning from Milford where they had made a Sunday trip to leave their older daughter, Florence, who is a teacher in the public schools of that town. Mrs. Child was in the front seat with her husband and was thrown out when the top of the car came in contact with a tree, shattering the glass and unlatching the door. A physician was called from Alton by telephone and Mr. Child drove on to meet him, but as soon as it was possible to make examination it was determined that death had been instantaneous. It appears that accident had occurred as the Child car rounded a banked curve, causing it to careen, and the front wheels broke through the surface at the edge of the road., throwing it out of control. The deceased was 54 years of age, a native of Hollis, Me., the daughter of Tristram and Emily (Benson) Fletcher. As a small child she came to Farmington with her parents and since had lived in this village, where she was educated in the public schools and graduated from Farmington high school with the class of 1897. For a number of years she was a teacher in the upper grades at the high school building, and also taught at Glen street and at the Hare Road school in West Milton. In her younger days she displayed remarkable talents in the field of art and was a woman of culture and refinement. In 1907 she was married to Mr. Child. Since this union she had devoted herself to a loving family circle which is sadly afflicted by this tragic death. For several years the deceased had been in frail health and was just recovering from a severe accident of several months ago. Mrs. Child was a member of Minnehaha Rebekah lodge and the Farmington High School Alumni association. She is survived by her husband, two daughters, Miss Florence Child, who is a member of the class graduating from Keene Normal school this week and a practice teacher in Milford, and Miss Ethel Child of this village, two sons, Charles E.T. Child, and James Henry Child, of this village, a half-sister, a half-brother and numerous relatives farther removed. Funeral services were held at the Congregational church this Wednesday afternoon at 1.30, with Rev. D.H. Smith officiating. Interment was in Farmington cemetery, with committal services (Farmington News, [Friday,] June 16, 1933).

Her younger daughter, Ethel Child, died in Rochester, NH, February 24, 1934. Charles E. Child died in 1974.

Elfrida M. Peacock – 1901-02

Elfrida Mabel Peacock was born in Solon, ME, August 2, 1881, daughter of Robert M. and Ada M. (Lee) Peacock.

Elfrida M. Peacock was one of the three students who shared a three-way tie for public speaking at the Nute High School graduation ceremony for the Class of 1899. (She was then a junior).

LOCALS. Many Farmington friends of pupils in the Nute high school in MIlton will be interested in knowing that Miss Nellie Frances Nute of West Milton, Miss Elfrida M. Peacock of Nute Ridge and Carl Percy of Union are the three speakers at the graduating exercises of the class of ’99 who were decided upon as too nearly equal in the merit of their work for any distinction in rank to be made in the award of the three prizes offered. Miss Pansy E. Wallace, formerly of this village, is another of the speakers in whom readers of the News have a special interest. It is to be remembered that all the speaking was so high in character that it was difficult even to choose any as best. The judges are congratulated upon their impartiality and their appreciation of the exercises (Farmington News, June 23, 1899).

Robert M. Peacock, a clergyman, aged fifty-one years (b. Canada), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty years), Ada M. Peacock, aged forty years (b. ME), and his children, Elfie M. Peacock, at school, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Harold L. Peacock, at school, aged twelve years (b. MA), Robert B. Peacock, aged five years (b. MA), and Alfred G. Peacock, aged one year (b. NH). Robert M. Peacock rented their house. Ada M. Peacock was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

WEST MILTON. Miss Elfrida Peacock is spending the week at Milton Ridge, as the guest of her friend Miss Orinda Plummer. Miss Peacock, a graduate this June of Nute high school, expects to take an extended course at a Normal school this fall (Farmington News, July 20, 1900).

WEST MILTON. The school on the Hare road, taught by Miss Elfrida Peacock, closes this Friday (Farmington News, February 7, 1902).

WEST MILTON. Owing to the illness of Miss Peacock, the Hare road school will not begin until April 14 (Farmington News, April 11, 1902).

Moulton, Seth Augustine - per James Snyder
Seth Augustine Moulton (per James Snyder)

Elfrida Mabel Peacock married in Milton, September 3, 1903, Seth Augustine Moulton, both of Milton. Her father, Rev. Robert M. Peacock, performed the ceremony. Moulton was born in Lowell, MA, circa 1875-76, son of Charles E. and Clara (Russ) Moulton.

SOMERSET. Invitations have been received here for the wedding of Miss Elfrida Mabel Peacock, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Robert Peacock, to Mr. Seth Augustine Moulton, on Thursday, Sept 3, at Milton. Miss Peacock is very well known here, where her father was pastor of the First Congregational church for five years (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), August 24, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Miss Elfrida M. Peacock was united in marriage to Mr. Seth Moulton of Milton, by the bride’s father Thursday. In the afternoon a reception was held at her home and many beautiful presents were received. Mr. and Mrs. Moulton have gone to the mountains on their wedding tour (Farmington News, September 11, 1903).

Seth A. Moulton, a civil engineer, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), headed a Portland, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Elfrida P. Moulton, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME), his children, Lorna A. Moulton, aged five years (b. NH), and Olivia R. Moulton, aged three years (b. NH), his mother, Mrs. Clara A. Moulton, a widow, aged sixty-two years (b. MA), and his servant, Delia T. Duffey, a private family servant, aged twenty-four years (b. Ireland (Eng.)). Seth A. Moulton rented their house at 22 Clifton Street. Elfrida P. Moulton was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Mrs. Clara A. Moulton was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Augustus Moulton, a consulting engineer, aged forty-four years (b. MA), headed a Cambridge, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Alfrida M. Moulton, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), his children, Lorna A. Moulton, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Olivia F. Moulton, aged twelve years (b. NH), his mother, Clara A. Moulton, a widow, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA). Augustus Moulton rented their house at 120 Brattle Street.

Seth A. Moulton, a consulting engineer, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), headed a Los Angeles, CA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Elfrida M. Moulton, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), and his child, Lorna A. Moulton, a public school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Seth A. Moulton rented their residence in the Lil Mar Apartments, in the Assembly District, for $65 per month. They had a radio set.

Florence E. Wallinder, a life insurance typist, aged thirty-eight years (b. NY), headed a Long Beach, CA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Marian R. Wallinder, aged fourteen years (b. CA), and her lodgers, Elfrida Moulton, aged fifty-eight (b. ME), and Lorna A. Moulton, aged thirty-four years (b. NH). Florence E. Wallinder rented their residence at 1000 Elm Avenue, for $30 per month. (Seth A. Moulton, a chemical engineer, aged sixty-four years (b. MA), was a guest at the Woodward Hotel, on West 55th Street, in New York, NY, at the same time).

Seth A. Moulton died in 1945. Elfrida (Peacock) Moulton died in Augusta, ME, December 3, 1969.

Jessie F. Butler – 1902-03

Jessie F. Butler was born in Berwick, ME, in 1882, daughter of Oren H. and Oriana “Orrie” (Chellis) Butler.

Orrin C. Butler, a soap manufacturer, aged fifty-six years (b. ME), headed a Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife (of six years), Bessie Butler, aged forty years (b. ME), his children, Arthur C. Butler, aged twenty-nine years (b. ME), Clarence O. Butler, soap business, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), Jessie F. Butler, a school teacher, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Dean Butler, at school, aged five years (b. ME), Ella Butler, aged three years (b. ME), and Harry Butler, aged two years (b. ME), his lodger, James Carol, a farm hand, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and his servant, Blanche Boivin, a houseworker, aged twenty-three years (b. New Brunswick (Canada (Fr.)). Orrin C. Butler owned their house, free-and-clear. Bessie Butler was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

WEST MILTON. Schools began Monday. Miss Hattie Campnell has her same school at Nute Ridge, Miss Jessie Butler of Berwick teaches on the Hare road and Miss Daisy Davis of Rochester the West Milton school (Farmington News, September 12, 1902).

WEST MILTON. Miss Nellie Nute has been substituting at the Hare Road school this week, on account of the illness of Miss Butler (Farmington News, January 2, 1903).

WEST MILTON. The school on the Hare road taught by Miss Jessie Butler and the Nute Ridge school taught by Miss Hattie Campbell closed last Friday (Farmington News, February 6, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Miss Jessie Butler of Berwick, Me., a former teacher of the Hare Road school, has been visiting friends in this vicinity (Farmington News, October 23, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Miss Jessie Butler of Somersworth is spending Christmas holidays with Mrs. John Nute and friends (Farmington News, January 1, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The last meeting of the [In-As-Much] Society was with Mrs. Nellie Hayes, with an attendance of fifteen. Three were visitors, who are always welcome. The work was the tacking of a puff for Miss Jessie Butler of Somersworth (Farmington News, February 3, 1905).

WEST MILTON. The friends of Miss Jessie Butler, formerly a teacher here, will be interested to know that she is at present teaching in Munsonville [Nelson, NH]. In January she will have two weeks recess, during which time she will visit in this vicinity (Farmington News, November 23, 1906).

Jessie F. Butler married in Berwick, ME, June 16, 1907, Charles L. Batchelder, she of Berwick and he of North Hampton, NH. He was a farmer, aged twenty-two years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-five years. He was born in North Hampton, NH, in 1886, son of Charles and Martha M. (Brown) Batchelder.

Charles L. Batchelder, an express [company] chauffeur, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), headed a North Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Jessie B. Batchelder, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), and his boarder, Mercy H. Roberts, own income, aged seventy-four years (b. NH). Charles L. Batchelder rented their house.

Charles L. Batchelder, a garage proprietor, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a North Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Jessie B. Batchelder, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), Martha A. Batchelder, aged nine years (b. NH), Eleanor C. Batchelder, aged six years (b. NH), Helen A. Batchelder, aged four years (b. NH), and Mary C. Batchelder, aged eleven months (b. NH). Charles L. Batchelder rented their house on Atlantic Avenue.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Charles Batchelder of Hampton, with her four little girls, was at the Appleby farm for several days last week, She formerly was Jessie Butler, and before her marriage was a teacher for many successful terms in West Milton (Farmington News, October 27, 1922).

Charles L. Batchelder, a public garage man, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a North Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Jessie B Batchelder, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), Martha A. Batchelder, a public garage taxi driver, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Eleanor C. Batchelder, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Helen A Batchelder, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and M. Charlotte Batchelder, aged eleven years (b. NH). Charles L. Batchelder owned their farm on Atlantic Avenue. They had a radio set.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Charles Batchelder of North Hampton, with her four daughters, spent the week-end at Russell Wentworth’s house. Mrs. Batchelder was Jessie Butler, who was a former teacher at the Hare road school in 1901-02. Eleanor Batchelder favored the Nute chapel with violin music at the morning service (Farmington News, October 16, 1931).

Charles L. Batchelder died in 1938.

Jessie Batchelder, a trucking proprietor, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), headed a North Hampton, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Charlotte Batchelder, a hairdresser, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). Jessie Batchelder owned their house at 21 Atlantic Avenue, which was valued at $6,000.

Jessie F. (Butler) Batchelder died in Hampton, NH, April 15, 1973, aged ninety-one years.

Minerva R. Perry – 1903

Minerva Roxy Perry was born in Strafford, NH, May 26, 1871, daughter of John H. and Roxanna M. “Roxie” (Rundlett) Perry.

Minerva R. Perry taught the Fall term at least at the Wednesday Hill school in Lee, NH, during the 1890-91 academic year. Lee usually sent its few Wednesday Hill students to Packer’s Falls in Durham, NH, but found on this occasion that they had enough to reopen their own Wednesday Hill school.

But in the fall there were 10 scholars in Wednesday Hill and it was decided to run one term of 10 weeks, in the old school house. Although it may not be a disadvantage to change teachers occasionally, we do not consider it as well for the scholars to attend first one school, and then another, not being in any particular class and often alone. At Wednesday Hill we find the attendance very good, whole number 10, average 8; but the teacher was obliged to record what seemed to us an unnecessary number of instances of tardiness, taking into consideration the nearness of all the scholars. There are but five families and they are all very near the schoolhouse. The teacher, Miss Perry, encountered the same obstacles there that other teachers have found and met them as successfully as those before her have (Annual Report of the School Board of Lee, For the Year Ending March 31, 1891).

She received $28 per month, making $70 total, which she was paid November 14, 1890. (J.S. Jenkins was paid $2.25 for firewood for the school house). Miss Perry taught Reading, Spelling, and Penmanship to all ten students; Arithmetic to eight students; Geography to seven students; Grammar to eight students; History to three students; Composition to eight students; Physiology to one student; and Algebra and Bookkeeping to one student.

Miss Minerva R. Perry held the office of Lecturer at the Bow Lake Grange, in Strafford, NH, in 1893.

John H. Perry, a farmer, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-three years), Roxie Perry, aged seventy years (b. NH), and his children, Minerva R. Perry, a school teacher, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and Cornelia R. Perry, an invalid, aged thirty-three years (b. NH). John H. Perry owned their farm, free-and-clear. Roxie Perry was the mother of six children, of whom six were still living. (Cornelia R. Perry had been married for eight years).

Minerva R. Perry appeared in the Strafford directories of 1900 and 1902, as a teacher at the Daniels school, No. 18, boarding with John H. Perry, Strafford, Bow Lake.

WEST MILTON. The school at Nute Ridge began this week with the same teacher, Miss Campbell. The Hare road school will begin next Monday. Miss Pratt from Bow Pond will teach. The West Milton school will be discontinued, the scholars being conveyed to Nute Ridge (Farmington News, April 3, 1903).

WEST MILTON. We wish to correct the mistake in the name of the teacher of the Hare road school as given last week. It should have been Miss Perry not Miss Pratt (Farmington News, April 10, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Miss Minerva Perry spent Sunday of last week with Mrs. Jennie French at Farmington (Farmington News, May 15, 1903).

WEST MILTON. Miss Minerva Perry went to her home at Bow Lake Friday for a visit. On her return she was accompanied by her father (Farmington News, May 22, 1903).

WEST MILTON. The exercises at the Hare road schoolhouse Friday were very impressive and well attended. They were in charge of the two teachers, Miss Perry and Miss Campbell. Appropriate remarks were made by Rev. R.M. Peacock, and by Messrs. Jordan and Johnson, who represented the G.A.R. Post of Milton (Farmington News, June 5, 1903).

Miss Minerva R. Perry taught at the South Milton school during the 1903-04 academic year.

WEST MILTON. Miss Minerva Perry, who is teaching the South Milton school, was a guest of Mm G W Tasker over Sunday (Farmington News, January 22, 1904).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. G.H. Hurd had the pleasure of a visit last Saturday from Miss Minerva Perey. She was a former teacher of the Hare road school and is now teaching at South Milton (Farmington News, February 19, 1904).

Minerva Roxy Perry married in Rochester, NH, May 18, 1904, John Leslie Sanders. He was born in Swanville, ME, February 28, 1868, son of Permit P. and Rebecca (Cunningham) Sanders.

MILTON. Miss Minerva Perry, who formerly taught school in town, was married at her home in Strafford May 18, by Rev. John Manter of Rochester, to Rev. John L. Sanders of Dexter, Me. (Farmington News, May 27, 1904).

John L. Sanders, an F.B. [Free Baptist] Church minister, aged forty-two years (b. ME), headed a Charlestown, RI, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Minerva R. Sanders, aged forty-eight [thirty-eight] years (b. NH), and his children, Helen R. Sanders, aged three years (b. RI), and Winifred E. Sanders, aged two years (b. RI). Rev. Sanders rented their house. Minerva R. Sanders was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

John L. Sanders, a Free Baptist minister, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minerva R. Sanders, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), and his children, Helen R. Sanders, aged thirteen years (b. RI), Winifred E. Sanders, aged eleven years (b. RI), Irene R. Sanders, aged seven years (b. ME), and Phyliss L. Sanders, aged six years (b. ME). Rev. Sanders rented their house on Church Street, in Gonic village.

John L. Sanders, a Baptist Church clergyman, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Portland, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Minerva R. Sanders, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), and his children, Irene R. Sanders, aged seventeen years (b. ME), and Phyliss L. Sanders, aged sixteen years (b. ME). Rev. Sanders rented their house at 1435 Congress Street, for $25 per month. They did not have a radio set.

John L. Sanders died in Derry, NH, July 17, 1955. Minerva R. (Perry) Sanders died in Swanville, ME, December 27, 1964, aged ninety-three years.

MORNING DEATH NOTICES. SANDERS – In Swanville, Me., Dec. 27, Minerva R., 93 years, widow of Rev. John L. Sanders. Funeral services at the Coombs funeral Home in Belfast, Me., Tuesday,. Dec. 29, at 2 p.m. (Boston Globe, December 28, 1964).

Blanche E. McCrellis – 1904

Blanche Edna McCrellis was born in East Rochester, NH, September 17, 1883, daughter of Fred H. and Edith E. “Stella” (Howe) McCrellis.

Clara McCrellis, a widow, aged seventy-three years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Fred McCrellis, a spinner, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and her grandchildren, Blanch McCrellis, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Lola McCrellis, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Bertha McCrellis, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). Clara McCrellis owned their house at 7 Mill street, free-and-clear; she was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

It would seem that the Hare Road school pupils attended the West Milton school for the Fall term of the 1903-04 academic year. Miss Blanche McCrellis taught the Hare Road school for the Winter and Spring terms.

WEST MILTON. School began Monday with the following teachers: Miss Ora Dickey at West Milton; Miss Hattie Campbell, Nute Ridge school. Mr. Doughty convoys the students from Downingville and the Hare road to the West Milton school (Farmington News, September 18, 1903).

NEWS OF THE STATE. Banner Grange of East Rochester has elected the following officers: Master, E.A. Corson; overseer, Henry Varney; lecturer, Mabel Wiggin; assistant steward, A.I. Richards; chaplain, Flora Shorey; treasurer, C.A. Sleeper; secretary, Sabra J.  Corson; gatekeeper, John Baker; Pomona, Blanche McCrillis; Flora, Oriana Baker; Ceres, Mrs. Henry Varney; lady assistant steward, Mrs. Frank W. Walsh; pianist, Grace Shorey; steward, John C. Bigelow (Farmington News, January 1, 1904).

WEST MILTON. The Misses Daisy Davis and Blanche McCrellis spent the Memorial recess at their homes in Rochester (Farmington News, June 3, 1904).

WEST MILTON. School in this section closed last Friday. Miss McCrellis, teacher of the Hare road school, returned to her home Wednesday. Miss Davis of the West Milton school will remain with her aunt, Mrs. Annie Cook, over the Fourth (Farmington News, July 1, 1904).

Fred H. McCrellis, a woolen mill jack fixer, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Blanche E. McCrellis, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and his granddaughter, Edrie E. McCrellis, aged four years (b. NH). Fred H. McCrellis rented their house at 16 Green Street

Fred H. McCrellis, a woolen mill loom fixer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife [daughter], Blanche E. McCrellis, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and his grandchildren, Odrie M. McCrellis, a shoe factory worker, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Otto N. McCrellis, aged nine years (b. NH). Fred H. McCrellis rented their house at 16 Green Street.

EAST ROCHESTER, N.H., MAYOR IS VOTED BEST-LOOKING MAN. Councilman Gets Title of Homeliest in Beauty Contest – Three Women Judges. EAST ROCHESTER, N.H., Jan. 20 – According to information that has leaked out, Mayor Elihu A. Corson won the contest for the best-looking man, and Councilman Harry G. Bickford for the homeliest-looking man in the beauty contest staged in connection with the regular meeting of Banner Grange here Wednesday night. Mayor Corson was presented with a mirror and Councilman Bickford with a vanity case. The judges were three women. Miss Blanche McCrillis, Mrs. Mary Frye and Mrs. Cora Bucklin. There were 15 contestants and they represented three Granges, Banner of this place, Lebanon, of Center Lebanon, Me, and Crown Point Grange of Stratford Corner (Boston Globe, January 20, 1928).

Fred H. McCrellis, a woolen mill loom fixer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Blanche McCrellis, aged forty-six years (b. NH), and his grandson, Otto N. McCrellis, a shoe factory laborer, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Fred H. McCrellis rented their house at 16 Green Street, for $10 per month. They had a radio set.

Blanche E. McCrellis died in East Rochester, NH, February 10, 1939, aged fifty-five years, four months, and twenty days. Edrie M. Carpenter of East Rochester, NH, supplied the information.

Alice L. Patterson – 1904-05

Alice Louise Patterson was born in Brookline, MA, October 14, 1877, daughter of James and Catherine (Campbell) Patterson.

James Patterson, an insurance co. office janitor, aged sixty-two years (b. Ireland), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Catherine Patterson, aged sixty years (b. Ireland), his children, Mary [(Patterson)] Massie, a public teacher, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), William Patterson, a machine salesman, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), Alice L. Patterson, a music teacher, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), his grandchild, Mildred P. Massie, aged seven years (b. MA), and his lodger, J. Tina Grant, a dressmaker, aged twenty-six years (b. Canada (Eng.)). James Patterson rented their house at 101 Harvard Street. Catherine Patterson was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

WEST MILTON. Miss Alice L. Patterson, teacher in the Hare Road district, returned to her home in Brookline for the vacation (Farmington News, December 30, 1904).

WEST MILTON. Miss Alice Patterson has gone to Newbury, Vt., to visit Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Gilman (Farmington News, September 25, 1908).

Catherine C. Patterson, a widow, aged seventy-one years (b. Ireland), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Mary E. Masse, a public school teacher, aged forty-four years (b. MA), and Alice L. Patterson, a music teacher, aged thirty-two years (b. MA), and her granddaughter, Mildred P. Masse, aged seventeen years (b. MA). Catherine C. Patterson rented their house at 86 Brook Street. Catherine C. Patterson was the mother of six children, of whom four were still living. Mary E. Masse was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Alice Louise Patterson married in Brookline, MA, August 24, 1910, Lewis Walter Harriman, both of Brookline. He was a custodian, aged thirty years, and she was a teacher, aged thirty-two years. He was born in North Conway, NH, November 2, 1879, son of Ezra C. and Alice M. (Burbank) Harriman.

Lewis W. Harriman, a box board co. engineer, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Wayland, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice L. Harriman, aged forty years (b. MA), and his mother-in-law, a widow, aged eighty years (b. Ireland (Eng.)). Lewis W. Harriman owned their house at 49 Plain Street.

Lewis W. Harriman, a box factory machinist, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Wayland, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty years), Alice L. Harriman, aged fifty-two years (b. MA). Lewis W. Harriman owned their house at 49 W. Plain Street, which was valued at $7,000. They had a radio set.

Lewis W. Harriman died in Wayland, MA, April 26, 1939.

Alice L. Harriman, a widow, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Wayland, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Alice L. Harriman owned her house at 49 W. Plain Street, which was valued at $1,800. She had resided in the same house in 1935.

Miss Whitaker – 1905-06

Miss Whitaker remains elusive. At this point all that is known is that she hailed from Conway, NH, and had relatives in Boston, MA. A Miss Helen E. Whitaker from Conway, NH, graduated from Nute High School with the Class of 1916, but she would have been too young to teach at the Hare Road school in 1905-06.

WEST MILTON. The Hare road school opened this week for the winter term, with Miss Whitaker as teacher. She is from Conway (Farmington News, December 8, 1905).

WEST MILTON. Miss Whitaker, teacher of the Hare road school, spent the Christmas vacation with relatives in Boston (Farmington News, January 5, 1906). 

WEST MILTON. Washington’s birthday was observed Friday afternoon at the Hare road school by appropriate exercises (Farmington News, March 2, 1906).

Hare Road School Not in Session – 1908-09

The Milton directory of 1909 did not mention any Hare Road school teacher (although those for Plummer’s Ridge, Nute’s Ridge, and the South Milton schools, as well as those teaching in the Milton Grammar school, were all identified).

Alice M. (Brownell) Canney – 1916-17

Alice M. Brownell was born in Dover, NH, November 2, 1886, daughter of William A. and Sarah S. (Brown) Brownell.

Alice M. Brownell married (1st) in Dover, NH, June 28, 1911, Carl B. Canney, she of Dover, and he of Milton. He was born in Milton, July 11, 1884, son of George D. and Addie B. (Hatch) Canney.

Mrs. Alice M. Canney taught the Hare Road school in the Spring term of 1916-17 academic year. Her usual place was at the nearby West Milton school, from which she brought also her West Milton students for this term. (A fuller account of her life and career may be found in Milton’s West Milton Teachers, 1885-23).

West Milton.  The Hare Road school was reopened last Monday with Mrs. Alice Canney as teacher and an initial enrollment of eight pupils. Mrs. John Grace will transport the pupils from the West Milton district (Farmington News, April 20, 1917).

West Milton. The Hare road and Nute Ridge schools close this Friday for the summer vacation (Farmington News, June 15, 1917).

Marion I. Dixon – 1917-18

Marion Irene Dickson was born in Shirley, MA, August 1, 1895, daughter of William A.  and Hattie M. (Newell) Dickson.

William A. Dickson, a leather-board mill superintendent, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), headed a Milton [“Milton-Town”] household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Hattie Dickson, aged thirty-four years (b. MA); his children, Marion I. Dickson, aged fourteen years (b. MA), Hazel M. Dickson, aged five years (b. NH), and Carlyn P. Dickson, aged two years (b. NH); and his in-laws William V. Newell, aged sixty-six years (b. MA), and Lucy H. Newell, aged sixty-six years (b. MA). William A. Dickson rented their house. Hattie M. Dickson was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living. The Newells had been married forty-six years, during which time she had been the mother of five children, of whom four were still living.  They resided next-door to the Spaulding workers’ hotel or barracks, with its numbered immigrant workers.

Marion I. Dickson graduated from Nute High School with the Class of 1911.

Mrs. Hattie M. (Newell) Dickson died in Milton, December 20, 1914. William A. Dickson advertised for a housekeeper to care for his family of five in August 1915. He married (2nd) in East Rochester, NH, May 21, 1918, Grace E. Harwood, a teacher at the Milton Grammar school.

Marion I. Dickson, appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a student at the Plymouth Normal school, with her home at W.A.D.’s, on South Main street. William A. Dickson, superintendent at Spaulding’s, had his house on South Main street, in the third house beyond the railroad crossing.

WEST MILTON. Improvements are being made on the Hare road school buildings (Farmington News, October 17, 1917).

WEST MILTON. Miss Marion Dixon, teacher at the Hare Road school, gave her pupils a delightful Hallowe’en party, Wednesday afternoon (Farmington News, November 2, 1917).

WEST MILTON. The Hare road school is in session and Miss Marion Dixon of Milton has returned as teacher (Farmington News, April 12, 1918).

West Milton. Miss Marion Dickson of South Milton, who closed a very successful school year here in June, is to teach the 4th and 5th grades in the Milton Grammar school (Farmington News, August 23, 1918).

William A. Dickson, a leather-board mill superintendent, aged forty-five years (b. MA), headed a Milton [“Milton-Town”] household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Hattie Dickson, aged thirty-six [forty-five] years (b. MA); his children, Marion I. Dickson, a grammar school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), Hazel M. Dickson, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Carlyne P. Dickson, aged twelve years (b. NH); and his servant, Isabel H. Mansfield, a private family servant, aged fifty-four years (b. ME). William A. Dickson rented their house on the Wakefield Road, i.e., White Mountain Highway, in South Milton. They resided still next-door to the Spaulding workers’ hotel or barracks.

Marion I. Dickson appeared in the Annual Report of Conway, NH, of 1926, as a school teacher, with a salary of $1,050. She taught grades 7 and 8 (Conway Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1926).

Scituate. Yesterday Harold A. Wingate, former superintendent of schools at Center Ossipee, N.H., assumed his newly appointed position as superintendent of schools here. He met the teachers for instructions. Schools opened today with a record enrollment. Owing to resignations several new teachers were added to the staff. New principals will have charge of both grammar schools. At the Jenkins School Le Roy Fuller, for 10 years teacher in Belmont Junior High School, will be principal. Miss Marion Dickson, former principal of Conway, N.H., grammar school; Miss Florence Toomey of Bridgewater and Miss Helen Pearl of West Boxford have joined the Jenkins School staff. At the Hatherly School the new principal is George W. Burrill of Newport, Me, and Miss Helen Knox of Exeter, N H, Is a teacher (Boston Globe, September 26, 1926).

James T. Larkin, a chain store manager, aged forty-five years (b. Irish Free State), headed a Scituate, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty years), Annie E. Larkin, aged thirty-nine years (b. MA), and his boarder, Marion I. Dickson, a public school teacher, aged thirty-four years (b. MA). James T. Larkin rented their house on First Parish Road, for $30 per month. They had a radio set.

Marion I. Dickson appeared in the Annual Report of Boscawen, NH, of 1933, as a school teacher, with a salary of $1,050 (Boscawen Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1933).

Marion I. Dickson appeared in the Annual Report of Boscawen, NH, of 1939 as its grammar school principal, and teacher of grades 7 and 8, with a salary of $1,100 (Boscawen Annual Report, For the Year Ending January 31, 1939).

Marion Irene Dickson married in Northfield, NH, May 2, 1941, James Harry Sanderson, both of Boscawen, NH. He was a widowed leather worker, aged fifty-four years, and she was a teacher, aged forty-five years. He was born in Columbia, NH, son of Gilbert D. and Lillie (Prince) Sanderson.

Marion I. (Dickson) Sanderson died in 1969. James H. Sanderson died in 1977.

Lizzie M. (Whittier) Drew – 1918-20

Lizzie M. Whittier was born in NH, circa May 1877, daughter of George and Nancy A. (Moody) Whittier.

Lizzie M. Whittier married in Farmington, NH, September 9, 1899, Charles E. Drew, she of Farmington and he of Alton, NH. He was born in Alton, NH, circa 1875, son of Charles G. and Hannah (Watson) Drew.

Nancy A. Whittier, a widow, aged seventy-one years (b. ME), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Mary E.A.C. Whittier, aged forty years (b. NH), and her boarders, Ernest C. Drew, a blacksmith, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and  Lizzie M. Drew, a teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). Nancy A. Whittier owned their house at 25 Orange Street, free-and-clear.

Charles E. Drew, a box shop boxmaker, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Lizzie M. Drew, a school teacher, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and his sister-in-law, aged fifty years (b. NH). Charles E. Drew owned their house on North Main Street, free-and-clear. They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of their tenant, Henry J. Sheehan, a shoe factory shoe finisher, aged twenty-five years (b. MA).

West Milton. The Hare road school is to re-open August 26, with Mrs. Lizzie Drew of Farmington as teacher (Farmington News, August 23, 1918).

West Milton. Pupils from West Milton and Downing hill are attending the Hare road school, there being none in the above mentioned districts (Farmington News, September 6, 1918).

West Milton. Several pupils of the Hare road school have been victims of the prevailing colds and the attendance has been correspondingly small (Farmington News, October 4, 1918).

On the afternoon of the WW I armistice, the Hare Road school teacher and students adjourned to attend a parade in Farmington, NH.

West Milton. There was but one session of the Hare road school Monday as teacher and pupils attended the parade and celebration at Farmington in the afternoon (Farmington News, [Friday,] November 15, 1918).

WEST MILTON. After six weeks’ vacation, the Hare Road school reopened Monday for the Spring term, with Miss [Mrs.] Lizzie Drew of Farmington as teacher (Farmington News, April 4, 1919).

WEST MILTON. The Memorial was fittingly observed with appropriate exercises by the teacher and pupils of the Hare Road school on Thursday afternoon of last week. The schoolroom was tastefully decorated with wreaths of evergreen, flags, and crepe paper in the national colors, while bouquets added their beauty and fragrance. It was evident that time and labor and thoughtful interest had been combined in preparing for this day of commemoration. The teacher and pupils from Nute Ridge were in attendance, together with parents and neighbors, and the hour was pleasantly and profitably spent in giving attention to the program of songs and recitations which was very creditably given, At the close of the exercises, refreshments of assorted cake and fruit punch were served, and the pleasant little affair was concluded with the taking of a group picture of the school by Miss McGregor (June 6, 1919).

WEST MILTON. The interior of the Hare road schoolhouse has been newly painted during the last week. School reopens Tuesday, with Mrs. Lizzie Drew of Farmington as teacher (Farmington News, September 5, 1919).

WEST MILTON. The Hare road school reopened on Monday, after a holiday recess of one week (Farmington News, January 2, 1920).

Mary E.A.C. Whittier, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her cousins, Lizzie M. Drew, a school teacher, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and Ernest C. Drew, a shoe factory edge trimmer, aged forty-four years (b. NH). Mary E.A.C. Whittier owned their house on Prospect Street, free-and-clear.

WEST MILTON. There was no session of the Hare road school Friday, as the teacher, Mrs. Lizzie M. Drew, was in Rochester in attendance at the meeting of the Strafford County Teachers’ association (Farmington News, February 6, 1920).

WEST MILTON. The Hare road school re-opened Monday, after an extended vacation with an enrollment of 18 scholars (Farmington News, April 23, 1920).

WEST MILTON. The Hare road school closed Friday for the usual summer vacation. No program of closing exercises bad been prepared, but by request, Floyd Hall, who has recently come into this community to reside, gave a short but interesting talk to the school, concerning means and methods employed in war overseas, where Mr. Hall saw service as lieutenant in the 26th division. In connection with this he exhibited several articles, reminders of the great world struggle, in which he had participated. There was manifest appreciation on the part of those whose privilege it was to hear Mr. Hall, and the hours was concluded with the serving of fancy wafers, fruit punch and candy (Farmington News, July 9, 1920).

Cora B. Whittier, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her cousin-in-law, Charles E. Drew, a shoe factory shipper, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and her cousin [his wife of thirty years], and Lizzie M. Drew, a general practice practical nurse, aged fifty-two years (b. NH). Cora B. Whittier owned their house at 7 Prospect Street, which was valued at $3,500. They did not have a radio set.

Charles E. Drew died in Farmington, NH, October 5, 1931.

Lizzie M. Drew, a private nurse, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. She owned her house at 7 Prospect Street, which was valued at $3,000. She had attended four years of high school.

Lizzie M. (Whittier) Drew died in 1960.

Clara B. (Tozier) Miller – 1920-21

Clara B. Tozier was born in Fairfield, ME, February 4, 1871, daughter of  Nahum and Julia B. (Holt) Tozier.

Clara Belle Tozier married in Rochester, NH, July 1, 1918, David Cameron Miller, both of Milton. She was a teacher, aged forty-seven years, and he was a farmer, aged forty-seven years. He was born in Clinton, MA, in 1870, son of William A. and Janet L. (Cameron) Miller.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. David Miller has accepted a position as assistant teacher in the Nute high school in Milton (Farmington News, September 12, 1919).

David C. Miller, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included Clara B. Miller, aged forty-eight years (b. ME). David C. Miller owned their farm on the Hare Road, free-and-clear. The census enumerator recorded them between the households of Llewellyn D. Garland, a farmer, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), and Ira W. Hayes, a farmer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH).

WEST MILTON. The fall term of the Hare road school opened Monday, with Mrs. David Miller as teacher (Farmington News, September 3, 1920).

WEST MILTON. There will be a vacation of one week beginning December 29 at the Hare road school (Farmington News, December 24, 1920).

WEST MILTON. The school on the Hare road opened again for the winter term Monday morning of this week (Farmington News, January 7, 1921).

WEST MILTON. School opened again at the Hare Road schoolhouse after a vacation of four weeks. A mighty fine idea it was, too, through the mud season (Farmington News, April 8, 1921).

David C. Miller, aged fifty-nine years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twelve years), Clara T. Miller, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME). David C. Miller owned their house on the Hare Road, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set.

David C. Miller died in Milton, April 20, 1930, aged fifty-nine years. Clara B. (Tozier) Miller died in Milton, June 19, 1946.

IN MEMORIAM. Mrs. Clara Tozier Miller. One of the best known residents of the Hare road, Mrs. Clara Tozier Miller, passed away suddenly at her home last week, Wednesday, June 19. Naturally a very energetic person, she had been about her usual pursuits until a brief time before her death. The deceased was born February 4, 1871, in Fairfield, Maine. After completion of her education she became a school teacher and her last engagement in the profession was in Fitchburg, Mass. In 1918 Mrs. Miller came to her home on the Hare road with her late husband, David Miller, whom she survived for a number of years. She was quite well known about Farmington from her frequent visits to town, but found her chief interests in the affairs of her home. She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Vera Gerrish of Groton, Mass., and several nieces and nephews. One niece, Mrs. Homer Lothrop of Oakland, Maine, was with her at the time of her passing, having arrived the previous day for a visit. Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at the Otis funeral home and the remains were taken to Fairfield, Maine, for committal services Friday (Farmington News, June 28, 1946).

Unknown Teacher(s) – 1922-26

WEST MILTON. The Hare Road school opened last Monday for the fall term. The Nute Ridge school will open next Monday and it is expected that the West Milton school will open later (Farmington News, September 1, 1922).

WEST MILTON. A meeting was called by the school board of Milton last week to discuss the matter of consolidation of the several schools in this corner of the town. Nothing was done except to discuss the pros and cons. A goodly number was in attendance, but matters were left as they stood before, with two schools, one at Nute Ridge and the other on the Hare road. The outside scholars will be conveyed as heretofore. All expressed their views and a vote was taken which soon decided the matter in favor of the two schools (Farmington News, August 3, 1923).

WEST MILTON. Schools in this part of the town closed last week for a vacation of three months. Nute Ridge and the school on the Hare road had joint exercises at the close of the term (Farmington News, June 13, 1924).

WEST MILTON. The teachers in Nute Ridge and Hare road districts are having a month’s vacation (Farmington News, April 3, 1925).

No subsequent newspaper reports have come to hand as yet that mention any Hare Road schoolteacher after 1924-25. (There might have been a 1925-26 academic year). No Town Reports have come to hand prior to that of 1928, in which the 1926-27 School report did not mention any salary for a Hare Road school teacher. Nor was any such allocation ever made in subsequent reports.

Hare Road Schoolhouse Aftermath

The Milton School District warrant for the March 1937 election sought authority to sell the disused Hare Road schoolhouse building.

To see if the District will authorize the School Board to sell the Hare Road schoolhouse (Annual Report for the Year Ending January 31, 1937).

It would appear that a former Hare Road teacher, Mrs. Clara B. (Tozier) Miller, acquired the Hare Road schoolhouse, which she conveyed later to the Borack family after the loss of their house by fire in October 1938.

Peter Frederick Boorack was born in Alexandroka, Russia, November 23, 1893. He registered for the WW I military draft in Boston, MA, June 5, 1917. He was a Boston Elevated R.R. motorman, Div. 5, South Boston, aged twenty-three years (b. Alexandroka, Russia, November 23, 1893). He was a “declarant,” i.e., he had declared his intent to become a citizen. He claimed an exemption as being the support of his parents. He was a tall, stout man, with blue eyes, and light brown hair. He enlisted in the U.S. Army, September 22, 1917, and was discharged March 3, 1919.

Peter F. Boorack, aged twenty-seven years, a motorman, resident at 671 Broadway, South Boston, and Helen F. Quinn, aged twenty-five years, same address, filed marriage intentions in Boston, MA, September 23, 1920 (Boston Globe, September 24, 1920).

Peter F. Boorack, a building trades lather, aged thirty-seven years (b. Russia), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Helen F. Boorack, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), and his children, Frederick Boorack, aged seven years (b. MA), and Paul E. Boorack, aged six years (b. MA). Paul F. Boorack rented their house at 671 East Broadway, for $25 per month. They did not have a radio set.

Fred and Peter Boorack participated in the Nute Ridge school’s exercises concluding the 1933-34 academic year on Wednesday, June 20, 1934 (Farmington News, June 29, 1934).

FIRE DESTROYS HOUSE AT WEST MILTON. A fire that was discovered around two o’clock last Sunday morning destroyed the home of Peter Borack and family on the Hare road at West Milton, at the same time depriving Mr. and Mrs. John Wilson and family, tenants of the Borack premises, of most of their furniture and personal belongings. The blaze was discovered by Mr. Borack, who was awakened by the sound of the crackling flames, and he was barely able to awaken the members of the sleeping household, composed of his own family, visiting relatives from Massachusetts, and Mrs. Wilson and children, who occupied the ell part of the house. None of the occupants were able to salvage anything but a meager supply of clothing and a very few of their household effects. The neighborhood was quickly aroused by telephone and the fire company summoned from Milton village but before assistance could arrive the house was in flames. Efforts of the neighborhood and fire company were directed successfully to saving a large hay-filled barn across the road. Consequently, there was no loss of livestock or poultry and this is about all that Mr. Borack has left on which to reconstruct his future. Early the following morning the Wilson family accepted succor in Milton village, and Mr. Borack, his family and guests went to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Nute. The same afternoon Mrs. Borack and two sons left for Massachusetts, where they will find temporary quarters with relatives. Mr. Borack will remain at the home of Mr. Nute until readjustments are completed, on the outcome of which, his future plans will be determined. Both the Borack and Wilson families have lived in West Milton for several years, and have made many friends who express heartfelt sympathy in their loss (Farmington News, October 14, 1938).

WEST MILTON. Peter Boorack has purchased from Mrs. Clara Miller the Hare Road schoolhouse and is having it moved to the site of the house destroyed by fire in October 1938 (Farmington News, December 8, 1939).

Peter Boorack, a shoe shop assembler, aged forty-six years (b. Russia), headed a Milton, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Helen A. Boorack, aged forty-four years (b. MA), and his children, Fred Boorack, aged seventeen years (b. MA), Paul Boorack, aged sixteen years (b. MA), and Helen Boorack, aged five years (b. MA). The parents had graduated from grade  eight, while the two sons had also two years of high school. They were supposedly living in the “same house” as in 1935. That would seem to have been impossible, given the fire, and must have meant the same location, perhaps in the relocated schoolhouse.

Peter Frederick Boorack registered for the WW II military draft in Milton, NH, April 27, 1942. He was an employee of the Rondeau shoe company in Farmington, NH, aged forty-eight years (b. Alexandroka, Russia, November 23, 1893). He resided in Milton, NH, but had an R.F.D. Farmington, NH, mailing address. He was 5′ 11½” tall, weighed 210 lbs., and had blue eyes, gray hair, a light complexion, and a scar on his left knee.

FOR SALE. Two Guernsey milkers, third calf, both fresh, two Guernsey heifers, first calf, one fresh, one due. Peter Boorack, Hare Road, West Milton, P.O. address, R.F.D. Farmington (Farmington News, March 9, 1945).

Peter F. Boorack died May 24, 1974.


See also Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47Milton’s South Milton Teachers, 1886-29, Milton’s West Milton Teachers, 1885-23, and Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1875-11


References:

Find a Grave. (2018, October 13). Annie Jean Horne Beaton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/193956666/annie-jean-beaton

Find a Grave. (2013, October 28). Clara E. Tozier Miller. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/119434202/clara-e-miller

Find a Grave. (2016, October 11). Elizabeth M. Whittier Drew. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/171192104

Find a Grave. (2016, November 22). Jessie Florence Butler Batchelder. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/173078609

Find a Grave. (2015, October 27). Josie Caulkins Garland. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/154316946

Find a Grave. (2016, October 11). Lizzie M. Whittier Drew. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/171192104

Find a Grave. (2018, October 18). Marian I. Dickson Sanderson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/153918052

Find a Grave. (2013, June 15). Minerva Roxy Perry Sanders. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/112380001

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Myra Luella Page. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92198492

Find a Grave. (2015, July 24). Nellie Susan Fletcher Child. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/149731204

Find a Grave. (2014, October 12). Vienna Hill Foss. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/13714005

Grace

By Muriel Bristol | April 24, 2020

Plunkett, Grace Gifford
Grace E. (Gifford) Plunkett

Joseph Mary Plunkett, a leader of the Irish Easter Rising (April 1916) and a signatory of its Proclamation, married his fiancée, Grace Evelyn Gifford, in the chapel of Kilmainham Gaol, just hours before he was executed by a British firing squad in May 1916. (All of the Proclamation’s signatories were shot). She brought the ring, they had only ten minutes together.

There would be a guard there, and you could not talk. … I was just a few moments there to get married, and then again a few minutes to say good-bye that night; and a man stood there with his watch in his hand, and said: ‘ten minutes’.

Plunkett’s companion Padraic, who in the song calls him from his post-operative sickbed, was Padraic Pearse, president of the proclaimed provisional republic. He would be shot too, as was Grace’s brother-in-law (her sister’s husband). The General Post Office (G.P.O.) was the headquarters of their weeklong rebellion. (I See His Blood Upon the Rose was a poem written by Joseph Plunkett).

During the 2016 centenary of the Easter Rising, musicians Róisin O. [O’Reilly], her brother, Danny O’Reilly, and their cousin, Aoife Scott, gave a moving rendition of this much-covered song about Grace Gifford and Joseph Plunkett, which they performed in the Kilmainham Gaol where the Plunketts had married a century earlier. (They conclude their performance by quoting the last words of consolation of another signatory, James Connelly, as spoken to his wife Lillie shortly before he was shot).

Grace was imprisoned in Kilmainham herself for some months in 1923 by the Irish Free State, during the Irish Civil War. (She was an anti-Treaty adherent).

Grace by James McCann

As we gather in the chapel, here in old Kilmainham Gaol,
I think about these past few weeks, oh, will they say we failed?
From our school days, they have told us we must yearn for liberty,
Yet all I want in this dark place is to have you here with me.

[Chorus]

Oh, Grace, just hold me in your arms and let this moment linger,
They’ll take me out at dawn and I will die.
With all my love, I’ll place this wedding ring upon your finger,
There won’t be time to share our love, for we must say goodbye.

Now I know it’s hard for you my love to ever understand
The love I bear for these brave men, my love for this dear land,
But when Padraic called me to his side, down in the G.P.O.
I had to leave my own sick bed, to him I had to go.

[Chorus]

Now as the dawn is breaking, my heart is breaking too
On this May morn as I walk out, my thoughts will be of you
And I’ll write some words upon the wall so everyone will know
I loved so much that I could see His Blood Upon The Rose.

[Chorus]

Oh, there won’t be time to share our love, for we must say goodbye.

The BBC would not allow Rod Stewart to sing this song on their airwaves in October 2018.


References:

RTÉ One. (2016, March 29). The Proclamation. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERCVSDileo0

Wikipedia. (2020, March 1). Grace Gifford. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_Gifford

 

Milton’s Hierarchy of Needs

By S.D. Plissken | April 19, 2020

An acquaintance of a philosophical bent brought up in a discussion recently Maslow’s “Hierarchy of Needs.” Psychologist Abraham Maslow put forward his theory of a hierarchy of needs in a 1943 paper and, more fully, in his 1954 book Motivation and Personality.

In Maslow’s theory, usually depicted as a pyramid, with the most essential needs grouped as a foundation at the bottom, and the other categories of needs stacked each upon the other in a possible progression upwards. At the bottom, would be one’s Physiological needs, with Safety needs stacked upon that foundation (when Physiological needs have been satisfied), and then in succession Love/Belonging, Esteem, and finally Self-Actualization at the top.

Maslow's Hierarchy of NeedsAt the lowest level of Physiological needs there are basic health and homeostasis, because it is difficult to live with a massive physical trauma or adverse conditions of massively extreme heat, cold, pressure, lack of oxygen, etc. Under those conditions, one’s higher needs and aspirations are not even remotely a consideration.

Assuming one is not going to die instantly, the next need to be satisfied would be water. People cannot live more than a few days without water, perhaps even less than that, depending upon conditions. Then would come food. People cannot live more than a couple of weeks without food, perhaps even less. Sleep is vital too. Anyone who has worked several days and nights with little or no sleep will have learned how essential sleep is to our function. Shelter is next in the Physiological sequence.

Assuming that one’s Physiological needs may be satisfied, one can continue to exist. At that point, one might pursue higher needs from the next level above: Safety or Security needs of different types. This category includes Physical safety, Emotional security, Financial security, and longer-term Health and Well-Being, etc.

We should note that this second category of Safety or Security is less essential as a whole than the basic foundation one of Physiological needs. And the third category is less essential than the second and so on.

Under Maslow’s schema, none of Milton’s Town government services – not a single one, not even its Police and Fire departments – should or would take precedence over the Physiological needs, including the need for shelter, i.e., the need to retain one’s home.

This is why a speaker – I think it was at a Candidates’ Night several years ago – warned correctly that the Town’s rate of tax increases had begun to constitute an “existential threat.” (Their warning fell on deaf ears). Our friends and neighbors dislike hearing anecdotes of neighbors struggling here before being forced to leave town for places with better “price points.” (“Price point” being a term more appropriate for a voluntary transaction that might be refused, and misapplied when speaking of forcible taxation).

This is why the “sledge hammer” Tax Cap passed so readily: taxpayers sought to staunch the bleeding.

Chairwoman Hutchings in her disquisition took Police and Fire positions and salaries “off the table.” Despite employee salaries, benefits, COLA [!!!], and pensions making up the largest portion of the Town budget.

She was utterly wrong, of course. Nothing that the Town does is more important, in the Maslovian sense discussed above, than the ability of homeowners to remain in their “shelters.” Therefore, it necessarily follows everything the Town spends is most definitely on the table. If all Town expenses are not on her table, then they might appear instead on the table of petitioners and voting taxpayers.

Not mentioned in her discussion was disgorging “fund balance” monies as tax relief. After all, the monies were ostensibly collected for CIP items that were not passed at the ballot. Nor was there any mention of reducing the excessive “fund balance” percentages that drive them each and every year. Nor was any mention made of extending the so-called CIP timelines in order to “flatten the curve.”

Nobody undertook to cease mining zombie job slots – some vacant for years now – to cover extra-budgetary raises.

Nor was there any mention of bundling boating expenses (repair of ramp, costs of the Police navy, costs of collecting the fees, boat inspections, European Naiad remediation, etc.), under a self-sustaining boat launch fee, rather than a general tax burden.

And let us not even mention the “elephant in the room”: the Milton School District, whose much larger budget – double? triple? – was also rejected. They need to get themselves under control also.

The plan is evidently to form a “Task Force,” most likely composed of people that participated in making the problem, to see if there even is a problem. (This is not Leyte Gulf and you are not Taffy 3). “We investigated ourselves and found we did nothing wrong.”

The Town government is in a deep hole, but not solely a budgetary one. It has serious credibility and trust issues too. In December 2017 the BOS “mistakenly” over-taxed us by an amount which was then estimated at $1.4 million. The BOS has never explained either the nature or size of its error.

At that time, there should have been immediate resignations all around. Some assumed then that the disgraced board remained in place only for the opportunity to “make things right.” Instead, they said nothing and when “surprised” by post-budget employee benefit cost increases, the BOS claimed the people’s money as their own to cover that and other budgetary increases.

Yes, it was an outright theft, a legal theft (per Mr. Brown), but a theft nevertheless. For many that was the “last straw.”

Disgorge the fund balance overages. Make sure they can never again rise so high. Damn the DRA and their “recommendations.” Absolutely everything is “on the table.” Retention of homes comes before any and all Town notions in the taxpayers’ hierarchy of needs. Way before, it is not even close.


“All other priorities are rescinded.”


References:

McEvoy, Eleanor. (2014, November 8). Trapped Inside. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiK-I-cRqfg

Wikipedia. (2020. April 18). Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow%27s_hierarchy_of_needs

 

 

Milton Businesses in 1917

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | April 19, 2020

Many of the merchants that had paid extra in the prior directory for bolded uppercase entries, or supplementary advertisements on the advertisement pages, scaled back their expenditure in this directory.

Many have multiple entries, due to having multiple product lines or lines of business listed in different categories.


MILTON BUSINESS DIRECTORY 1917

Twenty miles northwest of Dover. R.R. stations at Milton, Union and Hayes, on B.&M. R.R. northern division. Milton Mills four miles from Union, stage twice daily. It was originally a part of Rochester. Incorporated June 11, 1802. Farming and manufacturing are the principal employments. Area 25,000 acres. Population, 1,640; Bass & Co, 1,684.

Agricultural Implements.

MURRAY, D., Milton Mills – See p. 835.
PLUMMER, B.B., Plummer’s Ridge – See p. 833.

Apothecary.

EMERSON PHARMACY, 44 Main, Milton Mills – See p. 834.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main – See p. 832.

Architect & Designer.

(Water Power Plants).
JONES, I.W., 28 Main, opp. Leb. bridge – See p. 832.

Auto Parties – Road Lunch.

YE RAGGED ROBIN TEA SHOP, Plummer’s Ridge, 3 miles north of Milton depot – See p. 833.

Auto Repairers and Supplies.

McIntosh, R.A., 35 Main.
SUNSET GROCERY CO. (supplies), 43 Main – See p. 832.

Bakery (Agents.)

Maddox, J.H. & Son, M. Mills.
Pinkham, C.E., Main, near p.o.

Blacksmiths.

DUNTLEY, IRA W. ESTATE, 17 Main.
OAKES, E.P., n. bridge Leb. side, M. – See p. 832.
Rudd, Alfred A., 20 Main, Milton Mills.

Blanket Mfr.

TOWNSEND, JAMES E. ESTATE, 1-2 Main, M. Mills – See pages 735 and 12.

Boarding Houses.

Brock, J.B. Mrs., 45 Charles, n. Toppan.
Finegan, H.F. Mrs., (lodging), 7 So. Main.
Greek, 44 Charles n. Toppan and So. Main n. Spaulding’s Mills.
Hodgdon, E.A. Mrs., 22 South Main.
HURLBURT, C.N. MRS., 52 Main – See p. 834.
Kimball, R.M. Mrs., 6 Kimball.
PINFOLD, WM. MRS., 43 Main, M. Mills – See p. 835.
Regan, J.J. Mrs., So. Main at Spaulding’s.

Boats to Let.

Brown, Everett E., B.&M. depot.

Boot Blacks.

Collias, Christ, 26 Main.

Boot and Shoe Dealers.

Horne, J.E., 12 Main, M. Mills.
McINTOSH, R.A., 28 Main – See p. 832.
WILLEY, J.D., 31 Main – See p. 834.

Boot and Shoe Machinery and Repairer.

KNIGHT, W.C., 6 Toppan – See p. 833.

Boot and Shoe Makers and Repairers.

Leighton, A.O., 20 So. Main.
Libby, E.T., 17 Main, M. Mills.

Boot and Shoe Mfrs.

Timson Shoe Co., off 55 Main, M. Mills.

Building Material.

AVERY & ROBERTS, Main – See p. 832.

Butchers.

Horne, C.A., 32 Main.
Pike, R.S., Milton Mills.

Carpenters and Builders.

Boyd, Joseph, 20 Highland, M. Mills.
Flye, A.M., 20 Main, M. Mills.
HARRIMAN, EUGENE B., 95 No. Main – See p. 832.
HARRIMAN, F.L., 97 No. Main – See p. 832.
Hayes, Guy L., 7 Far. rd.
Rines, Mark, Union, cor. School, M. Mills.
Simes, E.S., 25 School, M. Mills.
Tanner, H.E., 30 Charles.
Webber, Royal K., So. Main.
Wentworth E.A., 103 No. Main, M. Mills.

Carriage Repairers.

OAKES, E.P., n. bridge, Leb. side, M. – See p. 832.

Churches and Clergymen.

Cong., 17 So. Main, Milton.
F. Bap., A.T. Everett, pastor, 31-33 So. Main, Milton.
F. Bap., Geo. B. Southwick, pastor, Milton Mills.
Methodist, L.E. Alexander, pastor, 8 Highland, M. Mills.
Union Nute Chapel, D.A. Gammon, pastor, Nute Ridge, Milton.

Cattle Breeders.

HAYES, L.C., (Holstein), So. Milton, near Hayes station – See p. 833.

Cider Mill.

Canney, Geo. D., Mid. rd., W.M., Leb. side, at bridge.

Cigars and Tobacco.

EMERSON’S PHARMACY, 44 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.
LORD, F.H., 39 Main – See p. 834.
MUCCI, N., 46 Main, Milton Mills – See p. 835.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main, Milton – See p. 832.

Civil and Hydraulic Engineer.

JONES, I.W., Main, opp. Leb. bridge – See p. 832.

Clothing.

Horne, J.E., 12 Main, M. Mills.
McINTOSH, R.A., 28 Main, Milton – See p. 832.

Coal and Wood.

TOWNSEND, J.E. ESTATE, Milton Mills.

Confectionary and Fruit.

EMERSON’S PHARMACY, 44 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.
KNIGHT, W.C. Mrs., 6 Toppan – See p. 833.
LORD, F.H., 39 Main – See p. 834.
MUCCI, N., 46 Main, Milton Mills – See p. 835.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main – See p. 832.

Conveyancer, Claim and Collection Agents.

MARSH, F.L., Milton Mills – See p. 834.

Crockery and Glassware.

Maddox, J.A., 7 Main, M. Mills.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., 19-21 Main – See p. 832.
WILLEY, J.D., 31 Main – See p. 834.

Deputy Sheriff.

REYNOLDS, WILLIS L., 28 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.

Designer of Water Power Plants.

JONES, I.W., Main, opp. Leb. bridge, Milton – See p. 832.

Dressmakers.

Bishop, W.P. Mrs., 5 School, Milton.
Bruce, C.P. Mrs., Lebanon.
Dixon, S.E. Mrs., 16 So. Main, Milton.
Finegan, H.E. Mrs., 7 So. Main.
Stevens, C.L. Mrs., Union rd., near School, Milton Mills.

Dry and Fancy Goods.

AVERY & ROBERTS, Main – See p. 832.
KNIGHTS, W.C.
, 6 Toppan – See p. 833.
MARSH, M.T. MRS., 40 Main, M. Mills.
McIntosh, Ada C. Mrs., 4 Charles, near So. Main.
WILLEY, J.D., 31 Main – See p. 834.

Engineer (Civil).

JONES, IRA W., Main, opp. Leb. bridge – See p. 832.

Express Company.

American Express Co., H.A. Beaton, agt., Milton depot.

Fish and Oyster Dealer.

Horne, C.A., 32 Main.
SUNSET GROCERY CO. (oysters and clams), 45 Main – See p. 833.
Wentworth, E.L., 14 Mill, n. Charles.

Flour and Grain.

BUCK, H.L., Springvale rd., M. Mills – See p. 835.
SUNSET GROCERY CO., L.O. Stetson, 45 Main – See p. 833.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F.
, Main – See p. 832.
WILLEY, J.D., 31 Main.

Garage.

McINTOSH, R.A., 28 Main, M. – See p. 832.

Gasoline, Oils, Etc.

KNIGHTS, W.C., 6 Toppan – See p. 833.
McINTOSH, R.A., 35 Main – See p. 832.
SUNSET GROCERY CO., 43 Main – See p. 833.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., 19 Main – See p. 832.

General Stores.

KNIGHTS, W.C., 6 Toppan – See p. 833.
Maddox, J.A. & Son, 7 Main, M. Mills.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., 19 Main – See p. 833.
WILLEY, J.D., 31 Main – See p. 834.

Gent’s Furnishings.

McINTOSH, R.A., 28 Main – See p. 832.

Grain and Feed.

BUCK, H.L., Springvale rd., M. Mills – See p. 835.
Laskey, A.J., Milton Mills and Union rd.
WILLEY, J.D., 33 Main – See p. 834.

Grocers.

KNIGHTS, W.C., 6 Toppan – See p. 833.
Maddox, J.A. & Son, M. Mills.
MUCCI, N. (fancy,) 46 Main, M.M. – See p. 835.
SUNSET GROCERY CO., L.O. Stetson, 45 Main – See p. 833.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., 19 Main – See p. 832.
WILLEY, J.D., 31 Main – See p. 834.

Hairdressers.

Burke, Chas. L., 23 Main at C. dam, Milton.
Page, Robert, 16 Main, M. Mills.

Hardware.

MURRAY, DANIEL, Milton Mills – See p. 835.
WILLEY, J.D., 31 Main, Milton – See p. 834.

Harness Makers and Repairers.

Leighton, A.O., 20 So. Main, M.
Locke, J.T., 96 No. Main, Milton Mills.

Hats, Caps, etc.

Horne, J.E., Milton Mills.
McINTOSH, R.A., 28 Main – See p. 832.

Horseshoers.

DUNTLEY, IRA W. Estate, 17 Main.
OAKES, E.P., n. bridge, Leb. side, M. – See p. 832.
Rudd, A.A., 20 Main, M.M.

Hotels.

Central House, Fred Rowe, M. Mills.
LAKE VIEW HOUSE, Mrs. C.N. Hurlburt, prop., 52 Main – See p. 834.
MILTON HOTEL, G.F. Downs, Toppan – See p. 833.
Sampson The, Main near depot (closed).

Ice Cream and Soda.

EMERSON PHARMACY, 44 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.
LORD, F.H., 39 Main, Milton – See p. 834.
MUCCI, N., 46 Main, corner Church, M.M.- See p. 835.
WILLEY, J.H., Main, corner Silver – See p. 832.

Ice Dealers (Retail.)

Beede, D.W., Leb. side, Milton.

Ice Dealers (Wholesale.)

Boston Ice Co., North Main.
Downing Ice Co., North Main.
Lynn Ice Co., Leb. side, Milton.
Metropolitan Ice Co., Leb. side, Milton.
Porter Ice Co., No. Main.

Insurance Agents.

Evans, C.W. (life), 41 Silver.
Finegan, H.E., 7 So. Main.
MARSH, FORREST L., 30 Main, M.M. – See p. 834.

Job Wagons.

Columbus, A.N., 7 Kimball.
Laskey, A.J., M. Mills and Union rd.

Justices of the Peace.

AVERY, H.L., Main – See p. 832.
Goodwin, G.H., West Milton.
JONES, CHARLES A., South Milton, 1 mile out.
MARSH, F.L., Milton Mills – See p. 834.
PLUMMER, B.B., Plummer’s Ridge – See p. 833.
Walker, Joseph D.

Ladies’ Furnishings.

KNIGHTS, W.C., 6 Toppan – See p. 833.
Marsh, M.T. Mrs., 40 Main, M. Mills.
McIntosh, Ada C., 4 Charles, near South Main.

Laundry (Steam).

ELLIS, GEO. W., Plummer’s Ridge opp. Schoolhouse – See p. 834.

Laundry Agents.

Page, Robert, 23 Main, M.M.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main, corner Silver – See p. 832.

Lawyers.

MARSH, FORREST L., 30 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.

Leather Board Mfrs.

MILTON LEATHER BOARD CO. – See p. 833.
SPAULDING, J. & SONS CO. – See p. 17.

Libraries.

Milton Free Public Library, John U. Simes, librarian (1700 volumes,) M. Mills.
NUTE LIBRARY, Mrs. S.P. Haley, librarian, 15 Farmington rd., Milton – See p. 831.

Lumbermen.

AVERY & ROBERTS, Main – See p. 832.
Chamberlin, M.G., 1 mile south of Milton Mills.
Edgecomb, C.R. (dealer and sawyer), Milton Mills.
Plummer, G.L., 1 mile south of Union depot (p.o. Union).

Lunch Rooms.

YE RAGGED ROBIN TEA SHOP, Austin & Wallace, props., Plummer’s Ridge, 3 miles north Milton depot – See p. 833.

Manufacturing Companies.

MILTON LEATHER BOARD CO. (leather board), S.F. Dawson, Jr., mgr., Mill, at R.R. track, ⅛ mile So. of depot – See p. 833.
SPAULDING, J. & SONS CO., (leather board and counters) – See p. 17.
Timson Shoe Mfr. Co., off 55 Main, M. Mills.
TOWNSEND, JOHN E. Estate, (blankets,) Milton Mills – See pp. 835 and 12.

Marble and Granite Monuments.

SMALLEY, HOBBS & HUNTER, 5 Signal opp. Union depot, Rochester, N.H. – See p. 518.

Masons and Plasterers.

HARRIMAN, F.L., 97 North Main – See p.832.

Milkmen.

Doe, James F., Plummer’s Ridge, M.
Lord E.B., Leb. side, M.
Plummer, Moses P., Plummer’s Ridge, M.
Reynolds, E.E., A.S., M. Mills.
Stanley, Edwin S., Leb. side, M.
Tibbetts, C.H., Leb. side, M.

Millinery.

Horne, Olive A. Mrs., M.M.
McIntosh, A.C. Mrs., 4 Charles.

Music Teachers.

Anderson, H.E. Mrs., M. Mills.
Getchell, G.M. Miss (piano), 15 Charles.
Jones, F.P. Mrs. (piano), Plummer’s Ridge, Milton.
Jones, I.W. Mrs. (piano), Leb. side, Milton.
Keddie, Mary A. Mrs. (piano), 35 Church, Milton Mills.
Whitehouse, Edith M. (piano), Leb. side, M.

Newspapers and Periodicals.

Pinkham, James D., 15 Main, at the dam.

Notaries Public.

AVERY, H.L., 28 Main, Milton – See p. 832.
Finegan, H.F., 7 So. Main.
Fox, E.F., Milton Mills.
Looney, Walter E., 54 South Main, Milton.
MARSH, FORREST L., 30 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.
Wentworth, G.C.S., Main, M.

Oysters, Clams, etc.

Horne, C.A., 32 Main, opp. Leb. bridge.
SUNSET GROCERY CO., 45 Main – See p. 833.
Wentworth, E.L., 14 Mill, M.

Painters (Carriage, Automobile and Sign.)

SCHULMAIER, H.R. & SON, 15 Allen, Berwick, Me. – See Somersworth, p. 324.

Painters and Paper Hangers.

Ayers, R.E., 27 Church, M.M.
Connolly, T., 7 Highland, M. Mills.
Pinkham, Thomas H., 56 So. Main.
Whitehouse, H.F., rear 42 Main.

Paints and Oils.

EMERSON’S PHARMACY, 44 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., 19 Main, Milton – See p. 832.
WILLEY, J.D., 31 Main – See p. 834.

Physicians.

Anderson, Harry E., Springvale rd., M. Mills.
Buckley, J.J., 18 So. Main.
HART, M.A.H., 30 So. Main.
WEEKS, F.S., 102 No. Main, M. Mills – See p. 835.

Plumber.

MURRAY, D., 14 Main, M. Mills – See p. 835.

Pool Rooms.

Burke, Chas. L., 23 Main at C. Dam, M.
Page, R., 14 Main, M. Mills.

Poultry Crates.

Gem Mfg. Co., Milton Mills.

Poultry Raisers.

CORSON, GEO. N., 31 Silver – See p. 833.
LEWIS, JAMES, School, 2d west of Union, M. Mills – See p. 835.

Poultry Supplies.

BUCK, H.L., 31 Springvale rd., M. Mills – See p. 835.

Provisions, Meats, etc.

Horne, C.A., 32 Main, opp. Leb. bridge.
Pike, R.S. (pedler), Milton Mills.

Railroad.

Boston & Maine R.R., Hugh A. Beaton, agent.

Real Estate Agents.

MARSH, FORREST L., 37 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.

Sawmills.

AVERY & ROBERTS (portable) – See p. 832.
Edgecomb, C.R., 41 Leb. rd.
Plumer, G.L., near Union.

Schools.

Milton Grammar School, R.M. Looney, principal, 8 Church, Milton.
Milton Mills School, 15 School, M. Mills.
NUTE FREE HIGH SCHOOL, F.H. Manter, principal, 15 Far. rd., M. – See p. 831.

Stables.

Mills, W.F., 66 Main, M. Mills.

Stock Farms.

Chamberlin, M.G., M.M. and U. rd..
HAYES, L.C., So. Main, So. Milton (Holstein cattle) – See p. 833.
Nute, George E., N. Ridge.
PLUMMER, B.B., Plummer’s Ridge – See p. 833.

Stoves and Tinware.

MURRAY, D., 14 Main, M. Mills – See p. 835.

Surveyors for Dams, Paper and Elec. Power Plants.

JONES, I.W., 28 Main, Milton – See p. 832.

Teamsters and Truckmen.

Columbus, O.W. , 26 Charles.
Corson, John M., 23 Silver.
HURLBURT, CHARLES N., 52 Main – See p. 834.
Laskey, A.J., M.M. rd. junc. Union rd.
LASKEY, C.H. MRS., Lebanon, M. Mills.

Telephone Company.

N.E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 30 Main opp. Leb. bridge.

Toilet Articles.

EMERSON’S PHARMACY, 44 Main, M.M. – See p. 834.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main, Milton – See p. 832.

Undertakers.

FOX, CHARLES D. Estate, 10 School, Milton Mills – See p. 835.

Upholsterer and Carpet Work.

Jenness, C.G., 41 So. Main. M.

Wagon and Cart Builders.

OAKES, E.P., n. bridge, Leb. side, M. See p. 832.

Wheelwrights.

DUNTLEY, IRA B. Estate, Main.
OAKES, E.B., n. bridge, Leb. side, M. – See p. 832.
Rudd, A.T. (iron work,) 20 Main, M.M.

Wood Dealers.

AVERY & ROBERTS, Main, M. – See p. 832.
Hayes, L.C., So. Milton.
HURLBURT, CHAS N., 52 Main.
Jones, C.A., So. Main.
Jones, F.P., Plummer’s Ridge.

Wood Sawyers.

Beede, D.W., Leb. side, M.
Columbus, A.N., 7 Kimball.
Ford, L.J., Silver, 2 m. out.
HURLBURT, CHAS. N., 52 Main.

Woolen Goods Mfr.

TOWNSEND, JOHN E. Estate (blankets) – See pp. 835 and 12.


MILTON SOCIETIES.

Milton Woman’s Club, Mrs. Edith A. Dawson, Sec.; Eli Wentworth Post, G.A.R., James W. Johnson, Adjt.; Woman’s Relief Corps, Mrs. J.B. Hart, Sec.; Strafford Lodge, A.O.U.W., John W. Avery, Rec.; Lewis W. Nute Grange, P. of H., Mrs. Alta D. Chipman, Sec.; Friendship Lodge, K. of P., Samuel W. Blaisdell, K. of R. and S.; Madokawando Tribe, I.O.R.M., William T. Wallace, C. of R.; Minnewawa Council, D. of P., Mrs. S.E. Drew, K. of R.

Milton Mills Societies – Miltonia Lodge, I.O. of O.F., Forest L. Marsh, R.S.; Rising Sun Lodge, D. of R., Mrs. J.C. Townsend, Sec.; Morning Star Lodge, K. of P., Charles L. Stevens, K. of R. and S.; Pleasant Valley Grange, P. of H., Mrs. D. Philbrick, Sec.


WEST MILTON. The Sunset Grocery Co. of Milton, which has covered the local delivery route the last eight years, has discontinued this branch of its service. A feature which will be missed almost as much as the good service which the route has furnished its patrons will be the semi-weekly calls of the popular driver, Dana Tuttle, who recently resigned his position to enter the employ of the Spaulding & Sons Mfg. Co. at North Rochester. Mr. Tuttle has been in the employ of the Sunset since immediately after his graduation from Nute high school some nine years ago and during his connection with the store has made many friends who wish him the best of future success (Farmington News, February 16, 1917).

Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1912; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1921


References:

Bass & Co. (1917). Dover, Somersworth, Rochester, and Strafford County Directory, 1917. Dover, NH: 466 Central Avenue.

 

 

Public BOS Session Scheduled (April 20, 2020)

By Muriel Bristol | April 18, 2020

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a quasi-Public BOS meeting to be held Monday, April 20 at 5:00 PM.

Due to their concerns regarding Covid-19, there will be no public in attendance and, therefore, no public comment. The session may be watched remotely through the usual YouTube means or by teleconference. The links for both are in their original agenda, for which there is a link in the References below.


The Public portion of the agenda has New Business, Old Business, Other Business, and some housekeeping items.

Under New Business are scheduled three agenda items: 1) Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Activities; 2) Department of Public Works a) Update of Transfer Station Operations b) Schoolhouse on Plummer’s Ridge – Roof Bids and Possible Action; and 3) Qualifications for the Local Government Efficiency Task Force.

Update Regarding Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Activities. One supposes, by the very terms of the meeting announcement, that the Covid-19 is still among us. We will evidently hear an update on those things with which the BOS has been active.

People are becoming restive. For example, there will be an End the Lockdown rally at the Statehouse in Concord, NH, at noon on Saturday, April 18. Yes, [correction: two days] before the quasi-Public BOS meeting.

Update of Transfer Station Operations. Those who went to the Transfer Station a week ago will have found that they were unable to drop off their paper and cardboard. (Many simply burned at home that which was refused).

One assumes that we will hear that paper and cardboard will be accepted again in some manner.

Schoolhouse on Plummer’s Ridge – Roof Bids and Possible Action. Sounds like a job for the newly-established Heritage Commission.

Qualifications for the Local Government Efficiency Task Force. One might suppose that it will be also an Independent Local Government Efficiency Task Force, i.e., one appointed by the BOS from a broad cross-section of current and former Town officials.

Oxymoron. Noun. plural oxymorons or, less commonly, oxymora: a combination of contradictory or incongruous words (such as cruel kindness [or government efficiency]); broadly, something (such as a concept) that is made up of contradictory or incongruous elements.


Old Business has a single item: 1). Consideration of Selectmen By-Laws.

Consideration of Selectmen By-Laws. Put off from before.


Other Business That May Come Before the Board has no scheduled items.

There will be the approval of prior minutes (from the quasi-Public session of April 6, 2020), the expenditure report, Town Administrator comments, and BOS comments.


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

Town of Milton. (2020, April 17). BOS Meeting Agenda, April 20, 2020. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/miltonnh/files/agendas/04-20-2020_bosagenda_posted_0.pdf

Wikipedia. (2019, November 19). Washington Monument Syndrome. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Monument_Syndrome

How They Made the Sausages

By S.D. Plissken | April 14, 2020

Commenters have occasionally questioned exactly why Milton’s Board of Selectmen have held so very many closed-door 91A sessions. A number of them, including even several legislators, have suggested that there is something amiss there.

Chairwoman Hutchings’ disquisition of Monday, April 6, 2020, as well as the other selectmen’s remarks that followed, revealed finally why at least some of those secret sessions were “necessary.”

The BOS has been using money from unfilled positions, which positions were authorized at the ballot – at certain amounts – to hand out raises and benefit increases, whose increased budget amounts were not authorized at the ballot. They “mine” the unauthorized amounts from the unfilled positions.

To cite the example given by Selectman Rawson, they have five positions at some rate of pay. Some one of the five leaves to follow another opportunity, perhaps a better-paying one. The selectmen are then able to “mine” that unfilled position’s authorized salary and benefit amounts to hand out unauthorized increases – in this example, increases of up to 20% – to the remaining four positions.

They won’t likely ever get “caught.” It will all be papered over when the voters approve the next budget, which will include the temporarily-unauthorized increased amounts. They can even fill the fifth position at that time and begin their “process” all over again.

Selectman Rawson: Well, when we initially gave the raises … I don’t know if these … I don’t know if Erin [Hutchings] and Matt [Morrill] were even … I know Matt wasn’t, but Erin … You might have been on the Board when we gave the DPW all those raises . were you here or not?

Chairwoman Hutchings: Uh-hum.

Rawson: Well, just out of transparency, the Public Works [DPW] gave some concessions, and that was one man. So, it’s not like … I just want to make it clear that it’s not like we were just giving out these huge raises – well, not huge, but raises at least – to keep people, good people here in Milton. You know, they gave a concession, and that was to lose a body, and, you know, when you don’t have a lot of bodies and you lose a body, you know, it’s just people have to work a little harder and, if I was an employee down there and I was going to get a raise, and I had to work a little harder, I would be on board. So, that is what happened with that. I just want to make that clear, because there was some concessions already from DPW. So, like on some of the large-ticket items … so, what are some of the large-ticket items that were being proposed this year? Do you know what some of those ticket items were, or were going to be?

Creveling: Most of ones that I am aware of were the phone systems in Town hall, but those were covered by the [State-provided] Unanticipated Revenue.

The “good people” with whom they should be concerned primarily are the taxpaying voters. What happens if those hard-pressed taxpaying voters – they are a nuisance, aren’t they? – do not approve your increased proposed budget, with its poison pill of already-granted raises? Well, the BOS can just continue to mine the vacant position for another year and catch up later. (Not to pick on the DPW. There is no reason whatsoever to think that this peculiar workaround is limited to the DPW budget and TO&E).

But what happens if the voters chose the default budget two times running? Let us imagine some alternate universe in which the voters become unhappy with the rate at which their taxes have increased. Well, now the BOS would have a problem – one that they might actually care about – as opposed to the apparently negligible problem of increasing taxes yet again. They discover suddenly that they have been skating on rather thin ice.

The Town can evidently function without these positions, except as yet another slush fund to be tapped. The ostensible reason for all of this sleight-of-hand was a bidding war in a competitive job market. Well, the bottom just dropped out of that. Pessimists are saying it will be a long time coming back, if ever it fully does.

Might it be that these unfilled positions, vacant for several years now and apparently preserved only to pay raises that lack proper budget authorization, should be removed finally from the Town table of organization?

Just in the interests of transparency, you know.

References:

Town of Milton. (2020, April 16). BOS Meeting, April 6, 2020. Retrieved from youtu.be/AseNUlSoUK8?t=2351

Thoughts of Chairwoman Hutchings

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | April 12, 2020

Item #4 on the agenda for the Board of Selectmen (BOS) meeting of Monday, April 6, 2020, was a Default Budget Discussion. Chairwoman Hutchings led off the discussion by reading a statement compiled by she and Town Administrator Ernest Creveling.

Chairwoman Hutchings: Okay, I’ve been kind of talking to [Town Administrator] Ernie a little bit, and we’ve been throwing some ideas back and forth, and that on the default budget, with the coronavirus and that, so, since I’ve gotten so great at reading this evening, do you all mind if I go ahead and just read?.

Vice-Chairman Rawson: No.

Selectman Morrill: Have at it.

Hutchings: You might get to have some input.

Hutchings [reading from a prepared text]: The voters have stated very clearly that they want to see budget cuts. Department heads and members of the previous Board of Selectmen were stating the same thing as early as last September when we really got started in developing the budget. The mantra for many became “We need to come in with a budget that is no more than the default budget in order for it to pass.” 

To clarify, last year’s voter-adopted budget was the default budget, as developed in the 2018 budget season for the 2019 warrant. This year’s voter-adopted budget was the default budget as developed in the 2019 budget season for the 2020 warrant. That scenario has played itself out six times since 2009. Once the selectmen submitted their proposed budget to the Budget Committee in 2019, the Budget Committee met several times and made the budget its own by carving the numbers down by $45,514 to a point $1,376 less than last year’s adopted [default] budget. Hoping that their efforts would put Milton on the path to adopted operating budget as proposed, instead of a rejection, which would again placed us under a default budget.

Complicating the matter further, there have been errors made in calculating the default budget in 2018, making it over $30,000 higher than it should have been. So, even though the Budget Committee did offer a budget on the 2020 warrant that was less than 2019’s adopted budget, the competing default budget on the ballot this past March was substantially lower. In fact, $34,679 lower to be exact, and the voters chose the lower number, once again sending their message loudly and clearly.

Not only did the voters reject the proposed operating budget, in favor of the default budget, but they also rejected every appropriation warrant article on the ballot this year, except for two capital reserve fund articles related to technology. I think that was the GIS and then the Technology Fund itself. Together totaling only $5,000, and another article in the amount of $10,000 to fight the invasive plant species in Milton Three Ponds. [See Town Election Results for March 10, 2020].

Finally, the voters accentuated their message with a sledge hammer, with the approval of a tax cap that was placed on the warrant by petition. It seems that despite the fact that the voters have over and over, as many times as not, rejected proposed budgets in favor of default budgets, both the Budget Committee and the selectmen have misinterpreted the message the voters have been trying to send.

That message, I believe, is this: voters want a substantial cut in the amount of money it costs to live in Milton, specifically, in terms of what they have to pay in property taxes. This Board has responsibility to heed that message. Milton voters, as a legislative body of the town of Milton, established budgetary limitations within which we must operate. For every year they are given only two options, the proposed and default budgets. Everyone who said that the goal should be to bring our budget proposals to the voters at or below the default budget were correct, but only partially correct.

What we really need to do is to understand voters’ collective price point and then develop a budget that brings the most responsible and safe level of services possible to them. Our job now is to determine that price point by communicating with our residents, educating them about regulatory mandates with which we have no choice but to comply, and then translating what we all learn together into responsible policies by the Board of Selectmen.

We know there are variables which cannot always be predicted accurately: hard winters with an abundance of snow, prolonged rain events resulting in flooding, wind, non-weather-related public safety issues with police and fire, and others that may not be even on our radar when a budget is developed, like this pandemic for example. In order to safeguard us from budget over expenditures this year, the selectmen need to make some early decisions.

Hutchings: And I listed some of the things I believe we need to consider. Do you want to take a minute to look at them?

Rawson: I mean, I wish we would have gotten this prior to the meeting.

Hutchings: It was a lot of work. And this is just a discussion, that is all it is, just talking about …

Chairwoman Hutchings continued with her “list of things”:

One. Large-ticket purchases. An operating budget spending freeze on non-Covid19-related large-ticket items should be enacted right away until we can get a handle on where things are going as a result of both the default budget and the pandemic. This does not include items for which money has been encumbered from last year’s budget, items encumbered from the unanticipated revenue that the town received at the end of the year last year, the what, $74,000?, or scheduled or needed purchases from existing capital reserve funds.

Two. Staff shortages. As of April 17, Public Works will be down four employees. We are presently down one part-time position in the Recreation Department – the assistant rec. director – two officers in the Police Department, one is militarily deployed, so that is a reserved vacancy that cannot be filled. Keeping positions filled in the Police Department has been difficult, as it always is when small municipalities are forced to compete with larger and/or wealthier communities for law-enforcement professionals.

The same issues are at play with the Fire Department for that reason, and also because smaller communities have had less success in recent years recruiting and maintaining responsive volunteer call rosters than was possible in the past. That is no reflection on the incredible men and women who do work on a volunteer or on-call basis. It’s more of a reflection of what people’s work and family situations are, and the fact that many of those volunteer first-responders have full-time jobs in other communities, along with the increased time commitment that is required to meet more stringent training and certification requirements which have grown over the years.

We have had similar issues in the Department of Public Works, which at the beginning of 2019 compelled the Board of Selectmen to approve a change in wages because a number of talented and experienced people left their jobs for better pay with other employers. Several other adjustments in wages were made at the end of 2019 in other departments to try and maintain equity in the wage structure, which is always a complicated endeavor in any organization. None of these increases could be carried forward into the default budget.

The economy, up until at least a few weeks ago when the coronavirus pandemic hit us with unexpected fury, was firing on all cylinders, creating a shortage of qualified workers and insurmountable competition from larger communities with more resources. That has changed rapidly, with 6.6 million people in the United States filing for unemployment just last week, with rapidly growing numbers here in the State of New Hampshire as well. According to Richard Lavers, the deputy commissioner of New Hampshire Unemployment Security who stated in response to a question posed to him by news anchor Tom Griffith that under normal circumstances in the week before the coronavirus crisis, they saw 500 new applications for unemployment; the first week of the crisis they received 28,000 new claims, and in the second another 29,000 new claims.

We don’t know for certain what that will mean for Milton, but we will begin to understand better over the next few weeks. What we do know is that we need to be prudent in our spending now and that this will also require the same approach in developing a budget for 2021. Some of the positions mentioned above will remain vacant to ensure that there is money available for any short-term needs that arise due to the pandemic. Also, we do not want to fill positions that may be eliminated as we work through the redevelopment of the budget for 2021. Responding to the message our friends and neighbors keep sending us, over and over again, year after year.

[Three.] Transfer to cover the raises. This is the one that hurts, the numbers don’t lie. There will be budgetary transfers required from areas of the operating budget this year to cover wage increases that were given by the Board of Selectmen last year and in 2018. These adjustments total roughly $95,566. This has required us also to leave some of the above described positions vacant, [and] to lay off one part-time position from Administration.

I have met with the Town Administrator and through information we have compiled the following are reservations of money that we think should be considered earmarked for the time being to offset the Covid-related expenses until we can reassess where we stand as this crisis continues into the year. And there’s a list of suggestions.

Obviously, I’ll say it up front, police and fire department, it’s kind of hard to touch them, as first-responders they’re out there on the front lines, especially right now dealing with the Covid. We don’t know from one day to the next if somebody’s going to have to be quarantined or, you know, what’s going to happen there. They’re in a … there are no adjustments that I think that we can make to that. Highway and government buildings, as I said, they’re down, or going to be down April 17, four employees. Do you want me to read the rest, or are you …?

Creveling: Do you want me to just explain that?

Hutchings: Yeah, how about … can we?

Creveling: Under the highway and government buildings, I’ve worked with [DPW Director] Pat to take a look at, you know, what is going on. Now, just to go back to the transfers to cover the raises, I think, you know, a couple of years ago, it sort of started, people were under the impression that when some of these raises were given they would be carried forward in the default budget, but that just isn’t the case. But you were losing people, you still had to make the decision to give raises to keep people from leaving and, so, what that ends up casting into when you do that kind of thing is that $95,000, because any of the raises that were given at the end of 2018 and into 2019, none of them were able to carry forward in the default budget and that’s what you got in both of those years.

So, moving forward into the … what we looked at was a 5% reservation from the administration budget itself, which totals a little over $14,000, and then there was the remaining salary line in Welfare, which was another $14,400, for a total of about $28,000 [$28,400], just to sort of earmark for any of these unexpected expenses. Again, Police and Fire, just don’t touch them at this point, they’re out there doing the dangerous work in this environment, and it’s hard enough to keep folks anyway in those areas, so kudos to them and thank you for the work you’re doing.

Highway and government buildings, I mean, these folks, they work hard as well, but they will be down four employees. As of April 17, we just got a notice here from someone we will be very sorry to lose. But the budget for both highway and building and grounds together is about $845,000.

The default budget contained the amount for two unfilled positions that, again, were at the old rate of pay, $16 per hour essentially, So, figuring out the amount of leaving two of those positions unfilled, one in highway and one in buildings and grounds, it ends up keeping about $71,600. So, as a result of that, looking at a 10% of the combined budgets set aside of about $84,555.

And then in the health insurance, you’ve got one, two, three, four, five, six vacancies now that you’ve just counted in that bunch, so I think you can go into the health insurance and set aside the cost of two family plans, which is an additional $668088.

So, by the time you add up those reservations, if you call them – if you look at the – must finish the handout, which we will put up on the website when the meeting is over – the total reservation is $180,285 less than the $95,566 that needs to be redistributed for the previously town-approved …, or the raises given beyond the previously town-approved wage plans, that leaves a balance of about $84,700 to be reserved for Covid-related expenditures until re-evaluated.

And then, again, you know, it’s one of those things, I think I had put together an article to put out there in a blog that we’re working on, you know, to keep people informed but then the Covid crisis hit and it just kind of threw everything over to the side. So, there are some proposals that we can … I’ll be happy to talk about them later on, if you want to discuss this yourselves.

The other selectmen did favor us with their thoughts (which have not been transcribed here (perhaps separately)).


Ed. note: One of our correspondents has pointed out that, by the terms of Article 28A of the New Hampshire constitution, Milton is not required to comply with any unfunded State programs or regulatory mandates:

[Art.] 28-a. [Mandated Programs.] The state shall not mandate or assign any new, expanded or modified programs or responsibilities to any political subdivision in such a way as to necessitate additional local expenditures by the political subdivision unless such programs or responsibilities are fully funded by the state or unless such programs or responsibilities are approved for funding by a vote of the local legislative body of the political subdivision. November 28, 1984.

Unless, of course, the “local legislative body” is misguided enough to vote to adopt and pay for such measures through increased local taxation and without the required State funding.

State legislators and regulators spend much of their time devising ever more costs for us. They seem to feel that they are always just one law, regulation or tax away from achieving some sort of perfection. Obviously, they are wrong, and they’ll be back next year with the next step. Live your life and just say “No.”

References:

State of New Hampshire. (2019). State Constitution. Retrieved from www.nh.gov/glance/constitution.htm

Town of Milton. (2020, April 6). BOS Meeting, April 6, 2020. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=AseNUlSoUK8&t=1327

Milton Businesses in 1912

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | April 12, 2020

Many of the merchants that had paid extra in the prior directory for bolded uppercase entries, or supplementary advertisements on the advertisement pages, scaled back their expenditure in this directory.

Many have multiple entries, due to having multiple product lines or lines of business listed in different categories.


MILTON BUSINESS DIRECTORY 1912

Twenty miles northwest of Dover. R.R. stations at Milton, Union and Hayes, on B.&M. R.R. northern division. Milton Mills four miles from Union, stage twice daily. It was originally a part of Rochester. Incorporated June 11, 1802. Farming and manufacturing are the principal employments. Area 25,000 acres. Population, 1,640; Bass & Co, 1,684.

Selectmen – Samuel E. Drew, Bard B. Plummer, Chas. S. Philbrick. Town Clerk – Harry L. Avery. Treasurer – Everett F. Fox. School Board – M.A.H. Hart, Fred P. Jones, Joseph Boyd. Treasurer School Board – E.F. Fox. Board of Health – Dr. M.A.H. Hart, C.D. Fox, Harry D. Coles. Postmasters – Joseph H. Avery, Milton; E.T. Libby, Milton Mills. Deputy Sheriff, Fred S. Hartford, Milton.

Agricultural Implements.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton Mills – See page 835.
MURRAY, D., Milton Mills – See page 835.
PLUMMER, B.B., Plummer’s Ridge – See page 833.

Apothecary.

EMERSON PHARMACY, 44 Main, Milton Mills – See p. 834.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main – See page 832.

Architect & Designer.

(Water Power Plants).
JONES, I.W., Main, Opp. Leb. bridge – See page 832.

Bakery (Agents.)

Maddox, J.H. & Sons, M. Mills.
Pinkham, C.E., Main, near p.o.

Blacksmiths.

DUNTLEY, IRA W. – See p. 833.
Moody, H.B., 71 Main, M. Mills.
Rudd, Alfred A., 20 Main, Milton Mills.
Sherburne, L.M., Leb. side, M.

Blanket Mfr.

TOWNSEND, JAMES E., 1-2 Main, M. Mills – See p. 735 and 12.

Boarding Houses.

Finegan, H.F. Mrs., (lodging) 7 So. Main.
Hodgdon, L.J. Mrs., 25 South Main
Kimball, R.M. Mrs., 6 Kimball.
Pike, F.D. Mrs., 48 Main.
Regan, J.J. Mrs., So. Main at R.R. bridge.
Tasker, E.A. Mrs., So. Main, cor. Charles.

Boats to Let.

Brown, Everett E., B.&M. depot.

Boot and Shoe Dealers.

FOX, ASA & SON, M. Mills. – See page 835.
HURD, F.J., 35 Main, M. Mills – See page 834.
McIntosh, R.J., Main.
Willey, J.D., Main.

Boot and Shoe Machinery and Repairer.

Plummer, H., 28 Silver.

Boot and Shoe Makers and Repairers.

HURD, F.J., 35 Main, M. Mills – See page 834.
Leighton, A.O., 20 So. Main.

Boot and Shoe Mfrs.

ANDREWS-WASGATT CO., Acton side – Milton Mills – See page 834.
Milton Shoe Co., Leb. side at C. dam.

Building Material.

AVERY & ROBERTS, Main – See page 832.

Butchers.

DOWNS, GEO. F., Silver – See page 832.
Horne, C.A., Main.
Pike, R.S., Milton Mills.

Carpenters and Builders.

Flye, A.M., Highland, M.M.
Harriman, F.L., 97 No. Main.
Hayes, Guy L., 7 Far. rd.
Simes, E.S., Milton Mills.
Simes, Geo. E., Milton Mills.
Webber, Royal K., So. Main.
Wright, A.W., Leb. rd., A.S., M.M.

Carriage Repairers.

DUNTLEY, IRA M., Main, M. – See page 833.

Churches and Clergymen.

Cong., Clarence Pike, pastor, 17 So. Main, Milton.
F. Bap., John T. Clow, pastor, 4 Church, Milton.
F. Bap., Jas. W. Williams, pastor, Milton Mills.
Methodist, F.H. Sleep, pastor, S. Highland, M. Mills.
Union Nute Chapel, Edward P. Eastman, pastor, Nute Ridge, Milton.

Cider Mill.

WHITEHOUSE, D.A., Leb. side, at bridge – See p. 833.

Cigars and Tobacco.

EMERSON’S PHARMACY, 44 Main, M. Mills – See page 834.
Libby, E.T., 17 Main, Milton Mills.
MUCCI, N., 46 Main, Milton Mills – See page 834.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main, Milton – See page 832.

Civil and Hydraulic Engineer.

JONES, I.W., Main, opp. Leb. bridge – See page 832.

Clothing.

Horne, J.E., Milton Mills.
McIntosh, R.A., Main, Milton.

Clothing Cleaned, Pressed and Repaired.

MATTHEWS, O.S., 5 Main, Central Sq., M. Mills – See page 835.

Coal and Wood.

Plummer, Hazen, 28 Silver, Milton.
Townsend, J.E., Milton Mills.

Coffins and Caskets.

FOX, ASA A., 10 School, Milton – See page 835.

Confectionary and Fruit.

EMERSON’S PHARMACY, 44 Main, M. Mills – See page 834.
Knight, W.C. Mrs., 6 Toppan.
Libby, E.T., 17 Main, Milton Mills.
Larochelle, A.A., Main
MUCCI, N., 46 Main, Milton Mills – See page 834.
WILLEY, J.H., 2 Main – See page 832.

Conveyancer, Claim and Collection Agents.

FOX, E.W., Milton Mills – See page 835.
MARSH, F.L., Milton Mills – See page 834.

Crockery and Glassware.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 835.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., Main – See page 832.

Deputy Sheriff.

Hartford, Fred S., Main off. Silver, Milton.

Designer of Water Power Plants.

JONES, I.W., Main, opp. Leb. bridge, Milton – See p. 832.

Dressed Beef.

DOWNS, GEO. F. (wholesale,) Silver, M. – See page 832.

Dressmakers.

Bishop, W.P. Mrs., 5 School, Milton.
Dixon, S.E. Mrs., 7 Toppan, Milton.
Hayes, J.H. Mrs., So. Main, M.
Stevens, C.L. Mrs., Union rd., near School, Milton Mills.

Dry and Fancy Goods.

AVERY & ROBERTS, Main – See page 832.
FOX, ASA & SON
, M. Mills – See page 835.
Hart, Lena M., Main, n. p.o.
MARSH, M.T. MRS., 40 Main, M. Mills.
McIntosh, Ada C. Mrs., 4 Charles, near So. Main.

Embalmer.

FOX, ASA A., 10 School, M. Mills – See page 835.
FOX, CHARLES D., 10 School, Milton Mills – See page 835.

Engineer (Civil).

JONES, IRA W., Main, opp. Leb. bridge – See p. 832.

Express Company.

American Express Co., H.A. Beaton, agent, Milton.

Fish and Oyster Dealer.

Wentworth, E.L., 14 Mill, n. Charles.

Flour and Grain.

FOX, ASA & SON, M. Mills – See page 835.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F.
, Main – See page 832.
Willey, J.D., Main.

Furniture.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 835.

General Stores.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 835.
Willey, J.D., Main.

Gent’s Furnishings.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 835.
McIntosh, R.A., 25 Main.

Grain and Feed.

Horne & Marsh, 41 Main, M. Mills.
Laskey, A.J., Milton Mills and Union rd.
Whitehouse, D.A., Main, Milton.

Grocers.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 835.
Pinkham, C.E., Main, n. p.o.
Maddox, J.A. & Son, M. Mills.
MUCCI, N. (fancy,) 46 Main, M.M. – See page 834.
Pinkham, C.E., Main, n. p.o.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., Main – See page 832.
Willey, J.D., Main.

Hairdressers.

BURKE, CHAS. L., Main at C. dam, Milton – See page 832.
Hartford, Fred S., Main, Milton.
MATTHEWS, O.S., 5 Main, M.M. – See page 835.
Page, Robert, Milton Mills.

Hardware.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 835.
MURRAY, DANIEL, Milton Mills – See page 835.
Willey, J.D., Main, Milton.

Harness Makers and Repairers.

Leighton, A.O., 20 So. Main.
Locke, J.T., 96 No. Main, Milton Mills.

Hats, Caps, etc.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 835.
Horne, J.E., Milton Mills.
McIntosh, R.A., Main

Hay Dealers.

Whitehouse, D.A., Main, Milton.

Horseshoers.

DUNTLEY, IRA W., Main – See page 833.
Moody, H.B., 71 Main, M. Mills.
Rudd, A.A., 20 Main, M.M..

Hotels.

CENTRAL HOUSE, Fred Rowe, M. Mills – See page 834.
Milton Hotel, C.A. Jaffrey, prop., Toppan.
SAMPSON THE, J.F. Quinlan, prop., Main near depot – See page 833.

Ice Cream and Soda.

Larochelle, A.A., Main.
Libby, E.T., Milton Mills.
MUCCI, N., 46 Main, corner Church, M.M.- See page 834.
WILLEY, J.H., Main, corner Silver – See page 832.

Ice Dealers (Retail.)

Beede, D.W., Leb. side, Milton.

Ice Dealers (Wholesale.)

Boston Ice Co., North Main.
Downing Ice Co., North Main.
Lynn Ice Co., Leb. side, Milton.
Marblehead Ice Co., No. Main.
Union Ice Co., Leb. side, M.

Insurance Agents.

Finegan, H.E., 7 So. Main.
Gage, J.M., Main, opp. drug store, Milton.
MARSH, FORREST L., 30 Main, M.M. – See page 834.

Jewelry and Watches.

Libby, E.T., Main, M. Mills.

Justices of the Peace.

AVERY, H.L., Main – See page 832.
Finegan, H.E., 7 So. Main.
FOX, E.F., Milton Mills – See page 835.
FOX, E.W., Milton Mills – See page 835.
Goodwin, G.H., West Milton.
Jones, Charles A., South Milton, 1 mile out.
MARSH, F.L., Milton Mills – See page 834.
PLUMMER, B.B., Plummer’s Ridge – See page 833.

Ladies’ Furnishings.

Hart, Lena M., Main, near p.o.
Marsh, M.T. Mrs., 40 Main, M. Mills.
McIntosh, Ada C., 4 Charles, near South Main.

Laundry Agents.

Hartford, Fred S., Main, Milton.
Libby, E.T., Milton Mills.
Page, Robert, 23 Main, M.M.
WILLEY, J.H., Main, corner Silver – See page 832.

Lawyers.

MARSH, FORREST L., 30 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.

Leather Board Mfrs.

MILTON LEATHER BOARD CO. – See page 833.
SPAULDING, J. & SONS CO. – See page 17.

Libraries.

Milton Free Public Library, John U. Simes, librarian (1700 volumes,) M. Mills.
NUTE LIBRARY, Mrs. S.P. Haley, librarian, Milton – See page 837.

Lumbermen.

AVERY & ROBERTS, Main – See page 832.
Edgecomb, C.R. (dealer and sawyer,) Milton Mills.
Plummer, G.L. (p.o. Union).

Lunch Rooms.

Larochelle, A.A., Main opp. Leb. bridge.

Machinist.

Plummer, Hazen, 28 Silver.

Manufacturing Companies.

ANDREWS-WASGATT CO. (boots and shoes), Milton Mills – See page 834.
SPAULDING, J. & SONS CO., (leather board and counters) – See page 17.
TOWNSEND, JOHN E., (blankets,) Milton Mills – See pages 835 and 12.

Marble and Granite Monuments.

JOHNSON, M.L., Union, N.H. – See pages 11=833.

Masons and Plasterers.

Goodwin, C.B.., West Lebanon, Me.

Milkmen.

Burke, C.F., Springvale rd., Acton side, Milton Mills.
Drew, Samuel E., 80 Main.
Reynolds, E.E., A.S., M. Mills.
Tibbetts, C.H., W.M. and Far. rd.

Millinery.

Foss, Gertrude M., 24 So. Main, Milton.
Horne, Olive A. Mrs., M.M.
Patterson, Cora B. Miss, Church cor. Remick.

Music Teachers.

Clow, A.A. Miss (piano,) 33 So. Main, Milton.
Getchell, G.M. Miss (piano,) 15 Charles.
Jones, F.P. Mrs. (piano,) Plummer’s Ridge, Milton.
Jones, I.W. Mrs. (piano,) Leb. side, Milton.
Keddie, Mary A. Mrs. (piano,) 35 Church, Milton Mills.

Newspapers and Periodicals.

Libby, E.T., at p.o., Milton Mills.
Pinkham, James D., Main, at the dam.

Notaries Public.

AVERY, H.L., Main, Milton – See page 832.
Finegan, H.E., 7 So. Main.
FOX, E.F.
, Milton Mills – See page 835.
FOX, E.W., Milton Mills – See page 835.
Looney, Walter E., 54 South Main, Milton.
MARSH, FORREST L., 30 Main, M. Mills – See p. 834.
Wentworth, G.C.S., Main, M.

Oysters, Clams, etc.

Horne, C.A., Main, n. p.o.
Howard, Fred, Main.
Wentworth, E.L., 14 Mill, M.

Painters (Carriage, Automobile and Sign.)

SCHULMAIER, H.R. & SON, 15 Allen, Berwick, Me. – See Somersworth, page 324.

Painters and Paper Hangers.

Ayers, H.E., 13 Church.
Connolly, T., 7 Highland, M. Mills.
GILMORE, C.A., 14 So. Main – See page 833.
PARTRIDGE, G.W., 25 Main, M.M. – See page 835.
Pinkham, Thomas H., Main, M.
Smith, J.L., 29 South Main.

Paints and Oils.

FOX, ASA & SON, Milton M. – See page 835.
WHITEHOUSE, H.F., Main, Milton – See page 832.
Willey, J.D., Main.

Physicians.

ANDERSON, HARRY E., Main cor. Church, M. Mills – See page 834.
Buckley, J.J., 16 South Main.
GROSS, C.W., Central House, Milton Mills – See page 835.
HART, M.A.H., 30 South Main.
Weeks, F.S., 102 No. Main, M. Mills.

Plumber.

MURRAY, D., Milton Mills – See page 835.

Pool Rooms.

BURKE, CHAS. L., Main at C. Dam, M. – See page 832.
Hartford, F.S., Main, Milton.
Page, R., 14 Main, M. Mills.

Provisions, Meats, etc.

DOWNS, GEO. F., (butcher,) Silver, 2 miles out – See page 832.
Horne, C.A., Main, at p.o.
Howard, Fred, Main.
Pike, R.S., (pedler,) Milton Mills.

Railroad.

BOSTON & MAINE R.R., Hugh A. Beaton, agent.

Sawmills.

AVERY & ROBERTS – See page 832.
Edgecomb, C.R., 41 Leb. rd.
Plumer, G.L., near Union.

Schools.

Milton Grammar School, R.M. Looney, principal, 8 Church, Milton.
Milton Mills High School, 15 School, M.M.
Nute Free High School, C.E. Kelly, principal, 15 Far. rd., M.

Stables.

QUINLAN, J.F., Main – See page 833.
ROWE, FRED, Central House, M.M. – See page 834.

Stock Farms.

CHAMBERLIN, M.G., M.M. and U. rd. – See page 834.
Hayes, L.C., So. Main, So. Milton.
Nute, George E., N. Ridge.

Stoves and Tinware.

MURRAY, D., Milton Mills – See page 835.

Teamsters and Truckmen.

Columbus, O., Charles.
Downs, H.W., 7 Silver, M.
Laskey, C.H., A. side, M. Mills.

Telephone Company.

N.E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., Main opp. Leb. bridge.

Toilet Articles.

EMERSON’S PHARMACY, 44 Main, M.M. – See page 834.
WILLEY, J.H., Main, Milton – See page 832.

Undertakers.

FOX, ASA A., Milton Mills – See page 835.
FOX, CHARLES D., 10 School, Milton Mills – See page 835.

Upholsterer and Carpet Work.

Jenness, C.G., 41 So. Main. M.

Wheelwrights.

DUNTLEY, IRA B., Main – See page 833.
Moody, Henry B., 71 Main.
Rudd, A.T. (iron work,) 20 Main, M.M.

Wood Dealers.

AVERY & ROBERTS, Main, M. – See page 832.
Clements, John B., Milton.
Hayes, L.C., So. Milton.
Jones, C.A., So. Main.
Jones, F.P., Plummer’s Ridge.

Wood Sawyers.

Beede, D.W., Leb. side, M.

Woolen Goods Mfr.

TOWNSEND, JOHN E. (blankets) – See page 835 and 12.


Here we learn of the 1912 acquisition of a Farmington store by the enterprising Carl E. Pinkham of Milton. He added it to his “chain” of existing grocery stores in Lynn, MA, and Milton. The description of his Farmington store and the goods on offer there likely serves to describe also his Milton store.

SUNSET GROCERY CO. This is the corner grocery store recently purchased from L.B. Foster by the above company and added to their rapidly growing chain of stores. Under the direction of the enterprising new proprietor, C.E. Pinkham of Milton, this store has assumed a most orderly and attractive interior. The goods are very neatly and artistically displayed and the new store is receiving a liberal and highly appreciated share of patronage. Many Christmas specials are being offered here at low prices. Among these are the famous “Angelus Brand” of canned goods, celery, cranberries, pop corn, nuts, fancy biscuit crackers, figs, dates and grapes. This is also the exclusive agency for the well-known “Meadow Gold” butter and eggs. The store is neatly kept and handsomely decorated and should not be forgotten when you make up the Christmas dinner list (Farmington News, [Friday,] December 20, 1912).


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1909; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1917


References:

Bass & Co. (1912). Dover, Somersworth, Rochester, and Strafford County Directory, 1912. Dover, NH: 466 Central Avenue.

Bolting the Door

By Ian Aikens | April 4, 2020

One of the many revelations that has come out of the current health crisis is the lack of available hospital beds in the state. True, it is a national problem and not confined to New Hampshire, but how did this come about? As has been written about extensively lately, the culprit is Certificate of Need (CON) laws that force applicants who want to build new hospitals or expand health facilities to be approved by bureaucrats at existing hospitals within 15 miles of the proposed facility. Yes, you read that right: if you want to construct a new health facility or expand health services to serve the public, the hospital nearby has to approve your right to serve the public. Hmm … is it any wonder that such applications have generally been turned down? To New Hampshire’s credit, the legislature did away with the state’s CON laws back in 2016, but the collateral damage persists to this day.

I happened to take a look at recent House Bill 1243 and noticed the same problem again, though in a different area. The bill would have added a clause to the law that no higher education institution will be granted permission to issue degrees unless first recommended by the New Hampshire Higher Education Commission. Obviously, no post-secondary school can go into business if it can’t issue degrees, so what we’re talking about here is whether such schools can open up for business in the state or not. Currently, permission to grant degrees rests with the legislature, but this bill would have given the power to recommend the applicant – if at all – before having the legislature give its authorization. Hence, a double roadblock instead of just one. Fortunately, the bill got bogged down in the Education Committee, as a majority of members felt it was ceding control from the legislature to the Department of Education. The committee ended up recommending “Inexpedient to Legislate,” which is a good thing since educational bureaucrats already have too much political power.

When you look at the make-up of the current New Hampshire Higher Education Commission, it becomes pretty obvious how the system is rigged: the president of New England College, the president of Plymouth State University, the president of United Way of Greater Nahua, the president of Rivier University, a litigation attorney, the president of the University of New Hampshire, a commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Education, the chancellor of the Community College System of New Hampshire, the chancellor of the University System of New Hampshire, the president of White Mountain Community College, the president of University College at Southern New Hampshire University, the president of Franklin Pierce University, a lawyer who was formerly an adjunct professor at the University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law, the president of Granite State College, the president of Colby-Sawyer College, the president of Keene State College, and the president of River Valley Community College. See a pattern here?! It’s these individuals who currently have the legal authority to evaluate and approve the plans of any out-of-state institution of higher learning that wants to enter the New Hampshire market. Is this not a bizarre conflict of interest? Does it make any sense? Why would any business allow a direct competitor for its customer dollars to possibly hurt its own business? Obviously, the business is going to find every reason in the book to deny approval.

No matter if they’re for-profit or non-profit or how they’re funded, all schools are still businesses – or at least should be – so it would be too much to expect elite administrators of schools already in operation to approve the entrance of new competing businesses. No one is that noble when such a conflict of interest exists.

To add insult to injury, there are special exceptions for some schools that don’t have to go through this approval process: any institution now granting degrees which has been in continuous operation since before 1775, and institutions of the university and community college systems of New Hampshire. So, the rules don’t apply to schools that have been around as long as Methuselah and government schools.

Instead of protectionist thinking that goes back to colonial times, how about a novel idea: let the students themselves decide which schools are worth attending or not. If investors, shareholders, lenders, donors, and students are willing to take a chance on investing in a new school – risking their own money, not the taxpayers’ – why does a new school have to go through this rigged approval process involving competitors with vested interests and politicians who often answer to special interests? If the teachers turn out to be lousy, the school’s reputation will suffer, and it will have a hard time attracting new students and staying in business. Do grown adults really need educational “experts” to protect them from poor choices?

Is the protection for the students or the elites’ schools? Just as CON laws are once again getting the spotlight turned on them, it’s time to take another look at educational paternalism and monopoly privileges and end the racket.

References:

Bosse, Grant D. (2012, February). Do Certificate of Need laws reduce costs or hurt patients? Retrieved from www.jbartlett.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Irrational-Certificate-of-Need-Laws.pdf

LegiScan. (2020). HB1243: Relative to the degree-granting authority of an educational institution in New Hampshire. Retrieved from legiscan.com/NH/bill/HB1243/2020

New Hampshire Department of Education. (2020). Higher Education Commission Members. Retrieved from www.education.nh.gov/who-we-are/higher-education-commission/higher-education-commission-members

New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated (2019, August 24). The State and Its Government – Department of Education – Chapter 21-N. Retrieved from www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/I/21-N/21-N-8-a.htm

Wikipedia. (2020, April 1). Certificate of Need. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Certificate_of_need