Lemonade May Flow Unvexed

By S.D. Plissken | April 12, 2021

Among other matters of perhaps greater moment, Milton-Middleton Representatives Hayward and Bailey both voted last week in the NH House in favor of HB183Prohibiting Municipalities from Requiring a License for a Soft Drink Stand Operated by a Person Under the Age of 18.

Municipalities of other states and even Federal authorities have appeared in the news from time to time – in a very bad light – when shutting down and even occasionally arresting those that set up lemonade stands. Those thus imposed upon are usually children.

New Hampshire has not been so prone to this as other more-benighted places, although it has happened here too. Much of NH might retain still some shred of allegiance to its motto: Live Free or Die.

One might assume that passage of such a measure would be a “no brainer,” but some 163 representatives actually voted against budding entrepreneurs living free in the matter of lemonade stands. (Their names may be found here. It comes as no surprise to find that the representative who left her dog in the car throughout most of that warm day’s ten-hour session was among those voting “Nay”).

A majority of 211 representatives voted in favor. (The Speaker does not vote, except in case of a tie; and some 25 representatives were absent, excused, or did not vote).

HB183 passed in the NH House and goes next to the NH Senate. Governor Sununu has said in regard to other matters that he thinks the NH House is “silly,” so there is no telling whether he will deign to sign it if it reaches his desk.


I believe that starting any business should be as easy as a 10-year-old starting a lemonade stand. – Mark Cuban


References:

CBS19 News. (2021, April 7). Little Girl Holds Lemonade Stand to Buy Stuffed Animals for Kids in Need. Retrieved from www.cbs19news.com/story/43623611/little-girl-holds-lemonade-stand-to-buy-stuffed-animals-for-kids-in-need

CBSN. (2018. May 29). Child’s Lemonade Stand Shut Down For Lack Of Permit. Retrieved from denver.cbslocal.com/2018/05/29/lemonade-stand-shut-down/

Fox 10 TV. (2021, March 25). Mesa Kids’ Lemonade Stand Raising Money for Cancer Patients. Retrieved from www.fox10phoenix.com/video/915006

KABC TV. (2021, April 1). 4th Grader on Mission to Change World with Lemonade Stand. Retrieved from abc7.com/localish/4th-grader-on-mission-to-change-world-with-lemonade-stand/10450174/

MacDonald, Steve. (2021, April 10). What Did Deb “Hot Dog” Stevens Think About Mitt Romney’s Dog on the Roof Story in 2012? Retrieved from granitegrok.com/blog/2021/04/what-did-deb-hot-dog-stevens-think-about-mitt-romneys-dog-on-the-roof-story-in-2012

NY Times. (2018, August 19). Boy’s Lemonade Stand, Shut Down for Lack of Permit, Reopens With Fanfare. Retrieved from www.nytimes.com/2018/08/19/nyregion/brendans-lemonade-stand-reopens.html

Schiewe, Jessie. (2020, June 23).  Lemonade Stands Are Illegal in Most of the United States. Retrieved from www.okwhatever.org/topics/wtf/are-lemonade-stands-illegal

Washington Post. (2018, June 12). Bullies were Shutting Down America’s Lemonade Stands. These Lawyers Work for Big Lemonade. Retrieved from www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2018/06/12/bullies-were-shutting-down-americas-lemonade-stands-these-lawyers-work-for-big-lemonade/

WFMZ-TV. (2021, March 23). Lafayette College Sorority Hosts Lemonade Stand to Raise Funds for Breast Cancer Research. Retrieved from www.wfmz.com/news/area/lehighvalley/lafayette-college-sorority-hosts-lemonade-stand-to-raise-funds-for-breast-cancer-research/article_33597f4c-8c3d-11eb-b92f-83f91e0e887d.html

WGME. (2021, April 8). Bill Could Allow Maine kids to Operate Lemonade Stands Without a License, Retrieved from wgme.com/news/local/bill-could-allow-maine-kids-to-operate-lemonade-stands-without-a-license

Milton Policemen – c1891-1914

By Muriel Bristol | April 4, 2021

The first mention of a Milton policeman that has come to hand concerns the April 1891 arrest of one Correbin E. Murphy for drunkenness.

(An examination of Strafford County Court records might shed more light on exactly when Milton policemen began sending cases that way).

Prior to having its own policemen Milton had, or perhaps had instead, many justices of the peace – as many as fifteen of them in any given year – and usually had also a resident appointed deputy sheriff who reported to the elected county sheriff.

Neighboring Farmington, NH, had town policemen as early as 1879. In 1880, five policemen, presumably including its police chief, if any there was initially, published the town’s police regulations (as countersigned by the town selectmen):

POLICE REGULATIONS FOR THE TOWN OF FARMINGTON. Article 1. No awning shade or other fixtures, in front of any store or dwelling house, shall be less than eight feet in height in the lowest part thereof. Art. 2. No boxes, barrels, or any other article, “Seats for Loafers,” will be allowed to remain on any side-walk on the Sabbath, within the limits of the village of Farmington. Art. 3. There will be no collection of persons on the side-walks, or at the corners of the streets, so as to impede or prevent any person from freely passing therein. Nor shall anyone be suffered to push, insult or abuse by words or otherwise, any person passing on the side-walk or in the streets of thus town. Art. 4. No person shall smoke any pipe or cigar, in any livery stable, or any stable used in connection with either of the hotels of this town. Art. 5. Shouting, screaming and whistling, or making any other disturbance in the streets or on the commons, particularly in the evening or night time, is strictly forbidden, under the penalty of the act hereafter mentioned. Art. 6. If two or more persons shall be on the side-walk in a situation to interfere with those that wish to pass on the side-walk, in such a manner as unnecessarily to come in contact with persons whom they may meet, they and each shall be punished as in the statute hereafter mentioned. Art. 7. Any person creating any disturbance in any public place in this town, and, being requested by a Police Officer, shall not immediately leave, or having left by such request, shall return the same evening, shall be punished as above provided. Art. 8. No person shall be allowed to play ball, pitch quoits, or make any disturbance whatever, in any of the streets, lanes or alleys of this town. Art. 9. No person or persons shall be allowed to slide or coast in any of the streets, lanes or alleys within the limits of this town. Art. 10. It shall be deemed rude or disorderly conduct, and a violation of Police Laws, for three or more persons to collect after sunset in front of the Post Office, or corners of any street in town, and there remain after a notice by the police officer to disperse, and all persons without business of necessity so found standing or sitting, shall be punished as rude and disorderly persons, according to the provisions of Chapter 296 of the General Laws of this State, Art. 11. The proprietors or employees of any and all Saloons and Restaurants, are requested to close the same at 10 P.M., and not open them on the Sabbath. Art. 12. No person shall be allowed at any meeting at the Town Hall to stamp, whistle, or make any other disturbance whatever. Art. 13. No person shall leave standing or fastened any horse or carriage in any street in such a manner as to impede the free travel thereon, in the village of this town. Art. 14. Any person offending against any of these Laws, By-Laws and Regulations, shall be punished according to the provisions of Chapter 269 and 533 of the General Laws of this State. STEPHEN NUTTER, CHAS. WHITEHOUSE, ALBERT J. WILLEY, SAML. J. LEIGHTON, JOHN G.H. SMITH, Police Officers of Farmington. Approved by the Selectmen, June, 1880. SAMUEL S. AMAZEEN, JOSEPH L. DEMERRITT, BENJAMIN ROBERTS, Selectmen of Farmington (Farmington News, June 25, 1880).

The obvious unconstitutionality of much of this might be enough almost to make one want to violate Article 12 by stamping, whistling, or making some other disturbance at the next Town Hall meeting. One might hope that Milton’s police regulations, if any there were, managed to achieve a more perfect alignment with the natural rights acknowledged by the Bill of Rights.

The offices of Milton chief of police, as well as the usually lone Milton constable or policeman, were elected positions. None of those holding those offices in this period did so on a full-time basis, they all had also their principal occupations.

The Milton policemen of this period (that have been identified to date) were: James H. “Harris” Rhines, Fred P. Howard, Charles E. Remick, Hiram J. Burrows, Hazen W. “Wesley” Downs, Hartley A. Nutter, and Mylo M. Sinclair.


James H. Rhines, Jr. – c1891-14

James Harris Rhines, Jr., was born in New Durham, NH, July 8, 1855, son of James H. and Melissa D. (Boston) Rhines.

James H. Rines married in Farmington, NH, November 12, 1877, Emma [A.] Knox, he of Farmington and she of Milton. He was a farmer, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. D.H. Adams of Farmington performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, October 19, 1855, daughter of Hosea and Belinda Q. (Leighton) Knox.

James H. Rines, works on shoes, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma Rines, keeps house, aged twenty-two years (b. NH).

The first mention of a Milton policeman that has come to hand is the April 8, 1891 arrest by Policeman J.H. Rines for public drunkenness.

MILTON. Correbin E. Murphy was arrested by Policeman J.H. Rines Wednesday night and at the court, Thursday morning, Judge Fox sentenced him to ninety days in the county jail as a common drunkard (Farmington News, April 10, 1891).

Policeman Rines appeared next in the record conducting a liquor raid on a Milton hotel. Its owner or manager, John E. Ward, was born in Calais, ME, June 27, 1843. He and his wife Eva left their home in nearby Barnstead, NH, to manage a Milton hotel in February 1892.

NORTH BARNSTEAD. We are sorry to learn of the departure of our neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. John Ward, who have gone to Milton to take charge of a hotel (Farmington News, February 12, 1892).

MILTON. Officer Rines made a raid last Saturday night on Mr. Ward’s hotel, and found evidence enough to convict him of selling liquor without a license. Mr. Ward was taken to the jail and kept there until Monday, when he had his trial. He was bound over to the superior court, which will meet at Dover in September, and held in $200 bonds (Farmington News, April 15, 1892).

MILTON. A raid was made on Ward’s hotel some time ago and he was held under bonds for the September court. Mr. Ward continued the sale of liquor without a license and last week Thursday the state took the case in hand and carried Ward to Dover, where his trial was held. He paid a large fine and returned home (Farmington News, May 6, 1892).

John E. Ward appeared in the Somersworth, NH, directory of 1895, as a teamster, with his house on Main street, at its corner with Indigo Hill road. (John E. Ward of Farmington, NH, died of apoplexy, i.e., a stroke, on the Strafford County Farm, in Dover, NH, June 13, 1926, aged eighty-three years).

MILTON. Harris Rines has strawberries in the several stages of bearing, from blossoming to ripe fruit. They are potted plants, but have been kept out of doors most of the time (Farmington News, 1898).

James Harris Rines appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a shoe edge setter, with his house at 35 South Main street.

James Rines, a day laborer, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Emma Rines, aged forty-three years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Forrest E. Knox, aged twenty years (b. NH). James Rines owned their house, free-and-clear. Emma Rines was the mother of one child, of whom none was still living.

Another of the Milton Samsons is Chief of Police Harris Rines. Mr. Rines is very popular, and many of his friends assert that he is actually the strongest man in town. Chief Rines is 40, measures 5 feet 11 inches in height and tips the scales at 210 pounds. His commands are always promptly obeyed, for it is well known that the genial chief is not at all backward about enforcing them whenever occasion demands (Boston Globe, November 26, 1900 (See Milton’s Men of Muscle in 1900)).

James Harris Rines appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a shoe operative, with his house at 35 So. Main street. He appeared in the Milton directory of 1905, as a laborer, with his house at 35 So. Main street.

Milton Police Chief Rhines arrested and held in custody Genaro Calella, the suspect in the Hennessey kidnapping of 1908, until he turned him over to officer James Hoy of the Charlestown, MA, police. Before the transfer, Calella attempted to hang himself in his cell, but Chief Rhines cut him down in time.

HE TRIED HANGING, KIDNAPPER OF GIRL. Milton, N.H., May 18 – After his arrest for kidnapping seventeen-years-old Josephine Counihan of Charlestown, Mass., love-crazed Genaro Callela tried to kill himself in his cell here because he could not have her. Chief of Police Rhines, it was learned to-day, found the man hanging with a suspender around his neck from a peg in the wall where prisoners are supposed to put their clothes and cut him down just in time to save his life. Callela, who is twenty-eight years old and married, forced the girl, according to her story, to leave Charlestown with him under threat of death. He brought her here and put her in a boarding house, but while he was out getting his hair cut the girl appealed to the landlady and Callela was arrested. “I will kill myself” cried the man when he was revived after the attempt at suicide. “If I can’t have Josephine no one else shall.” He will be taken to Charlestown for trial (Meriden Journal (Meriden, CT), May 18, 1908).

James Harris Rines appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a laborer and policeman, with his house at 35 So. Main street. (He appeared also, under the alternate spelling Rhines, as a farmer and policeman, with his house at 35 So. Main street).

Hart Block - 547 White Mountatin HighwayChief of Police James Rines sought for arrest a State Highway road worker who had stabbed another road worker in their lodgings in the Hart Building in November 1909. (See Milton in the News – 1909).

MILTON. At the town meeting last Tuesday, Charles A. Jones, Haven Nutter and Samuel Drew were chosen for selectmen. Dr. M.A.H. Hart was re-elected on the school board for the next three years. Everett F. Fox town treasurer. H.L. Avery and B.B. Plummer town auditors, H.W. Downs constable, J.H. Rhines chief of police (Farmington News, March 12, 1909).

James H. Rines, Town police man, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Emma A. Rines, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), his brother-in-law, Forest Knox, a R.R. crossing flagman, aged forty years (b. NH), and his sister-in-law, Sarah Knox, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). James H. Rines owned their house, free-and-clear. Emma Rines was the mother of one child, of whom none was still living.

James Harris Rhines appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a farmer and policeman, with his house at 35 So. Main street.

J. Harris Rhines, a policeman, died of acute indigestion in Milton, September 24, 1914, aged fifty-nine years, two months, and sixteen days. (James J. Buckley, M.D., signed the death certificate).

James H. Rhines appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a farmer and policeman, who had died September 24, 1914, aged fifty-nine years. Emma A. Rhines, appeared as the widow of James H., with her house at 35 So. Main street.

Emma A. (Knox) Rhines died of fibroid phthisis in Milton, October 28, 1918, aged sixty-three years, and nine days. (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate).

Fred P. Howard – c1896-1912

Fred P. Howard was born in Rochester, NH, October 10, 1867, son of Elbridge W. and Sarah E. Howard.

Fred Howard married in Rochester, NH, May 11, 1886, Costella A. Scruton, both of Gonic, i.e., Rochester, NH. He was a shoe buffer, aged nineteen years, and she was aged nineteen years. She was born in Rochester, NH, September 24, 1869, daughter of Denman B. and Elizabeth Ann “Betsy” (Foss) Scruton.

MILTON. Chief of Police Howard captured a seven-pound lake trout at Wolfeboro Monday (Farmington News, [Friday,] May 28, 1896).

MILTON NEWS LETTER. Chief of Police Howard on Monday arrested a man, supposed to be wanted for a murder committed in Connecticut. The man proved to be a gold brick, however, as the right man was found in Massachusetts (Farmington News, August 20, 1897).

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a policeman and edge setter, with his house on School street.

Fred P. Howard, a shoe edge setter, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Costella Howard, aged thirty years (b. NH), and his child, Effie Howard, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). Fred P. Howard owned their house, free-and-clear. Costella Howard was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a shoe edge setter in Newburyport, MA, with his house at School street in Milton.

STRAFFORD CORNER. Mrs. Fred Howard and daughter, Effie, of Milton have been visiting at B.P. Berry’s the past week (Farmington News, August 8, 1902).

STRAFFORD CORNER. Mrs. Fred Howard and daughter Effie of Milton were guests of B.P. Berry’s family Wednesday of last week (Farmington News, June 19, 1903).

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directories of 1905 and 1909, as a shoe operative, with his house at 9 School street. His daughter, Effie Howard, appeared also in 1909, as a shoe operative, boarding with F.H., at 9 School street.

Fred Howard, a shoe factory finisher, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Costella Howard, aged forty years (b. NH). Fred Howard owned their house, free-and-clear. Costella Howard was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a having or working at a meat market on Main street, and as being a policeman, with his house at 9 School street.

Fred Howard appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a shoe operative, with his house at 9 School street.

Fred Howard, a shoe shop edge setter, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Costilla Howard, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). Fred Howard owned his house on the Farmington Road in Milton Village, free-and-clear.

Fred Howard, a retail meat market merchant, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-three years), Costilla Howard, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH). Fred Howard owned their house on School Street, which was valued at $1,800. They did not have a radio set. School Street lay between the Farmington Road (now Elm Street) and Church Street. It had three houses only, those of Hannah Wentworth, a widow, aged eighty-nine years (b. NH), Fred Howard, and Charles W. Wilson, a gravel company foreman, aged forty-one years (b. ME).

Costella A. (Scruton) Howard died of a pulmonary embolism at Frisbee Hospital in Rochester, NH, May 24, 1934, aged sixty-three years, and eight months. (A breast cancer operation was a contributing cause).

Fred Howard, a shoe shop shoemaker, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. He owned his house on School Street, which was valued at $1,500. He had lived in the same house in 1935.

Fred Howard died in Rochester, NH, February 1, 1950, aged eighty-two years.

Charles E. Remick – 1900-05

Charles E. Remick was born in Milton, circa 1856, son of Moses H. and Clara (Wentworth) Remick.

Charles Remick married in Wakefield, NH, August 26, 1874, Etta S. Horne, he of Milton, and she of Acton, ME. He was a farmer, aged eighteen years, and she was aged eighteen years. She was born in Sanford, ME, October 23, 1856, daughter of Edward and Louisa Horne.

Charles Remick, a day laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta S. Remick, keeping house, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and his child, Lester C. Remick, aged four years (b. NH).

Charles Remick, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Etta Remick, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Lester Remick, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Minnie Remick, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Forrest Remick, aged four years (b. NH). Charles Remick rented their house. Etta Remick was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living

Charles E. Remick appeared in the Milton directories of 1900, 1902, and 1905, as a policeman and shoe nailer, with his house at the rear of 70 Main street, in Milton Mills.

Remick, CE - 1909CHARLES E. REMICK appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as deputy sheriff, with his house at 42 Main street, at the corner of Charles street, in Milton Mills.

Charles Remick, a shoe factory laster, aged fifty-three years, headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-five years), Etta S. Remick, aged fifty-three years, and his child, Forest E. Remick, aged fourteen years. Charles Remick rented their house. Etta I. Remick was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Etta S. Remick died of stomach cancer in Milton Mills, April 25, 1910, aged fifty-three years, six months, and two days.

Charles E. Remick appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as having moved to Sanbornville, i.e., Wakefield, NH.

Charles E. Remick married (2nd) in Farmington, NH, September 16, 1917, Hattie M. “Maude” [(Kimball)] Hill, both of Farmington. He was a shoeworker, aged sixty years, and she was a housekeeper, aged thirty-two years. Charles Pitman, Justice-of-the-Peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Farmington, NH, circa 1884, daughter of Samuel W. and Addie R. (Young) Kimball.

Charles E. Remick of Rochester, NH, divorced Maud Remick of Farmington, NH, in Starfford County Court, October 15, 1919. He alleged extreme cruelty (one had to allege something).

Charles E. Remick, a general farm farmer, aged fifty-six [sixty-six] years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his housekeeper, Mattie L. Foss, a shoe factory lining in, aged fifty-one years (b. MA). He was divorced. They resided on Elm Street.

Harry Hamilton, a shoe factory laster, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-nine years), Minnie G. Hamilton, a shoe factory stitcher, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), his children, Rena E. Bennett, a private family housemaid, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Lena A. Hamilton, a shoe factory room girl, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Beatrice U. Hamilton, a shoe factory doubler, aged nineteen years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Charles E. Remick, a shoe factory leveller, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Harry Hamilton rented their house at 52 Central Street, for $20 per month.

Charles E. Remick died of angina pectoris at 52 Central Street in Farmington, NH, February 11, 1936, aged seventy-six years, nine months, and seventeen days.

Hazen W. Downs – c1901-09

Hazen W. “Wesley” Downs was born in Milton, January 25, 1848, son of Joshua H. “Hanson” and Emily P. (Duntley) Downs. (Blacksmith Hazen Duntley was his maternal grandfather).

Hazen W. Downs married (1st) in Dover, NH, February 12, 1875, Fannie M. Hersom, he of Milton, and she of Dover. She was born in Waterboro, ME, circa 1849, daughter of Jesse R. and Mary E. (Smith) Hersom. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-seven years.

Hasen W. Downs, a shoemaker, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Fanny Downs, keeping house, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and his daughter, Blanch Downs, aged three years (b. NH). They resided on Sixth Street.

MILTON. As the seasons change so do business men. Mr. Charles Looney has moved his goods and post-office into Wentworth’s Block on Main St., with Mr. Wesley Downs, formerly of this place, and has put in a large lot of groceries and crockery ware, and is now ready to do business o the square (Farmington News, April 29, 1881).

MILTON. Wesley Downs lost his horse Monday afternoon. While drawing a small load of brick up the hill on Silver Street, the animal fell dead in the harness (Farmington News, December 5, 1890).

Fanny M. (Hersom) Downs died of a “complication of diseases” in Milton, October 17, 1894, aged forty-six years, nine months, and two days. (W.F. Wallace, M.D., signed the death certificate).

MILTON. H.W. Downs spent last week with friends in Boston (Farmington News, April 21, 1899).

Hazen W. Downs, a teamster, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His house included his daughter, Lura Downs, a housekeeper, aged nineteen years (b. NH).

MILTON. An entertainment was given at Sid Nutter’s camp last Thursday night, by a Boston party stopping there, which was called “Dobbyn’s Rough Rider Minstrel Show, at Crape Hall.” Wesley Downs was presented by the party with a silver policeman’s badge (Farmington News, August 16, 1901).

The entertainment’s host, Sid Nutter, was father of another Milton policeman, Hartley A. Nutter (see below). John F. Dobbyn was a lieutenant in the Charlestown, MA, i.e., Boston, MA, police. He and his wife were frequent campers in Milton. (She rescued a drowning child in 1902, and it was he that escorted the alleged kidnapper of 1908 back to Boston).

Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1902 and 1905, as a truckman and policeman, with his house at 7 Silver street. Miss Lura Downs appeared in 1902 as boarding at 7 Silver street.

MILTON. At the town election Tuesday March 10, Harry Avery was chosen town clerk, Haven K. Jewett, J.H. Avery, Fred B. Roberts, selectmen, Elisha I. Libbey, treasurer, Wesley Downs, chief of police, and Dr. M.A.H. Hart on the school board. An extra appropriation of $800 was made for school. Horace Babb of Dover was present at the meeting and explained that the accumulation from the sum left by Lewis W. Nute for the care of the cemetery on Nute’s Ridge had for certain reasons not been used. It was voted that the selectmen in conjunction with a committee chosen from the heirs should be appointed to expend the accumulation in improving the grounds (Farmington News, March 13, 1903).

MILTON. Lura Downs died Dec. 31, after an illness of nine months of consumption. She was the only remaining daughter of J. [H.] Wesley Downs. The funeral was held Sunday, the D. of P. [Daughters of Pythias], of which she was a member, performing their burial service (Farmington News, January 8, 1904).

MILTON. Town meeting passed off quietly, and the following officers were elected to serve the town for the ensuing year: Selectmen, Warren Jewett, Joseph H. Avery, and Charles A. Jones; town clerk, Harry L. Avery; constables, H.W. Downs, Hartley Nutter; school board, Frank G. Howe, Forrest L. Marsh, Dr. M.A.H. Hart (Farmington News, March 12, 1904).

Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a truckman, with his house at 7 Silver street.

MILTON. At the town meeting last Tuesday, Charles A. Jones, Haven Nutter and Samuel Drew were chosen for selectmen. Dr. M.A.H. Hart was re-elected on the school board for the next three years. Everett F. Fox town treasurer. H.L. Avery and B.B. Plummer town auditors, H.W. Downs constable, J.H. Rhines chief of police (Farmington News, March 12, 1909).

Westley Downs, an odd jobs truckman, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his housekeeper, Martha G. Cushman, a private family housekeeper, aged fifty-two years (b. VT). Westley Downs owned their house, free-and-clear.

Hazen W. Downs married (2nd) in Athol, MA, August 13, 1910, Martha G. (Granger) Cushman, both of Milton, NH. He was a truckman, aged sixty-two years, and she was a housekeeper, aged fifty-three years. She was born in Fairlee, VT, August 8, 1857, daughter of Samuel L. and Hannah G. (Pierce) Granger.

Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a truckman, with his house at 7 Silver street.

Hazen W. Downs died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Milton, November 10, 1916, aged sixty-eight years, nine months, and sixteen days. (M.A.H. Hart, M.D., signed the death certificate)

.Mrs. Hazen W. Downs appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a widow, with her house at 7 Silver street.

Martha G. Downs, a widow, aged sixty-two years (b. VT), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. She owned her two-family house on Silver Street, free-and-clear. The other owner was Mary J. Twombly, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH).

Martha Downs appeared in the Brattleboro, VT, directories of 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1937, as the widow of Hazen W. Downs, with her house at 403 Western avenue.

West Brattleboro. Mrs. Effie Boynton is working as housekeeper in the home of Mrs. Martha Downs (Brattleboro Reformer, June 21, 1938).

Martha Granger Downs died on Sunset Lake Road in West Brattleboro, VT, September 28, 1938, aged eighty-one years, one month, and twenty-one days.

MRS. WESLEY DOWNS DIES. West Brattleboro Resident 9 Years, Leaves 3 Step-Sons. Mrs. Martha (Granger) Downs, 81, widow of Wesley Downs, died at 3.15 o’clock yesterday afternoon in the home of her step-grandson, Russell Cushman of the Sunset Lake road. She had been there since early in August. Last year she spent most of the time there. Her health had been gradually failing for some time. Mrs. Downs made her home for several years in the Joel Johnson house in West Brattleboro. Born in Fairlee, Aug. 8, 1857, she was a daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Pierce) Granger. She first married Peleg Cushman, of Orford, N.H., the ceremony taking place in 1892. He died about a month after their marriage. Her marriage to Wesley Downs of Milton, N.H., took place about 20 years ago. After Mr. Downs’ death Mrs. Downs moved to Rochester, N.H., coming to West Brattleboro about nine years ago. She leaves three step-sons, William, George and Henry Cushman, all of Brattleboro, and a step-daughter, Mrs. Mary Pinkham of Dover, N.H. She also leaves one brother, Charles A. Granger of West Newton, Mass. Funeral services will be held at Mitchells funeral home tomorrow at 2.30 p.m., Rev. J.H. Blackburn officiating. Burial will take place in Prospect Hill cemetery, Lebanon, Me. (Brattleboro Reformer, September 30, 1938).

Hiram J. Burrows – 1902-12

Hiram J. Burrows was born in Lebanon, ME, circa 1855, son of Edward and Mary A. (Ricker) Burrows.

Eliza Jones, Lucy Goodwin, John S. Parker, guardian of Lucy Goodwin; Ruth Lucy Goodwin, Simon Ricker, Jr., Lavinia A. Burrows, Mary Frances Burrows, Ruth Burrows, and Hiram J. Burrows, residing at North Lebanon, ME, joined with many other heirs of Benjamin Lord, deceased, in petitioning the trustees of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge for title to Brooklyn real estate held by Augustus Cruikshank, trustee (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 2, 1883).

Hiram J. Burrows married in Milton, June 29, 1884, Sarah E. Thomas, he of Milton and she of Newfield, ME. She was born in Newfield, ME, in 1862, daughter of Elbridge G. and Lydia E. (Lane) Thomas.

LEBANON, ME. Mr. L.H. Buttler has sold his farm and blacksmith shop to Hiram Burrows of Milton Mills. Mr. Butler and his son Clarence intend soon to start for the far west. We wish them success (Farmington News, September 25, 1885).

Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fifteen years), Sarah E. Burrows, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, John Burrows, at school, aged thirteen years (b. ME), and Eva Burrows, at school, aged nine years (b. NH). Hiram J. Burrows rented their house. Sarah E. Burrows was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directories of 1902, and 1905, as a policeman and blacksmith, on Main street, with his house on Highland street, in Milton Mills. (His house on Highland street was opposite the M.E. Church in 1905).

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a policeman and blacksmith, on Main street, with his house on the Acton side, in Milton Mills.

Geo. W. Marsh, an express teamster, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Eva M. Marsh, aged nineteen years (b. ME), and his child, Ithel E. Marsh, aged thirteen months (b. NH), his father-in-law, Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith (working out), aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law (Hiram’s wife of twenty-six years), Sarah E. Burrows, a shoe shop stitcher, aged forty-seven years (b. NH). Geo. W. Marsh rented their house. Eva M. Marsh was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Sarah E. Burrows was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a policeman and blacksmith, on Main street, with his house on the Acton side, in Milton Mills.

Hiram J. Burrows appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as a blacksmith, with his house at 20 Lebanon street, on the Acton side, in Milton Mills.

Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith (own shop), aged sixty-four years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah E. Burrows, aged fifty-six years (b. ME). Hiram J. Burrows rented their house on the Lebanon Road.

A major Milton Mills fire started in a blacksmith shop on Main st. owned by John E. Horn and occupied by Hiram Burrows in the early hours of Thursday, November 20, 1924. (See Milton in the News – 1924).

Hiram J. Burrows, a blacksmith (repair shop), aged seventy-five years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah E. Burrows, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME). Hiram J. Burrows owned their house, which was valued at $1,000. They did not have a radio set.

Hiram J. Burrows died in 1938. Sarah E. (Thomas) Burrows died in 1955.

Hartley A. Nutter – 1904

Hartley Addis Nutter was born in Milton, January 24, 1874, son of Luman S. “Sidney” and Arabelle “Belle” (Corson) Nutter.

Hartley A. Nutter married in Milton, July 20, 1893, Ada M. Huntress, both of Milton. He was a laborer, aged nineteen years, and she was a housekeeper, aged eighteen years. Charles H. Looney, justice-of-the-peace performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, March 17, 1875, daughter of Stillman S. and Francina (Lowe) Huntress.

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as an employee of the U.I. [Union Ice] Co., with his house near the ice house on the Leb. side.

MILTON. Town meeting passed off quietly, and the following officers were elected to serve the town for the ensuing year: Selectmen, Warren Jewett, Joseph H. Avery, and Charles A. Jones; town clerk, Harry L. Avery; constables, H.W. Downs, Hartley Nutter; school board, Frank G. Howe, Forrest L. Marsh, Dr. M.A.H. Hart (Farmington News, March 12, 1904).

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directories of 1905 and 1909, as an employee of the U.I. [Union Ice] Co., with his house at 98 Main street.

Hartley Nutter, an ice house engineer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixteen years), Ada Nutter, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), and his children, Addis Nutter, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Malcom Nutter, aged ten years (b. NH), and Francine Nutter, aged eight years (b. NH). Hartley Nutter owned their house, free-and-clear. Ada Nutter was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as an employee of the U.I. [Union Ice] Co., with his house at 98 Main street.

Hartley A. Nutter appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as an employee of the M.I. [Porter-Milton Ice] Co., with his house at 98 Main street. His daughter-in-law, Mrs. Addis S. Nutter, widow, had her house at H.A.N.’s, i.e., with he and his wife, at 98 Main street.

Hartley Addis Nutter registered for the WW I military draft in Milton, September 12, 1918. He resided in Milton, and was aged forty-four years (b. January 24, 1874). He was employed by Porter-Milton Ice Co., as a laborer. His nearest relative was his wife, Addie M. Nutter, of Milton. He was of a medium height, with a medium build, gray eyes, and gray hair.

Hartley A. Nutter, a foreman at the Milton Ice Co., aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ada H. Nutter, aged forty-four years (b. ME), his daughter, Francena I. Warnecke, aged seventeen years (b. NH), his son-in-law, William H. Warnecke, a laborer at the Milton Ice Co., aged thirty-four years (b. Germany), and his grandchildren, Thelma A. Warnecke, aged three years (b. NH), and Wilma F. Warnecke, aged one year (b. NH). Hartley A. Nutter owned their house on Upper Main Street in Milton Village, free-and-clear. Son-in-law William H. Warnecke was a permantent alien, having immigrated into the U.S. in 1909.

Hartley A. Nutter, an ice company laborer, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), aged fifty-five years (b. ME), Ada H. Nutter, and his nephew, Alvin B. Roberts, a leather-board mill machinist, aged thirty-four years (b. NH). Hartley A. Nutter owned their multi-family house on No. Main Street, which was valued at $1,200. They had a radio set. They shared their building with the household of tenant [and son-in-law] William Warnecke, an ice company laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. Germany).

Hartley A. Nutter died of aortic stenosis on Main Street in Milton, December 31, 1933, aged fifty-nine years, eleven months, and seven days.

Ada H. Nutter, a boarders’ hostess, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her grandchildren, Malcom H. Nutter, a laborer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Donald S. Warnecke, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and her boarders, Earvin Proctor, aged seventy-seven years (b. MA), and Arnold Nash, a wood factory laborer, aged eighteen years (b. Nova Scotia). Ada H. Nutter owned their house in the Milton Community, which was valued at $1,200. They had all resided in the same house in 1935, with the exception of Arnold Nash, who had resided elsewhere in the same place, i.e., Milton.

Ada May (Huntress) Nutter died in 1966.

Mylo M. Sinclair – 1907

Mylo Martin Sinclair was born in Stow, ME, July 13, 1879, son of George H. and Susie G. (Johnson) Sinclair.

Milo M. Sinclair married in Milton, June 16, 1900, Minnie F. [(Johnson)] Ellis, he of Dover, NH, and she of Milton. Rev. E. Johnson of Lebanon, ME, performed the ceremony. He was a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years, and she was a widowed shoe stitcher, aged thirty-two years. She was born in Milton, November 1867, daughter of James W. and Julia A. (Hatch) Johnson.

Mylo Sinclair, a shoe laster, aged twenty years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Miton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of zero years [two weeks]), Minnie Sinclair, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). Mylo Sinclair rented their house.

Miles M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as an employee of a leather-board manufacturer, with his house at 16 So. Main street. Mrs. Susie G. (George) Sinclair had also her house at 16 So. Main street.

WEST MILTON. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Johnson and their little daughter are spending his vacation from railroad work in this vicinity, visiting his aunt and sister, Mrs. George Canney and Mrs. Minnie Sinclair (Farmington News, November 22, 1901).

Milo M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1905, as an engineer for N.B.T. & Co. [N.B. Thayer & Co.], with his house at So. Main street, at the R.R. Crossing.

Mylo N. [M.] Sinclair, police officer, Milton, testified before the NH Board of Railroad Commissioners, December 13, 1907, regarding the accidental death of Lyman Welch of Wolfeboro, NH, which occurred on the railroad tracks a mile south of the Milton railroad station, September 26, 1907 (NH Board of Railroad Commissioners, 1907).

Milo M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as an engineer for N.B.T. [N.B. Thayer] Co., with his house on South Main street, at the R.R. crossing. His mother, Mrs. Susie G. Sinclair, had her house at the same address.

Mylo Sinclair, a shoe shop engineer, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton 3-Ponds”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie Sinclair, aged forty-two years (b. NH), his child, Arline Sinclair, aged nine years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, Woodbury Johnson, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Mylo Sinclair owned their house, free-and-clear. Miriam Sinclair was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

WEST MILTON. H.D. Johnson, who was stricken with ptomaine poisoning while on his run from North Conway to Boston Friday morning, was taken from his train at Milton and conveyed to the home of his sister, Mrs. Mylo Sinclair, where he received immediate medical attention. He is so far improved that he made a trip to Boston on Tuesday, returning to the home of his aunt, Mrs. George Canney, where he will spend the remainder of the week (Farmington News, [Friday,] February 3, 1911).

Milo M. Sinclair appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a shoe operative for M.S. [Milton Shoe] Co., with his house on South Main street, at the R.R. crossing. His mother, Mrs. Susie G. Sinclair, had her house at the same address.

Martin Sinclair registered for the WW I military draft in Rochester, NH, September 12, 1918. He resided at 6 Union Street in East Rochester, NH, and was aged thirty-nine years (b. July 13, 1879). He was employed by N.B. Thayer & Co., as a shoemaker. His nearest relative was his wife, Minnie F. Sinclair, of 6 Union Street, E. Rochester, NH. He stood 6′ 1″ tall, and had a medium build, brown eyes, and brown hair.

Mylo M Sinclair, a shoe factory rapid stitcher, aged forty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie F. Sinclair, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his father-in-law, James W. Thompson, aged eighty-three years (b. NH). Mylo M. Sinclair owned their house at 6 Union Street, with a mortgage.

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Minnie Sinclair and her daughter, Mrs. Arline Symonds, with her little grandson, called at Teneriffe View farm a few days ago (Farmington News, September 26, 1924).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Minnie Sinclair of East Rochester called on friends here Monday (Farmington News, September 24, 1926).

Mylo M. Sinclair, a shoe factory engineer, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie J. Sinclair, aged sixty-two years (b. NH). Mylo M. Sinclair owned their house on the Salmon Falls Road. They had a radio set.

Its a Dizzy Pace! (Country correspondence in the Rochester, N.H., Courier). Mr. and Mrs. Mylo Sinclair are enjoying a new radio (Boston Globe, March 30, 1940).

Mylo Sinclair, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie Sinclair, aged seventy-two years (b. NH).

SOUTH VERNON. Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Simonds and Mr. and Mrs. Milo Sinclair were week-end guests of Rev. and Mrs. H.R. Simonds. They were returning from Florida to their home in East Rochester, N.H. (Brattleboro Reformer (Brattleboro, VT), April 21, 1950).

Mylo M. Sinclair died in March 1956. Minnie Sinclair died in March 1956.


To be continued …


References:

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Hiram Burrows. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114726369/hiram-burrows

Find a Grave. (2002, August 22). Fred Howard. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/6722810/fred-howard

Find a Grave. (2014, January 8). James Harris Rines, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/123011041/james-harris-rines

Find a Grave. (2012, July 2). Mylo M. Sinclair. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/92968497/mylo-m-sinclair

NH Board of Railroad Commissioners. (1907). Annual Report of the Railroad Commissioners of the State of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=hmk0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA372