Milton Classical Institute (1867-c1889)

By Muriel Bristol | October 11, 2018

Ten prominent Milton citizens incorporated a private secondary school at Three Ponds Village in Milton, NH, in July 1867. The incorporators included NH Governor’s Councilor (and ex-officio NH State Board of Education member) Charles Jones, Strafford Sheriff Luther Hayes, manufacturers William P. Tuttle and Hiram V. Wentworth, Dr. George W. Peavey, and others.

Many of the incorporators appeared in Milton’s US Excise Tax of May 1864 or in Milton Businesses in 1868.


AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE MILTON CLASSICAL INSTITUTE AT MILTON

Section 1. Corporation name, powers and liabilities. 2. Purposes, location and capital stock. 3. First meeting, how called, etc. Section. 4. Power of Legislature reserved. 5. Repealing clause. 6. Act takes effect on its passage.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened:

Section 1. That Luther Hayes, Charles Jones, George W. Peavy, Joseph Sayward, William P. Tuttle, George W. Tasker, John S. Hersey, Hiram V. Wentworth, George Lyman, and John Lucus, all of Milton, and their successors, be, and they hereby are, created and made a body politic by the name of the Milton Classical Institute, and by that name may sue and be sued, prosecute and defend to final judgment and execution, and shall have and enjoy all the privileges, and be subject to all the liabilities incident to corporations of a similar nature.

Sect. 2. Said corporation is hereby authorized to establish and maintain at Three Ponds Village, in the town of Milton, in this State, the Milton Classical Institute, a literary and scientific institution heretofore established in said village, for the purpose of the academical instruction of the young in any or all of the branches of education usually taught in any academy; and for that purpose is made capable in law to have, and to hold, and enjoy, all the property, both real and personal, which has been heretofore and is now held and possessed by the said grantees as trustees of said institute, for said purpose, and which may be so held and possessed at the time of the passage of this act; and for this purpose may purchase, erect, and maintain suitable buildings therefor; and may receive and hold by purchase, gift, devise, or otherwise, real or personal estate to an amount not exceeding thirty thousand dollars.

Sect. 3. Any two of said corporators may call the first meeting of said corporation, at said Three Ponds Village, by giving a written or printed notice thereof to each of said corporators, or causing the same to be left at his last and usual place of abode, five days prior to the time appointed for holding the same; at which, or any subsequent meeting called and holden, said corporation may adopt such constitution and by-laws, not repugnant to the constitution and laws of this State, as they shall judge proper to carry into effect the object of this grant, and may choose such officers and trustees as they may deem expedient.

Sect. 4. The Legislature may at any time alter, amend, or repeal this act, whenever, in their opinion, the public good may require it.

Sect. 5. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act are hereby repealed.

Sect. 6. This act shall take effect from and after its passage. (Approved July 8 1867).


The Milton Classical Institute occupied a repurposed church building on Main street at Milton Three Ponds, just south of the B&M railroad station. The 1888 “Bird’s Eye” map shows it as a reddish multi-story building set back a bit from Main street (with a whitish number “3” on its roof to the left of its four-pointed tower or spire). It was a bit south (left) of the train station and on the opposite side of the street.

Institute Bldg (3) and Station (7)
Milton, N.H., 1888. 3. Institute Building; and 7. Station, B.&M. R.R,, Northern Div.

(The same map locates the Congregational church thrice as far south, also on Main street, but between Silver and Church streets).

The Milton Classical Institute was a private secondary school sustained by tuition fees. Most of Milton’s graduating district or “common” school students would not have bothered to study further at such an institution. It had classical courses, modern languages, and scientific studies. Most students sought a bit more education, but there were also among them those few wanting to attend college (in order to enter one of the “learned” professions or the ministry). It would not have been limited to Milton residents.

Dr. John Edmund Scruton (1846-1894) of Union “received his early education at the Farmington (N.H.) High School, at the West Lebanon Academy, and at Milton (N.H.) Classical Institute.” As he received his medical degree at Bowdoin College in 1870, he too must have attended the Milton Classical Institute in its earliest days.

A short biography of Milton merchant and NH State Senator Charles H. Looney (1849-1902) says that he “was educated in the [Milton] common schools and at the Classical Institute of Milton N.H.” The course of his life suggests that he must have attended the Milton Classical Institute not long after its 1867 incorporation. He was already running his own Milton store by 1871.

Mary C. (Ricker) Quimby (1847-1934) was first a student and then a teacher at the Milton Classical Institute, probably prior to her marriage in 1878.

Mrs. Mary C. Quimby, who for 46 years has been a school teacher, observed her 79th birthday in her home at Acton, Me., near her birthplace. Mrs. Quimby was educated in West Lebanon, Me., academy and Milton Institute. In the latter she acted as assistant teacher for two years. She taught her first term of school when 15 years of age [c1862]. Mrs. Quimby’s parents were Daniel and Susan (Hern) Ricker. Mr. and Mrs. Quimby will observe their 48th wedding anniversary the 12th of next month, having married October 12th 1878, by Rev. Hiram Manser (Carroll County Independent, September 17, 1926).

Milton’s famous hydraulic engineer, Ira W. Jones (1854-1946), was said to have “attended the district schools in South Milton, and the Milton High school,” that is to say, he attended the Milton Classical Institute (Scales, 1914).

In her genealogy of the family of John Hayes of Dover, NH, Katherine F. Richmond recounted the following story of how the Milton Classical Institute acquired its school bell (apparently after whatever bell the Union church might or might not have had).

There is a record that he [Joseph Hayes (1783-1872)] loaned a thousand dollars to William Trickey of Milton to buy a bell for the [Crown Point Methodist] church for which Mr. Trickey never paid. When the church building was demolished, the bell was sold by Joseph for sixty dollars, and after serving as a factory bell at “Goodwinville,” [in West Milton,] and as a school bell for the Milton Classical Institute, it finally “came to its own” again in the belfry of the present Free Baptist Church of Milton Three Ponds (Richmond, 1936).

The Milton Classical Institute first opened its doors in 1867 (probably September 1867). Its lead teachers or principals were William D. Ewer, Josephine M. Ham, Jesse P. Bickford, C. Augusta Clements, Allen E. Cowell, Frederick A. Chase (or Chace), Elizabeth J. ((Chamberlain) Hussey) Cowell, and Fannie L. Hayes. Most of these principals would have had an assistant teacher also.

William Dyer Ewer – 1867-68

William Dyer Ewer was born in Vassalboro, ME, January 14, 1835, son of Rev. John Alpheus “Alpheus” and Mary J. (Dyer) Ewer.

Alpheus Ewer, a farmer, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Vassalboro, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included [his second wife,] Betsey Ewer, aged forty-six years (b. ME), Henry A. Ewer, aged fifteen years (b. ME), Charles E. Ewer, aged twelve years (b. ME), Mary J. Ewer, aged five years (b. ME), William D. Ewer, a student, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), and Rhoda Ewer, aged eighty-six years (b. MA). Alpheus Ewer had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $700.

William Dyer Ewer was a Junior at Waterville College in 1860-61, and presumably graduated from there in June 1862.

William D. Ewer married in Waterville, ME, July 12, 1862, Julia F. Hamlin. She was born in China, ME, 1838, daughter of Calvin and Phebe H. (Jordan) Hamlin

He enlisted in Company B of the Maine Sixteenth Regiment, August 14, 1862, in which he served as a sergeant, until mustered out March 5, 1863.

W.D. Ewer appeared in the NH Business Directory of 1868, as principal of the Milton Classical Institute.

W.D. Ewer, a school teacher, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), headed a Sierra (Sierra-ville P.O.), CA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included J. Ewer, keeping house, aged thirty years (b. ME). W.D. Ewer had real estate valued at $250 and personal estate valued at $50. E.H. Hamlin, a farmer, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), was his neighbor.

Sixtieth Wedding Anniversary Feted. SAN JOSE, July 17. Celebration of their 60th wedding anniversary was observed here last week by Mr. and Mrs. William D. Ewer, beloved residents of this city for a number of years, when a host of their friends gathered to do them honor at their family residence, 1030 Willow street. The venerable old people greeted more than 50 at the reception and both were firm in their confidence that the future holds numerous more anniversaries for them. Mr. and Mrs. Ewer, both natives of Maine, were married in that state just 60 years ago. A number of years later they crossed the continent to California and here have passed many anniversaries together with their wide circle of friends. Despite her advanced age, Mrs. Ewer made her own white-dress with streamers of gold ribbon, which she wore on the occasion of the anniversary. She is 84 years of age and her husband slightly older (Oakland Tribune (Oakland, CA), July 17, 1922).

William D. Ewar died in Santa Clara, CA, January 21, 1927, aged ninety-two years. Julia F. (Hamlin) Ewer died in San Jose, CA, August 11, 1935, aged ninety-six years.

Josephine Mary Ham – 1871-73

Josephine Mary Ham was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1852, daughter of Joseph W. and Sarah H. (Roberts) Ham.

Jos. W. Ham, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Gonic”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah H. Ham, keeping house, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), Josephine M. Ham, a school teacher, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Abbie J. Ham, at home, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Henry W. Ham, at home, aged five years (b. NH), Edgar J. Ham, aged two months (b. NH), James Ham, aged eighty-four years (b. NH), Abbie M. Ham, aged forty years (b. NH), and Edga[r] B. Curry, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA). Jos. W. Ham had real estate valued at $900 and personal estate valued at $500. James Ham had real estate valued at $2,000.

The NH Register listed the Milton Classical Institute as a Literary Institution in 1871. J.N. Ham appeared in the Milton directory of 1873, as principal of the Milton Classical Institute.

M. Josephine Ham married in Rochester, NH, May 7, 1879, George B. Haley, she of Rochester and he of Barrington, NH. He was a station agent, aged thirty-three years; she was a teacher, aged twenty-seven years. He was born in Lee, NH, December 20, 1846, son of John P. and Lydia A. (Giles) Haley.

George B. Haley, a R.R. station agent, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Barrington, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Josephine Haley, keeping house, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH).

George B. Haley died in Barrington, NH, August 11, 1923. Mary J. (Ham) Haley died in Barrington, NH, May 25, 1938 aged eighty-five years, nine months, and thirteen days.

The Maine Journal of Education identified Freedom Hutchinson (1847-1922) as a teacher at the Milton Institute for the fall term of the 1872-73 academic year. (His older brother was Liberty H. Hutchinson). That is to say, he was the assistant teacher to the principal teacher.

EDUCATIONAL INTELLIGENCE. Mr. F. Hutchinson, of Auburn, is to teach the fall term of Milton Institute at Milton, N.H. (Brown Thurston, 1872). 

Bates College conferred an A.B. degree upon Freedom Hutchinson, of Auburn, ME, in June 1873 (Boston Globe, June 27, 1873).

Jesse Piper Bickford – 1874-78

Jesse Piper Bickford was born in Newburgh, ME, March 3, 1844, son of George and Ann (Piper) Bickford.

Jesse Piper Bickford, of Newburgh, ME, attended Governor Dummer Academy in Byfield, MA, in 1868-69.

Jesse P. Bickford, of Newburgh, Maine, attended Bowdoin College; he belonged to Bowdoin’s Athenean Society in his freshman (1870) and sophomore (1871) years. Jesse Piper Bickford resided in room 21 of Bowdoin’s M.H. residence during his junior year (1872). He likely would have graduated from Bowdoin College in the Spring of 1874.

The US Commissioner of Education included the Milton Classical Institute in his annual report of 1874, with the newly-minted Jesse P. Bickford as its Principal. The Institute had been both chartered and opened in 1867. It had then one male (Bickford himself) and one female instructor, and sixty-eight students (38 males and 30 females). Sixty-seven students took a classical course of studies, while one took a scientific course of studies. None took a modern languages course. Only one student intended to go on to take a classical course in college.

The Milton Classical Institute appeared in the Milton directories of 1874 and 1875, but without a named principal.

The US Commissioner of Education included the Milton Classical Institute (Principal J.P. Bickford) in his 1875 report. The Institute had been both chartered and opened in 1867. It had then one male (Bickford himself) and one female instructor, and one hundred-thirteen students (57 males and 56 females). One hundred-ten students took a classical course of studies, while three took a scientific course of studies. None took a modern languages course. Three students were preparing to take a classical course in college.

He married Elizabeth “Lizzie” C. Horne of Milton, July 30, 1876. She was born in Massachusetts, circa 1858, daughter of James R. and Abbie A. Horne.

J.P. Bickford appeared in the Milton directories of 1876 and 1877, as principal of the Milton Classical Institute.

Steiger’s Educational Directory listed the Milton Classical Institute of Milton, N.H., in its 1878 edition.

The US Secretary of the Interior included the Milton Classical Institute (Principal J.P. Bickford, A.B.) in his 1878 report. The Institute had been both chartered and opened in 1867. It had then one male (Bickford himself) and one female instructor, and sixty-five students (25 males and 40 females). Forty-one students took an English course of studies, while four took a scientific course of studies. None took a modern languages course. Three students intended to enter college, while two intended to enter a scientific or technical school or college.

Jesse P. Bickford seems to have left Milton shortly after this time. He appeared next in the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. He may have been called home due to his father’s being ill; in fact, his father died in September 1880. (His wife, Lizzie C. (Horne) Bickford, was not present).

George Bickford, a farmer, aged seventy-eight years (b. ME), headed a Newburgh, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna Bickford, keeping house, aged seventy-seven years (b. ME), his children, Jesse Bickford, a teacher,  aged thirty-six years (b. ME), and Annie E. Bickford, housework at home, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and his grandchild,Walter H. Bartlett, a clothing & fancy goods storekeeper, aged twenty-five years (b. ME).

J.P. Bickford, of Newburgh, ME, was a guest at the New England House hotel in Boston, MA, in December 1881 (Boston Globe, December 9, 1881).

Jesse P. Bickford died in Bangor, ME, May 26, 1910, aged sixty-six years, two months, and twenty-three days.

C. Augusta Clements – 1878-80

Miss C. Augusta Clements appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1865, as the teacher at Dover’s School District #9 schoolhouse. She boarded at 31 Locust street.

Charles E. Hussey taught at the high school, i.e., Classical Institute, in Milton at about this time.

For a year he [Hussey] taught the high school at Milton, N.H. In 1879, he resigned to take the principalship at Rochester (Eaton, 1896).

Miss Clements appeared in the Milton directory of 1880, as principal of the Milton Classical Institute.

The US Commissioner of Education included the Milton Classical Institute (Principal C. Augusta Clements) in his 1880 report. The Milton Classical Institute had been chartered in 1866 [SIC]. It had then no male and two female instructors (including Miss Clements), and forty-eight students (19 males and 29 females). Thirty-six students took an English course of studies, while twelve took a scientific course of studies. None took a modern languages course. None of these students intended to enter college or a scientific or technical school or college.

The US Commissioner of Education reported the Milton Classical Institute, of Milton, NH, as having been “closed.” This information appeared in an addendum to an 1881 List of institutions for secondary instruction, & c. But, as Mark Twain would have it, reports of its demise were exaggerated.

Allen Eustis Cowell – 1881-83

Allen Eustis Cowell was born in Lebanon, ME, July 26, 1862, son Edmond E. and Elizabeth J. (Chamberlain) Cowell of Lebanon, ME. (His mother would be the Mrs. E.E. Cowell of 1887 (below); she was a sister of Samuel G. Chamberlain).

Edmund E. Cowell, a silver miner, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, E. Jane Cowell, keeping house, aged fifty years (b. NH), his son, Allen E. Cowell, at home, aged eighteen years (b. ME), and his mother, Merry Cowell, at home, aged seventy-nine years (b. ME).

A.E. Cowell appeared in the Milton directories of 1881 and 1882, as principal of the Milton Classical Institute.

MILTON. School began May 2, Prof. Cowell, principal, and Mrs. Oren Varney, asst. Mr. C. has given satisfaction in his own state as a teacher, and we think we have got the right man in the right place (Farmington News, May 13, 1881).

By 1894, A.E. Cowell had become the local agent for the Pearl Square Auger Co., of Rochester, NH. This should be read as Pearl “Square Auger,” rather than “Pearl Square” Auger. That is to say, the Pearl company made a auger that bored a square hole.

LOCALS. Mr. A.E. Cowell, agent for the Pearl Square Auger, who has many friends in town, is convalescing from a severe illness at his home at West Lebanon, Me. (Farmington News, October 23, 1894).

Allen E. Cowell married in Rochester, NH, April 25, 1900, Sarah Inez Hayes, both of Lebanon, ME. He was a farmer, aged thirty-seven years (b. Lebanon, ME); she was a lady, aged thirty-three years (b. Lebanon, ME). Rev. John Manter of Rochester performed the ceremony. She was born in Lebanon, ME, in July 1866, daughter of Cyrus W. and Lydia (Furbush) Hayes.

Cyrus W. Hayes, a widowed farmer, aged seventy-six years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Inez S. Cowell, aged thirty-three years (b. ME), and his son-in-law, Allen E. Cowell, a farmer, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME). Cyrus W. Hayes owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Allen E. Cowell died in 1929.

Frederick A. Chace – 1883-84

Frederick A. Chace was born in Westport, MA, July 3, 1855, son of Elbridge G. and Susan B. (Macomber) Chace.

Fred A. Chace, a school teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. MA), boarded at the Massachusetts State Reform School for Boys, in Westborough, MA, at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Luther H. Sheldon, aged sixty-two years (b. MA) was its superintendent, and his wife, Sarah H. Sheldon, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA) was its matron. There were two assistant matrons, a nurse, a turnkey, a clerk, five teachers (including Chace), an engineer, an assistant engineer, three housekeepers, a seamstress, a laundress, two cooks, two dining-room workers, two gardeners, three farmers, four farm workers, a laborer, and a painter. There were one hundred-eighty prisoners, all working in the chair shop, aged between twelve and eighteen years of age.

WESTPORT. The pupils in the Brownell’s Corner school presented their teacher, Mr. Fred A. Chace, with an autograph album at the close of the school term; the parents also testified their appreciation of his services by raising money sufficient to continue the school for another month (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), March 6, 1883)

Fred A. Chase appeared in the Milton directory of 1884, as principal of the Milton Classical Institute.

Frederick A. Chace died in Westport, MA, February 7, 1885, aged thirty years, seven months, and four days.

Mrs. Eliza Jane ((Chamberlain) Hussey)) Cowell – 1886-87

Elizabeth Jane “Eliza” Chamberlain was born in Milton, November 24, 1829, daughter of Samuel N. and Mary (Moody) Chamberlain.

Elizabeth J. Chamberlain married (1st) in Milton, August 24, 1851, Alexander T. Hussey, both of Milton. Rev. James Doldt performed the ceremony. He was born in Acton, ME, August 27, 1827. He died of typhoid fever in Milton, November 15, 1851, aged twenty-four years, two months, and twenty-two days.

Eliza Jane (Chamberlain) Hussey married (2nd) in Lebanon, ME, in February 1858, Edmund Eustis Cowell. He was born in Beverly, MA, circa 1825, son of Isaac and Lucy (Cottle) Cowell.

Edmond E. Cowell received appointments as West Lebanon postmaster, July 16, 1859, and April 7, 1864.

E.E. Cowell, a retail grocer, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Elizabeth J. Cowell, keeping house, aged forty years (b. NH), Emma J. Cowell, aged eleven years (b. ME), Allen E. Cowell, aged eight years (b. ME), and Lucy N. Cowell, aged four years (b. ME). E.E. Cowell had real estate valued at $3,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000.

Edmond E. Cowell received appointment as West Lebanon postmaster, December 22, 1885.

Mrs. M.K. Cowell was said to have run the Milton Classical Institute in 1886, while Mrs. E.E. Cowell (mother of A.E. Cowell) ran it in 1887. There really was no Mrs. Moses K. Cowell, as he never married. He was at this time a physician in Milton Mills; He died single in Acton, ME, July 8, 1905, aged eighty-two years, four months, and sixteen days. The Mrs. M.K. Cowell of 1886 was likely also Mrs. E.E. Cowell.

LOCALS. An entertainment, consisting of solos, duets and choruses by the Amphion Male Quartette, assisted by Mrs. H.B. White, soprano and accompanist, and a lecture by S.S. Parker upon “Pictures from Books of Stone,” illustrated with the stereopticon, was given at Institute hall, Milton, last week. It was pronounced first-class in every particular (Farmington News, November 30, 1888).

Edmond E. Cowell died in Lebanon, ME, August 3, 1898, aged seventy-three years, nine months, and ten days.

Elizabeth J. Cowell, a widowed farmer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her sister, Elinor M. Ricker, a widow, aged eighty-seven years (b NH). Elizabeth J. Cowell was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living; Elinor M. Ricker was the mother of no children. Elizabeth J. Cowell owned their farm, free-and-clear.

Mrs. Elizabeth J. ((Chamberlain) Hussey) Cowell died at Plummer’s Ridge in Milton (twenty years’ residence), May 18, 1923, aged ninety-three years, five months, and twenty-four days.

Fannie Lawrence Hayes – 1889

Fannie Lawrence Hayes was born in Milton, November 7, 1865, daughter of Luther and Sarah D. (Cochran) Hayes. (Her father had been one of the Institute’s original incorporators).

Luther Hayes, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nellie R. Hayes, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), his children, Lyman S. Hayes, at home, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Fannie L. Hayes, at home, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Hattie E. Hayes, aged twelve years (b. NH), Luther C. Hayes, aged ten years (b. NH), and Clarence Hayes, aged two years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Rachel F. Morrill, aged seventy-four years (b. NH).

Miss Fannie L. Hayes appeared in the Milton directory of 1889, as principal of the Milton Classical Institute. She would seem to have been its last principal.

MILTON. Miss Fannie L. Hayes, who is teaching school at Haverhill, Mass., will spend her holiday vacation at her home in South Milton (Farmington News, December 30, 1892).

The Boston Globe ran a best or favorite teacher promotion at this time. Students and others might vote for their candidate by clipping ballots from the newspaper which, of course, had the potential of increasing purchases of its newspaper. Miss Fannie L. Hayes of Milton, but then teaching in Haverhill, MA, was a serious contender, at least on the state level. The winner would receive an all-expenses-paid trip to the Columbian World Exposition, in Chicago, IL.

Miss A. Yietta Kimball of Concord, N.H., who led yesterday in that State with 883 votes, and increased her number to 1020 during the day, is displaced by Miss Fannie L. Hayes of Milton, who has 1021 (Boston Globe, January 31, 1893).

Fanny L. Hayes, a school teacher, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her lodger, Ada B. Berry, a school teacher, aged forty-two years (b. MA). Fanny L. Hayes rented their portion of a two-family dwelling at 272 Washington Street, which they shared with the household of William Martin, a hat finisher, aged thirty-two years (b. England).

Miss Fannie L. Hayes appeared in the Milton directories of 1905, 1909, 1912, and 1917, as a teacher in Haverhill, MA, with a summer residence with E.J. Wyatt, in South Milton. (Edgar J. Wyatt appeared as a farmer at L.C. Hayes, South Milton).

Miss Fannie L. Hayes was principal of Haverhill’s Crowell School during the 1912-13 academic year (but likely before as well).

HAVERHILL. Miss Fannie L. Hayes, principal of the Crowell School, has gone to Milton, N.H., for the Summer vacation. Stanley D. Gray, principal of the Winter-st School, is at Bucksport, Me., where he will remain until September (Boston Globe, June 23, 1913).

Fannie Lawrence Hayes married in Milton, December 25, 1919, Frank Nathaniel Rand, she of Milton and he of Haverhill, MA. He was born in Morrisville, VT, circa 1862-63, son of Alvinza and Fidelia R. (Goodell) Rand. She was a teacher, aged fifty-four years; he was a real estate contractor, aged fifty-six years.

Frank N. Rand, proprietor of a real estate construction company, aged fifty-six years (b. VT), headed a Haverhill, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fannie L. Rand, a public school teacher, aged fifty-four years (b. NH). Frank N. Rand rented their house on Sandler Place.

Frank N. Rand died in 1939. Fannie L. (Hayes) Rand died in 1953.

Dissolution of the Milton Classical Institute – c1890-91

The Milton Classical Institute did not appear in the Milton directory of 1890. Its hall continued to be used for other purposes. Here NH State Senator David A. Taggart of Manchester, NH, campaigned for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, and Rev. Frank K. Chase of Dover, NH, campaigned for prohibition.

MILTON. Wednesday evening Hon. David A. Taggart spoke at Institute hall. Friday evening Rev. F.K. Chase, of Dover, speaks at the same place in the interests of prohibition (Farmington News, October 24, 1890).

The journal of the NH House of Representatives for the afternoon of Thursday, January 22, 1891, includes the following:

On motion of Mr. Pulsifer of Gilford, the following petitions were recalled from the Committee on Education and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary:

Petition of the trustees of the Milton Classical Institute for authority to sell and convey the property of said institute and dispose of the proceeds thereof.

Petition of Ira W. Duntley and 36 others of Milton, praying that authority be granted the trustees of the Milton Classical Institute to sell and convey the property of said institute and dispose of the proceeds thereof.

At which point, it was all over but the conveyancing. Its successor, the Nute High School, opened its doors for the first time on Tuesday, September 8, 1891, with William K. Norton as its principal.

MILTON. Milton Institute, which was once a prominent educational building in this town, is now a thing of the past. The building has been used for school purposes for over thirty-five [twenty-five] years, and on Saturday it was sold at public auction to J.D. Willey for $710. That amount, by vote of the trustees, is to be evenly divided between the two churches. The building, previous to being used as an institute, was the Congregational church, and has stood on its present site for about seventy-five years. It will now be made into a tenement house (Farmington News, September 4, 1891).

Joseph D. Willey kept a general store (and a summer boarding house) at Milton Three Ponds in 1892.

There was this sort of eulogy, which was published in a local 1907-08 town directory, as a lead-in to a discussion of the 1891 Nute High School and Library.

The first attempt at the establishment of a high school in Milton was made by the Rev. Ezra S. Anderson, in 1832. The most successful of the earlier institutions, however, was the Classical Institute, classes being held in the old Union meeting-house, remodeled in 1866, for that purpose. Many men of prominence in the community and State, today [1908], point with pride and satisfaction to the early training they received there.


See also Nute High School Principals, 1891-21 and Nute High School Principals, 1923-57


References:

Biographical Review Publishing Company. (1897). Biographical Review: Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Stafford and Belknap Countries, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=C2sjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA102

Bowdoin College. (1894, June 1). Obituary Record of the Graduates of Bowdoin College and the Medical College of Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=wyxsedhgmawC&pg=PA217

Brown Thurston. (1872). Maine Journal of Education. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EcIBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA357

Davis, Bryant, and Lawton. (1908). The Town Register: Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA115

Eaton, Chester W. and Warren E. (1896). Proceedings of the 250th Anniversary of the Ancient Town of Redding, Once Including the Territory Now Comprising the Towns of Reading, Wakefield, and North Reading. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Ke44AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA78

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Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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