Celestial Seasonings – December 2020

By Heather Durham | November 30, 2020

December 21 brings with it the final solstice of 2020 – the Winter Solstice along with an astronomical once in a lifetime event that last happened in 1623. Here is a quote I selected to describe this solstice.

There is a privacy about it which no other season gives you … In spring, summer and fall people sort of have an open season on each other; only in the winter, in the country, can you have longer, quiet stretches when you can savor belonging to yourself. – Ruth Stout.

December 5. The φ-Cassiopeid [Phi-Cassiopeid] meteor shower, from the Constellation Andromeda, will show this date. It will be prevalent throughout the night.

December 7. Today, we will have the last quarter of the Moon.

December 8. The Monocerotid meteor shower in the Constellation Monoceros, will be on display. This will remain active until dawn.

December 11. The σ-Hydrid [Sigma-Hydrid] meteor shower, from the Constellation Hydra, will put on a show. As was the case with the Monocerotid shower, this too, should be visible until dawn.

December 14. Yet another meteor shower – the Geminid, in the Constellation Gemini, will sprinkle the evening skies on this date. Yet another one with prime viewing near dawn.

December 15. The Comae Berenicid meteor shower, from the Constellation Leo, will be great today. This should be around until after dawn breaks.

December 16. The Moon and Jupiter will rise closely to one another.

December 17. The Moon along with Jupiter and Saturn will rise closely to one another.

December 19. The Leonid Minorid meteor shower, from the Constellation Leo Minor, should be prolific today. It’s best show will be at 5:00 EST.

December 21. Today is the midwinter solstice – the shortest amount of daylight. Jupiter and Saturn will rise very closely to one another [The Great Conjunction]. These two planets haven’t risen this closely since 1623. The Moon will be at first quarter.

December 22. We will be delighted with the Ursid meteor shower, from the Constellation Ursa Minor today. This will be active throughout the night.

December 23. The Moon and Mars will rise closely to one another.

December 29. This date will bring us the first full Moon of winter. It is referred to as the Old Moon.


References:

Hunt, Jeffrey L. (2020, February 20). 1623: The Great Conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn. Retrieved from whenthecurveslineup.com/2020/02/20/1623-the-great-conjunction-of-jupiter-and-saturn/

In The Sky. (2020, November 28). Night Sky Guide. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org/data/data.php

Wikipedia. (2020, October 14). Coma Berenicids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coma_Berenicids

Wikipedia. (2020, November 4). Geminids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geminids

Wikipedia. (2020, November 29). Great Conjunction. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_conjunction

Wikipedia. (2020, November 26). Leonids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonids

Wikipedia. (2020, November 21). Monocerotids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monocerotids

Wikipedia. (2020, July 23). Sigma Hydrids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigma_Hydrids

Wikipedia. (2020, April 18). Ursids. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ursids

Wise Old Sayings. (2020 November 27). Winter Sayings and Winter Quotes. Retrieved from www.wisesayings.com/winter-quotes/#ixzz6f1YQxqKw

Milton Mills’ Dr. John L. Swinerton (1805-1882)

By Muriel Bristol | November 29, 2020

John Langdon Swinerton was born in Newfield, ME, June 28, 1805, son of John and Lydia (Dunnell) Swinerton (both born Salem, MA).

John Langdon Swinerton’s birth occurred in Newfield, Maine, June 28, 1805, and it was in that little town that he spent childish years. He was the recipient of an excellent education, the preparatory portion being obtained in the public schools of his native place, after which he took a course in Bowdoin College from which he graduated with the class of 1829. He then entered the profession of teaching, going at times to Danvers, Peabody and Salem, Massachusetts, and to Milton, New Hampshire. He was a member of the Congregational church and a man of strong domestic instincts, as was his father before him (Genealogical Publishing, 1915).

Dr. John L. Swinerton was active in Wolfeborough, NH, in 1831, “remaining but a few years” (Parker, 1901). (He would seem to have been replaced by 1834 by Dr. Jeremiah F. Hall, who practiced there until about 1840).

John L. Swinerton married in Wakefield, NH, April 25, 1832, Ann A. Robinson, both of Wolfeboro, NH. Rev. Samuel Nichols performed the ceremony. She was born in Greenland, NH, June 15 1803, daughter of Ebenezer C. and Anna (Avery) Robinson. (Her family resided in Bow, NH, in 1810, Newmarket, NH, in 1820, Stratham, NH, in 1830, and Wakefield, NH, in 1840).

He married April 25, 1832, Anna A. Robinson, born June 15, 1803, a daughter of Ebenezer and Anna (Avery) Robinson of Wakefield, New Hampshire, where he [Ebenezer] died November 17, 1849. To Mr. and Mrs. John, whose deaths both occurred in 1882 [SIC], there were born three children, as follows: Charles E., born August 12, 1834, died August 3, 1903, resided in Massachusetts, and married Abbie C. Wentworth, who bore him one son, Charles A. Swinerton; Ann Frances, born January 12, 1838, married Albert F. Wentworth, and became the mother of two children, Millie R. and Flora R.; [and] John Robinson [born December 16, 1840] of whom further (Genealogical Publishing, 1915).

John L. Swinerton of Milton, NH, appeared among Bowdoin College’s medical students in the February-May term of 1835. (His studies there would seem to have been interrupted for a time after this).

The Federal government discontinued the Milton Mills post office, February 20, 1838, displacing the postmaster, John Nutter, but soon reestablished it and him, March 27, 1838. John L. Swinerton replaced Nutter as postmaster at Milton Mills near the end of that same year, December 13, 1838. Such appointments were generally political sinecures, so we might assume that both Nutter and Swinerton were Democrats, at least to some degree, as was then-president Martin Van Buren.

Bowdoin College listed John L. Swinerton of Milton, NH, among its medical students in the February-May term of 1839. He was attending his first course of lectures. John L. Swinerton of Milton, NH, appeared also among its medical students in the February-May term of 1840. He was attending then his second course of lectures. (Rufus K. Pearl of Farmington, NH, Ebenezer Jenness of Rochester, NH, William L. Guptil, Orin Quinby, and William G. Smith, all of Somersworth, NH, were among his classmates).

The NH directory of 1840 identified John Hayes as physician at Chestnut Hills, i.e., South Milton, Stephen Drew at Milton, and J.L. Swinerton at Milton Mills. Drew and Swinerton were also justices-of-the-peace (McFarland and Jenks, 1840).

John L. Swinerton headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Ann A. Swinerton], one male aged 5-9 years [Charles E. Swinerton], and one female aged under-5 years [Ann F. Swinerton]. One member of his household was employed in the learned professions. His household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Asa Fox [and Bray U. Simes] and Alpheus Goodwin.

John L. Swinerton of Milton, NH, appeared also among Bowdoin College’s medical students in the February-May term of 1841. He was attending then his third course of lectures.

John Nutter resumed the office of Milton Mills postmaster, May 12, 1841, under Whig president John Tyler (“Tippecanoe and Tyler Too”). (President William H. Harrison (“Tippecanoe”) had died in office after only a month’s tenure).

John L. Swinnerton, a physician, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Ann A. Swinnerton, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), Annie F. Swinnerton, aged twelve years (b. NH), and John R. Swinnerton, a physician, aged ten years (b. NH). John L. Swinnerton had real estate valued at $800. His household followed that of Bray U. Simes in the enumeration.

Swinerton, Dr JL - 1851
Milton Mills in 1851. Dr. J.L. Swinerton’s house (marked in red) appeared in what would be termed later Central Square, across the road to Acton from Bray U. Simes’ store (just above the Tailor’s Shop), and across the Main street from Asa Fox’s house and store. Swinerton’s house was on or near the lot that would become the Central House hotel.

Democrat president Franklin Pierce appointed John L. Swinerton as postmaster at Milton Mills, July 6, 1853. Swinerton replaced Gilman Jewett in that office and would be replaced in turn by John Townsend, June 22, 1860.

John L. Swinerton appeared in the NH register of 1854, as a Milton justice-of-the-peace. In the same register, Milton’s physicians were Stephen Drew, John L. Swinerton, and D.E. Palmer (Lyon, 1854).

Milton – The School House – A good school-house is of paramount importance. On this point there needs to be a thorough reform. Nearly all the school-houses in town require more or less expenditure. Some should be rebuilt, others remodeled, improved within and perhaps without. If parents will candidly look into this matter, they will be surprised to think they have been content to confine their children so many hours a day, through a large part of the severest and most trying season of the year, in houses so ill constructed, so badly ventilated, so imperfectly warmed, so dirty, so repugnant to all habits of neatness, thought, taste, or purity. If possible, the school-house should be built upon an elevated plot of ground, with a pleasant and healthful prospect around. – D.E. Palmer, Geo. C. Colbath, John L. Swinerton, Committee (NH State Board of Education, 1854).

Mrs. Sophia ((Cushing) Hayes) Wyatt – a former Milton teacher – described Dr. Swindleton, i.e., Dr. Swinerton, in her 1854 memoir as being “… useful in his profession, and popular.”

Son Charles E. Swinerton received an appointment as postmaster at Union village, Wakefield, NH, January 31, 1857. (He was replaced by John Tredick, April 13, 1861).

John L. Swinerton, a physician, aged fifty-five years (b. NH [SIC]), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Ann A. Swinerton, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), Charles E. Swinerton, a physician [a ditto mark below his father’s occupation], aged twenty-six years (b. NH), Annie F. Swinerton, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), and John R.L. Swinerton, a physician [a ditto mark below his brother’s ditto mark], aged nineteen years (b. NH). John L. Swinerton had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $100.

Charles Robinson of Cambridgeport, MA, applied for a U.S. patent on his “improved clothes dryer” invention, February 19, 1861. John L. Swinerton and [his son] C.E. Swinerton signed as witnesses (U.S. Patent Office, 1861). Charles Robinson would seem to have been a relation of Ann A. (Robinson) Swinerton. He was an inventor, aged forty-five years (b. NH), heading a Cambridge (“Cambridgeport P.O.”), MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah Robinson, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. NH).

John L. Swinerton of Wakefield, NH, paid a $6.67 tax on his physician’s license in the US. Excise Tax of 1863. He was more particularly of Union village in Wakefield, NH, when he paid a $10.00 tax on his physician’s license in the US Excise Tax of 1864 and that of 1865.

Daughter Ann F. Swinerton married in Farmington, NH, June 17, 1864, Albert F. Wentworth, both of Wakefield, NH. She was engaged in needlework, aged twenty-five years (born Milton), and he was in the shoe business, age thirty years (born Wakefield, NH). Rev. Roger M. Sargent performed the ceremony. Wentworth was born in Wakefield, NH, April 30, 1834, son of Albra and Rhoda (Cook) Wentworth.

Son Charles E. Wentworth married in Wakefield, NH, October 23, 1864, Abigail C. “Abby” Wentworth. Nathaniel Barker performed the ceremony. She was born circa 1838, daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah (Paul) Wentworth. (She died circa 1870-79).

Swinerton, CE - NEF680516
“In 1865 [son John R. Swinerton] formed with his brother a partnership under the firm name Charles E. Swinerton & Company to deal in grain” (Genealogical Publishing, 1915). Their advertisement above from the New England Farmer, May 16, 1868

John L. Swinerton appeared in the Milton business directory of 1867, as a physician at Milton Mills. He appeared as a Wakefield, NH, justice-of-the-peace in the NE business directory of 1868.

John L. Swinerton, a physician, aged sixty-four years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield (“Union P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Ann A. Swinerton, keeping house, aged sixty-six years (b. VT [SIC]). John L. Swinerton had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $300. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Hosea Reynolds, a shop worker, aged fifty years (b. ME), and Mary Moulton, keeping house, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH).

John Swinerton appeared in the NH business directory of 1874, as a physician at Union, Wakefield, NH.

John L. Swinerton was an original incorporator of the Unity Lodge of Free Masons at Union village in Wakefield, NH, June 30, 1875, HIs son, Charles E. Swinerton, as well as Milton residents Bard B. Plummer and John U. Simes were also incorporators (NH Secretary of State, 1875).

John L. Swinerton, a physician, aged seventy-four years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna A. Swinerton, keeping house, aged seventy-six years (b. NH [SIC]), his sons, Charles E. Swinerton, a tea salesman, aged forty-four years (b. NH), and John R. Swinerton, a hotel clerk, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and grandsons, Charles A. Swinerton, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and John L. Swinerton, at school, aged ten years (b. NH).

Ann A. (Robinson) Swinerton died September 11,  1880. John L. Swinerton died of dropsy [i.e., edema,] in Wakefield, NH, November 2, 1882, aged seventy-seven years.

[Bowdoin College] Class of 1841. John Langdon Swinerton, b. 28 June, 1805, Newfield. Physician, Milton, N.H., 1832-60; Wakefield, N.H., 1860-82; d. 2 Sept, 1882 (Bowdoin College, 1912).

Dr. John Langdon Swinerton was born at Newfield, Maine, 1805; graduated from medical school of Bowdoin, 1841; a member of Strafford Medical Society in 1845; practised the medical profession during nearly fifty years at Brookfield, Wolfeborough, Milton Mills, and Union, where he died in the fall of 1882, November 2, at the age of seventy-nine [seventy-seven], regretted by all who knew him as a kind friend, a safe counselor, a good physician to the sick and suffering (Merrill, 1889).

References:

Bowdoin College. (1912). General Catalogue of Bowdoin College and the Medical School of Maine, 1794-1912. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=DjZJAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA341

Find a Grave. (2012, February 20). John Robinson Swinerton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/85239766/john-robinson-swinerton

Genealogical Publishing. (1915). Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qYZ0qtJfGJwC&pg=PA950

Little, George T. (1894). General Catalogue of Bowdoin College and the Medical School of Maine, 1794-1894: Including a Historical Sketch of the Institution During Its First Century. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=oq8TAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA116

Lyon, G. Parker. (1854). NH Annual Register, 1854. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=l-cWAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA103

Merrill, Georgia D. (1889). History of Carroll County, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=xmMKyZxlU5MC&pg=PA519

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). The Town Register: Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA188

NH Secretary of State. (1875). Laws of the State of New Hampshire Passed June Session, 1875. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=K5pGAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA491

NH State Board of Education. (1854). Report of the State Board of Education. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qYQ-AQAAMAAJ&pg=PR8

Parker, Benjamin F. (1901). History of Wolfeborough (New Hampshire). Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=tObqwKRR5yMC&pg=PA462-IA3

U.S. Patent Office. (1861). Letters Patent. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ELxAAAAAcAAJ&pg=PP512

Lesson in Survival

By Ian Aikens | November 25, 2020

For the quintessential American holiday of Thanksgiving that we celebrate tomorrow, it’s worth pondering if this is just another day to miss work or school, or is there something more significant to celebrate. Is there more to the tale of the Pilgrims escaping religious persecution in England, fighting starvation and the elements in the harsh New England winter with the help of local Indians, and celebrating a bountiful harvest in 1621?

It turns out the story is more complicated than the standard version we hear most often. The first clarification needed is the make-up of “the Pilgrims.” Of the 102 souls who sailed on the Mayflower, only 41 were actually Puritan Separatists, 18 were indentured servants bound as slaves for 7 years to their masters, and the other 43 were mostly Anglicans seeking economic opportunity in the New World. Another part of the standard narrative is that the colonists were hard-working, tenacious, and G_d-fearing. While there may have been some settlers who fit this description, according to William Bradford, who served as governor of the colony for 30 years, in his History of Plymouth Plantation, many of the colonists were lazy and refused to work in the fields. Stealing what little food there was became rampant, and the colony was overrun with corruption.

What caused the colonists to behave like this when their very lives depended on it? The arrangement was a joint-stock partnership named John Peirce and Associates between the colonists and a group of London merchants. It received a grant in 1620 from the South Virginia Company for a plantation in the Virginia territory. The terms of the alliance stipulated that each adult settler be granted a share in the joint-stock company, and each investment of 10 pounds receive a share. Herein lay the problem: “All settlers … were to receive their necessities out of the common stock. For seven years there was to be no individual property or trade, but the labor of the colony was to be organized according to the different capacities of the settlers. At the end of the seven years the company was to be dissolved and the whole stock divided.”

It should be noted that two concessions requested by the colonists in the original agreement might have made the arrangement in the New World workable despite its “It Takes A Village” emphasis. One was for the settlers to be granted separate plots of land near their houses, and the other was to allow them 2 days a week to cultivate their own land. The reason for requesting the two concessions was because most of the colonists had been tenant farmers in the open fields of an old manorial hunting park in Nottinghamshire, and though they had worked in the lord’s fields, they also had time to work their own individual plots for their own needs. As it turned out though, the London partners refused to grant the concessions and disaster in the New World ensued.

Per William Bradford’s account, “… that the taking away of property and bringing community would make them happy and flourishing … For this community was found to breed much confusion and discontent and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort. For the younger men, that were most able and fit for labour and service, did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without any recompense. The strong … had no more in division of victuals and clothes than he that was weak and not able to do a quarter the other could; this was thought injustice … Upon … all being to have alike and all to do alike, they thought … one as good as another, and so … did … work diminish.” In other words, removing the profit motive caused everyone to work less. If it hadn’t been for the Indians who helped show the settlers how to plant crops native to New England, and how to fish, catch eels, and harvest oysters—not to mention another ship that arrived from England in 1621 just in the nick of time—the settlers would have all perished.

The harvests of 1621 and 1622 were also dismal due to low production, so finally in 1623 Governor Bradford established a system of privately-controlled plots of land, which allowed each family or individual to work them and keep the proceeds. In other words, he abandoned the communal arrangement and established real property rights, and the results were spectacular.

From Bradford again: “So they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop than they had done, that they might not still thus languish in misery … This had very good success, for it made all hands very industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been by any means the Governor or any other could use, and saved him a great deal of trouble, and gave far better content. The women now went willingly into the field, and took their little ones with them to set corn; which before would allege weakness and inability; whom to have compelled would have been thought great tyranny and oppression.” By the harvest of 1623, “the starving time” became the bountiful occasion we now celebrate as Thanksgiving. Furthermore, by 1624, so much food was produced that the colonists were now able to sell and export corn.

Was this success a coincidence? A stroke of luck? A divine message from above? I think not. The private property system that Bradford established in Plymouth was in sync with human nature and the natural instinct to take care of one’s needs and one’s family’s needs first before those of strangers. Which is not to say that charity or compassion is not part of human nature, but “starving time” does not advance generosity. Only independence and self-reliance, which come from the freedom to determine one’s goals and priorities, foster true goodwill towards others.

One final thought on the survival lesson of Thanksgiving. As poorly as the communal system in place until 1623 turned out, consider that it was a (mostly) voluntary arrangement, since each adult man and woman chose to sign on with the trip to the New World even though the two concessions regarding private property were rejected. Even voluntarily willing to take a chance on a perilous journey to a strange land—and still many starved to death. Can you imagine the guaranteed fiasco had the system been forced on them? You only need to look at the outcome when forced giving, production, and redistribution are mandated by government. History is filled with examples, but China’s Great Leap Forward is the best illustration of what happens when property rights are trampled on: at least 30 million people starved to death from 1958 to 1962. With so many voices raised these days in favor of forced collectivism, perhaps they should learn the real lesson of Thanksgiving.


References:

Carson, Kevin. (2013, November 27). No, Stossel. The Pilgrims Were Starved by a Corporation, Not by Communism. Retrieved from c4ss.org/content/22792

Ceeley, Craig. (2003, November 27). From ‘Starving Time’ to Cornucopia: The American Thanksgiving. Retrieved from www.theatlasphere.com/columns/031127_ceely_thanksgiving.php

Franc, Michael. (2005, November 22). Pilgrims Beat ‘Communism’ With Free Market. www.heritage.org/markets-and-finance/commentary/pilgrims-beat-communism-free-market

Mayberry, Richard J. (2014, November 27). The Great Thanksgiving Hoax. Retrieved from mises.org/library/great-thanksgiving-hoax-1

Miniter, Frank. (2016, November 23). Did Capitalism Really Save The Pilgrims—And Give Them A Thanksgiving To Remember? Retrieved from www.forbes.com/sites/frankminiter/2016/11/23/did-capitalism-really-save-the-pilgrims-and-give-them-a-thanksgiving-to-remember/#44147f264ffb

Pease, Harold. (2018, November 15). The Mayflower Compact Facilitated Pilgrim Starvation. Retrieved from suindependent.com/mayflower-compact-pilgrim-starvation/

Milton Mills’ Bray U. Simes (1801-1885)

By Muriel Bristol | November 22, 2020

Bray Underwood Simes was born in Portsmouth, NH, circa June 1801, son of William and Hannah (Underwood) Simes. (His father, William Underwood, was a goldsmith. He died in Portsmouth, NH, April 15, 1824, aged fifty-one years).

Bray U. Simes left his native Portsmouth, NH, in the same year that his father died, 1824 (Brewster, 1853). Portsmouth had been capitol of New Hampshire until 1807, and was still its major seaport and entrepôt. Many of his relatives and associates were tradesmen or merchants of one kind or another. He presumably set out from home in order to open his own store at Milton Mills, which he ran there for nearly fifty years. (He preceded fellow storekeeper Asa Fox by about ten years).

A country storekeeper of his time did not simply sell retail goods. They functioned also as a middleman: taking in local farm and home products in trade, aggregating them, and passing them on to larger markets, hopefully at a profit. Simes’ Portsmouth connections likely came in handy for such trading. (The arrival of the railroad at Union in the mid 1850s would have made this easier).

NH Store Ledgers, 1820s
1820s [Exeter & Hampton] NH Country Store Ledgers (Liveauctioneers.com)

Not every transaction in Simes’ store would have involved an exchange of money, which was sometimes scarce. (Think of the current “change” shortage). Account books were kept. One might obtain a “credit” on the merchant’s books – likely after some “sharp” Yankee trading – by turning in some goods or product, such as foodstuffs, maple syrup, butter, leather, wool, firewood, etc., and then drawing upon that credit either then or later to purchase retail goods. Settlement of estates often involved a final settling of such accounts. Such establishments served often as post offices and were certainly active social hubs.

Bray U. Simes married, apparently in neighboring Middleton, NH, June 4, 1828, Martha Spinney, he of Milton and she of Wakefield, NH. Rev. William Buzzell (1775-1841), a Free-Will Baptist minister of Middleton, NH, performed the ceremony. She was born in Kittery, ME, circa 1808.

Simes, Bray Underwood (1801-1885)
Bray Underwood Simes, circa 1835 (Colonial Williamsburg)

B.U. Sims headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [Bray Sims], one female aged 15-19 years [Martha Simes], and one female aged under-5 years [Elizabeth E. Simes]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Jere. [Jeremiah] Goodwin and Nathl. [Nathaniel] Dearborn.

Bray Sims headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [Bray Sims], two females 20-29 years [Martha Simes and someone else], one female aged 10-14 [Elizabeth E. Simes], two males aged 5-9 years [William Simes and George Simes], one female aged 5-9 years [Caroline Simes], one male aged under-5 years [John Simes], and one female aged under-5 years [Ann Simes]. One member of his household was employed in Commerce. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Susannah Nutter and Asa Fox. ([Dr.] John L. Swinerton appeared after Asa Fox).

Simes, Martha (Spinney) (1808-c1883)
Martha (Spinney) Simes, circa 1835 (Colonial Williamsburg)

A certain “Ada” [Adaline Simes] of Portsmouth, NH, addressed a letter – in the period 1840-55 – to Mrs. Martha Simes and Bray U. Simes in Milton Mills, NH, in which she addressed them as Sister and Brother. Her letter mentioned family matters; the sailing of the ship Athens; visiting family; seeing an eye doctor in Boston; having received a letter from William, who had sailed from Charlestown, SC, to Mobile, AL, with William Sises; deaths in Portsmouth (Mrs. Betterham) and Aunt Dame; Mother having fallen on the ice and strained her ligament; and Louise [Simes] being determined to remain an old maid (Portsmouth Athenaeum, 2017).

Adeline [Simes] of Portsmouth, NH, addressed a letter – circa 1848 – to Bray U. Simes in Milton Mills, NH, in which she addressed him as Brother. Her letter mentioned ordering butter; family matters (sister Caroline [(Simes) Chase] having a cold); and Masonic activities in Portsmouth (John Christie having been elected grand master) (Portsmouth Athenaeum, 2017).

(Simes’ widowed mother, Hannah [(Underwood)] Simes, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), headed a Portsmouth, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included [her daughters,] Louisa Simes, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and Adaline Simes, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). They shared a two-family residence with the household of John Chase, a sea captain, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), Caroline E. [(Simes)] Chase, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), and their family).

Milton Representative Asa Fox submitted a petition to the NH legislature on behalf of Bray U. Simes and others, on Saturday, June 9, 1849. Their petition sought a reorganization or reform of the NH state militia. (Simes himself would have been above militia age).

Bray U. Simes, a trader, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Martha Simes, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Elizabeth E. Simes, aged twenty years (b. NH), William Simes, a student, aged eighteen years (b. NH), George Simes, a student, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Caroline Simes, aged fourteen years (b. NH), John Simes, aged twelve years (b. NH), Ann Simes, aged ten years (b. NH), Edward Simes, aged eight years (b. NH), Shadrach Simes, aged five years (b. NH), and Adaline Simes, aged two years (b. NH). Bray U. Simes had real estate valued at $1,500. His household appeared between those of James Parker, a weaver, aged twenty-five years, and John L. Swinerton, a physician, aged forty-five years (b. ME).

Bray U. Simes of Milton Mills, N.H., a trader, visited the Sons of Portsmouth Jubilee, on Monday, July 4, 1853. It was a reunion or “Old Home Week” of sorts for Portsmouth, NH, natives and those who had formerly resided there. Simes had moved from Portsmouth in 1824 (Brewster, 1853).

B.U. Simes’ perception and subtlety in detecting a sneak thief, circa 1855, would be remembered at the time of his death thirty years later in 1885.

Brother-in-law John Chase (husband of sister Caroline Simes), appeared in the Portsmouth directory of 1857, as a ship master, with his house at 15 Elm street. Sime’s mother, Hannah (Underwood) Simes, widow of William Simes, resided with them at 15 Elm street. Brother-in-law Edward F. Sise (husband of sister Anne M. Simes), appeared as a coal and crockery merchant at 75 Market street, with his house at 10 Middle street. Hannah (Simes) Underwood died in Portsmouth, NH, September 11, 1858.

B.U. Simes, a merchant, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Martha Simes, keeping house, aged fifty years (b. ME), Elizabeth Simes, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Ann Simes, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Adda Simes, aged twelve years (b. NH), and John Simes, a merchant, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). Bray U. Simes had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $3,000. His household appeared between those of Elbridge W. Fox, a farmer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and George Simes, a carpenter, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH).

Sister Adaline Simes – she of the letters summarized above – married in Portsmouth, NH January 29, 1862, William Stavers, Jr., she of Portsmouth, and he of Philadelphia, PA. He was a widowed clerk, aged fifty-five years, and she was aged forty-nine years.

Bray U. Simes was taxed as a retail dealer in Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1862, US Excise Tax of 1863, and US Excise Tax of May 1864. His store was one of Milton Mills’ “four regular stores” mentioned in the Vulpes Letter of January 1864.

Son Shadrach S. Simes, of Milton, NH, aged nineteen years, enlisted in Company C of the Ninth NH Regiment, at Portsmouth, NH, January 5, 1864.

Military Items. Two hundred conscripts for the 6th and 9th New Hampshire regiments passed through Louisville on Wednesday, to join their regiments. They are from Concord, N.H. (Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, IL), January 26, 1864).

He was captured by the Confederates on May 12, 1864, during the Battle of Spotsylvania, VA. He died in the notorious prison camp at Andersonville, GA, June 30, 1864. (Its commandant would later be hanged as a war criminal).

Bray U. (or B.U.) Simes appeared as a Milton Mills variety merchant, or a dry goods & grocery merchant in Milton business directories of the years 1867-681869-70, and 1871. (Son John U. Simes had also his own mercantile listing from at least this period).

Bray U. Simes, a retail grocer, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Martha Simes, keeping house, aged sixty-two years (b. ME), and his children, Elizabeth E. Simes, aged forty-one years (b. NH), Ann S. Simes, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Adda Simes, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Bray U. Simes had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $2,880. His household appeared between those of [his son,] Edward S. Simes, a carpenter, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Asa A. Fox, a retail grocer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH).

Milton Mills, 1871 - Detail
Milton Mills, 1871 (Detail). Ira Miller was shown as being still proprietor of the Central House hotel in Central Square. B.U. Simes’ store occupies the Central Square corner that would soon become “Ira Miller’s Store.” Asa Fox’s store stood across the square from Miller and Simes. Simes’ house, and those of his sons, shared a single large lot between Main and Church streets.

George W. Tasker and B.N. [B.U.] Simes were elected as Milton’s representatives in the NH House of Representatives, on Tuesday, March 12, 1872 (NH General Court, 1872). In the gubernatorial portion of that same election, Milton gave 222 votes (61.2%) to the Republican candidate, Ezekiel A. Straw (1819-1882) of Manchester, NH; 131 votes (36.1%) to the Democrat candidate, James A. Weston (1827-1895) of Manchester, NH; 6 votes (1.7%) to Labor-Reform candidate Lemuel P. Cooper (1803-1890) of Croydon, NH; and 4 votes (1.1%) to Temperance candidate Dr. John Blackmer (1829-1895) of Sandwich, NH (Boston Globe, March 13, 1872).

Bray U. Simes of Milton made out his last will, February 3, 1879, probably in Portsmouth, NH. He devised a token $5 each to his four sons, George Simes, William Simes, John U. Simes, and Edward S. Simes, as well as cancelling the $1,000 notes of hand given him by each of them. He devised to his daughter, Elizabeth E. Simes, $2,000. (Other children, Shadrach (d. 1864), Caroline (d. 1868), Adaline (d. 1875), and Ann S. Simes (d. 1878), died prior to the drafting of the will). He devised all the rest and residue of his estate to his “beloved wife,” Martha Simes, “to have and to hold the same, free from the control of any person, and at her disposal forever.” He also named her as executrix, and released her from the need to pay an executrix’s bond. John T. French, Geo. Annable, and Chas E. Green signed as witnesses, likely in Portsmouth, NH (Strafford County Probate, 102:420). (John T. French (1821-1889) was a Portsmouth merchant, George Annable (1820-1894) was a Portsmouth fire insurance clerk, and Charles E. Green (1857-1912), was a Portsmouth druggist’s clerk).

Bray U. Simes, a retired merchant, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Martha Simes, a housekeeper, aged seventy-two years (b. ME), his daughter, Elisabeth E. Simes, at house, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and his grandson, William C. Simes, works peddling fancy goods & c., aged seventeen years (b. NH). His household appeared between those of [his son,] Edward S. Simes, a carpenter, aged thirty-seven years, and Ira Miller, a storekeeper, aged fifty-three years (b. ME).

Bray U. Simes died of a heart ailment in Milton, July 15, 1885, aged eighty-four years, one month, and twelve days.

Martha Simes conveyed land in Milton to [her son] John U. Simes, for $1, as recorded in 1888 (Farmington News, May 18, 1888).

Martha (Spinney) Simes died in 1891.


See also Milton Mills’ Asa Fox & Son General Store and Milton Mills’ Ira Miller (1826-1902)


References:

Brewster, Charles W. (1853). The Portsmouth Jubilee: The Reception of the Sons of Portsmouth Resident Abroad, July 4, 1853. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=lipAAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA77

Brewster, Charles W. (1869). Rambles About Portsmouth. First Series: Sketches of Persons, Localities, and Incidents of Two Centuries: Principally from Tradition and Unpublished Documents, Volume 2. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=j6amPQWixN0C&pg=PA296

Christian Union. (1885, August 20). The Death of B.U. Simes, of Milton Mills, Recalls. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=37c_AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA7-PA29

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. (2020). Bray Underwood Simes (1801-1885). Retrieved from emuseum.history.org/objects/58174/bray-underwood-simes-18011885

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. (2020). Martha Spinney Simes (1808-c1883). Retrieved from emuseum.history.org/objects/58175/martha-spinney-simes-mrs-bray-underwood-simes1808ca-18#

Find a Grave. (2016, October 15). Caroline E. Simes Chase. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/171330981/caroline-e-chase

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Bray U. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612041/bray-u-simes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Edward S. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612171/edward-s-simes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). George E. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612433/george-e-simes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). John Underwood Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612563/john-underwood-simes

Find a Grave. (2016, July 11). Louisa A. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/166833508/louisa-a.-simes

Find a Grave. (2010, April 15). Sherdick S. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/51143762/sherdick-s-simes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). William Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612785/william-simes

Find a Grave. (2016, July 11). William Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/166833728/william-simes

Find a Grave. (2008, January 22). Adaline Simes Stavers. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/24110196/adaline-stavers

NH General Court. (1872). Journals of the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=CYAlAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA272

Portsmouth Athenaeum. (2017). S901, Letter from Adeline to Bray U. Simes. Retrieved from athenaeum.pastperfectonline.com/archive/94B6F817-A07B-4B05-BD9E-854194515470

Portsmouth Athenaeum. (2017). S905, Letter from Ada to Martha Simes. Retrieved from athenaeum.pastperfectonline.com/archive/DC85A076-B5EB-4819-9A0B-612659962236

Straw, Ezekiel A. (1872). Message of His Excellency E.A. Straw, Governor of New Hampshire, to the Two Branches of the Legislature, June Session, 1873. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3AYWAAAAYAAJ

Wikipedia. (2020, October 22). Andersonville National Historic Site. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andersonville_National_Historic_Site

Wikipedia. (2020, November 8). Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Spotsylvania_Court_House

Milton Grammar School Teachers, 1930-53

By Muriel Bristol | November 15, 2020

Continued from Milton Grammar School Teachers, 1908-30

Alvin A. Newell – Grades 7-8, Principal – 1930-42

Alvin Alton Newell was born in Farmington, ME, February 1, 1906, son of Alfred S. “Fred” and Mabel J. (Hardy) Newell.

Alvin A. Newell of Farmington, ME, a student at the University of Maine’s College of Agriculture, Class of 1928, placed on the Dean’s List in December 1925 (Bangor Daily News, December 3, 1925).

Alvin A. Newell married in ME, August 11, 1928, Lenora N. Abbott, he of Farmington, ME, and she of Phillips, ME. She was born in Phillips, ME, July 15, 1906, daughter of Frederick E. and Rose B. (Adams) Abbott.

The new teachers in the elementary schools are Mr. Alvin A. Newell, who has trained at the University of Maine, Farmington Normal School, and Keene Normal School; Miss Valna I. Lover, Keene Normal School, 1926, and Miss Florence H. Nye, Aroostook Normal School, 1926 (Milton Town Report, 1930).

Alvin Newell, a public school teacher, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Lenora Newell, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and his sister-in-law, Lillian Abbott, a private family housewife, aged thirty-three years (b. ME). Alvin Newell rented their house on Silver Street, for $20 per month. They did not have a radio set.

CHILD HEALTH CONFERENCE IN MILTON. A child health conference for babies and children of pre-school age will be held at the Milton grammar school on August 20, from 1.30 to 4.30 p.m. Good health means good citizenship. Every child attending will be weighed, measured, and given a complete physical examination by a physician. A card stating the height, weight and results of the examination, with recommendations made by the physician, will be given to the parents at the conference (Farmington News, August 16, 1935).

Alvin Newell, a public school principal, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of two years), Lenora Newell, aged thirty years (b. ME). Alvin Newell rented their house on Silver Street, for $22 per month. They had resided in the same place, i.e., Milton, in 1935.

Alvin Alton Newell registered for the WW II military draft in Rochester, NH, October 16, 1940. He was born in Farmington, ME, February 1, 1906, and was aged thirty-four years. He was employed by the Milton School district. His wife, Mrs. Leonora A. Newell, of P.O. Box 53, Milton, NH, was his next of kin. He gave the same address initially, but it was crossed out in favor of 21 Farwell Street, Lewiston, ME. He was 6′ tall and weighed 160 lbs., with gray eyes, brown hair, and a ruddy complexion. His name appeared on Milton’s WW II Honor Roll.

Alvin (Lenora) Newell appeared in the Lewiston, ME, directory of 1949, as agent for Prudential Insurance Company, resident on Allen avenue.

Alvin A. Newell died in Brunswick, ME, May 13, 1962, aged fifty-six years.

Notes from the Classes. NECROLOGY. 1928. ALVIN ALTON NEWELL. Alvin A. Newell, 56, of Lewiston, died May 13, 1962, at his summer cottage at Mere Point, Brunswick, following a heart attack. A native of Farmington, he graduated from Farmington high school, and attended the University of Maine for two years. He then taught schools in Union and Farmington, and at Milton, N.H. He had been employed for a number of years as an agent for the Prudential Insurance Co., of America. Mr. Newell served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He was a member of the Androscoggin Valley Life Underwriters Assn. Survivors include his wife and two sisters. Mr. Newell was a member of the Phi Omega Delta, which later became Beta Kappa (Maine Alumnus. June-July 1962).

Lenora N. (Abbott) Newell died in Lewiston, ME, September 25, 2000.

Ethelyn F. ((Gray) (Bickford)) Hull – Grades 1-2 – 1931-36, Grades 1 – 1936-45, Grades 2-3 – 1945-48

Ethelyn Frances Gray was born in Barrington, NH, October 28, 1899, daughter of Frank H. and Gertrude S. “Sophronia” (Cilley) Gray.

Sophronia Gray, a widow, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Ethelyn Gray, a dry goods clerk, aged twenty years (b. NH). Sophronia Gray owned their house on Main Street in Gonic, free-and-clear.

Ethelyn F. Gray married (1st) in Farmington, NH, July 21, 1923, Frederick Sherman Bickford, she of Gonic and he of Rochester, NH. She was a teacher, aged twenty-five years, and he was a telegraph operator, aged twenty-five years. He was born in Rochester, July 26, 1900, son of Charles E. and Cora I. (Shorey) Bickford. He died in Cambridge, MA, March 20, 1930, aged twenty-nine years.

DIED IN MASS. HOSPITAL. Fred S. Bickford, for several years a telegraph operator for the Boston & Maine Railroad at Rochester, died Thursday at the Charlesgate Hospital, Cambridge, Mass. Death was the result of heart trouble. Included among the ‘surviving relatives are the widow, three small children, his parents, two brothers, Harold of North Berwick, Me., and Everett  of Rochester, and a sister, Mrs. Laurel Roberts of Rochester (Portsmouth Herald, [Saturday,] March 22, 1930).

Ethelyn F. Bickford, a widow, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Franklin S. Bickford, aged four years, three months (b. NH), Leona F. Bickford, aged three years, one month (b. NH), and Natalie G. Bickford, aged one year, seven months (b. NH). Ethelyn F. Bickford owned their house on the Salmon Falls Road, which was valued at $4,000. They did not have a radio set.

Grades two and three were combined this year, enabling Miss [Mrs.] Bickford to spend more time with a large class of beginners. (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report, 1936).

Ethelyne Bickford, a public school teacher, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Franklin Bickford, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Leona Bickford, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Natalie Bickford, aged eleven years (b. NH), and her mother Sophronia Gray, a widow, aged eighty-two years (b. NH). Ethelyne Bickford owned their house on the Salmon Falls Road, which was valued at $2,000. They had all lived in the same house in 1935.

LADD STREET. Ethelyn Bickford and friends of Rochester were recent callers at Mrs. Anabel Glines (Groton Times (Groton, VT), September 12, 1941).

About Rochester. Mrs. Ethelyn Bickford of Shoreyville is enjoying a vacation from her teaching duties at Milton, N.H. (Portsmouth Herald, December 27, 1941).

Frank Hull registered for the WW II military draft in Rochester, NH, February 15, 1942. He resided on R.F.D. #1 in Rochester, but kept P.O. Box 16 at the Rochester post office. He was employed by the Hubbard Shoe Co., of East Rochester. His telephone number was Rochester 648-M. He was forty-two years of age, 5′ 10″ tall, weight 150 pounds, and had brown hair, blue eyes, and a light brown complexion. His contact, who would know always his whereabouts, was Mrs. Ethelyn Bickford, of Rochester, NH.

Ethelyn F. (Gray) Bickford married in Berwick, ME, September 26, 1942, Frank Hull, Jr. He was born in Rochester, NH, June 26, 1900, son of Frank Hull.

Mrs. E. Bickford, Frank Hull Marry. Announcement was made this week of the marriage of Frank Hull and Mrs. Ethelyn Bickford, both of Salmon Falls road in the Shoreyville section. The ceremony was performed last Saturday at the parsonage of the Methodist church in Berwick, Me., by the pastor Rev. Ralph J. Barron. They were unattended. Mr. Hull is a life-long resident of East Rochester and is a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hull. He has been employed in the local shoe factory but of late has been engaged in the ice business with his brother-in-law, Harvey E. Warburton. Mrs. Hull is a teacher in the Grammar school at Milton, and an active member in the Evangeline Rebekah lodge. They will live in the home of the bride in Shoreyville (Portsmouth Herald, [Thursday,] October 1, 1942).

Frank (Ethelyn) Hull, Jr., appeared in the Rochester, NH, directory of 1943, as a laborer, resident with Harvey E. Warburton.

Rebekahs Feature Valentine Party. Members of Evangeline Rebekah lodge held a Valentine party Wednesday night in connection with their regular meeting. On the committee in charge of the event were Past Noble Grands Mrs. Ella M. McKenney and Mrs. Elizabeth L. Varney and Mrs. F. Alta Carpenter. Washington and Lincoln’s birthdays will be observed at the next meeting, Wednesday, Feb. 24, when the committee will be Mrs. Georgia M.B. Tibbetts, Past Noble Grand Mrs. Ethelyn Hull and Janet H. Warburton (Portsmouth Herald, February 12, 1943).

Mrs. Ethelyn Hull, teacher of the first grade at Milton, was given a leave of absence because of illness until January, 1944, when she resumed her teaching. Mrs. Doris Taylor Fernald, another experienced teacher, took her place (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report 1943).

Ethelyn (Mrs. Frank Jr.) Hull appeared in the Rochester directory of 1948, as a Milton teacher, with her house on the Salmon Falls rd. R.D. 1. Frank (Ethelyn) Hull, Jr., appeared as an employee of Furbush Oil Co,, with his house on the Salmon Falls rd. R.D.

Frank Hull, Jr. died in Rochester, NH, September 8, 1969. Ethelyn F. (Gray) (Bickford)) Hull died March 1, 1982.

Marion J. Atwood – Grades 5-6 – 1931-42

Marion Janet Atwood was born in Pelham, NH, April 19, 1908, daughter of Harry H. and Carrie M. (Stickney) Atwood.

Marion J. Atwood, an insurance clerk, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), was one of thirteen lodgers in the Hartford, CT, household of Doris A. Lord at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Lord was a public school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Her lodgers were all young ladies employed in various clerical positions.

Peter J. Lover, a leather-board mill machine tender, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice M. Lover, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), his child, Wilbur C. Lover, a leather-board mill finisher, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and his boarder, Marion Atwood, a public school teacher, aged thirty years (b. NH). Peter J. Lover owned their house on Church Street, which was valued at $1,150. They had all lived in the same house in 1935. (Helen Chamberlain had boarded with the Lovers in 1930).

Marion J. Atwood’s younger brother, Harry H. Atwood, Jr., died in Lowell, MA, March 19. 1946. She received appointment as administratrix of his estate.

LEGAL NOTICE. ADMINISTRATRIX’ NOTICE. The Subscriber gives notice that she has been duly appointed Administratrix of the Estate of Harry H. Atwood, Jr., late Pelham, N.H. in the County Hillsborough, deceased. All persons indebted to said Estate are requested to make payment, and all having claims to present them for adjustment. Dated Sept. 3, 1946. 9-10,17,24. Marion J. Atwood (Portsmouth Herald, September 10, 1946).

Marion J. Atwood became assistant postmaster of Pelham, NH, June 1, 1947, upon the retirement of her father, who had been postmaster there since at least September 1944. She became postmaster in her own right, October 1, 1949, and held that position until her retirement in 1972.

Marion J. Atwood died in Pelham, NH, March 1, 1988, aged seventy-nine years.

Obituaries. Marion J. “Mac” Atwood, 79, died Tuesday at her home. Miss Atwood was the Pelham postmaster for thirty years before her retirement in 1972. She was born in Pelham and attended the Pelham elementary schools. A 1925 graduate of Nashua High, she graduated from Keene State College in 1927. Miss Atwood taught elementary school for 14 years in Alton and Moulton [Milton], N.H., and had also worked in Remington Arms in Lowell, Mass. She was a member of the First Congregational Church, the Pelham Senior Citizens, the AARP and was a former member of the Pelham Grange. She is survived by brothers, Willis Atwood of Pelham and Frank Atwood of Windham; sisters, Mrs. Harry (Marjorie) Page of Albany, N.Y., Mrs. Clifford (Elizabeth) Laws of Kittery, Maine, and Mrs. Richard (Phyliss) Ivers and Mrs. George (Shirley) Sutton, both of Pelham; and several nieces and nephews. Private family services will be held and burial will be in Gibson Cemetery. At the request of the family there are no calling hours. Memorial contributions may be made to the Merrimack Valley Home Health Visiting Nurses, P.O. Box 216, Continental Boulevard, Merrimack, N.H. Arrangements are by the Goundrey Funeral Home of Salem (Lawrence Eagle-Tribune, [Friday,] March 4, 1988).

Bernice L. (Adams) Parshley – Grades 3 – 1934-35

Bernice Leighton Adams was born in Farmington, NH, July 1, 1901, daughter of Frank A. and Rachel K. (Leighton) Adams.

Bernice Leighton Adams married in Farmington, NH, November 23, 1924, Richmond H. Parshley, she of Farmington and he of Rochester, NH. She was a teacher, aged twenty-three years, and he was a drug clerk, aged twenty-five years. He was born in Strafford, NH, May 21, 1899, son of Charles E. and Mary E. (Jewell) Parshley.

PARSHLEY-ADAMS. Richard Hobson Parshley of Rochester and Miss Bernice Leighton Adams, a popular teacher in the Glen street school, were quietly united in marriage Sunday afternoon at four o’clock in the parsonage of the Congregational church, with the double ring service, by Rev. George W. Clark. Percy Varney of Rochester and Miss Doris Willoughby of Plymouth, a teacher in the Glen street school, attended the couple. The bride was becomingly gowned in blue silk. The groom is a representative young man in Rochester, was in service during the World war and for some time has been employed as clerk in the H.T. Hayes drug store. The bride, a daughter of Selectman and Mrs. Frank A. Adams, is a graduate of Farmington high school and Dover Business college. She holds a state certificate for teaching and has taught in Harrisville and Union, but for the past two years has had charge of the third grade in Glen street school. The couple left on the Sunday evening train for Portland for their honeymoon. On their return Mrs. Parshley will continue her school duties here for the remainder of the year, and they will make their home in Farmington and Rochester. The happy couple has legions of friends who tender their congratulations and best wishes tor many years of happy wedded life (Farmington News, November 28, 1924).

Richmond H. Parshley, a Cloverdale store manager, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of four [six] years), Bernice L. Parshley, a public school teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and his children, Ardys L. Parshley, aged four years (b. NH), Richmond H. Parshley, aged three years (b. NH), and Frank C. Parshley, aged two years (b. NH). Richmond H. Parshley owned their house at 13 Bunker Street, which was valued at $1,300. They had a radio set.

In my last report I made the suggestion that assistance would have to be provided for the teacher in grades three and four because of the large enrollment. The State Department of Education consented to bear the expense of another teacher for the remainder of the year could one be provided and the plan was developed whereby seats and desks were placed in the assembly room and Mrs. Bernice Parshley hired to complete the year (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report, 1935).

Richmond Parshley, a retail grocery store [manager], aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of four [six] years), Bernice Parshley, a public school teacher, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), and his children, Ardys Parshley, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Richmond Parshley, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Frank Parshley, aged twelve years (b. NH), Lois Parshley, aged nine years (b. NH), and Floyd Parshley, aged four years (b. NH). Richmond H. Parshley owned their house on Mount Pleasant Street, which was valued at $1,700. They had all resided in the same house in 1935 (except Floyd Parshley).

Bernice L. (Adams) Parshley died in Rochester, NH, January 20, 1990. Richmond H.D. Parshley died in Rochester, NH, December 27, 1990.

Dorothy E. Whiting – Grade 3 – 1935-36

Dorothy E. Whiting was born in Conway, NH, September 22, 1909, daughter of Claud D. and Edith L. (Ames) Whiting.

Whiting, Dorothy E - Plymouth State, 1931
Dorothy Elizabeth Whiting, Plymouth State College, 1931

Claude G. Whiting, a Navy yard ship fitter, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Edith L. Whiting, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and his child, Dorothy E. Whiting, aged twenty years (b. NH). Claude G. Whiting owned their house on Atlantic Heights, which was valued at $2,500. They had a radio set.

EPPING. Miss Dorothy Whiting will spend the vacation from her teaching duties at her home in Dover (Portsmouth Herald, March 30, 1934).

Miss Whiting came next to Milton from her former teaching position in Epping, NH.

In September 1935, Mrs. [Miss] Dorothy Whiting of Dover replaced Mrs. Parshley who resigned (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report, 1935).

Miss Whiting was elected to a position in Rochester and Miss Mary Willard, a graduate of Keene Teachers’ College who had been teaching for me in Rollinsford, was elected to fill this vacancy (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report, 1936).

Claud Whiting, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edith L. Whiting, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and his child, Dorothy Whiting, a public school teacher, aged thirty years (b. NH). Claud Whiting owned their house on Elmwood Avenue, which was valued at $1,900. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

School Head Appointed by Dover Board. William S. Hounsell, 46, of Conway was appointed headmaster of Dover High school last week by the Dover board of education upon recommendation of Dover Supt. of Schools Murray Watson. Mr. Hounsell formerly was headmaster of Colebrook academy for five year. He is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire with graduate work there and at Boston university. He was Headmaster of Simonds Free High school in Warner for six years, Durham Junior High school for four years and Bartlett High school for seven years. In addition to the new headmaster, the School Board elected Wallace A. Welch of South Portland, Me., as the new teacher in shop welding. He has twenty years of experience at Littleton High school. Miss Dorothy Whiting of this city was added to the grade school staff. She has had six years of experience at Rochester (Portsmouth Herald, September 7, 1943).

Teachers College Seacoast Unit Elects Officers. Herbert Arnold of Exeter was elected president of the Seacoast Alumni Unit of Plymouth Teachers College at the final meeting of season, recently in the Women’s City Club. Other officers are Miss Alice Jeffords, vice president, Miss Dorothy Whiting of Dover, recording secretary, Miss Alice Downing of Hampton, corresponding secretary, and Miss Edna MacAaskill of Exeter, treasurer. Nominating committee members bringing in the slate were Mrs. Frances Leavitt, Miss Margaret Brown and Mrs. Olive Saloman of Hampton The group voted to give a scholarship of $75 to a student attending the college. Scholarship committee members were Miss Downing, Mrs. Saloman and Mrs. Mildred Peterson of Hampton (Portsmouth Herald, May 22, 1954).

Accident Report. Two cars were damaged in an accident at the intersection of State and Union streets yesterday at 3:15 p.m. Operators were Donna F . Brown, 38, of 186 Madison St., and Dorothy E. Whiting, 62, 7 Fairview Ave., Dover, police said. Front damage occurred to Brown car and damage in rear fender areas occurred to the Whiting car. (Portsmouth Herald, September 15, 1972).

Dorothy E. Whiting died in Dover, NH, in 1987.

Louise F. Sayward – Grades 2-3 – 1936-38

Sayward, Louise F - Keene State College, 1934
Louise Florence Sayward, Keene State College, 1934

Louise F. Sayward was born in Manchester, NH, September 25, 1913, daughter of Harold A. and Laura (Clement) Sayward.

H.A. Sayward, a fire department fireman, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Manchester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Lura C. Sayward, aged forty-four years (b. NH), and his children, Eleanor V. Sayward, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Louise F. Sayward, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Marion C. Sayward, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and David A. Sayward, aged twelve years (b. NH). H.A. Sayward rented their house at 28 Warren Street.

Mrs. Helen Chamberlain was succeeded by Miss Louise Sayward, who is a graduate of Keene Teachers’ College, with experience. (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report, 1936).

Sumner W. Pratt, a private practice dentist, aged fifty-nine years (ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace Pratt, aged forty-five years (b. MA), his child, Jean Pratt, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and his lodgers, Maria Laurion, a shoe shop presser, aged fifteen years (b. Canada), and Louise Sayward, a public school teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. NH). Sumner W. Pratt owned their house at 100 Summer Street, which was valued at $2,000. They did not have a radio set.

Louise Florence Sayward married in Manchester, NH, November 14, 1942, Henry Eaton Noyes, she of Manchester and he of Portland, ME. She was a teacher, aged twenty-nine years, and he was a meter technician, aged thirty-five years. He was born in Stonington, ME, May 30, 1907, son of George B. and Bessie H. (Eaton) Noyes.

School Board to Act on Job Vacancies. … The resignation of Mrs. Louise Sayward Noyes of Manchester, for a number of years opportunity teacher in the [Rochester, NH] schools, was announced yesterday by Superintendent Rand (Portsmouth Herald, July 16, 1943).

Henry E. Noyes died in Cape Elizabeth, ME, October 3, 1999. Louise F. (Sayward) Noyes died in Portland, ME, April 27, 2012.

Mary E. Willard – Grade 4 – 1936-39, 1940-44

Mary Elizabeth Willard was born in Boston, MA, December 18, 1909, daughter of Marshall and Marguerite J. (Gowing) Willard.

Arthur Maynard, a chair shop seater, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Keene, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Marguerite Maynard, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), his step-daughters, Mildred Bruder, a shoe shop stitcher, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Elizabeth Willard, aged twenty years (b. MA), Margaret Willard, aged fourteen years (b. MA), and his son, Harrison Maynard, aged seven years (b. NH). Arthur Maynard rented their house on West Street, for $20 per month. They had a radio set.

Miss Mary Willard, teacher of Grade Four at Milton Village, asked for a leave of absence to secure her degree at Keene Teachers’ College. She will return February third. Mrs. Clara Roberts Henderson of So. Berwick, Maine, a former teacher in Rollinsford under my supervision, was engaged to fill the position for the half year. Mrs. Henderson was a substitute of wide experience who could fill any elementary  position. She was loved by both teachers and pupils in Milton and gloom was cast over the Christmas exercises by her untimely and tragic death in an automobile accident just before the Christmas vacation. Mrs. Ellen Tuttle, formerly principal of the school at Gonic, and a Rochester substitute teacher, was loaned to us by Superintendent Arthur Rollins (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report, 1940).

Leland Maxfield, a Community minister, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elizabeth Maxfield, aged twenty-seven years (b. NY), and his boarders, Mary E. Willard, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), and Mary E. Sherborne, aged twenty-three years (b. ME).

The Milton Grammar school building took fire in the early hours of Tuesday, January 6, 1942.

Miss Mary Willard, teacher of grade four, resigned to take a much better position in Connecticut and Miss Beatrice Duquette of East Rochester, a graduate of Plymouth Teachers’ College, succeeded Miss Willard (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report 1943).

Miss Betty Willard, former primary teacher here, now principal of a Manchester, Conn., school, writes she has had a busy year. She is attending the University of Connecticut this summer, working on her Master’s degree. Miss Willard sent best wishes to her friends in Decatur and enclosed a check to keep the Messenger coming her way (Wise Count Messenger, Decatur, TX), June 15, 1950).

She married in Westwood, MA, in 1952, Robert Eldred “Eldred” Doyle. He was born in Tolland, CT, November 12, 1905.

Tolland. R. Eldred Doyle is a patient at the Manchester Hospital (Hartford Courant, February 28, 1960).

Mary W. Doyle appeared in the Vernon-Rockwell, CT, directory of 1962, as the widow of Eldred W. Doyle, and as having removed to Texas. (R. Eldred Doyle appeared as having died April 6, 1960, aged fifty four years).

Former Decatur Teacher Retires. Mrs. Betty Willard Doyle, fourth grade teacher at Highland Park school in Manchester, Conn., is retiring after teaching 33 years, 23 of them in Manchester. More than 300 attended the open house held in her honor. Mrs. Doyle is a former Decatur resident and former member of the public school faculty here and at Bridgeport (Wise County Messenger (Decatur, TX), June 13, 1968).

Mary E. “Betty” (Willard) Doyle died in Winchester, NH, February 12, 1993.

Doris L. (Fortier) Chase – Grades 2-3 – 1938-70

Doris Lavinia Fortier was born in Chocorua, i.e., the Chocorua village of Tamworth, NH, May 6, 1911, daughter of Albert J. and Nellie Weymouth Lane (Hobbs) Fortier.

Doris Lavinia Fortier married in Sanbornville, i.e., the Sanbornville village of Wakefield, NH, May 20, 1934, Leslie Oliver Chase, she of Chocorua and he of Milton. She was a school teacher, aged twenty-two years, and he was a shipper, aged twenty-three years. He was born in East Rochester, NH, circa 1910, son of George H. and Adeline (Willey) Chase.

Leslie O. Chase, a leather-board co. foreman, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Doris Chase, a public school teacher, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), his children, Leslie B. Chase, aged five years (b. NH), and Nancy W. Chase, aged three years (b. NH), his housekeeper, Florence W. Ford, a private family housekeeper, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his lodger, Ruth Whitehouse, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-five years (b. NH). Leslie O. Chase owned their house in the Milton Community, which was valued at $1,500. Leslie O. and Doris Chase had lived in the “same place,” i.e., Milton, in 1935.

The Milton Grammar school building took fire in the early hours of Tuesday, January 6, 1942.

Sports Club Maps Winter Carnival. The Teneriffe Sports club of Milton, announced Monday that it hold its annual winter carnival on Feb. 28 and ski meet on March 1. Stanley Tanner is chairman of the general committee, assisted by Charles Whitehouse and Bard Plummer. Harold Stillings, Adelbert Varney and Charles Tanner are in charge of the carnival ball. Everett Mclntire, Forrest Sceggell and Harold Stillings are on the ski committee. The carnival queen committee Is headed by “Red” Stillings, assisted by Albert Columbus, Hervey Tanner and Leslie Chase. Mrs. Doris Chase, Yvonne Tanner, Miss Ruth Whitehouse and Irene Whitehouse will serve on the button committee (Portsmouth Herald, February 17, 1942).

Leslie O. Chase died in Milton, March 11, 1992. Doris L. (Fortier) Chase died in Milton, September 6, 1995.

Clara H. (Roberts) Henderson – Grade 4 – 1940

Clara H. Roberts was born in Rollinsford, NH, January 7, 1894, daughter of Joseph D. and Elizabeth A. “Addie” (Littlefield) Roberts.

Clara H. Roberts married in Dover, NH, March 31, 1920, Wilbur A. Henderson, she of Rollinsford, NH, and he of Dover. She was at home, aged twenty-six years, and he was a machine operator, aged twenty-nine years. He was born in Dover, NH, circa 1891, son of Frank H. and Amelia J. Henderson.

Addie E. Roberts, a widow, aged seventy-five years (b. ME), headed a South Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her son-in-law, Wilber Henderson, a retail grocery salesman, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), her daughter (and his wife of ten years), Clara Henderson, a public school teacher, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and her grandchildren, Philip Henderson, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Dorothy S. Henderson, aged six years (b. ME), and Ruth H. Henderson, aged six years (b. ME). Addie E. Roberts owned their house, which was valued at $5,000. They had a radio set.

South Berwick. Mrs. Clara Henderson of Main street has accepted a position as teacher of the fourth grade at Milton (Portsmouth Herald, August 26, 1940).

Clara H. (Roberts) Henderson died in an auto accident in Rochester, NH, December 13, 1940, aged forty-six years.

So. Berwick Woman Killed In Auto-Truck Crash At Rochester. Mrs. Clara R. Henderson, 46-year-old school teacher of Main street, South Berwick, was killed instantly this morning when her car swerved across an icy highway on route and collided with a truck, which drove through the middle of her car. According to City Marshal James Bowering of Rochester, Mrs. Henderson apparently lost control of her car. She was going north on route 16 and the truck driven by Ernest Cardinal, was coming in the opposite direction. Cardinal was unhurt. At the of the accident he was trucking sand from Farmington to Portsmouth. Mrs. Henderson, who had been substituting in a Milton school, usually took two or three passengers with her. This morning they had gotten other rides (Portsmouth Herald, December 13, 1940). 

Rites Held for Accident Victim. Funeral services for Mrs. Clara R. Henderson, Milton school teacher, who was killed in au automobile accident at Rochester Friday, were held Sunday afternoon from her home in South Berwick. Services were conducted by Rev. Herman Worthley of the Federated church and Rev. Russell G. Martin of First Baptist church of that town. Burial was in the Rollinsford cemetery (Portsmouth Herald, December 16, 1940).

Wilbur A. Henderson died in Greenville, SC, in 1956.

Ellen L. (Hart) Tuttle – Grade 4 – 1940, Grades 7-8, Principal – 1942-48

Ellen L. Hart was born in Gonic, Rochester, NH, June 7, 1897, daughter of Roscoe S. and Elizabeth A. “Lizzie” (Hanson) Hart.

Lizzie Hart, a widow, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included Ellen L. Hart, a public school teacher, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Carl Bunker, aged twelve years, and Ralph Bunker, aged ten years (b. NH). Lizzie Hart owned their house on the Old Dover Road, which was valued at $1,000. They had a radio set.

Ellen L. Hart married in Exeter, NH, February 16, 1933, Albert Roscoe “Ross” Tuttle, both of Gonic, Rochester, NH. She was a teacher, aged thirty-five years, and he was a garage proprietor, aged fifty-eight years. He was born in Strafford, NH, December 20, 1873, son of Hezekiah F. and Jane L. (Cheswell) Tuttle.

Roscoe Tuttle, a retail automobile manager, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Census. His household included his wife, Ellen Tuttle, aged forty-two years (b. NH), his daughter, Jane Tuttle, aged seven years (b. NH), his mother-in-law, Elizabeth [Hart], aged seventy-four years (b. NH), and his nephews, Ralph Bunker, a garage salesman, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Carlton Bunker, a garage mechanic, aged twenty years (b. NH). Roscoe Tuttle owned their house, which was valued at $1,500. They had all lived in the same house in 1935.

The Milton Grammar school building took fire in the early hours of Tuesday, January 6, 1942.

A. Roscoe Tuttle died in Rochester, NH, July 26, 1943, aged sixty-nine years.

Ex-City Official, A. Roscoe Tuttle, Dies Suddenly. Stricken by angina while working in his garden at his home on Old Dover road Monday night, A. Roscoe Tuttle, 69, a former street commissioner and member of the city council, died suddenly. He was a native of nearby Strafford, the son of Freeman and Jane (Cheswell) Tuttle. Educated in the Strafford schools he came here about 50 years ago Mr. Tuttle was a member of the Republican party and as such served his city as street commissioner in 1920, 1921 and 1922, during the administration of the late Mayor James B. Young and also during the time William K. Kimball was chief executive. Succeeding Charles H. Keates he was named a member of the city council from the Gonic district in the city election in December, 1902, and served from 1903 to 1912 when he was succeeded by Leopold Larose He served during the administrations of Mayor William G. Bradley, Charles W. Bickford, Joseph Warren and Dr. John H. Bates He held membership In the Masons and the Odd Fellows. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Ellen L. Tuttle and a daughter, Jane Tuttle, besides several nieces and nephews (Portsmouth Herald, July 29, 1943).

Rochester. A communication was read from Mrs. Ellen Tuttle, expressing appreciation for the floral tribute sent by the city on the occasion of the death of her husband, former Street Commissioner and Councilman A. Roscoe Tuttle (Portsmouth Herald, September 10, 1943).

Ellen L. (Hart) Tuttle died in Rochester, NH, in October 1970.

Rose A. Witham – Grades 5-6 – 1942-43

Witham, Rose A - Farmington Normal - 1938Rose Anna Witham (and her twin sister, Ruth A. Witham) was born in New Gloucester, ME, September 28, 1918, daughter of John P. and Rachel A. “Rachie” (Edwards) Witham.

Rachel A. Witham, a farmer, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), headed a New Gloucester, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Lucy W. Witham, an institutional waitress, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), Rose A. Witham, a public school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Ruth A. Witham, a public school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), and Harold J. Witham, aged eight years (b. ME), her lodger, Bruce L. Prince, aged eight years (b. ME), and her servants, Eugene Collins, a farm laborer, aged thirty-nine years (b. Canada (Fr.)), and Raymond H. Morin, a farm laborer, aged twenty-six years (b. Canada (Fr.)).

Cider Hill [York, ME]. Misses Rose and Ruth Witham, New Gloucester, are living in B.A. Moulton’s apartment. Miss Rose Witham teaches at the school, while her twin sister teaches the primary classes at Cape Neddick (Portsmouth Herald, September 10, 1941).

The Milton Grammar school building took fire in the early hours of Tuesday, January 6, 1942.

Miss Rose Witham, teacher of grades five and six at Milton Grammar School, resigned at the close of the year and has given up teaching (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report, 1943).

Despite her stated intention to give up teaching, Rose Witham appeared in the Lewiston, ME, directory of 1949, as a teacher at the Lake Street School, resident in New Gloucester, ME.

Rose A. Witham married in Maine, July 1, 1960, Leon M. Alexander. He was born in Brunswick, ME, January 13, 1916, son of Charles L. and Dorothy (Stanmore) Alexander.

Rose A. (Witham) Alexander died in Brunswick, ME, April 28, 1997. Leon M. Alexander died March 30, 2008.

E. Doris (Taylor) Fernald – Grade 1 – 1943-44

Eva Doris Taylor was born in Methuen, MA, August 6, 1908, daughter of Matthias and Jane E. (Bannister) Fernald.

Matthias Taylor, a milk farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. MA), headed a Salem, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Millie L. Taylor, aged fifty-eight years (b. MA), and his children, Eva D. Taylor, an elementary school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Raymond M. Taylor, a farm hand, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and Wilfred B. Taylor, a farm hand, aged sixteen years (b. NH).

Doris Taylor married in Salem, NH, April 26, 1933, Kenneth W. Fernald, she of Salem and he of Rochester, NH. She was a teacher, aged twenty-four years, and he was a mill worker, aged twenty-five years. He was born in Intervale, NH, October 17, 1907, son of Byron W. and Bertha M. (Hawkins) Fernald.

Kenneth Fernald, a woolen mill loom fixer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Doris Fernald, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), and his children, Gerald Fernald, aged six years (b. NH), and Jane Fernald, aged three years (b. NH). Kenneth Fernald rented their house on the Old Dover Road, for $15 per month.

Mrs. Ethelyn Hull, teacher of the first grade at Milton, was given a leave of absence because of illness until January, 1944, when she resumed her teaching. Mrs. Doris Taylor Fernald, another experienced teacher, took her place (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report 1943).

Kenneth W. Fernald died in Auburn, MA, January 24, 1969. E, Doris (Taylor) Fernald died in Chapel Hill, NC, April 9, 1995.

Beatrice G. Duquette – Grade 4 – 1943-47

Beatrice Gladys Duquette was born in East Rochester, NH, November 19, 1921, daughter of Louis W. and Gladys M. (Hull) Duquette.

Louis Duquette, a woolen mill spinner, aged fifty-four years  (b. Canada (French)), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Census. His household included his wife, Gladys Duquette, a woolen mill weaver, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Beatrice Duquette, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Louise Duquette, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Arlene Duquette, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and James Duquette, aged twelve years (b. NH). Louis Duquette owned their house at 22 Grove Street. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

Beatrice G. Duquette appeared in the Rochester, NH, directories of 1941 and 1943, as a student, resident at 22 Grove street, in East Rochester. Louis W. (Gladys M.) appeared as being employed in South Berwick, ME, with their house at 22 Grove street, in East Rochester.

Local Area Students Graduated at Plymouth. Among the young men and women who received their diplomas from Plymouth Teachers college Saturday in the 71st commencement of the institution were Miss Julia A. Stulb of Portsmouth, Miss Beatrice G. Duquette of East Rochester and Miss Martha A. Lefebvre of Somersworth (Portsmouth Herald, June 15, 1943).

Miss Mary Willard, teacher of grade four, resigned to take a much better position in Connecticut and Miss Beatrice Duquette of East Rochester, a graduate of Plymouth Teachers’ College, succeeded Miss Willard (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report 1943).

Beatrice Duquette married in Dover, NH, May 21, 1946, Gerald Dexter [“Jerry”] Arnault, she of East Rochester, NH, and he of Dover. She was a school teacher, aged twenty-four years, and he was a civil servant, aged twenty-five years. He was born in Haverhill, MA, January 10, 1921, son of Edward C. and Beatrice (Fitzgerald) Arnault.

Beatrice G. (Duquette) Arnault died in Rochester, NH, October 26, 1988. Gerald D. Arnault died in Exeter, NH, September 14, 2010.

Marion E. (Draper) Kenison – Grades 5-6 – 1943-48

Marion Elsie Draper was born in Rumney, NH, April 2, 1893, daughter of Alvah E. and Mary A. (Duston) Draper.

Marion Elsie Draper married in Lawrence, MA, March 21, 1917, Darrell Ona Kenison, she of Lawrence, MA, and he of Jefferson, NH. She was a school teacher, aged twenty-three years, and he was a farmer, aged twenty-two yeara. He was born in Jefferson, NH, March 5, 1895, son of Lyman D. and Lillian J. “Josie” (Davis) Kenison.

Ona D. Kenison, a farmer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Jefferson, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Marion E. Kenison, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his daughter, Helen P. Kenison, aged one year, one month (b. NH). Ona D. Kenison owned their farm on Jackson Road, with a mortgage.

Darrell O. Kenison died in Jefferson, NH, February 6, 1928.

Alvah E. Draper, a Methodist Church clergyman, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Warren, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Marian D. Kenison, a private family housekeeper, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), and his grandchildren, Hellen P. Kenison, aged eleven years (b. NH), Lyman D. Kenison, aged nine years (b. NH), Muriel A. Kenison, aged six years (b. NH), and Eleanor J. Kenison, aged five years (b. NH). Alvah E. Draper rented their house on Main Street, for $17 per month. They had a radio set.

WARREN. Norman Draper and daughter of Hartford, Conn., have been visiting his father, Rev. A.E. Draper, and were present at the graduation of his sister, Marion Kenison, at Plymouth normal school. … Rev. A.E. Draper and daughter, Mrs. Marion Kenison, left Thursday for Boone, Ohio, to visit the formers sister (Groton Times (Groton, VT), June 19, 1931).

NEWINGTON. Newington, June 28 – Mrs. Marion Kenison, teacher in the grammar grades, has gone to her home in Warren to spend the summer (Portsmouth Herald, June 28, 1932).

Marion Kennison, a public school teacher, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Newfields, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Helen P. Kennison, a public school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Lyman Kennison, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Muriel Kennison, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Eleanor Kennison, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and her father, [Alvah E.] Draper, a widower, aged seventy-five years (b. NH). Marion Kennison rented their house on Main Street, for $17 per month. They had all resided in Salem, NH, in 1935.

Newfields. Mrs. Marion Kenison, who teaches in Newington, is having a week’s vacation. Her daughter, Miss Pauline Kenison, has returned to her teaching duties in Madison, after having had last week as her vacation (Portsmouth Herald, February 25, 1941).

Newfields. Mrs. Marion Kenison has entered the Keene Teachers’ college, Keene, for the summer course. … Rev Alvin E. Draper, is visiting his son, Ralph Draper, in Andover, Mass. (Portsmouth Herald, July 8, 1941).

Newfields. Mrs. Marion Kenison Given Farewell Fete. A surprise farewell party was given to Mrs. Marion Kenison Wednesdav afternoon at the home of Mrs. Robert Barker by members of Goodwill Rebekah lodge. Mrs. Kenison, who has been a resident of this town for several years, is moving her family to Rochester as she has accepted a teaching position there for the next school year at Milton. Mrs. Kenison previously taught in Newington. Mrs. Kenison is Noble Grand of Goodwill lodge and her place will be taken by Mrs. Earl Price, who on behalf of the lodge presented Mrs. Kenison with a gift. Among those present were Mrs. Perry Smith. Mrs. Helen Merrill. Mrs. Edgar Gray, Mrs. Royal Mayo, Mrs. Lester Hildreth, Mrs. Oscar Zachariasen, Mrs. Minnie Fernald, Charles Simpson, Mrs. Ole Syvertsen, Mrs. Forest Hayden. Mrs. Robert Nixon and small daughter. Marion, Mrs. Howard McClellan and small son, Grant, Mrs. Blanche Runnels, and the Misses Eva Patridge, Frances Kendall and Muriel Kenison (Portsmouth Herald, August 23, 1943).

Mrs. Marion Draper Kenison, an experienced teacher, who had previously taught for me, was selected to take her [Miss Rose Witham’s] place (Howard L. Winslow, Superintendent, Town Report 1943).

Marion E. (Draper) Kenison died in Rochester, NH, December 14, 1967.

Deaths and Funerals. Mrs. Marion D. Kenison. ROCHESTER — A former teacher in the schools of Newington and Greenland died yesterday at Frisbie Memorial Hospital. She was Mrs. Marion D. Kenison, 74, a native of Rumney. Mrs. Kenison was born April 2, 1893, and was the widow Darrell O. Kenison. She had lived here for the past nine years and made her home at 21C Linden St. Her advanced education was at Plymouth Normal School, was a member of the Rebekah Lodge in East Rochester. Survivors include a son, I,yman Kenison of Exeter; three daughters, Mrs. Pauline Nixon of Newfields, Mrs. Muriel A. Lincoln of Rochester and Mrs. Eleanor Holmes of Jefferson; a brother, Ralph Draper of Andover, Mass. Sixteen grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren also survive (Portsmouth Herald, December 15, 1957).

Vesta M. Fenderson – Grade 1 – 1945-46

Vesta Mabel Fenderson was born in Exeter, NH, October 12, 1922, daughter of Carleton E. and Edith M. (Garland) Fenderson.

Carleton Fenderson, a road construction truck driver, aged forty-three years (b. ME), headed an Old Orchard Beach, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Edith Fenderson, a hotel house maid, aged forty-two years b. NH), and his children, Vesta Fenderson, a private family nursemaid, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Irene Fenderson, aged fifteen years (b. ME), Carllene M. Fenderson, aged twelve years (b. NH), Lloyd E. Fenderson, aged eleven years (b. ME), Gordon W. Fenderson, aged nine years (b. NH), Wellesley E. Fenderson, aged six years (b. NH), Hubert L. Fenderson, aged five years (b. ME), Carleton Fenderson, aged three years (b. ME), and Richmond W. Fenderson, aged two years (b. NH). Carleton Fenderson owned their house on the Wheel Road, which was valued at $300.

The Misses Vesta and Irene Fenderson appeared in the Exeter, NH, directory of 1941, as students at R.S. [Robinson Seminary], boarding at 124 Front Street. Vesta Fenderson appeared on the Twelfth Grade honor roll for the winter term at the Robinson Seminary in Exeter, NH (Portsmouth Herald, March 21, 1941). Vesta Mabel Fenderson graduated from there, in June 1941 (Portsmouth Herald, June 12, 1941).

Vesta M. Fenderson graduated from Keene State College in 1945. Milton Grammar School would have been her first teaching position.

Vesta Mabel Fenderson married in Exeter, NH, April 19, 1947, George Lawrence Kennedy, she of Exeter and he of West Swansey, NH. She was a teacher, aged twenty-three years, and he was a grader, aged twenty-two years. He was born in New York, NY, September 3, 1924, son of Robert L. and Lucy M. (Henry) Kennedy.

George L. Kennedy died in Keene, NH, June 3, 2002. Vesta M. (Fenderson) Kennedy died March 11, 2016, aged ninety-three years.

Elsie E. (Williams) Julin – Grade 1 – 1947-67

Williams, Eunice E - Framingham State U, 1926
Elsie E. Williams, Framingham State University, 1928

Elsie Eunice Williams was born in Boston, MA, December 5, 1906, daughter of Griffin D. and Winnifred H. (Andrews) Williams.

Griffith Williams, an organ joiner, aged fifty-five years (b. Wales), headed an Arlington, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Winifred Williams, aged forty-nine years (b. England), and his children, Elsie Williams, a school teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. MA), Winifred Williams, a shoe polish [co.] typist, aged nineteen years, Enid Williams, aged seventeen years (b. MA), and Margary Williams, aged twelve years (b. MA). Griffith Williams owned their house at 80 Madison Avenue, which was valued ay $4,000. They had a radio set.

NUTE RIDGE. Several relatives of Arnold Julin from Massachusetts spent the weekend at his home. Miss Elsie Williams and Mr. Julin’s father, mother and brother will be here the greater part of this week (Farmington News, July 10, 1931).

Elsie Eunice Williams married in Arlington, MA, July 18, 1931, Arnold Samuel Julin. He was born in Boston, MA, June 17, 1906, son of Ture G.S. and Sylvanja J. “Vanja” (Smith) Julin.

WEST MILTON. The Julin brothers are occupying the Annie Cook farm (Farmington News, July 11, 1930).

WEST MILTON. Mrs. Julin’s sister, Miss Winnifred Williams of Lynn, MA, is spending her vacation with Mr. and Mrs. Julin (Farmington News, September 4, 1931).

Arnold S. Julin, a farm laborer, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elsie E. Julin, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), and his children, Eunice W. Julin, aged five years (b. NH), and Arnold M. Julin, aged three years (b. NH). Arnold S. Julin owned their house on the Nute Ridge Road, which was valued at $800. Arnold S. and Elsie E. Julin had both resided in the same house in 1935.

Milton Math Workshop. Ten parents of the second graders in the Milton Elementary school sat, bent into second grade chairs, for three interesting hours last evening listening to an explanation of the new mathematics being taught the first and second graders. Mrs. Llewelyn Scott, second grade teacher, and Mrs. Arnold Julin, first grade teachers, were both on hand to demonstrate this new method that acquaints children with an understanding of the relationship of numbers and through an endless variety of number problems makes the learning of traditional arithmetic easier, faster and much more of a challenge to the young learner. Mr. John R. Callahan, principal of the schools, spoke highly of this new method along, with the teachers teaching it and expressed the hope of extending the program into the rest of the first six grades Those parents attending the session were Mr. and Mrs. George Leaman, Mrs. William Young, Mrs. Ralph Pugh, John Lucier, Mrs. Louis Kaspryzk, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Boggs, Mrs. Lloyd Goodwin and Mrs. Russell Ellis (Farmington News, November 29, 1962).

Arnold S. Julin died in Milton, in 1984. Elsie E. (Williams) Julin died in Milton, April 30, 1997.

Frances E. (Lane) Doe – Grades 3-4 – 1947-49

Frances Ella Lane was born in Mechanic Falls, ME, September 13, 1915, daughter of  Fred E. and Eunice M. (Gowell) Lane.

Frances E. Lane married in Jay, ME, August 8, 1934, Walter H. Doe, both of Jay, ME. He was born in Parsonsfield, ME, March 1, 1910, son of LaForest Q. and Ethel I. (Sylvester) Doe.

Walter Doe, a box shop truck driver, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Frances Doe, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), and his children, Kendrick Doe, aged four years (b. ME), Sandra Doe, aged two years (b. ME), and Joan Doe, aged one year (b. ME). Walter Doe rented their house on the Chestnut Hill Road, for $10 per month. Walter and Frances Doe had resided in Jay, ME, in 1935.

Mrs. Frances Doe resigned from her position in the grammar school in November, 1949, to work for a book publisher and was replaced by Mrs. Ellen Cochran of Dover. Mrs. Cochran is a graduate of Keene Teachers College (1943) and has had six years of successful experience in Grades 2 and 3 in the primary school at Newmarket (Jonathan A. Osgood, Superintendent, Town Report, 1949).

TWO TEACHERS HIRED; 1 LEAVES. Another teacher has left the local school system for higher pay, and two others have been added Supt. Martineau told the NEWS this morning, to complete the teaching requirements this year. Resigning for a 5th-grade assignment and an $800 boost in salary in Dover, Martineau said, is Mrs. Frances Doe. A teacher here 13 years, Mrs. Doe instructed second graders at Memorial drive. Her replacement will be Mrs. John Zanes of Tappan st., a local school graduate of 1951. Mrs. Zanes, the former Penny Liberty, attended Keene Teachers and received degrees at Tufts in Boston and the Elliott-Pierson Kindergarten school. She taught at Germantown Friends school in Philadelphia and the second grade in Hodgins in Albuquerque before her marriage 3 years ago. New social studies at the high school will be Roger Owens of Colebrook. He graduated this year from Plymouth Teachers (Farmington News, June 18, 1959).

Walter H. Doe died in Keene, NH, December 10, 1984, aged seventy-four years. Frances E. (Lane) Doe died in Peabody, MA, February 2, 1905.

Clarence P. Amadon – Principal – 1948-53

Amadon, Clarence P - Plymouth Normal School, 1934
Clarence P. Amadon (Plymouth Norma School, 1934)

Clarence Porter Amadon was born in Thetford Mines, Les Appalaches, Quebec, Canada, August 5, 1912, son of Henry B. “Brayton” and Martha J. (Porter) Amadon.

ORFORD, N.H. Clarence Amadon has returned to Mrs. Pressey’s after a busy summer at Keene Teacher’s College (United Opinion (Bradford, VT), August 18, 1939).

Elizabeth M. Pressey, boarders, aged seventy years )b. NH), headed an Orford, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. Her household included her lodgers, Clarence Amadon, a high school teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. Canada), Helen Johnson, a high school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Morris Knight, a garage mechanic, aged twenty-four years (b. VT), and Maston R. Breck, a training cadet, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Clarence Amadon had resided in Quebec in 1935.

Clarence Porter Amadon married in Laconia, NH, June 23, 1941, Florence Stanley Blanchard, he of Lancaster, NH, and she of Littleton, NH. Both were teachers, he aged twenty-seven years, and she aged twenty-eight years. She was born in Yarmouth, ME, February 7, 1913, daughter of George and Florence (Kwinkleberg) Blanchard.

ORFORD, N.H. Clarence Amadon, the grammar room teacher for five years, has entered the Navy and is now stationed at Newport, R.I. (United Opinion (Bradford, VT), October 8, 1943).

Muriel Louise Amadon, was born in Rochester, NH, August 25, 1949, daughter of Clarence P. and Florence S. (Blanchard) Amadon (Milton Vital Records).

School Principals In Meeting Here. The Southeastern section of elementary school principals met the Sherburne school Monday for a pot-luck supper and business meeting. It was decided to hold the meeting in Somersworth with Thomas Hennessey as host. Henry Hogue, a guidance counselor for Portsmouth schools, will lead a discussion on guidance problems. The meeting adjourned so that members .could attend a meeting at the Junior high school where Dr. Eleanor Trowbridge was the speaker. Present were Miss Edith Austin, Miss Julia Butler, Miss Jeffords, Miss Agnes McCarthy, Miss Muriel Morrow, Miss Simpson and Miss Deborah Stone of Portsmouth; Mrs. Luvera Burleigh and Mrs. Bernice King of Farmington; Miss Marie Nixon, Lillian Davis and Miss Marion Nelson of Rochester; Carroll Mathews of Barrington; Richard Gale, of Deerfield; Miss Fanny Morrison of Dover; Clarence Amadon of Milton and Douglas Harlow of Greenland (Portsmouth Herald, November 8, 1950).

P.T.A. The monthly meeting of the P.T.A. was held on Tuesday, January 30, at the high school. The guest of the evening, Mr. Amadon of Milton, spoke to the group about the proposed hot lunch program and explained this project very thoroughly. After the meeting a social hour and refreshments followed (Farmington News, February 2, 1951).

ORFORD, N.H. Clarence Amadon of Milton, N.H., a former teacher in Orford, called on friends in town Thursday (United Opinion (Bradford, VT), June 27, 1952).

Clarence P. and Florence S. (Blanchard) went next to Barre, VT. He was principal at the North Barre school there for the 1953-54 and 1954-55 academic years.

WANTED. NEW BARRE SCHOOL TEACHERS – need house of seven or more rooms for four adults and two children. Communicate with Clarence P. Amadon, Milton, N.H. 65t3 (Barre Daily Times (Barre, VT), June 1, 1953).

Clarence P. Amadon accepted an appointment next as principal of the Union school in Montpelier, VT, beginning with the 1954-55 academic year.

Clarence Amadon Named Principal Of Capital School. MONTPELIER, June 2 Clarence P. Amadon, principal of the North Barre School in Barre, has been named principal of the Union School in Montpelier, it was announced today by Philip Mathewson, newly elected superintendent of schools. Amadon is a graduate of Lancaster (N.H.) Academy, Plymouth State Teachers’ College and has also studied at Keene State Teachers’ College, Boston University and the University of New Hampshire (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), June 3, 1954).

Clarence P. Amadon died in Lancaster, NH, October 20, 1985. Florence S. (Blanchard) Amadon died in Lancaster, NH, June 7, 2007.

Ellen M. (Deem) Cochrane – Grades 2-3 – 1949-50

Deem, Ellen M - Keene Teachers
Ellen M. Deem at Keene State (Detail)

Ellen Margaret Deem was born in Akron, OH, December 7, 1919, daughter of Benjamin F. and Hannah M. (Ducey) Deem.

Benjamin F. Deem, aged fifty-three years (b. WV), headed a Northwood, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hannah Deem, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), and his children, Ellen M. Deem, a private family housekeeper, aged twenty years (b. OH), Mary E. Deem, aged fifteen years (b. OH), Catherine A. Deem, aged fourteen years (b. OH), John J. Deem, aged thirteen years (b. OH), and J. Robert Deem, aged nine years (b. OH), and his ward, Barbara C.M. Rolins, aged three years (b. NH). Benjamin F. Deem owned their house on Green Street, which was valued at $1,200.

NEWMARKET. School Board Lists New Staffs. Elementary. … In grade two, Miss Ellen Deem of Northwood, who received her training at Keene Teachers college, replaces Miss Alice Desprez of Nashua (Portsmouth Herald, June 14, 1943).

Ellen M. Deem married in Northwood, NH, in October 1949, Donald Soley Cochran. He was born in Roxbury, MA, December 26, 1917, son of George L. and Susan D. (Soley) Cochran.

Miss Ellen Deem, Donald S. Cochran Wed in Northwood. Miss Ellen Deem, former Newmarket teacher and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Deem of Northwood. became the bride of Donald S. Cochran, son of Mr. and Mrs. David Cochran of Dover, Saturday at the Harvey Lake inn in Northwood. The double ring ceremony was performed by Rev. Ernest A. McKenzie, pastor, of the Newmarket Community church. The bride was attended by her sister, Mrs. Linwood Riley of Kittery, as matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Mrs. Catherine Ring and Miss Barbara Deem, sister of the bride, both Northwood. Best man was Everett Cochran, brother of the bridegroom. John Deem, brother of bride, ushered. Immediately after the ceremony a wedding breakfast was served at the inn. After a wedding trip through Nova Scotia, the couple will reside in Dover. Mrs. Cochran taught for several years in Newmarket, acting as principal of the elementary grades and Grade 3 teacher. She was supervisor of the Community playground during summer vacations. Mr. Cochran attended schools in Nova Scotia and Everett, Mass. He served in the European theater with the air force during War II. He is a carpenter by trade (Portsmouth Herald, [Saturday,] October 8, 1949).

Mrs. Frances Doe resigned from her position in the grammar school in November, 1949, to work for a book publisher and was replaced by Mrs. Ellen Cochran of Dover. Mrs. Cochran is a graduate of Keene Teachers College (1943) and has had six years of successful experience in Grades 2 and 3 in the primary school at Newmarket (Jonathan A. Osgood, Superintendent, Town Report, 1949).

Ellen M. (Deem) Cochrane died in Dade, FL, May 3, 1992. Donald S. Cochran died in Dade, FL, July 19, 1993.

Florence S. (Blanchard) Amadon – Grade 2 – 1950-53

Florence Stanley Blanchard was born in Yarmouth, ME, February 7, 1913, daughter of George and Florence (Kwinkleberg) Blanchard.

Florence Stanley Blanchard married in Laconia, NH, June 23, 1941, Clarence Porter Amadon, she of Littleton, and he of Lancaster, NH, NH. Both were teachers, he aged twenty-seven years, and she aged twenty-eight years

See Clarence P. Amadon above.

Florence S. (Blanchard) Amadon died in Lancaster, NH, June 7, 2007.

Ferne C. McGregor – Various Grades – 1948-61

Ferne C. Gilmartin was born, probably in Lowell, MA, January 24, 1894, daughter of William J. and Roseltha S. (Chesley) Gilmartin. Her mother married (2nd), in Boston, MA, February 28, 1901, Fred McGregor, a B&M railroad engineer. Ferne took his surname.

Ferne C. McGregor was Milton’s last district school teacher (apart from that of Milton Mills). Her Milton teaching career began in 1913 and ran until her Nute Ridge district school was closed after the 1946-47 academic year.

For a more thorough account of her life and teaching career, see Milton’s Nute Ridge Teachers – 1897-47.

LOCAL. Mrs. Hazel Hart of this [Farmington] town and Miss Ferne McGregor and Mrs. Julian [Julin] of Milton recently completed the school teachers’ summer course at the University of New Hampshire. Mrs. Hart will resume her teaching duties at New Durham this fall (Farmington News, 1948).

Ferne C. McGregor taught various grades at the Milton Grammar School between 1948 and her retirement in 1961.

MILTON. Milton Teachers To Meet Tuesday Before Classes Start. Milton – Milton schools will open next Wednesday, following workshops for teachers on Tuesday. Assignments of teachers for this year have been made: Walter J. Foster, principal at the high school, will teach social studies; Gerard Roberge will teach grade 8 and biology; Miss Marjorie E. Goodwin, commercial; Miss Katheryn M. White, home economics, general science; Mrs. Esther Poland, nurse; Joseph Malta, music; John J. Tierney, trades and Industries, Stuart Whipple, English French, Harry E. Kimball, mathematics, chemistry Grades 1-7, John B. Folsom, supervising principal Milton grammar, Miss Elizabeth Lambert, grades 3-4, Miss Feme C. McGregor, 4 and 5, Mrs. Leona F. Foster, 6 and 7, Mrs. Doris F. Chase, 2, Mrs. Elsie E. Julin, 1; Milton Mills, Mrs. Christie C. Kimball, 5-6-7, Mrs. Doris Lowd, 1-2-3-4 (Farmington News, August 30, 1956).

Ferne C. Gilmartin McGregor died at Frisbee Hospital in Rochester, NH, June 23, 1970.

Sally H. Sloan – Grades 3-4 – 1953-55

In October the staff of the grammar school presented a panel discussion at the regular meeting of the PTA. Teaching techniques and class procedures were discussed and explained to the parents. Members serving on the panel were: Mrs. Chase, Mrs. Sloan, Mrs. Foster, Mrs. Rawding and Mr. Piper. … Teachers continue to advance themselves professionally by taking advantage of summer schools and special courses. In the spring of 1954 Mr. Piper took a course in Public School Supervision at the University of New Hampshire. Mrs. Sloan attended the summer session at the University of New Hampshire, and Mrs. Julin attended the summer session at Boston University. Several teachers are planning to take courses in the spring of 1955 (Robert M. Piper, Principal, Town Report, 1954).

Mrs. Sally Sloan appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1956, as a teacher in Somersworth, NH, residing at 44 Cushing Street.

Robert M. Piper – Principal – 1953-55

Robert Munroe Piper was born in Northwood, NH, May 10, 1914, son of James L. and Margaret W. (Seeton) Piper.

James Piper, a dentist and farmer, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Northwood, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Margaret Piper, aged fifty-seven years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and his children, Robert Piper, a public school teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Elizabeth Piper, aged seventeen years (b. NH). James Piper owned their farm on the Concord-Durham Turnpike, which was valued at $4,800. They had all resided in the same house in 1935.

In the spring of 1954 Mr. Piper took a course in Public School Supervision at the University of New Hampshire (Robert M. Piper, Principal, Town Report, 1954).

Principal Robert M. Piper went next to the Sherburne school in Portsmouth, NH.

Sherburne PTA Plans for Year. Program recommendations for the coming year were discussed a recent Sherburne PTA executive board meeting at the home of W. Frank Reardon of Coolidge president. The suggestions will be voted upon by the entire PTA at its meeting to be held Wednesday the school. At this time a membership supper will be served from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. followed by a business session at 7:45 p.m. Also at the executive session Reardon reported on a summer PTA institute held in Laconia. Robert M. Piper, new principal of the school, attended the officers’ meeting (Portsmouth Herald, September 9, 1955).

School Board. The resignation of Robert M. Piper, principal of Sherburne- Lafayette Schools, was accepted (Portsmouth Herald, November 13, 1975).

Robert M. Piper died in Wolfeboro, NH, February 5, 2008.


Previous in sequence: Milton Grammar School Teachers, 1908-30


References:

Find a Grave. (2010, February 19). Evelyn F. Gray Bickford. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/48368444/ethelyn-f-bickford

Find a Grave. (2013, August 4). Doris Lavinia Fortier Chase. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114887670/doris-lavinia-chase

Find a Grave. (2020, June 5). Clara H. Roberts Henderson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/210926867/clara-h-henderson

Find a Grave. (2016). Ferne C. McGregor. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/18168860

Find a Grave. (2013, December 9). Alvin A. Newell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/121465218/alvin-a-newell

Find a Grave. (2016, May 9). Robert M. Piper. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/162405014/robert-m.-piper

Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1863

By Muriel Bristol | November 8, 2020

Those assessed for Federal taxes in Milton in May 1863 were Lewis W. Berry, John H. Cloutman, Moses W. Cook, Dr. Stephen Drew, Asa Fox & Son, Edward L. Goodwin, John E. Goodwin, William H. Huntress, Thomas Jones, Charles W. Nute, Dr. Daniel E. Palmer, Lewis D. Reed, Bray U. Simes, John Townsend, and Ezra H. Twombly.

The Civil War income tax was the first tax paid on individual incomes by residents of the United States. It was a “progressive” tax in that it initially levied a tax of 3 percent on annual incomes over $600 but less than $10,000 and a tax of 5 percent on any income over $10,000 (Fox, 1986).

It would seem that John Townsend of Milton Mills was in this year the very first Milton resident to ever pay an income tax.

Those fifteen taxpayers are arranged here in the order in which they appeared in the Eighth (1860) Federal Census (with their house and household numbers), beginning in West Milton and progressing through Milton to Milton Mills.

West Milton

C.W. Nute (1847-1926) of Milton paid a $1 tax on his carriage, which was valued at $80.

Charles W. Nute was born in Milton, January 6, 1847, son of Stephen and Eleanor M.E. (Abbott) Nute.

12/11 – Stephen Nute, a farmer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“West Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eleanor Nute, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), Charles W. Nute, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Alonzo E. Nute, aged twelve years (b. NH), John A. Nute, aged ten years (b. NH), Clara J. Nute, aged seven years (b. NH), Gardener A. Nute, aged four years (b. NH), Arthur H. Nute, aged two years (b. NH), Capitole S. Nute, aged seven months (b. NH), and Richard Peabody, a pauper, aged forty-four years (b. NH). Stephen Nute had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $100.

Charles W. Nute would have been only fifteen or sixteen years of age when he paid his carriage tax. By 1870, he was a Milton shoe factory worker.

Charles W. Nute married (1st) in Farmington, NH, September 27, 1872, Leonora E. Colbath, he of Farmington and she of Middleton, NH. She was born in Middleton, NH, circa 1853, daughter of Leighton D. and Mary J. Colbath. She died in Farmington, NH, in 1876.

Charles W. Nute married (2nd) in Rochester, NH, April 28, 1888, Clara M. Varney, both of Milton. He was a farmer, aged forty-one years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-nine years. She was born in Milton, January 29, 1859, daughter of Jonas and Mary E. (Esther) Varney.

Charles W. Nute died in Farmington, NH, August 23, 1926, aged seventy-nine years, seven months, and seventeen days.

IN MEMORIAM. Charles W. Nute. Charles W. Nute, one of Farmington’s oldest and most respected citizens, died at his home on Bunker street early Monday morning of an illness that covered a period of over five years, and the end came peacefully from infirmities incident to long suffering and general debility. The deceased was 79 years old, a native of Dover and the second son in a family of six boys and four girls born to Stephen and Eleanor (Abbott) Nute, who moved to this locality when the family was very young. Mr. Nute learned with his father the trade of hand shoemaking and followed the industry as a sole leather cutter through its development until forced to retire. In his calling he was as honest as in all dealings with his fellow men by which he earned the respect of the community. Quiet, unassuming of disposition and rugged of character Mr. Nute made an ideal husband and a faithful friend. Thirty eight years ago he married Miss Clara M. Hussey [Varney] of this town and ever since the couple had lived happily, faithfully and prosperously together, sharing life’s pleasures and vicissitudes in a spirit of perfect communion. The deceased was a member of Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., and a member and post officer of Mad River Encampment, to both of which he gave much faithful service. His was an exemplary life that embraced only the cleanest of habits and a zeal for industry that bore the harvest in prosperity and respect. The sympathy of the community is expressed for the bereaved wife, two sisters, Mrs. Clara Dudley of Concord and Mrs. James H. Wiggin of Keezar Falls, Me., three brothers, John and Arthur Nute of West Milton and Eddie Nute of Union, two nieces, Mrs. Thurston Gilman of Maine and Mrs. Mildred Nute, and two nephews. Harry and Ray Nute of West Milton. Funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at 1.30 from the home with Rev. Frederick Brooks officiating. Bearers were from the Odd Fellows and Encampment. Interment was in the family lot in Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, August 27, 1926).

Clara M. (Varney) Nute died in Farmington, NH, January 15, 1937, aged seventy-eight years.

IN MEMORIAM. Mrs. Clara M. Nute. In the death of Mrs. Clara M. Nute which occurred at her home just off Bunker street late last Friday evening, this community lost one of its most estimable women. She was the widow of Charles W. Nute, whom she survived about ten years. A few years ago she was rendered a permanent invalid by a fall in which she fractured a hip. In spite of her infirmities, she continued to perform as much of her household duties as she was able and exhibited the finest traits of character, never complaining of her misfortunes, and having abundant sympathy for her for her friends and acquaintance. Had she lived until the 29th of this month she would have attained her 79th birthday. She was a native of Milton, the only child of James and Esther (Jones) Varney and over fifty years of her life had been spent in this village. She was one of the oldest members of Minnehaha Rebekah Lodge and had been one of its most helpful and active members. She is survived by three cousins, Ira W. Jones of Milton, Mrs. Nellie Webber and Charles Tucker of Florida. Services were held from the funeral home of Norman L. Otis Monday afternoon with Rev. J.W. Newton (Farmington News, January 22, 1937).

J.E. Goodwin (1820-1893) of Milton paid a $6.67 tax on his Class B manufacturer’s license. Details regarding West Milton taxpayer John E. Goodwin may be found in the prior year’s Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1862.

Edward L. Goodwin (1839-1922) of Milton paid a $1.67 tax on his retail dealer’s license.

Edward Lawrence Goodwin was born in Milton, July 4, 1839, son of Daniel B. and Susan H. (Knight) Goodwin.

38/36 – Daniel B. Goodwin, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“West Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Susan H. [(Knight)] Goodwin, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), Edward L. Goodwin, a farmer, aged twenty years (b. NH), Martha S. Goodwin, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Emily A. Goodwin, aged fifteen years (b. NH), and Clara J. Goodwin, aged eleven years (b. NH).

Edward L. Goodwin of Milton, a shoemaker, aged twenty-two years (b. Milton), enlisted in Co. A of the Fourth NH Volunteer Infantry, September 4, 1861. He had blue eyes, dark hair, a dark complexion, and stood 5′ 10″ tall. (Alonzo Nute was his recruiting officer). He mustered out at Hilton Head, SC, January 31, 1862.

Edward L. Goodwin married (1st), July 4, 1862, Emily M. Hersey. She was  born in Tuftonboro, NH, July 16, 1841, daughter of Jonathan B. and Elizabeth C. (Wiggin) Hersey.

The US Post Office Department paid Edward L. Goodwin $26.41 for his service as postmaster at West Milton, September 30, 1865. They owed him still a balance of $14.16.

Emily M. (Hersey) Goodwin died of consumption in Milton, June 16, 1868. Edward L. Goodwin married (2nd) in Boston, MA, February 27, 1870, Olive Adelaide Goss, both of Boston. He was a clerk, aged fifty-one years, and she was aged thirty-five years. She was born in Moultonborough, NH, circa 1834, daughter of Jonathan and Olive Goss.

Edward L. Goodwin received a Civil War pension in Massachusetts beginning in 1892 (Boston Globe, July 8, 1892).

Olive A. (Goss) Goodwin died in Roslindale, MA, January 15, 1900, aged sixty-five years, six months, and two days.

WEST ROXBURY DISTRICT. Mrs. Olive A. Goodwin, wife of Mr. E.L. Goodwin, died yesterday morning at her home on Conway st., Roslindale, at the age of 65 years. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock. The interment will be in Farmington, N.H. (Boston Globe, January 16, 1900).

Edward L. Goodwin married (3rd) in Westport, MA, October 17,  1905, Jane T. Macomber, he of Boston, MA, and she of Westport. He was a conveyancer, aged sixty-six years, and she was a field S.S. worker, aged fifty-three years. She was born in Dartmouth, MA, circa 1851, daughter of Charles H. and Rebecca W. (Russell) Macomber.

Edward L. Goodwin died in Roslindale, MA, January 14, 1922.

DEATHS. GOODWIN – In Roslindale, Jan. 14, Edward L., husband of Jane T. Goodwin. Services at residence, 6 Tappan st., Tuesday, at 1 p.m. Relatives and friends invited. Farmington, N.H., papers please copy (Boston Globe, January 16, 1922).

Jane T. (Macomber) Goodwin died in Fall River, MA, December 2, 1926.

DEATHS. GOODWIN – In Fall River, Mass., Dec. 2, Jane T. Macomber, widow of Edward L. Goodwin. Funeral services at her home, 571 Robeson st., Fall River, on Mon., Dec. 6, at 2 o’clock p.m. Burial at convenience of the family (Boston Globe, December 3, 1926).

Milton

Details regarding Milton taxpayers Dr. Daniel E. Palmer, Ezra H. Twombly, Lewis N. Berry, William H. Huntress, Dr. Stephen Drew, and Thomas Jones may be found in the prior year’s Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1862.

Dr. Daniel E. Palmer (1821-1889) of Milton paid a $6.67 tax on his physician’s license.

E.H. Twombly (1827-1883) of Milton paid a $6.67 tax on his retail dealer’s license.

L.N. Berry (1824-1863) of Milton paid a $6.67 tax on his Class B manufacturer’s license.

W.H. Huntress (1822-1873) of Milton paid a $6.33 tax on his 8th Class hotel license, $13.34 on his retail liquor license, and $10.00 on his livery stable.

Dr. Stephen Drew (1791-1872) of Milton paid a $6.67 tax on his physician’s license.

Moses W. Cook (1836-1890) of Milton paid an $18.33 tax on his retail liquor dealer’s license.

Moses William Cook was born in Milton, August 20, 1836, son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Peavey) Cook.

Moses W. Cook married, circa 1856, Freelove Sally Downing. She was born in Holderness, NH, May 24, 1840, daughter of Royal B. and Fannie G. (Prescott) Downing.  For some reason, she preferred to use her middle name, Sally, in preference to her first name, Freelove. (Can you blame her?)

240/226 – M.W. Cook, a shoemaker, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sally H. Cook, aged nineteen years (b. NH), H.N. [Henry N.] Cook, aged two years (b. NH), and “Infant” [Julietta Freelove] Cook, aged five months (b. NH). M.W. Cook had real estate valued at $300 and personal estate valued at $100. The households of Sally H. Cook’s brothers, Stephen Downing, and D.P. [David Prescott] Downing, appeared in the enumeration just before that of M.W. Cook.

Moses Cook, by then of Center Harbor, NH, aged twenty-five years, who enlisted in Co. H of the Ninth NH Volunteer Infantry Regiment, December 7, 1861. He was wounded just above the left arm at the Second Battle of Bull Run, August 29, 1862. He refused a surgeon’s insistence on an amputation and recovered. He was discharged as disabled at Concord, NH, May 15, 1863.

He is thought to be also the Moses Cook, aged twenty-seven years, who enlisted in Co. D of the same regiment, December 10, 1863. This enlistment was credited to Dover, NH. He was wounded again at Petersburg, VA, July 4, 1864, and apparently recovered. He was mustered out a year later, July 17, 1865. (His gravestone mentions his service in Co. F of the Ninth Regiment).

Moses W. Cook resided in Milton in 1870 and 1880. His daughter, Clara Cook, died in Milton in 1880.

DEATHS. In Milton, Nov. 11, Clara, daughter of Moses W. Cook, aged 4 yrs. (Farmington News, November 19, 1880).

Moses W. Cook died in Barnstead, NH, July 8, 1890, aged fifty-three years, ten months, and nineteen days.

WEST MILTON. The Betsey Downing place – except amount due Mrs. Sally Cook – goes to the town of Milton, and will be sold at auction soon (Farmington News, April 13, 1900).

Freelove S. (Downing) Cook died in Barnstead, NH, May 22, 1909.

Thomas Jones of Milton paid a $6.67 tax on his retail dealer’s license.

Milton Mills

Details regarding Milton Mills taxpayers Asa Fox & Son, Lewis D. Reed, and Bray U. Simes may be found in the prior year’s Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1862.

Bray U. Simes (1801-1885) of Milton paid a $6.67 tax, a $5.83 tax, and a $10.00 tax on his retail dealer’s license, or three of them.

Asa Fox & Son of Milton paid a $6.67 tax on their retail dealer’s license.

L.D. Reed (c1825-1870) of Milton paid a $6.33 tax on his 7th Class hotel license, and $13.33 on his retail liquor license.

John Townsend (1807-1891) paid an $18.00 (3%) tax on his $600 of income. Details regarding John Townsend may be found in Milton Mills Mfg. & the Waumbeck Companies – 1837-98.

Middleton

John H. Cloutman (1833-1910) of “Milton,” actually Middleton, paid a $1 tax on his carriage, which was valued at $75.


Previous in sequence: Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1862; next in sequence: Milton’s US Excise Tax of May 1864


References:

Find a Grave. (2016, July 9). Moses William Cook. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/166675689/moses-william-cook

Find a Grave. (2017, June 20). Charles W. Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/180572524/charles-w-nute

Wikipedia. (2020, August 23). 4th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4th_New_Hampshire_Infantry_Regiment

Wikipedia. (2020, August 23). 9th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9th_New_Hampshire_Infantry_Regiment

Wikipedia. (2020, October 23). Second Battle of Bull Run. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Bull_Run

Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1862

By Muriel Bristol | November 1, 2020

The US Congress passed the Revenue Act of 1862 in late June 1862, and President Abraham Lincoln signed it into law on July 1, 1862. It was intended to pay in part the costs of the Civil War then in progress. (It also established for the first time the department that would eventually become the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)).

Among the many categories of taxes imposed …

Annual licenses were required for bankers, auctioneers, wholesale and retail dealers, pawnbrokers, distillers, brewers, brokers, tobacconists, jugglers (“Every person who performs by sleight of hand shall be regarded as a juggler under this act.”), confectioners, horse dealers, livery stable keepers, cattle brokers, tallow-chandlers and soapmakers, coal-oil distillers, peddlers, apothecaries, photographers, lawyers, and physicians. Hotels, inns, and taverns were classified according to the annual rent or estimated rent, from a first-class establishment with a yearly rental of $10,000 to an eighth-class hotel with a yearly rental of less than $100, and charged license fees of from $200 to $5 accordingly (Fox, 1986).

Those assessed for Federal taxes in Milton in September 1862 were Lewis W. Berry, Dr. Stephen Drew, Jedediah L. Duntley, Asa Fox & Son, John E. Goodwin, William H. Huntress, Asa Jewett, Charles Jones, Thomas Jones, Dr. Daniel E. Palmer, Enoch W. Plummer, Lewis D. Reed, Bray U. Simes, Ezra H. Twombly, and Samuel Twombly.

Those fifteen taxpayers are arranged here in the order in which they appeared in the Eighth (1860) Federal Census (with their house and household numbers), beginning in West Milton and progressing through Milton to Milton Mills.

West Milton

John E. Goodwin (1820-1893) of Milton paid $10 in tax for his manufacturer’s license.

37/35 – John E. Goodwin, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“West Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza [(Hayes)] Goodwin, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), J.H. [Henry] Goodwin, aged fourteen years (b. NH), L.H. [Leah Helen] Goodwin, aged twelve years (b. NH), L.M. [Laura May] Goodwin, aged nine years (b. NH), A.E. [Alice Eliza] Goodwin, aged seven years (b. NH), and J.F. [John Fremont] Goodwin, aged three years (b. NH). John E. Goodwin had real estate valued at $7,000 and personal estate valued at $5,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration next to that of Daniel B. Goodwin, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH).

Extensive Fire In Dover, New Hampshire. Dover, New Hampshire, Nov 1. – John E. Goodwin & Co.’s large shoe manufactory was discovered on fire at 2 this morning. The buildings with the contents was consumed. The fire next caught a small shoe factory occupied by the same firm which was also burned. The old Catholic church was next burned and a building occupied by Messrs. C.E. and S.C. Hayes. From the old Catholic Church the fire caught the new Catholic Church now building and the priest’s residence which were also burned. The high winds carried the cinders a long distance and the roofs of the buildings were repeatedly on fire. Had it not been for the rain yesterday the fire would have been much more disastrous. Messrs. Goodwin and Co. were insured $270,000 on their stock. The building was owned by Deacon Benjamin Ray and was insured $4000. No insurance on the churches (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), November 1, 1870).

Milton

Dr. Daniel E. Palmer (1821-1889) of Milton paid $10 in tax for his physician’s license.

108/105 – D.E. Palmer, a physician, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Anna [(Durgin)] Palmer, aged forty years (b. NH), Charles H. Palmer, aged seven years (b. NH), and Frank A. Palmer, aged two years (b. NH). D.E. Palmer had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $800.

Dr. Daniel E. Palmer served as surgeon in the 81st Regiment US Colored Infantry between 1864 and 1865. (They served mostly in and around Louisiana, which is presumably where he contracted the malaria that ended his life).

ATTENDED BY G.A.R. VETERANS. The Funeral of Dr. Daniel E. Palmer, Deceased Yesterday, Occurs Tomorrow. Portsmouth, N.H., March 12. Dr. Daniel E. Palmer died at Kittery, Me., Monday, March 11, from malarial poisoning. He was a graduate of Bowdoin Medical College. and served during the rebellion as surgeon of the Eighty-first United States Colored Troops and Second Vermont Volunteers. He occupied a seat in the New Hampshire Legislature in 1859-60 from Milton. Deceased was 67 years 9 months old, and leaves a wife, two sons and a daughter. The funeral will take place Wednesday, under the auspices of Parker Post, G.A.R., of which deceased was a member (Boston Globe, March 12, 1889).

J.L. Duntley (c1834-1914) of Milton paid $20 in tax for his retail liquor license.

Jedediah Leighton Duntley was born in Farmington, NH, circa 1834, son of Hazen and Phoebe (Leighton) Duntley.

131/121 – Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Phoebe [(Leighton)] Duntley, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), J.L. Duntley, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Mary J. Duntley, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Ira W. Duntley, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Amos G. Duntley, aged sixteen years (b. NH), A. Duntley, aged fourteen years (b. NH), L. Duntley, aged fourteen years (b. NH), P.A. Duntley, aged eight years (b. NH), and Sally Leighton, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Hazen Duntley had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $800; and Sally Leighton had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $500.

PLENTY OF FUN. Rochester’s Citizens Think They Compare with Any Owners of speed. ROCHESTER, N.H., Feb 16. It Is doubtful if any town in New Hampshire could muster such an array of road horses as Rochester can at present. Being the location of one of the finest fair grounds and having many lovers of the race course, it is but natural that this city should be well supplied with plenty of steppers for the winter brushes. Early in March the speedway will be put in excellent shape for racing. and an oat race for all comers will be given, the purse being 100 bushels of oats. Rochester horses, which will be on deck, are now receiving careful preparation. Lawyer E.J. Smart owns Bay Alto, 2.27¼, a horse with the most extreme speed. He has paced a half over Old Orchard track in 1.01, and deservedly heads the list. Forest Patchen, 2.19¼, owned by J.L. Duntley, is still possessed of courage and speed, and will be seen a little later with the veteran, T. D. Marsh, behind him. … (Boston Globe, February 17, 1895).

E.H. Twombly (1827-1883) of Milton paid $10 in tax for his retail dealer’s license.

145/134 – E.H. Twombly, a merchant, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Lucinda K. [(Hanson)] Twombly, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Isabel Twombly, aged four years (b. NH), Susan A. Twombly, aged two years (b. NH), George A. Randall, aged ten years (b. NH), Charles E. Randall, aged nine years (b. NH), and E.F. Randall, aged six years (b. NH). E.H. Twombly had real estate valued at $3,500 and personal estate valued at $2,500.

FIRST EDITION. 3 P.M. Ezra H. Twombly, widely known as a prominent citizen, died at Dover, N.H., this morning in an apoplectic fit, aged 50 years (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), December 13, 1883).

L.N. Berry (1824-1863) of Milton paid $10 in tax on his Class B manufacturing license.

149/138 – Lewis N. Berry, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Emily [(Leighton)] Berry, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), and Janette E. Berry, aged three years (b. NH). Lewis N. Berry had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $2,000.

Lewis N. Berry, a shoe manufacturer, son of Mesach and Eliza [(Kimball)] Berry, died of “softening of brain” in Milton, June 5, 1863, aged thirty-nine years, and three months.

W.H. Huntress (1822-1873) of Milton paid $5 in tax for his 8th Class tavern license and $20 for his retail liquor license. (See Milton Hotels in 1860).

William H. Huntress was mentioned as owner of an abutting property in the trespass case of Palmer v. Tuttle in December 1859.

In a plea of trespass, for that the defendants, on the third day of April, A.D. 1858, at said Milton, with force and arms broke and entered the plaintiff’s close, situate in Milton, in said county, and bounded easterly partly by land of John Foss and partly by land of James C. Roberts, southerly by land of Stephen Downs, westerly by land now occupied by William H. Huntress and James F. Place, and northerly by the road leading by the houses of William W. Ricker and James B. Downs; and cut down and carried away ten hemlock trees, twenty-five pine trees, fifty beech trees, one hundred birch trees, one hundred oak trees, and two hundred maple trees, property of the plaintiff, of the value of two hundred dollars, and converted the same to their own use; and cut down and carried away thirty cords of the plaintiff’s wood, of the value of one hundred dollars, and converted the same to their own use, and with their oxen and horses trod up and injured the plaintiff’s soil, against the peace and to the damage of the said plaintiff (as he says) in the sum of three hundred dollars (Caselaw, 2020).

185/174 – William H. Huntress, a shoemaker, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah C. [(Tuttle)] Huntress, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Charles A. Huntress, aged six years (b. NH), and John W. Huntress, aged three years (b. NH). William H. Huntress had personal estate valued at $200.

Dr. Stephen Drew (1791-1872) of Milton paid $10 in tax for his physician’s license.

201/188 – Stephen Drew, a practicing physician (“in Milton 40 years”), aged sixty-six years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Harriet [(Watson)] Drew, aged sixty-three years (b. NH). Stephen Drew had real estate valued at $6,000 and personal estate valued at $5,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration next to the Milton Hotel, run by Joseph Jenness, a landlord, aged thirty-six years (b. NH).

Stephen Drew of Milton made his last will, July 9, 1866. He devised his homestead in Milton, as well as any other property, to his “beloved” wife, Harriet Drew. He gave to his two sons, Stephen Watson Drew and David Fogg Drew, “all my library, medicines, surgical instruments, splints, and office furniture,” to be divided equally between them. [Son Stephen W. Drew was also a physician, but in Woburn, MA]. He gave his daughter, Clara Mathes Drew Wentworth, the sum of $100, and the remainder of his personal estate to his wife, Harriet Drew. He appointed Harriet Drew, Stephen Watson Drew, and David Fogg Drew as joint executors. Joseph Sayward, Ira S. Knox, and Nathaniel G. Pinkham signed as witnesses. The will was proved in Farmington, NH, in April 2, 1872 (Strafford County Probate, 84:46).

Samuel Twombly [Jr.] (1779-1868) of Milton paid $1 in tax for his horse carriage (valued at $70).

Samuel Twombly’s parents, Samuel and Mary (Burrows) Twombly were early settlers of Milton.

Early in the summer of 1776, Samuel Twombly, a nephew of the first settler, Jonathan Twombly, could have been seen, with a pack well strapped upon his back, wending his way up the side of Teneriffe, to search out a home for his lady love, returning and bringing her to this wild region the next year. Stephen Wentworth very soon became a neighbor of the Twomblys (Hurd, 1882).

262/248 – Samuel Twombly, a farmer, aged eighty years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sophia [(Fish)] Twombly, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH). Samuel Twombly had real estate valued at $10,000 and personal estate valued at $5,000.

Samuel Twombly of Milton made his last will, May 7, 1861. He devised all his real estate, livestock, carriages, farming utensils, and $1,000, to his “beloved” wife, Sophia Twombly, “in her own right forever.” He gave $1 each to his three sons, Thomas Twombly, Josiah F. Twombly, and Ira F. Twombly. He gave $200 to his daughter, Sophia Hayes, $800 to his daughter, Rebecca Wentworth, and $10 to his grandchild, James Chesley Hayes. All the rest and residue of his property was to be equally divided between his wife, Sophia Twombly, sons, Josiah F. Twombly and Ira F. Twombly, and daughters, Sophia and Rebecca. As with their monetary bequests, the daughters’ shares were to be for “their sole and separate use, free from any interference or control of any husband.” Charles H. Roberts, John O. Sleeper, and J.D. Lyman signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 80:181).

E.W. Plumer (1815-1896) of Milton paid $1 in tax for his horse carriage (valued at $70).

290/273 – E.W. Plumer, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.” household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Orinda [(Ayers)] Plumer, aged forty-two years (b. NH), John T. Plumer, a farmer, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Joseph E. Plumer, a farmer, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Bard B. Plumer, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Mary B. Plumer, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Sarah Plumer, aged twelve years (b. NH), Fanny W. Plumer, aged nine years (b. NH), Susan Plumer, aged six years (b. NH), Sarah Plumer, aged seventy-five years (b. NH), Caroline Wentworth, aged forty-six years (b. NH), and Thomas Wentworth, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. NH). E.W. Plumer had real estate valued at $6,000 and personal estate valued at $1,500. Their household appeared in the enumeration next to that of Charles Jones.

HERE AND THERE. Mr. and Mrs. John S. Roberts attended on Sunday the funeral of deacon Enoch W. Plumer of Milton, who was truly a citizen well known (Farmington News, [Friday,] June 26, 1896).

Thomas Jones of Milton paid $10 in tax for his retail dealer’s license.

Charles Jones (1833-1873) of Milton paid $1 in tax for his horse carriage (valued at $70).

291/274 – Charles Jones, a farmer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Betsy [(Varney)] Jones, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Fred P. Jones, aged three months (b. NH), Sally [((Worster) Wallingford)] Jones, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), Abba Corliss, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Lydia Worster, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), and F.E. Wallingford, aged eight years (b. NH). Charles Jones had real estate valued at $16,000 and personal estate valued at $6,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration next to that of E.W. Plumer.

Milton Mills

Asa Fox & Son, Bray C. Simes, John U. Simes, and Asa Jewett were mentioned in the Vulpes letter of 1864 as proprietors of Milton Mills’ four general stores.

Simes, Bray Underwood (1801-1885)Bray U. Simes (1801-1885) of Milton paid $10 in tax for his retail dealer’s license.

318/301 – B.U. Simes, a merchant, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Martha [(Spinney)] Simes, aged fifty years (b. NH), Elizabeth Simes, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Ann Simes, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Adda Simes, aged twelve years (b. NH), and John Simes, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). B.U. Simes had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $3,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration next to that of Elbridge W. Fox (the “Son” of Asa Fox & Son).

B.U. Simes’ perception and subtlety was remembered at the time of his death in 1885.

Asa Fox & Son of Milton paid $10 in tax for their retail dealer’s license.

323/366 – Asa Fox, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.” household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Harriet W. [(Wood)] Fox, aged forty-six years (b. NH). Asa Fox had real estate valued at $3,000 and personal estate valued at $2,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration next to that of A.A Fox.

L.D. Reed (c1825-1870) of Milton paid $10 in tax for his 8th Class tavern license and $20 for his retail liquor license. (See Milton Hotels in 1860).

327/320 – L.D. Reed, a landlord, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Annetta [(Randall)] Reed, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), and Georgiana W. Reed, aged fourteen years (b. NH). His guests or tenants at the Milton Mills Hotel were William B. Reynolds, a physician, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), C. Parker, a pedlar, aged thirty years (b. NH), John Colby, a pedlar, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), Ed. D. Colby, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), Thomas Christie, a bread pedlar, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), George Moulton, an expressman, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and H. Livingston, a pedlar, aged forty-three years (b. NH). The Milton Mills Hotel appeared in the enumeration between the households of John L. Swinerton, a physician, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), and E. Osgood, a blacksmith, aged fifty-four years (b. NH).

Asa Jewett (1815-1883) of Milton paid $10 in tax for his retail dealer’s license.

Asa Jewett was, with his father, Gilman Jewett, and others, a founder in 1837 of the Milton Mills Manufacturing Co., when it was a lathe and wood-turning operation. They sold out to Durgin & Co.

Fire at Milton Mills, N.H. About one o’clock on the morning of the 19th ult. the shingle and clapboard mill of Mr. Asa H. Jewett, was discovered to be in flames, and before aid could be had, the fire had progressed so far that all effort was useless, and the mill, with its contents, were burned to ashes. The loss is estimated at about $1,200. Insurance $550, in the Strafford Mutual Insurance Fire Insurance Co. Credit is due to the fire company, who with their engine succeeded in saving other buildings and property. Dover Gazette (North Star (Danville, VT), August 4, 1845).

348/331 – Asa Jewett, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.” household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Richards)] Jewett, aged forty-five years (b. NH), Nancy R. Jewett, aged twenty years (b. NH), L.M. [Lydia M.] Jewett, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and C.A. Jewett, aged one year (b. NH). Asa Jewett had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $6,000.

Nancy R. Jewett married in Dover, NH, October 1, 1863, John U. Simes, a trader, and son of the Bray U. Simes taxed above. Asa Jewett died in Dover, NH, April 17, 1883.


Next in sequence: Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1863


References:

Caselaw. (2020). Palmer v. Tuttle, 39 N.H. 486 (1859). Retrieved from cite.case.law/nh/39/486/

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. (2020). Bray Underwood Simes (1801-1885). Retrieved from emuseum.history.org/objects/58174/bray-underwood-simes-18011885

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). Dr. Stephen Drew. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214561758/stephen-drew

Find a Grave. (2008, March 3). John Elkins Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/25013298/john-elkins-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Asa Jewett. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115418840/asa-jewett

Find a Grave. (2011, December 22). Dr. Daniel E. Palmer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82271199/daniel-e.-palmer

Find a Grave. (2017, October 19). Enoch W. Plumer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/184409140/enoch-w-plumer

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). Bray U. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612041/bray-u-simes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 17). John U. Simes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115612563/john-u-simes

Find a Grave. (2017, February 12). Ezra H. Twombley. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/176270653/ezra-h-twombley

Find a Grave. (2012, October 7). Samuel Twombly, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98444276/samuel-twombly

Fox, Cynthia G. (1986). Income Tax Records of the Civil War Years. Retrieved from www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1986/winter/civil-war-tax-records.html

Hurd, Duane Hamilton. (1882). History of Rockingham and Strafford Counties, New Hampshire: with Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Pioneers and Prominent Men. Philadelphia: J.W. Lewis

Wikipedia. (2020, September 17). Revenue Act of 1862. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revenue_Act_of_1862