Milton’s South Milton Teachers, 1886-29

By Muriel Bristol | April 10, 2020

Through a special legislative act, the South Milton school was managed by the Milton school district, but was financed jointly by Milton and neighboring Rochester. Milton provided two-thirds of its funding and Rochester provided the remaining one-third. (In Rochester’s records, it was called either their District No. 16 school or the South Milton school). Presumably, its student population came from Milton and Rochester in roughly similar proportions.

Ira W. Jones (Milton’s hydraulic engineer) received the bulk of his formal education at the South Milton school, although a generation earlier (c1861-70) than the period covered here. He supplemented this eighth-grade education at the private Milton Classical Institute, then at evening technical drawing classes in Boston, and finally through a succession of on-the-job experiences.

So Milton - 1892
The Nute Ridge school is visible (to the left), but the South Milton school does not appear, as one might expect, at South Milton P.O. One supposes it was just off map (to the right), beyond the house of I. & G.H. Wentworth

The South Milton school does not appear in the 1892 map of the South Milton P.O. village. It has been described as having stood on the State road, i.e., the modern NH Route 125. One supposes it was just off the edge of the map, i.e., nearer to the Milton-Rochester boundary, as students came on foot from both places.

The South school teachers identified in this 1886-1929 period were Mabel L. Goodwin, Laura G. Page, Coran K. Davis, Clara E. Stanton, Minerva R. Perry, Dolly M. Wallace, Ferne C. McGregor, and Cora E. (McDuffee) Hayes. Several of these teachers taught also in other Milton school districts in other years.

(As before, this list is necessarily a partial one, subject to addition or revision if and when more complete information comes to hand).

Mabel L. Goodwin – 1886-87

Mabel L. Goodwin was born in Dover, NH, June 29, 1868, daughter of William H.H. “Henry Harrison” and Belle (Davis) Goodwin. (His father was presumably an enthusiastic Whig, in that he named his son after Whig President William Henry Harrison (the “Tippecanoe” of “Tippecanoe and Tyler Too”)).

Her father died in Somersworth, NH, August 9, 1876, when she was seven years of age. Her mother married (2nd) in Somersworth, NH, November 28, 1877, John R. Meserve.

John P. Meserve, an expressman, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his “2nd Wife,” Belle Meserve, keeping house, aged thirty-five years, his step-daughters, Mabel L. Goodwin, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Florence Goodwin, aged eight years (b. NH), his daughter, Gertrude R. Meserve, aged three months (b. NH), and his wife’s aunt, Louisa Davis, aged sixty-one years (b. NH).

Mabel’s mother died in Somersworth, NH, April 8, 1884, when she was fifteen years of age.

Rochester, NH, reported that Mabel L. Goodwin was its District 16 (Milton and Rochester) school teacher for Fall 1886, at a monthly wage of $24. She had twenty-two enrolled students, with an average attendance of nineteen students.

Rochester School Board Secretary Louis M. Richardson reported on the difference between the length of the academic year in Rochester and in the Milton-Rochester union school:

For the past year there has been twenty-eight weeks of school in all the districts except No. 16, which is the union district with Milton (length of schooling twenty-three weeks). Satisfactory arrangements could not be made with that board to prolong the school, thus the scholars in that district suffered the loss of five weeks’ schooling. But the action the voters of the town took in relation to the articles specified in the warrant at the last school meeting concerning that district is sanctioned by the board, and hereafter those scholars will receive instruction in this town on an equal basis with the rest (Annual Report of the City of Rochester, New Hampshire, 1887).

The Superintending School Committee of Somersworth, NH, mentioned her in its report of the 1890-91 academic year:

In the primary schools some changes have occurred. Miss Mabel L. Goodwin has had charge of the 2d primary school, in the Orange street house.

It mentioned also the poor condition of the Orange Street school house to which they had assigned her.

The Orange street house is calling loudly for attention. Leaking roofs and worn-out paint tell the story of present needs (Reports of the Town of Somersworth, For the Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1891).

Mable L. Goodwin married in Boston, MA, September 22, 1892, Nathaniel M. Nichols, she of New Hampshire and he of Three Rivers [Palmer, MA]. He was born in Staten Island, NY, in March 1866, son of James M. and Eliza B. (Mason) Nichols.

Nathan M. Nichols, an advertising agent, aged thirty-four years (b. NY), headed a Manhattan, New York, NY, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Mabel G. Goodwin, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and his child, Francis B. Nichols, aged five years (b. MA). Nathan M. Nichols rented their house [apartment[ at 71 East 95th Street. Mabel G. Nichols was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Nathaniel M. Nichols, a town school buildings custodian, aged forty-four years (b. NY), headed a Winchester, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Mabel G. Nichols, forty-one years (b. NH), his children, Marion Nichols, aged seven years (b. MA), and Doris E. Nichols, aged three years (b. MA), his servant, Margaret Lydon, a private family servant, aged twenty-five years (b. Ireland), and his lodger, Ella G. Prentiss, a private family nurse, aged forty-nine years (b. VT). Nathaniel M. Nichols rented their house at 10 Hillside Avenue. Mabel G. Nichols was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living.

Nathaniel M. Nichols, a public school custodian, aged fifty-three years (b. NY), headed a Winchester, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mabel G. Nichols, fifty-one years (b. NH), his children, Marion Nichols, aged seventeen years (b. MA), and Doris E. Nichols, aged thirteen years (b. MA), and his boarder, Ella G. Prentiss, a public school teacher, aged forty-five [fifty-nine] years (b. MA). Nathaniel M. Nichols rented their house at 10 Hillside Avenue.

Nathaniel M. Nichols, a Town government tax collector, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), headed a Winchester, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Mabel G. Nichols, aged sixty-one years (b. NH). Nathaniel M. Nichols owned their house at 29 Crescent Road, which was valued at $10,000. They had a radio set.

Nathaniel Nichols, a tax collector, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), headed a Winchester, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mabel G. Nichols, aged seventy-one years (b. NH). Nathaniel M. Nichols owned their house at 29 Crescent Road, which was valued at $8,000.

Nathaniel M. Nichols died in Winchester, MA, December 27, 1947, aged eighty-one years. Mabel L. (Goodwin) Nichols died in MA, December 17, 1961.

Laura G. Page – 1890-91

Laura Gertrude Page was born in Wakefield, NH, in October 1866, daughter of Charles W. and Mary Ann (Chapman) Page. (She was a sister of Myra L. Page, a Hare Road school teacher).

MILTON. School commenced in the South Milton district this week. Miss Laura Page, teacher (Farmington News, August 29, 1890).

WEST MILTON. Miss Laura Page is not as well, and Miss Myra has remained at home this winter; Miss Josephine, the younger sister, is teaching in Manchester (March 16, 1900).

Charles H. Page, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-nine years), Mary A. Page, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Josephine W. Page, a school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Myra L. Page, a school teacher, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Laura G. Page, aged thirty-three years (b. NH). Charles H. Page owned their farm, free-and-clear. Mary A. Page was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

MILTON. Miss Laura Page of Wakefield is visiting friends in town (Farmington News, January 29, 1904).

MILTON. Miss Laura G. Page of Sanbornville is the guest of Mrs. R.K. Webber (Farmington News, June 17, 1904).

Charles H. Page, a farmer, aged eighty-one years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-nine years), Mary A. Page, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Laura G. Page, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Myra L. Page, a school teacher, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and Josephine W. Page, aged thirty-five years (b. NH). Charles H. Page owned their farm on the South Wakefield street, free-and-clear. Mary A. Page was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

Mary A. Page, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Laura G. Page, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), Myra L. Page, a public school teacher, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and Josephine W. Page, aged forty-five years (b. NH). Mary A. Page owned their house, free-and-clear.

Mira L. Page, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her sisters, Laura G. Page, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), and Josephine W. Page, aged fifty-five years (b. NH). Mira L. Page owned their house at 11 Liberty Street, which was valued at $1,000.

Laura G. Page, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her sister, Josephine W. Page, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). Laura G. Page owned their house at 11 Liberty Street, which was valued at $4,500. Both sisters had attended two years of college. They had resided in the same house in 1935.

Josephine W. Page died in 1947. Laura G. Page died in 1950.

Coran K. Davis – 1891-92

Coran K. Davis was born in Barnstead, NH, December 8, 1869, son of John K. and Abigail D. (Walker) Davis.

NORTH BARNSTEAD. The following is a partial list of the teachers in town: – Center, Harry Sanborn; Bickford, Miss Anne Hanson; Dennett, Mr. Myre George; Beauty Hill, Mrs. Grace Jenkins; White Oak, Mrs. Annie Tasker; Berry’s, Lula M. Hurd; North, C.K. Davis; Lock’s Corner, Emma Locke; Shackford’s Corner, Annie E. Ayers (Farmington News, May 15, 1891).

SOUTH MILTON. School commenced here Aug 17, under the instruction of C.K. Davis (Farmington News, August 28, 1891).

Despite the West Milton heading, the Pearl school house at which Coran Davis taught during the 1892-93 academic year was in Farmington, NH. (He perhaps boarded still in West Milton from the prior 1891-92 year spent at the South Milton school).

WEST MILTON. Mr. Coran Davis has closed another successful term in the Pearl school house (Farmington News, March 24, 1893).

Coran K. Davis married in Barnstead, NH, October 27, 1894, Annie A. Tuttle, both of Barnstead. He was a teacher, aged twenty-four years, and she was a houseworker, aged twenty-one years. She was born in Barnstead, NH, August 2, 1873, daughter of James C. and Alice J. (Hill) Tuttle.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. Belknap County Pomona grange will meet with Barnstead grange, Barnstead Centre, November 21. The public is invited. The following is the program: Singing, choir; welcome, Arthur T. Prendergast; response, J.M. Taylor; reading, Edith V. French; recitation, Mrs. Eva Gilman; music, Coran K. Davis; essay, O.E. Davis; recitation, H.B. Holman: grange paper, Mrs. L.A. Dyer; question, “What is the influence of the grange in making farming more popular, and how can we increase our membership?” T.E. Hunt, Richard Hanscome, C.F. Davis, H.N. Colbath, B. Frank Dow and others (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), November 17, 1894).

BARNSTEAD. Schools begin Monday, April 18. Miss Bertha Parshley takes this school again and C.K. Davis has the Berry school (Farmington News, April 1, 1898).

NORTH BARNSTEAD. C.K. Davis went to Concord Friday of last week, to take the examination for teachers’ state certificate. There were but nine present to take it (Farmington News, April 7, 1899).

NORTH BARNSTEAD. Coran Davis and Will Cote of the Belknap Cornet Band of this place have been engaged to play with the Gilmanton band at Barnstead Centre, Memorial Day (Farmington News, May 26, 1899).

John K. Davis, a farmer, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), headed a Barnstead, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifty-six years), Abby Davis, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), his son, Coran Davis, a teacher, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his daughter-in-law (of five years), Annie B. Davis, a dressmaker, aged twenty-six years (b. NH). John K. Davis owned their farm, free-and-clear. Abby Davis was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

Coran K. Davis, a farmer, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Barnstead, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Annie A. Davis, aged thirty-six years (b. NH). Coran K. Davis owned their farm, with a mortgage.

Coran K. Davis, a general farmer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Barnstead, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie Davis, a dressmaker, aged forty-six years (b. NH). Coran K. Davis owned their farm, with a mortgage.

Coran K. (Annie) Davis appeared in the Barnstead directory of 1926, as a school teacher, with his house at Ctr. Barnstead.

Coran K. Davis, a public school teacher, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Barnstead, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Annie A. Davis, aged fifty-six years (b. NH). Coran K. Davis owned their farm. They did not have a radio set.

Annie A. (Tuttle) Davis died February 7, 1939.

ALTON and ALTON BAY. Mrs. Coran Davis, who was well known in Alton, passed away quite suddenly at her home In Barnstead, Monday evening (Farmington News, February 10, 1939).

Coran Davis, a widower, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Barnstead, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Coran Davis owned his farm on the Locke Road, which was valued at $1,500. He had lived in the same house in 1935.

Coran K. Davis died in Barnstead, NH, January 1, 1965.

Davis, Coran K Farm - FN660428BARNSTEAD. The Coran Davis Farm shown against the sky is an historic landmark reported to be the oldest building still standing in the township, unfortunately, the timbers are weak and the old building is to be dismantled. Note the two chimneys with fireplaces at the two ends of the main house (Farmington News, April 28, 1966).

???? – 1892-93

MILTON. The school at South Milton had a flag raising Friday (Farmington News, October 28, 1892).

MILTON. The South Milton school has closed for a vacation of about two weeks (Farmington News, November 18, 1892).

Clara E. Stanton – 1893-94

Clara Edith Stanton was born in Lebanon, ME, September 4, 1856, daughter of James B. and Catherine (White) Stanton.

Clara E. Stanton of West Lebanon, ME, was one of eight senior class Ladies at the New Hampton Literary and Theological Institution in 1875. She took the English and Classical course of studies, and resided at Hamptonia Hall. Other potential majors were Classical; English and French; and English and Latin (Catalogue of the Officers and Students at New Hampton Literary Institution, at New Hampton, N.H., For the Academical Year 1874-75).

James B. Stanton, a farmer (and house carpenter), aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Catherine Stanton, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. RI), and daughter, Helen W. Stanton, at home, aged sixteen years (b. ME). Meanwhile, another daughter, Clara E. Stanton, a high school teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), was boarding in the Warner, NH, household of Newell Carr, a laborer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), and his wife, Mahala Carr, keeping house, aged sixty-one years (b. VT).

MILTON. The school at South Milton began Monday with Miss Stanton as teacher (Farmington News, August 18, 1893).

Timothy B. Young, keeps variety store, aged fifty-nine years (B. NH), headed a Wolfeboro, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Sarah I. Young, aged fifty years (b. NH), his son, Oscar L. Young, a lawyer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), his boarder, Clara E. Stanton, a teacher, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Timothy B. Young owned their house, free-and-clear. Sarah I. Young was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Fred L. Shapleigh, a painter (own shop), aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Eva D. Shapleigh, a private school proprietress, aged forty-five years (b. ME), his mother-in-law, Melissa J. Davis, own income, aged seventy-two years (b. ME), and his boarder, Clara E. Stanton, a private school teacher, aged fifty-three years (b. ME). Fred L. Shapleigh owned their farm, free-and-clear. Melissa J. Davis was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Clara E. Stanton was paid as the teacher of various district schools in Gilford, NH, in the 1911-12, 1912-13, 1913-13, 1913-15, and 1915-16 academic years; and Sanbornton, NH, in the 1918-19, and 1919-20 academic years.

Clara E. Stanton, a public school teacher, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her lodger, Jennie M. Orrell, a shoe factory stitcher, aged fifty years (b. NH). Clara E. Stanton rented their house at 17 Maple Street.

Willard N. Kimball, a cotton mill machinist, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-one years), Eva M. Kimball, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), and his roomer, Clara E. Stanton, aged seventy-three years (b. ME). Willard N. Kimball owned their house at 31 Lincoln Street, which was valued at $5,000. They had a radio set.

???? – 1897-98

The Annual Report of the City of Rochester, NH, reported an “incidental” payment of $85.17 to the “Town of Milton, one-third expense of school at South Milton.” Milton paid the other two-thirds of the costs of their South Milton “Union” school (Seventh Annual Report of the City of Rochester, New Hampshire, For the Year Ending December 31, 1898).

???? – 1900-01

The Annual Report of the City of Rochester, NH, reported an “incidental” payment of $84.58 to the “Town of Milton, ⅓ expense of school,” i.e., 1/3 of the costs of the South Milton school. Milton paid the other two-thirds of the costs of their South Milton “Union” school (Tenth Annual Report of the City of Rochester, New Hampshire, For the Year Ending December 31, 1901).

Minerva R. Perry – 1903-04

Miss Minerva R. Perry taught the South Milton school in the 1903-04 academic year. (A fuller account of her life and career may be found in Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26).

MILTON. Miss Minerva Perry, who is teaching the South Milton school, was a guest of Mrs. G.W. Tasker over Sunday (Farmington News, January 22, 1904).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. G.H. Hurd had the pleasure of a visit last Saturday from Miss Minerva Perey. She was a former teacher of the Hare road school and is now teaching at South Milton (Farmington News, February 19, 1904).

Millicent J. Penney – 1904

Millicent J. Penney was born in Union, Wakefield, NH, November 23, 1883, daughter of John C. and Arabella E. “Belle” (Stevens) Penney.

MILTON. Miss Millicent Penny has opened a private school in the house of Dans Hart, with 23 pupils (Farmington News, February 25, 1898).

Belle E. Penney, a widow, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, (“Union Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Millicent J. Penney, a teacher in school, aged twenty-two [seventeen] years (b. NH). Belle Penney owned their house free-and-clear. Belle Penney was the mother of three children, of whom one was still living.

MILTON. Miss Millicent Penny has the South Milton school this spring (Farmington News, April 22, 1904).

MILTON. Owing to the rain Monday afternoon, the Woman’s Relief Corps was unable to perform the Sailor service on the bridge, as planned, or go to the cemetery to participate in the service for the unknown dead. The Columbia drum corps of Dover furnished music for the march and Madokawanda Tribe, I.O.R.M., acted as escort. The exercises in the hall consisted of the oration by William S. Pierce of Somersworth, recitations by R.R. Hanson and Miss Millicent Penney, singing by eight young ladies, and several selections by Butler’s orchestra of Farmington (Farmington News, June 3, 1904).

Millicent J. Penney appeared in the Milton directory of 1905, as a teacher, boarding at 10 Bridge street, Leb. s. [Lebanon side]. Belle E. Penney appeared as the widow of John C. Penney, with her house at 10 Bridge street, Leb. s.

PERSONAL. Last Friday Mrs. B.F. Perkins, Mrs. A.W. Flanders, Miss Carrie Evans and Mrs. N.F. Roberts spent the day at the last mentioned lady’s cottage, “Openwell,” at Middleton. This week Mrs. Roberts is staying there and has as guests Mrs. Belle Penney and her daughter, Miss Millicent Penney of Milton, and Miss Blanche Trefethen of Exeter, beside occasional Farmington visitors (Farmington News, August 10, 1906).

Millicent J. Penney of Milton appeared in the Rochester directory of 1909, as one of two Grade IV teachers at Rochester’s Allen School for the 1908-09 academic year. (Nellie M. Wentworth of Rochester was the other).

Belle Penney, own income, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Millicent Penney, a school teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). Belle Penney rented their portion of a two-family house at 9A Silver Street. Belle Penney was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

She married in Rochester, NH, February 15, 1911, Frank R. Spiers. He was born in Chicopee, MA, circa 1873, son of John and Christina (Shaw) Spiers. She was a teacher, aged thirty-three years, and he was a brick manufacturer, aged thirty-eight years.

LOCAL. On Wednesday, Feb. 15, Miss Millicent J, Penney of Rochester and Frank R. Spiers of that city were united in marriage, Rev. Eastman of Union performing the ceremony. The bride, who is a graduate of Nute High and Plymouth normal schools, has been a popular teacher in Rochester for six years. The groom is a member of the Spiers-Fish Brick Co. They will reside in Rochester. Mrs. Spiers has many friends in Farmington who join in wishing her a life of happiness (Farmington News, February 17, 1911).

Frank Spiers, a brick yard manager, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nineteen years), Millicent Spiers, aged forty-two years (b. NH), his son, John R. Spiers, aged three years, six months (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Belle Penney, a widow, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH). Frank R. Spiers owned their house free-and-clear.

Frank (Millicent P.) Spiers appeared in the Rochester directory of 1929, as vice-president and assistant treasurer of the Spiers Brick Company, with his house at 16 Academy street. The Spiers Brick Company was north of the Pickering station in Gonic, i.e., Rochester, NH.

Frank R. Spiers, a brick yard manager, aged fifty-nine years (b. MA), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nineteen years), Millicent P. Spiers, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), his son, John R. Spiers, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his mother [-in-law], Belle E. Penny, a widow, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH). Frank R. Spiers owned their house at 16 Academy street. They had a radio set.

Millicent J. (Penny) Spiers died in Rochester, NH, April 14, 1931, aged fifty-three years, four months, and fourteen days. Frank R. Spiers died in Rochester, NH, August 7, 1938.

Dorothy M. “Dolly” Wallace – 1908-09

Dorothy May “Dolly” Wallace was born in Milton, September 20, 1889, daughter of John C.F. and Madora N. “Dora” (Perkins) Wallace.

Dollie M. Wallace appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as teacher of the South school for the 1908-09 academic year.

The Annual Report of the City of Rochester, NH, reported an “expenditure” of $101.84 for “One-third cost So. Milton school.” Milton paid the other two-thirds of the costs of their South Milton “Union” school (Eighteenth Annual Report of the City of Rochester, New Hampshire, For the Year Ending December 31, 1909).

Charles F. Wallace, a trucking teamster, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Dora Wallace, sewing (at home), aged forty-seven years (b. NH), and his daughters, Dorothy M. Wallace, a school teacher, aged twenty years (b. NH), and Annie J. Wallace, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Charles F. Wallace rented their house on Banker Street. Dora Wallace was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

Dollie May Wallace married in Farmington, NH, April 2, 1911, William D. Tufts, she of Farmington and he of Middleton, NH. He was born in Middleton, NH, circa 1887-88, son of Charles D. and Nellie M. (Corson) Tufts. She was a shoe shop operative, aged twenty-one years, and he was a farmer, aged twenty-two years.

Local. Married, April 2, by Rev. E.K. Amazeen, William D. Tufts of Middleton and Dollie May Wallace of Farmington (Farmington Nes, April 7, 1911).

LOCAL. The stork was a welcome visitor at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Tufts of Mt. Vernon street last Tuesday, where was left a bright little daughter (Farmington News, April 12, 1912).

William S.D. Tufts, a lumber jack (woods), aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Dollie M. Tufts, a shoe factory stitcher, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his daughter, Frances L. Tufts, aged seven years (b. NH). William S.D. Tufts rented their house on Winter Court.

William D. Tufts, a wood lot operator, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nineteen years), Dollie M. Tufts, aged forty years (b. NH), his children, Frances L. Tufts, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Rosalie E. Tufts, aged nine years (b. NH), and Wallace W. Tufts, aged five years (b. NH), and his roomers [parents], Charles D. Tufts, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), and [his wife (of fifty years),] Dora M. Tufts, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH). William D. Tufts owned their house at 21 Winter Court, which was valued at $800. They did not have a radio set.

Dolly M. (Wallace) Tufts died at the Huggins Hospital in Wolfeboro, NH, October 7, 1932, aged forty-three years, and seventeen days.

IN MEMORIAM. Mrs. William D. Tufts. A devoted family circle and many friends are deeply bereaved by the death of Mrs. Dollie M. Tufts, wife of William D. Tufts, which occurred at the Huggins hospital in Wolfeboro last Friday morning. Mrs. Tufts had been a patient there since September 13, during which time she had been critically ill.  She was a native of Milton, the second daughter of a family of four children born to Charles F. and Dora (Perkins) Wallace and had been a lifelong resident of this [vicinity]. She was born September 26, 1889, and received her early education in the public schools of her native town, having graduated from Nute high school with the class of 1907, with honors for scholarship, and later attended Plymouth Normal school. For some time she taught in the rural schools of Middleton. In April 1911 she was married to Mr. Tufts, to  whom she was a faithful, helpful and companionable wife. Mrs. Tufts was a woman of resourceful capabilities and Christian character, which contributed to the worthy pillars of example in the home where she lavished a wealth of devotion and found her first duty. She is survived by her husband, two daughters, Miss Frances Tufts and Miss B. Rosalee Tufts, one son, W. Wallace Tufts, her father, Charles F. Wallace, one sister, Mrs. Harvey Whitehouse of Durham, and a brother, Walter Wallace of Farmington. Funeral services were held from the Baptist church Sunday at two o’clock with Rev. Emery Wallace officiating. Interment was in Farmington cemetery with committal services. Anton Perkins, Cheney Perkins, Llewellyn Perkins, and Alvah Perkins, all cousins, acted as bearers (Farmington News, October 14, 1932).

William D. Tufts died in Farmington, NH, March 10, 1942.

???? – 1914-15

The Annual Report of the City of Rochester, NH, reported a “miscellaneous” payment of $119.63 to “Milton, town school district,” i.e., Rochester’s share of the cost of the South Milton school (Annual Report, City of Rochester, New Hampshire, For the Year Ending December 31, 1915).

Ferne C. McGregor – 1919-20

Miss Ferne C. McGregor taught the South Milton school in the 1919-20 academic year. (A fuller account of her life and career may be found in Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47).

WEST MILTON. Nute Ridge school has reopened with Mrs. Martin Wentworth as teacher, and Miss Ferne McGregor has the South Milton school (Farmington News, September 19, 1919).

Cora E. (McDuffee) Hayes – 1918-19, 1926-29

Cora Emma McDuffee was born in Rochester, NH, April 7, 1881, daughter of Daniel S. and Martha J. (Pinkham) McDuffee.

Daniel S. McDuffee, a R.R. section hand, aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty years), Martha J. McDuffee, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and his daughter Cora E. McDuffee, at school, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Daniel S. McDuffee owned their house at 201 Main Street, free-and-clear. Martha J. McDuffee was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Cora E. McDuffee married in Rochester, NH, September 2, 1903, Luther C. Hayes, she of Rochester and he of Milton. She was a teacher, aged twenty-two years, and he was a farmer, aged thirty-three years. He was born in Milton, November 3, 1869, son of Luther and Sarah D. (Coffran) Hayes.

Luther C. Hayes, a general farmer, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of six years), Cora E. Hayes, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), his servants, Clara Pinkham, a private family servant, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), and Charles E. Dorr, a private family servant, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and his hired man, Henry Johns, a farm laborer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH). Luther Hayes owned their farm on the Wakefield Road, free-and-clear.

The Milton School Board paid Cora E. Hayes $168 in teacher salary and a further $18 to serve also as a janitor, up to September 1, 1919, i.e., for the 1918-19 academic year. It also paid her $4 for fuel for the South Milton school. (It paid also A.J. Goodwin $13.50 for fuel for the same location).

The School District warrant for March 9, 1920, included an article seeking dissolution of the South Milton union district.

ARTICLE 11. To see if the District will vote to dissolve the Union District at South Milton, now maintained by the School District of Milton and the City of Rochester, or take any action in relation thereto.

School Superintendent Fred W. Dudley explained his reasoning for Article 11 in his accompanying annual report:

The problem with the school which we maintain at South Milton in partnership with the City of Rochester is one which deserves careful consideration. Milton has only six pupils in this school at the present time. Located upon the State Road it would be easy to transport these children to the village schools, where there is plenty of room to take care of them and where they can be given much greater advantages. I believe that it would be much better for the children and no more costly for the town to dissolve this district, which can be legally done by vote of Milton School District, and transport the pupils to the village.

In point of fact, the School District paid that year $686.50 to transport students to the village schools. That transportation expense – equivalent to the salaries of three teachers – was one the district had not incurred prior to closing its district schools. The measure did not pass at this time, although it would arise again (Annual Report of the Town of Milton, New Hampshire, for the Year Ending January 31, 1920)..

Luther C. Hayes, a general farmer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Cora E. Hayes, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), his aunt-in-law, Clara A. Pinkham, aged seventy years (b. NH), and his hired man, Frank Therrien, a dairy farm farmer, aged fifty years (b. Canada). Luther Hayes owned their farm on the Wakefield Road, free-and-clear.

School Superintendent Fred W. Dudley explained in the 1928 Milton Town Report that the South Milton school was a “Union” school, attended by both Milton and Rochester students.

I understand that some citizens have expressed surprise at the small number of pupils reported in the South Milton School. For the information of those who do not understand the situation I will say that, under a special act of the legislature, this school is maintained jointly by Milton and Rochester. Milton is responsible for the management of the school and pays two-thirds of the costs. Rochester pays one-third of the costs. Last year there were thirteen Rochester pupils in this school. The records of these pupils are kept in a separate register which is given to the school authorities of Rochester, and so these pupils do not appear in the statistics of Milton (Annual Report of the Town of Milton, New Hampshire, for the Year Ending January 31, 1929).

Luther Hayes, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Cora Hayes, a rural school teacher, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Daniel McDuffee, a widower, aged seventy-one years (b. NH). Luther Hayes owned their farm on the Wakefield Road. They had a radio set.

Luther C. Hayes, a dairy farmer, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Cora E. Hayes, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH). Luther Hayes owned their farm on the Old Road, which was valued at $5,000. Luther C. Hayes had attended eight years of school, and Cora E. Hayes had attended also four years of high school.

Luther C. Hayes died in Milton, June 25, 1952. Cora E. (McDuffee) Hayes died in Milton, April 8, 1954.

Dissolution of the South Milton School

The Milton School District warrant for the 1930 town election included the following article regarding the South Milton school.

13. To see if the District will vote to dissolve the union district at South Milton, now maintained by the School District of Milton and the City of Rochester, or take any action thereto (Annual Report for the Town of Milton, for the Year Ending January 31, 1930).

Article 12 involved selling the Branch district school. The superintendent’s report for the 1931 warrant has not come to hand. The South School may or may not have been open for the 1929-30 academic year (which would have been reported in the missing report). It was not open during the 1930-31 academic year nor any year thereafter.

The Milton School District warrant for the 1933 town election included the following article regarding the South Milton school and the West Milton school.

9. To see if the district will vote to authorize the School Board to sell the school buildings at South Milton and West Milton either at auction or at private sale (Annual Report for the Town of Milton, for the Year Ending January 31, 1933).


See also Milton’s Hare Road Teachers, 1890-26, Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47, Milton’s West Milton Teachers, 1885-23, and Milton Mills’ Teachers, 1875-11


References:

Find a Grave. (2011, March 17). Cora E. McDuffee Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/67047637/cora-e-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, September 11). Coran K. Davis. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/116897229

Find a Grave. (2016). Ferne C. McGregor. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/18168860

Find a Grave. (2012, June 19). Laura G. Page. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92198226

Find a Grave. (2012, July 16). Mabel Goodwin Nichols. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/93725718

Wikipedia. (2020, April 12). Three Rivers, Massachusetts. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Rivers,_Massachusetts

Wikipedia. (2020, May 11). William Henry Harrison. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Henry_Harrison

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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