Milton in NH Education Report, 1878

By Muriel Bristol | September 19, 2021

In his June 1878 report, the NH Superintendent of Instruction provided some statistics regarding Milton.

Milton’s town school committee members were identified as being J.P. Bickford (1844-1910) of Milton, Freeman H. Lowd (1853-1933) of Milton Mills, and Martin V.B. Cook (1839-1891) of Milton.

Milton had 10 school districts and 12 schools in town, 2 of which were graded schools. There were 10 schoolhouses, and 2 others that were unfit for use. Maps and globes were available in 2 schoolhouses. The value of schoolhouses, furnishings and sites was estimated at $10,000, and the value of apparatus was estimated at $100. Only 1 of the district schools had an average of 12 scholars of less; and none had an average of 6 scholars or less. The average run of district school classes was 15.7 weeks. (The Strafford County average was 23.45 weeks).

Milton had 1 fractional school district. It paid $43.00 in superintendence. Some 60 students had no absences during the year. It had 5 students attending private schools.

The school district with the largest sum on hand had $392.00, and that with the smallest had $30.00; the school district with the longest term had run 30 weeks students, and that with the shortest term had run for 12 weeks; the school district with the largest number of students had 49 students, and that with the smallest number had 7 students. The school assessment rate was $0.003 [per thousand].

Milton had 154 male and 161 female students enrolled. Of these, 20 were aged under six years, 272 were aged between 6 and 16 years, and 23 were aged over 16 years. There were 30 students pursuing higher branches, and there were 12 students aged between 5 and 15 years that were not attending any school. Average daily attendance was 262 students.

There were 3 male teachers, making an average of $60 per month, and 12 female teachers, making an average of $28.50 per month. Of these, 1 was teaching for the first time, and 5 had been teachers for more than one term. (One might infer that the remaining 9 had been teachers already for a single prior term). None of them had been to Normal school. Of 249 Strafford County teachers, only 16 (6.4%) had been to Normal school).

Under the heading Private Schools of a Higher Grade, Milton had its Classical Institute, which was situated at Milton Three Ponds. It had been chartered and organized in 1866. The value of its building, apparatus and grounds was $2,800. It had a 44-week school year, which began in September. It had no male teachers and 2 female teachers; and it had 17 male and 31 female students. Of these, 37 of them were NH residents, 18 of them were pursuing higher branches. Its principal was Miss Augusta Clement.

The school committee had available to it $3,594.61; of which $1,220.44 came from the town tax for support of schools, $1,942.61 came from district school taxes, $143.10 came from the literary fund, $30.00 came from local funds and the dog tax, $58.46 came from the railroad tax, and $200.00 came from contributions.

Milton expended $1,588.57 for new buildings, $130.00 in permanent repairs, $150.oo in miscellaneous expenses; and $1,343.00 in teacher salaries, for a grand total of $3,254.54. The average cost of salaries and miscellaneous expenses per scholar was $4.77. (The county average cost per scholar was $7.85).


Previous in sequence: Milton in NH Education Report, 1877; next in sequence: Milton in NH Education Report, 1879


References:

NH Superintendent of Public Instruction. (1878). Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=myMlAQAAIAAJ

Milton Mills and Milton’s C.H. Prescott Boarding Houses, 1887-c1908

By Muriel Bristol | September 15, 2021

Crosby Hanson Prescott was born in Acton, ME, October 7, 1850, son of Sewall W. and Marilla M. (Hersom) Prescott.

Sewell W. Prescott, a farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Marilla M. Prescott, keeping house, aged forty-six years (b. ME), and his son, Crosby H. Prescott, a farmer, aged twenty-nine years (b. ME).

Crosby H. Prescott married in Rochester, NH, October 15, 1885, Annie F. Hurd, both of Acton, ME. He was a waiter, aged thirty-five years, and she was aged thirty-five years. Rev. Edward C. Bass performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, September 26, 1854, daughter of Mark C. and Rhoby P. (Ricker) Hurd. (Mark C. Hurd was a farmer and postmaster of Acton, ME).

Crosby H. Prescott worked at some point at the Crawford House hotel, likely as a waiter. The Crawford House was one of New Hampshire’s “Grand Summer Resorts.” It had been founded in Crawford Notch in Carroll, NH, in 1851. After a disastrous fire, it had been rebuilt in 1859 as the then largest hotel in the state, and run successfully until closed in 1975.

Crawford House - 1910This [Crawford House] is a good hotel of the first class, 1,900 feet above the sea, with broad and almost interminable piazzas, cool and airy halls, post-office, telegraph-office, livery-stable, bowling-alley, gaslights; environs which the landscape-gardener has justly approved; and a dining-room where even Epicurus or Uncle Sam Ward need not famish …. Near the front of the house is the pretty little Saco Lake, the cradle of the Saco River, and so far widened and deepened by art as to give a reason for being for the boats which float on its crystal tide. The rugged forest between the lake and the overhanging mountain has been combed and brushed and perfumed, and otherwise adorned for a summer pleasaunce, so that it has won the happily suggestive name of Idlewild (Chisholm’s White-Mountain Guide-Book, 1887).

Crosby H. Prescott and his wife established together a series of smaller hotels and summer boarding houses in Milton Mills and Milton. They catered largely to a relatively new clientele: rusticators.

Hotel Prescott

SUMMER RESORTS. HOTEL PRESCOTT – Pleasantly situated; a desirable home for those seeking health, comfort and pleasure; good fishing and gunning; nice drives; good livery connected with the house; terms, $5 to $9 per week; transient $2 per day. C.H. PRESCOTT, Proprietor, Milton Mills, N.H.; formerly of the Crawford House, White Mountains. SSuTTh6t* jy16 (Boston Globe, July 17, 1887).

C.H. Prescott appeared in the Milton business directory of 1889, as proprietor of the eponymous Prescott House hotel (and livery stable) in Milton Mills.

SUMMER RESORTS. SUMMER BOARD for ladies or gentlemen can be obtained in a beautiful village in New Hampshire; home comforts; close to 3 churches and post office, organ, Boston papers, good livery, etc.; board $4 to $7 per week. Address C.H. PRESCOTT, Milton Mills, N.H. SuWF15t* jy13 (Boston Globe, July 16, 1890).

SUMMER RESORTS. HOTEL PRESCOTT – Pleasantly situated; a desirable home for those seeking health, comfort and pleasure; nice drives, good livery connected with the house ; terms $5 to $6 per week; transient $2 per day. C.H. PRESCOTT, Proprietor, Milton Mills, N.H. ThSu4t* au20 (Boston Globe, August 20, 1891).

C.H. Prescott appeared in the Milton business directory of 1892, as proprietor of the Hotel Prescott in Milton Mills. He appeared in the Milton business directories of  1894, and 1898, as proprietor of a summer boarding house at Milton Mills.

Crosby H. Prescott, a hotel headwaiter, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Annie F. Prescott, aged forty-five years (b. ME), his children, Lillian A. Prescott, at school, aged fourteen years (b. ME), Marion M. Prescott, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Ruth H. Prescott, at school, aged eight years (b. NH), and his boarders, Clara A. Perkins, closing on shoes, aged twenty-six years, and Nellie B. Pike, a shoe lining maker, aged twenty years (b. ME). Crosby H. Prescott rented their house. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Sarah A. Witham, a home-keeper, aged eighty-six years (b. NH), and Frank J. Hurd, a factory fireman, aged forty-eight years (b. ME).

Western Avenue Cottage

C.H. Prescott appeared in the Milton business directories of  1901, as proprietor of a summer boarding house at Milton Mills.

Milton. WESTERN AVE. COTTAGE. Mrs. C.H. Prescott, owner. P.O. address, Milton Mills; railroad station, Union. Price $6 per week; accommodates 12 guests. Open all the year (Rollins, 1902).

Miltonia House

The Prescotts transferred their summer boarding house operation from Milton Mills to Milton Three Ponds, at sometime between 1902 and 1903. (Their boarding house did not appear in the directory of 1904).

SUMMER RESORTS. NEW HAMPSHIRE. MILTONIA HOUSE, Milton, N.H. -located on Miltonia lake, which for bass, white perch, pickerel and other varieties of fish, cannot be surpassed in the state; parties desirous of passing their vacation in the country should avail themselves of the excellent privilege this house affords; fine country scenery, pleasant drives, boats, telephone, postoffice, drug store, RR station close to house; terms $7 per week. C.H. PRESCOTT, Miltonia House, Milton, N.H.  (Boston Globe, August 7, 1904).

C.H. Prescott appeared in the Milton business directories of 1905-06, as proprietor of Miltonia House, at 50-52 Main Street in Milton, i.e., at Milton Three Ponds rather than, as formerly, at Milton Mills. He resided at the same address.

Prescott, CH - Miltonia HouseC.H. Prescott appeared in the NH Register, State Year-book and Legislative Manual directories of 1906, and 1907, as proprietor of the Miltonia House hotel.

C.H. Prescott appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as having removed to Rochester, NH. (It would seem that he had actually gone to Farmington, NH).

Farmington, NH

Chester A. Bodwell, a shoe factory stitcher, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of three years), Ruth H. Bodwell, aged eighteen years (b. NH), his daughter, Frances L. Bodwell, aged three months (b. NH), his father-in-law, Crosby H. Prescott, a shoe factory treer, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Annie F. Prescott, aged fifty-five years (b. ME). (They had been married for twenty-five years). Chester A. Bodwell rented their house on North Main Street. Ruth H. Bodwell was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Annie F. Prescott was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

Crosby H. Prescott, a janitor, aged sixty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie F. Prescott, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), and his grandchildren, Frances L. Bodwell, aged ten years (b. NH), and Donald C. Bodwell, aged six years (b. NH). Crosby H. Prescott owned their house at 24 Elm Street, with a mortgage.

(The grandchildren’s father, Chester A. Bodwell, a shoe shop foreman, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), was one of five boarders in the Farmington, NH, household of Henrietta Noyes, a laundress, aged forty-seven years (b. NH). He divorced Ruth H. (Prescott) Bodwell in Strafford County, February 27, 1923).

PERSONAL. C.H. Prescott who has been ill for several months, was up town on Tuesday, the first time since February (Farmington News, May 21, 1920).

TO LET. Convenient tenement at 24 Elm St. Apply to C.H. Prescott (Farmington News, May 21, 1920).

Bertrand E. Twombly, his wife Bessie P. (Plummer) Twombly, and their two sons, took up residence in the Farmington, NH, household of C.H. Prescott over the winter of 1920-21.

LOCAL. B.E. Twombly and family are moving from their farm at West Milton to the C.H. Prescott house on Elm street for the winter (Farmington News, November 12, 1920).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Annie Cook spent part of last Friday with Mrs. C.H. Prescott in Farmington. Mr. Prescott is still in poor health (Farmington News, June 17, 1921).

Crosby H. Prescott died of angina pectoris in Farmington, NH, December 8, 1921, aged seventy-two years, two months, and one day. He had been a resident of Farmington for twelve years, i.e., since circa 1908-09, having formerly resided in Milton. E.S. Huntress, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Annie Prescott, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. She owned her house at 36 Winter Street, which was valued at $1,600. She did not have a radio set.

Annie F. Prescott appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1933, as the widow of Crosby H. Prescott, with her house at 36 Winter Street.

Annie F. (Hurd) Prescott died of lobar pneumonia at 36 Winter Street in Rochester, NH, August 10, 1933, aged seventy-eight years, ten months, and fifteen days. She had been a resident of Rochester, NH, for ten years, i.e., since circa 1922-23, having formerly resided in Farmington, NH. Edson M. Abbott, M.D., signed the death certificate.


References:

Rollins, Frank W. (1902). Tourists’ Guide-book to the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=olz9I0XJhncC&pg=PA72

Milton’s Franklin House Hotel, 1870-76

By Muriel Bristol | September 12, 2021

Continued from Milton’s Milton House Hotel, c1842-70

Milton’s Franklin House or Ben Franklin House appeared in the Milton business directories just as the Milton House left their pages. One might suppose that this represents merely a change of name and management rather than an entirely different hotel edifice. The Franklin House’s Joseph Jenness was the sometime manager or proprietor of both hotels.

Joseph Jenness – 1870-73, 1875

Joseph Jenness [Jr.] was born in Rochester, NH, in 1824, son of Joseph and Hannah (Potter) Jenness.

Joseph Jenness married, November 16, 1845, Reliance C. Witherell. She was born in Monmouth, ME, January 30, 1829, daughter of Rufus and Sarah T. (White) Witherell.

Joseph Jenness, a machinist, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Hannah [(Potter)] Jenness, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), Mary Jenness, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), Peace Jenness, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Joseph Jenness, Jr., a manufacturer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Isaac Jenness, a manufacturer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Alice Jenness, aged twenty years (b. NH), Benjamin Jenness, a manufacturer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Sarah Jenness, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and Reliance [(Witherell)] Jenness, aged twenty-one years (b. ME). Joseph Jenness had real estate valued at $800.

Joseph Jenness, a landlord, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Reliance C. [(Witherell)] Jenness, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), C. Crosby, a hired man, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Emiline Crosby, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Lydia M. Crosby, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Charles G. Crosby, aged seven years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of James Pinkham, a shoemaker, aged seventy years (b. NH), and Stephen Drew, a practicing physician in Milton 40 years, aged sixty-six years (b. NH). A marginal note indicated that this was the Milton Hotel. Joseph Jenness had no real estate valuation, which suggests he was not its owner.

His Milton House boarders in 1860 included John R. Palmer, postmaster, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), B.F. Rankins, a boarder, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Chas. Neal, a boarder, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), David Wentworth, a boarder, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Charles Peckham, a boarder, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Charles Nudd, Jr., a boarder, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), D. Palmer, a boarder, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), J.C. Robinson, a boarder, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), C.C. Smith, a boarder, aged forty years (b. NH), James Miller, a boarder, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), Mrs. C. Lane a teacher of music, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Pamelia C. Wetherell, aged twenty-nine years, S.C. Goodrich a dressmaker, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Dr. Jackson, a physician, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and George Hattan, an Indian doctor, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Joseph Jenness, a stabler, aged thirty-nine years, registered for the Civil War military draft in Milton, in June 1863.

Rufus Witherell, farmer, aged sixty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Monmouth, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah Witherell, keeping house, aged seventy-one years (b. ME), Joel W. Witherell, a farmer, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), Abbie G. [(Getchell)] Witherell, keeping house, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), Elsie A. Witherell, at home, aged eight years (b. ME), Mabel Witherell, at home, aged five years (b. ME), Ilda M. Witherell, at home, aged two years (b. ME), Mary E. Witherell, at home sick, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), Reliance [(Witherell)] Jenness, at home sick, aged forty-one years (b. ME), and Ambrose Crommett, works on farm, aged seventeen years (b. ME). Rufus Witherell had real estate valued at $5,000 and personal estate valued at $1,250.

Joseph Jenness appeared in the Milton business directories of 1873, and 1875, as proprietor or manager of the Ben Franklin House hotel.

Joseph Jenness appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1878, as night clerk at Granite State House, boarding there too.

Joel W. Witherell, a farmer, aged forty-three years (b. ME), headed a Monmouth, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Abby D. [(Getchell)] Witherell, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. ME), his children, Elsie A. Witherell, a school teacher, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Mabel Witherell, at school, aged fourteen years (b. ME), Illde A. Witherell, at school, aged twelve years (b. ME), Edith M. Witherell, at school, aged nine years (b. ME), Harvey H. Witherell, at school, aged seven years (b. ME), and Sarah E. Witherell, at school, aged five years (b. ME), his father, Rufus Witherell, a farmer, aged seventy-nine years (b. ME), his sister, Reliance C. [(Witherell)] Jenness, sewing, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), and his cousin, Elmer E. Gatchell, a farm laborer, aged seventeen years (b. ME).

Joseph Jenness died of consumption in Dover, NH, January 5, 1892, aged sixty-eight years.

Reliance C. (Witherell) Jenness died of diabetes mellitus in Revere, MA, September 2, 1901, aged seventy-two years, seven months, and two days.

DEATHS. In Revere, Mass. – Mrs. Reliance C. Jenness, 72 yrs. 7 mos. 2 ds. Prayers at 14 Centennial av., Revere, Tuesday, 4 p.m. Services and interment at Monmouth, Me, Sept. 4 at 4 p.m. (Boston Globe, September 3, 1901).

Alden T. Kidder – 1874

Alden Thayer Kidder was born in Dresden, ME, January 26, 1844, son of John and Thankful (Pushard) Kidder.

A member of the Second New Hampshire Regiment, who is himself a prisoner at Richmond, communicates to the Manchester Mirror a list of the names of forty-two members of the regiment who are now prisoners here. The list differs quite essentially from that previously published, which contained but twenty-eight names, and we therefore publish it although we have no means of determining which the more accurate. It is as follows: Herman Allen, John A. Barker, A.B. Bailey, John H. Barry, Joseph Burleigh, John Davis, Thurlow A. Emerson, Geo. C. Emerson, Moses Eastman, John L. Fitts, Galen A. Grout, A.L. Hall, Albert B. Robinson, Frank F. Weatherby, Frank K. Tucker, Samuel M. Joy, William H. Walker, W. Lord, Alden T. Kidder, Reuben F. Stevens, Charles H. Perry, Christy Jones, George E. Dow, Thomas E. Barker, Henry West, Henry Emerson, W.C. Haynes, Clark Stevens, Alonzo D. Leathers, Jacob Hall, Charles Rich, Daniel Martin, George H. Clay, Andrew L. Allen, Wyman W. Holden, Henry Moore, Levi W. Colbath, Joseph R. Morse, John F. Wheeler, Charles Chase, Henry Tibbetts, and John Rice (Portsmouth Herald, September 5, 1861).

John Kidder, a farm laborer, aged fifty-six years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Thankfull Kidder, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), Octavia Kidder, no occupation, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), Alden Kidder, a painter, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), Margaret J. [(Kidder)] Cole, a dressmaker, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Henry Kidder, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. NH), Mabel Kidder, attending school, aged twelve years (b. NH), Susan Kidder (b. ME), works in cotton mill, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), William H. Cole, works in iron foundry, aged twenty years (b. NH), Warren Kidder, a shoe maker, aged twenty-nine years (b. ME), Margaret Shorey, works in cotton mill, aged thirty-five years (b. NH).

Alden T. Kidder married in Somersworth, NH, December 9, 1872, Emma A. Galaghner, he of Great Falls, [Somersworth,] NH, and she of Milton. He was a painter, aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. True W. Woodman performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton [Farmington, NH], October 10, 1852, daughter of James and Eliza (Trask) Galnagh. (It was her younger sister whose pet dog had killed her pet chicken in 1869).

A. Kidder appeared in the Milton business directory of 1874, as proprietor or manager of the Franklin House hotel. (In 1900, he would be said to have lived in Somersworth, NH, for twenty-five years, i.e., he moved from Milton to there in or around 1875).

Alden Kidder appeared in the Great Falls, [Somersworth,] NH directory of 1876-77, as  a painter, boarding at John Kidder’s, on Main street. John Kidder had his house on Main street, near “Rollingsford,” i.e., Rollinsford, NH. Henry Kidder, a painter, boarded there also.

Alden T. Kidder, a hotel keeper, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma Kidder, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), his servant, Dennis Crowley, a servant, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and his boarder, Annie Brown, no occupation, aged twenty-three years (b. MA).

Alden T. Kidder appeared in the surviving veterans’ schedule of the Eleventh (1890) Federal Census in Somersworth, NH, . He was said to have served two years, six months, and twenty-five days, having enlisted as a private in Co. D, of the 2nd NH Volunteer Infantry Regiment, May 27, 1861, and having mustered out, January 22, 1864. He had been imprisoned for ten months, and ten days, of that time in Richmond, VA, New Orleans, LA, and Salisbury, NC, from which he suffered still from malarial poison and scurvy.

Alden T. Kidder died of phthisis pulmonary (pulmonary tuberculosis) in Somersworth, NH, April 22, 1900, aged fifty-six years, two months, and twenty-four days.

Emma A. (Galnagh) Kidder died of liver cancer in Somersworth, NH, September 29, 1915.

R. West – 1876

R. West appeared in the Milton business directory of 1876, as proprietor or manager of the Ben Franklin House hotel.


References:

Find a Grave. (2016, October 28). Alden Thayer Kidder. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/171912731/alden-thayer-kidder

Milton Postmaster Joseph H. Avery (1844-1937)

By Muriel Bristol | September 5, 2021

Joseph Howard Avery was born in Acton, ME, June 29, 1844, son of John and Mary (Nealey) Avery.

JOSEPH H. AVERY, an enterprising business man of Milton, and an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born in Acton, Me., June 29, 1844, son of John and Mary (Nealey) Avery. The Avery family were early settlers in Parsonsfield, Me., and Joseph H. Avery’s great-grandfather was the first to break a road through the woods to that town from Rochester, N.H. John Avery has spent the greater part of his life in Acton, and has followed the carpenter’s trade in connection with farming. He is now [1897] eighty-six years old, and is still active both mentally and physically. He wedded Mary Nealey, a native of Sandwich, N.H., who has borne him eight children. Of these five are living: namely, Charles, George, Lorenzo, Jeremiah and Joseph H. (Biographical Review, 1897).

Joseph H. Avery appeared twice in the 1860 Census, first with his parents in Acton, ME, and then again residing in the household of a Milton shoemaker, John H. Crane, presumably as Crane’s apprentice.

John Avery, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary Avery, a seamstress, aged fifty years (b. NH), Charles Avery, a farm laborer, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Thomas Avery, a farm laborer, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), George Avery, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. ME), Lorenzo Avery, a farm laborer, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Joseph H. Avery, a farm laborer, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Jeremiah Avery, aged fourteen years (b. ME), Mark Avery, aged eleven years (b. ME), and John J. Avery, aged nine years (b. ME). John Avery had real estate valued at $100 and personal estate valued at $50.

After receiving his education in the schools of Acton, Wakefield and Milton, Joseph H. Avery learned the shoemaker’s trade in this town and followed it for four years (Biographical Review, 1897).

John H. Crane, a shoemaker, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included E.M. Crane, aged thirty years (b. NH), Frank P. Crane, aged seven years (b. NH), Harriet A. Crane, aged eight months (b. NH), and Joseph H. Avery, aged fifteen years (b. NH [SIC]). John H. Crane had real estate valued at $200 and personal estate valued at $150. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Nathan Jones, a shoemaker, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Jacob Staples, a shoemaker, aged fifty-four years (b. NH).

He next went to Boston, where he worked in a restaurant for three years. In 1866 he returned to Milton, and since that time has had a varied as well as a successful business career (Biographical Review, 1897).

Joseph H. Avery married (1st) in Milton, May 26, 1866, Thestah D. Hanscom, he [and she] of Milton. He was twenty-one years of age and she was twenty-four years of age. Rev. James Doldt performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, January 13, 1846, daughter of Adaline Hanscom.

(In Classical antiquity, Thesta had been sister of the Syracusan tyrant Dionysus the Elder. Her noble reply to her tyrant brother in support of her husband, Polyxenus, who had escaped into exile, appeared in Plutarch’s Lives. She was regarded as a model of feminine strength and rectitude).

By his first wife, Thestah (Hanscom) Avery, there were two children: Herman, who died at the age of nine years; and Addie, who is the wife of O.W. Brown of Sanford, an enterprising business man (Biographical Review, 1897). 

Son Herman A. Avery was born in Milton, circa 1867. Daughter Addie M. Avery was born in Milton, May 7, 1868.

Joseph H. Avery, works for shoe factory, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Thesta Avery, keeping house, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Hermon A. Avery, aged three years (b. NH), Addie Avery, aged two years (b. NH), Betsey [(Tibbetts)] Hanscom, aged ninety years (b. ME), and Susan M. Hanscom, aged sixty years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Stephen Drew, a physician, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), and Moses Downs, works for shoe factory, aged fifty-three years (b. VT).

Thestah D. (Hanscom) Avery died of consumption in Milton, March 16, 1875, aged twenty-nine years, two months, and three days.

Son Herman A. Avery died of a fever in Milton, in September 1875, aged nine years.

[J.]H. Avery & Co. appeared in the Milton business directory of 1880 as a Milton excelsior manufacturer.

Joseph H. Avery, an excelsior manufacturer, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Addie M. Avery, aged twelve years (b. NH), his help, Agnes Moore, a domestic servant, aged thirty-three years (b. Nova Scotia), and his boarders, Luman Drake, an excelsior mill worker, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), and Frank Dillingham, an excelsior mill worker, aged twenty-six years (b. ME). Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of William H. Gerrish, works on shoes, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and Elizabeth Rouch, does serving, aged seventy-eight years (b. ME).

J.H. Avery & Co. appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, and 1882, as a Milton excelsior manufacturer. (S.M. Bragdon, i.e., Stephen M. Bragdon (1836-1909), took over as the excelsior manufacturer in 1884, 1887, and for some years thereafter).

J.H. Avery, of Milton, NH, registered as a guest at the American House hotel in Boston, MA, in early November 1881 (Boston Globe, November 7, 1881). (Lewis W. Nute and his wife had checked in there, again, just a few days earlier; they were more or less regular residents).

Joseph H. Avery married (2nd) in Milton, November 24, 1881, Emma C. Hanscom, both of Milton. He was an excelsior manufacturer, and she was a lady. Rev. George Sterling performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, December 8, 1851, daughter of James C. and Sarah (Jones) Hanscom. (She was a cousin of Avery’s deceased first wife).

His present wife, who was before marriage Emma Hanscom, is the mother of one daughter, Elsie (Biographical Review, 1897).

Daughter Elsie G. Avery was born in Milton, April 28, 1882.

One source had a Milton citizens’ group erecting a mill in 1884, with other sources claiming that J.H. “Howard” Avery built both the mill and its associated dam. Possibly Avery headed the citizens’ group. The mill was said to be “his” in 1885 and 1893. (He would in 1904 be a “promoter” of a similar group: the Milton & Lebanon Building Association (with, among others, Frank H. Thayer))

In 1884 an organization composed of citizens of the town erected a shoe factory 160 x 40 and four stories high, with other accessories, at Milton, at a cost of $12,000 which was leased to Burley & Usher in 1885, who were afterwards succeeded by N.B. Thayer & Co., the present occupants. Misses’ and children’s kid and Dongola spring heel slippers are manufactured, and employment is given to 100 or more hands. Steam and water are used for power and the firm is not exempt from taxation (NH Bureau of Labor, 1897).

LEBANON, ME. Howard Avery has let one room in his new mill for parties to manufacture boat oars. Now is a good chance for farmers to sell a little good timber (Farmington News, December 18, 1885).

Politically he acts with the Republican party. He was Chairman of the Board of Selectmen during the years 1886, 1887, and 1888, was Representative to the legislature in 1889 and 1890, and was again elected a Selectman in 1896. … His official duties have always been discharged with a zeal and efficiency that have earned the hearty commendation of his fellow townsmen (Biographical Review, 1897).

J.H. Avery appeared in the Milton business directories of 1887, and 1889, as a Milton flour and meal manufacturer.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. J.Q.A. Toppan to J.H. Avery, land in Milton, $20; J.Q.A. Toppan to J.H. Avery, land in Milton, $100; S.E. Dixon to J.H. Avery, land in Milton, $50 (Farmington News, July 8, 1887).

Daughter Addie M. Avery married in Milton, July 26, 1887, Orlando W. Brown, both of Milton. She was a lady, aged nineteen years, and he was a clerk, aged twenty-four years. Rev. Frank Haley performed the ceremony. Brown was born in Wolfeboro, NH, in 1859, son of Bradley M. and Lucilla J. “Lizzie” (Mason) Brown.

One of his [John Avery’s] sons, Joseph Howard Avery, an active, energetic business man, is located at Milton. He has a family of wife and two daughters, the eldest the wife of a Mr. Brown of Tuftonboro. The youngest is but six years of age (Dearborn, 1888). 

PERSONAL. J.H. Avery will start a toothpick factory in Milton, which will give employment to fifty persons (Farmington News, May 18, 1888).

The Milton Selectmen of 1888 were J.H. Avery, Charles C. Hayes, and Chas. Hayes. (Charles C. Hayes (1822-1893) was a farmer and setter of water wheels; Charles Hayes (1844-1892) was a farmer).

Milton elected Joseph H. Avery to the NH House of Representatives for the 1889-90 biennium. (The biennium ran from June 6, 1889 to December 31, 1890). He was credited for 170 miles of [roundtrip] mileage reimbursement, which suggests a much more circuitous route than those presently available. (The representatives from neighboring Farmington, NH, were credited with 156 miles). He filed a bill in June 1889: “By Mr. Joseph H. Avery of Milton, ‘An act to incorporate the Nute High School and Library in the town of Milton'” (NH General Court, 1889; NH Secretary of State, 1889).

MILTON. Mr. James Hanscomb, for many years a resident of Milton, died Wednesday morning about 9 o’clock of pneumonia, following la grippe. Mr. Hanscomb was a man highly esteemed in the community and his loss will be felt. His wife was taken away but a few months ago, since which time he has lived with his daughter at the old home. Mr. Hanscomb was about 70 years of age and the last surviving member of a large family of brothers and sisters. He leaves two children who have the sympathy of many friends in their bereavement, the unmarried daughter mentioned above and Mrs. J. Howard Avery of this village (Farmington News, [Friday,] January 31, 1890).

MILTON. J. Howard Avery went to Concord, Tuesday, he being a member of the legislature (Farmington News, December 5, 1890).

MILTON. J.H. Avery has sold his flour and grain business (Farmington News, January 30, 1891).

MILTON. At the republican caucus Saturday afternoon, the following delegates were chosen to the different conventions. State – E.W. Fox and Frank Horner; Congressional – R.M. Kimball and C.D. Fox; Senatorial – Luther Hayes and B.B. Plummer; Councillor – Chas. A. Jones and S.W. Wallingford; County – Fred B. Roberts and C.W. Gross; Town Committee – Chas. H. Looney, president, B.B. Plummer, secretary, Luther Hayes, C.A. Jones, J.H. Avery, W.H.H. Pinkham, Fred B. Roberts, S.W. Wallingford, Charles D. Fox and Charles W. Gross. The democratic flag raising took place last Thursday evening. Hon. S.D. Felker of Rochester and Isaac Pearl of Farmington addressed a large audience at A.O.U.W. hall (Farmington News, September 9, 1892). 

The shoe factory operated by N.B. Thayer & Co was erected by him [J.H. Avery] and he constructed the dam on the Salmon River which supplies it with power. His building enterprises have contributed much to the town’s improvement. He now ranks as one of Milton’s most enterprising and progressive business men (Biographical Review, 1897). 

MILTON. Howard Avery is to build an addition of seventy feet to his shoe shop for N.B. Thayer’s use. The stones for the foundation are being hauled (Farmington News, March 24, 1893).

MILTON. J.H. Avery has received a part of the lumber for the building of the extension upon the shoe shop occupied by N.B. Thayer (Farmington News, April 13, 1893).

The Milton Selectmen of 1896-97 were S.W. Wallingford, Joseph H. Avery, and Freeman H. Lowd. (Hon. Samuel W. Wallingford (1837-1899) was a Plummer’s Ridge farmer and former NH State Representative; Freeman H. Lowd (1853-1933) was a Milton Mills storekeeper (his wife was a daughter of Ira Miller)).

Joseph H. Avery received appointment as Milton postmaster, June 14, 1897. Such appointments were political sinecures. As this one was granted during the term of Republican President William McKinley (1897-1901), one might infer that Avery was a Republican also.

He has recently received the appointment as Postmaster of Milton (Biographical Review, 1897).

MILTON NEWS LETTER. POST OFFICE REMOVED TO ITS NEW QUARTERS. The postoffice, which was to have changed hands July 1, was delayed, and did not come under new management till July 15. Postmaster Avery will have as his assistants his daughter, Miss Elsie Avery, and Harry O. Coles. The new rooms which have been designed for the use of the postoffice are finished and equipped in model style throughout (Farmington News, July 16, 1897).

Henrietta (Jones) Dorsey cast Howard Avery in a negative light in her testimony regarding the Jones Poisoning Murder of 1897.

Mrs. Dorsey spoke very bitterly against Howard Avery, chairman of the Milton board of selectmen. She says that when her mother died Avery desired to administer the estate, but his offer, which included the care of Mr. Jones, was refused by the children. She says that Avery has long desired to get hold of a certain piece of property in Milton that was owned by her mother, and she knows that the relations of her brother with Mr. Avery have been unpleasant (Boston Globe, December 18, 1897).

Of course, Mrs. Dorsey might not have been the best judge of character. At the instigation of the actual murderer, she and her sister had accused falsely their father. Avery having had unpleasant relations with the murderer might have been taken as more of a recommendation rather than otherwise.

Nute High School graduations formerly featured an annual undergraduate prize speaking contest, with judging by invited dignitaries. Miss Elsie G. Avery was said to have been the only member of her Nute High School graduating Class of 1899. She went on to attend Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY.

LOCALS. The judges of the prize speaking at the Nute high school on Wednesday evening were the Hon. Henry E. Cobb of Newton, Mass., the Hon. J.W. Sanborn of Sanbornville, and Willis McDuffee of the FARMINGTON NEWS and Rochester Courier. The sole graduate of 1899 was Miss Elsie G. Avery of Milton (Farmington News, June 16, 1899).

Joseph H. Avery, postmaster, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nineteen years), Emma C. Avery, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), and his daughter, Elsie G. Avery, assistant postmaster, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Joseph H. Avery owned their house free-and-clear. Emma C. Avery was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of George W. Rand, in leatherboard mill, aged thirty years (b. MA), and George E. Jones, a day laborer, aged fifty-one years (b. NH).

J.H. Avery appeared in the Milton business directories of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as Milton postmaster.

The NH General Court authorized incorporation of the Milton Water Works Company, March 21, 1901, with initial board members Malcom A.H. Hart, Charles H. Looney, S. Lyman Hayes, Charles D. Jones, Fred B. RobertsHarry Avery, George E. Wentworth, Joseph H. Avery, Ira W. Jones, Arthur W. Dudley, Everett F. Fox, Henry F. Townsend, Freeman H. Lowd, William T. Wallace, Frank G. Horne, Charles A. Jones, and Nathaniel G. Pinkham. It established itself July 19, 1899, with Harry L. Avery as its treasurer (NH Secretary of State, 1901).

U.S. President McKinley was fatally wounded by an assassin at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, NY, in the first year of his second term, September 6, 1901, and died eight days later, September 14, 1901. He was succeeded by Vice President Theodore Roosevelt. (There was not at this time any mechanism for the successor President to appoint a replacement Vice President). Postmaster Avery’s appointment was confirmed or continued under President Roosevelt, October 22, 1901.

MILTON. Miss Elsie Avery is visiting friends in Farmington (Farmington News, August 23, 1901).

MILTON. Miss Elsie Avery returned to Vassar college Tuesday morning (Farmington News, September 13, 1901).

MILTON. Miss Elsie Avery came home from Vassar College Monday in charge of a trained nurse (Farmington News, January 24, 1902).

Avery’s daughter (of his second marriage), Elsie G. Avery, died of typhoid fever (four weeks duration) in Milton, February 6, 1902, aged nineteen years, nine months, and nine days. She was a student [presumably a Junior]. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

The Milton Selectmen of 1902-03 were H.R. Jewett, J.H. Avery, and F.B. Roberts. (Haven R. Jewett (1856-1924) was a Milton farmer; Frederick B. Roberts (1863-1943) was a Milton lumberman).

Postmaster J.H. Avery served as a pallbearer at the funeral of the Hon. Charles H. Looney on Saturday, April 26, 1902 (Farmington News, May 2, 1902).

Avery’s father, John Avery, died of paralysis in Acton, ME, May 22, 1903, aged ninety-two years. W.E. Pillsbury, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Joseph H. Avery was one of the “promoters” of the Milton & Lebanon Building Association, when it was incorporated in February 1904.

Maine Corporations. Milton & Lebanon Building Association, Lebanon – Capital, $10,000. Promoters, F.H. Thayer, Boston; Joseph H. Avery, B.B. Plummer, J. Gardner Alden, Milton; Ira W. Jones, Lebanon (Boston Globe, February 29, 1904).

The Milton Selectmen of 1904-05 were H.R. Jewett, J.H. Avery, and C.A. Jones. (Haven R. Jewett (1856-1924) was a Milton farmer; Charles A. Jones (1851-1934) was a Milton farmer (Hydraulic engineer Ira W. Jones was his younger brother)).

Grandson Orlando W. Brown, Jr., then about seven years of age, accompanied his mother, Addie M. (Avery) Brown on a visit to his Milton grandparents.

MILTON. Mrs. Orlando Brown and son of Sanford, Me., are the guests of Mrs. Brown’s father, J.N. Avery (Farmington News, June 3, 1904).

Joseph H. Avery received reappointment as Milton postmaster, December 14, 1904.

The Milton Selectmen of 1906 were J.H Avery, B.B. Plummer, and E.A. Wentworth. (Hon. Bard B. Plummer (1846-1919) was a Plummer’s Ridge farmer and former NH State Representative; Edgar A. Wentworth (1856-1932) was a Milton teamster). By the terms of recently passed forestry legislation, one of the selectman had to be designated annually as the town forest fire warden; and J.H. Avery was so designated for this term (NH Forestry Commission, 1906).

Joseph H. Avery received reappointment as Milton postmaster, December 14, 1908. (He was succeeded by James H. Willey, July 26, 1913).

Joseph Avery, postmaster, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife of (thirty-five years), Emma C. Avery, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH). Joseph Avery owned their house, free-and-clear. Emma C. Avery was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Varney, an odd jobs laborer, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and Hugh Beaton, a B&M Railroad station agent, aged thirty-six years (b. OH).

Local. Asa Dearborn Perkins, a resident of Milton Three Ponds, formerly of Farmington, was drowned in the pond at Milton last Sunday evening. He, in company with Jewel Smith, went out quite late to take a pleasure ride and fishing trip. When about one-fourth of a mile from shore, and about one-half mile above the depot, one of the men attempted to change seats and the boat was tipped over. Their cries were heard by Howard Avery who lives near the pond and he at once went to the aid of the men and succeeded in saving Mr. Smith but was unable to save Mr. Perkins. The unfortunate man was a native of Milton, aged 67 years (Farmington News, September 9, 1910).

In March 1911, the NH General Court approved the incorporation of the Nute Charitable Association (as set forth in the last will of Lewis W. Nute.

Section 1. That Everett F. Fox, Charles A. Jones, M.A.H. Hart, Harry L. Avery, Walter E. Looney, Charles D. Fox, Moses G. Chamberlain, and their successors are hereby made a body corporate by the name of the Nute Charitable Association, and shall have and enjoy all the powers and privileges and be subject to all the liabilities incident to corporations of a similar nature, and by that name may sue and be sued. Harry L. Avery or Charles A. Jones may call the first meeting of said association by letter mailed to each member of said association at least seven days prior to the date set for said first meeting (NH General Court, 1911a).

Section 1 was amended by the NH Senate to add the names Bard B. Plummer, and Joseph H. Avery after the name Harry L. Avery (NH General Court, 1911b).

J.H. Avery appeared in the Milton business directory of 1912, as Milton postmaster.

Avery’s surviving child (of his first marriage), Addie M. (Avery) Brown of Sanford, ME, died of cirrhosis of the liver in Milton, September 22, 1913, aged forty-five years, four months, and fifteen days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Joseph H. Avery, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma C. Avery, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and his boarders, Walter R. Atwater, a Milton Ice Co. laborer, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), Peter W. Dwyer, a Milton Ice Co. laborer, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA), and Burley E. Sawyer, a leatherboard laborer, aged forty-two years (b. ME). Joseph Avery owned their house on Upper Main Street in Milton Village, free-and-clear. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Walter I. Burrows, a civil engineer for I.W. Jones Co., aged thirty-two years (b. MA), and Martha E. Clements, a leatherboard box finisher, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH).

Joseph H. Avery, retired, aged eighty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma C. Avery, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH). Joseph H. Avery owned their two-family residence on North Main Street, which was valued at $3,000. They did not have a radio set. They shared their two-family residence with the household of Lewis Dwyer, a fibre mill laborer, aged thirty-nine years (b. VT). Dwyer rented their portion of the residence for $10 per month; and he did have a radio set.

Emma C. (Hanscom) Avery died of arterio-sclerosis on Main Street in Milton, November 14, 1933, aged eighty-one years, eleven months, and six days. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

J. Howard Avery died of pneumonia on Main Street in Milton, September 27, 1937, aged ninety-three years, two months, and twenty-eight days. He was was retired merchant, who had resided in Milton for seventy years. M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate.

LOCAL. Several members of Fraternal Lodge, A.F. & A.M., of this [Farmington] town, and other local friends attended the funeral of Howard H. [J.] Avery in Milton, Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Avery was one of the oldest residents and one of the town fathers, having served as postmaster, legislator, selectman and in other public offices over many years (Farmington News, October 1, 1937).


References:

Biographical Review. (1897). Biographical Review: Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Strafford and Belknap Counties, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=C2sjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA110

Dearborn, Jeremiah W. (1888). A History of the First Century of the Town of Parsonsfield, Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=lgk1AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA350

Find a Grave. (2015, September 16). John Avery. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/152381849/john-avery

Find a Grave. (2015, September 16). Joseph Howard Avery. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/152380929/joseph-howard-avery

Find a Grave. (2011, August 9). Adeline May “Addie” Avery Brown. Retrieved from https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/74662187/adeline-may-brown

NH Forestry Commission. (1906). Biennial Report of the Forestry Commission for the Years 1905-06. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Iz0WAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA21

NH General Court. (1889). Journals of the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=72RMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA343

NH General Court. (1911a). Journals of the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vmQ3AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA726

NH General Court. (1911b). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=iT8tAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA317

NH Secretary of State. (1889). New Hampshire Manual of Useful Information. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=W0ZGAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA408

North, Sir Thomas. (1579). Plutarch’s Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=p7bTAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA146

Wikipedia. (2021, August 12). Wood Wool [Excelsior]. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_wool