Milton Mills Blacksmith Ebenezer Osgood (1807-1892)

By Muriel Bristol | , May 21, 2023

Ebenezer Osgood was born in Loudon, NH, December 22, 1807, son of Ebenezer C. and [his second wife,] Anne (Fullonton) Osgood. (Ebenezer C. Osgood was a Revolutionary soldier, having served in Col. Nicholas Gilman’s Regiment).

Ebenezer [C.] Osgood headed a Loudon, NH, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Anna C. (Fullonton) Osgood], one female aged 16-25 years [Polly (Osgood) Ladd], one male aged 10-15 years [Ira Osgood], and three females aged under-10 years [Nancy Osgood, Lemina Osgood and Rosina Ladd?], and one male aged under-10 years [Ebenezer Osgood].

Father Ebenezer [C.] Osgood made his last will, December 1, 1814. He bequeathed to his beloved wife, Anna Osgood, one-third of his estate, “as the law directs.” He bequeathed $200 each to his sons [of his first marriage], Enoch F. Osgood and James Osgood; $25 to his daughter Polly Ladd, in addition to what she had already received; $75 each to his daughters, Lemina Osgood and Nancy Osgood; $250 to his son, Ebenezer Osgood, when he should reach twenty-one years of age, and his clock when he should reach twenty-five years of age; and to his sons, Bradley Osgood and Ira Osgood, all his real and personal estate, including when it should become available, the widow’s thirds. He appointed sons Bradley Osgood and Ira Osgood as joint executors. Jedediah Tucker, John Osgood, and John Bachelder signed as witnesses.

Father Ebenezer C. Osgood died in Loudon, NH, December 4, 1815, aged fifty-eight years. His last will was proved in a Rockingham County Probate court held at Epsom, NH, January 17, 1816.

Ebenezer Osgood married in Lebanon, ME, in 1829 [intentions filed September 15, 1829], Eleanor Chamberlain Burrows, he of Milton and she of Lebanon, ME. Rev. James Weston performed the ceremony. She was born in Lebanon, ME, December 18, 1806, daughter of Edward Jr. and Margaret (Chamberlain) Burrows.

(The known children of Ebenezer and Eleanor C. (Burrows) Osgood were Francis H./Hubbard Winslow Osgood (1830–1897), Almira B. Osgood (1833–1916), and Margaret E. Osgood (1841–185?)).

Anna [(Fullonton)] Osgood headed a Loudon, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. Her household included one female aged 60-69 years [herself]. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ira Osgood and Samuel Haines. James Osgood appeared higher up on the same page.

Eben Osgood headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], and one female aged 20-29 years [Eleanor C. (Burrows) Osgood). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Danl Hatch and Mehitable Swasey.

Son Francis H./Hubbard Winslow Osgood was born in Milton, October 10, 1830. (He seems to have been known as Francis H. Osgood only during his time in Virginia, which included his two marriage ceremonies). Daughter Almira B. Osgood was born in Milton, February 8, 1833.

Anna [(Fullonton)] Osgood headed a Loudon, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. Her household included one female aged 70-79 years [herself]. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of William Munsey and Ira Osgood. Samuel Haines appeared just after Ira Osgood.

Ebenezer Osgood headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Eleanor C. (Burrows) Osgood), one male aged 20-29 years, one male aged 5-9 years [Francis H./Hubbard W. Osgood], and one female aged 5-9 years [Almira B. Osgood]. One member of his household was engaged in Manufacture & the Trades and one member of his household was engaged in Commerce. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Alpheus Goodwin and Theodore Stevens. (Rev. Theodore Stevens was then pastor of the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church).

Daughter Margaret E. Osgood was born in Milton, in 1841.

Mother Anna (Fullonton) Osgood died in Loudon, NH, April 21, 1848.

Ebenezer Osgood, a blacksmith, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eleanor [(Burrows)] Osgood, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Almira B. Osgood, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Margaret E. Osgood, aged nine years (b. NH), and Henry C. Badger, a blacksmith, aged fifteen years (b. VT). Ebenezer Osgood had real estate valued at $1,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration between Joseph Whitehouse, a manufacturer, aged twenty-seven (b. England), and Joseph Townsend, a manufacturer, aged twenty-seven years (b. England).

Eliza Hearty, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Lawrence, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included George A. Hearty, aged eleven years (b. NH), Hubbard Osgood, a machinist, aged twenty years (b. Unknown), Albert Dickinson, an operative, aged seventeen years (b. Unknown), Obadiah Smith, an operative, aged seventeen years (b. Unknown), Emulus Stackpole, a machinist, aged twenty-five years (b. Unknown), Michael Rafferty, aged fourteen years (b. Ireland), John W. Gamsbury, an operative, aged twenty-two years (b. Canada), David Daniels, an operative, aged twenty-two years (b. Canada), John H. Brackett, an operative, aged sixteen years (b. ME), [“Mr.”] Wilde, an operative, aged twenty-eight years (b. England), Edward Gallagher, an operative, aged twenty-four years (b. Unknown), Charles Gallagher, an operative, aged eighteen years (b. Unknown), Thomas Buty, a watchman, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), Mary N. Moore, aged twenty years (b. ME), Elizabeth Callaghan, aged thirty-one years (b. Newfoundland), and Martha McPherson, aged thirty-three years (b. Newfoundland).

Son Hubbard W. Osgood appeared in the Lawrence, MA, directory of 1851, as a machinist, residing at 70 Common street. (Eliza Hearty had her [rooming] house at 70 Common street).

Milton sent Ebenezer Osgood to Concord, NH, as its NH State Representative for the 1851-52 biennium. He was assigned to the Committee on Unfinished Business.

Rep. Chase of Milford, NH, put forward a resolution on July 4, 1851, which opposed the Federal Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. It was intended to influence New Hampshire’s Federal delegation towards opposing slavery in general and repealing or otherwise opposing the Fugitive Slave Act in particular.

Resolved, That the resolutions adopted by the Legislature of this State, and approved July 7, 1849, by proclaiming the unqualified opposition of the people of New Hampshire to every form of oppression; by declaring that slavery is a great social evil, fraught with danger to the peace and welfare of the nation; by expressing the determination to respect and maintain the constitutional rights of every portion of this Republic; by proclaiming our unalterable attachment to the Union and Constitution of country – that they are safe in the hands of the American people – that from every corner of our land stout hearts and strong hands will be ever ready in the hour of our country’s peril to protect and defend it from the assaults of every foe, come from whence they may, and that this proud ark of freedom will be long preserved as the glorious example which will mould and fashion the institutions of other and despotic nations; by proclaiming the firm and unalterable opposition of our citizens to the extension of slavery over any portion of American soil now free, and asserting the power of Congress to prohibit such extension of slavery and to abolish it in the District of Columbia, and invoking the immediate exercise of these powers – embody principles and sentiments which have been sanctioned and sanctified by the sterner republicanism of our fathers, and which are as indestructible as are the pillars of our Government itself. We cordially adopt and recommend them as worthy of the entire confidence of the people of this State.
Caution - Fugitive Slave Act of 1850Resolved, That the law for the rendition of fugitives from service or labor, passed September 18, 1850, by its creating tribunals unknown to the Constitution to try cases arising under the laws of the United States; by permitting of cases of law to be determined on ex-parte evidence without any notice to the respondent; by its practical nullification of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus; by its denial of the right of trial by jury to the person claimed under it at the place where such person is arrested; by its legal presumptions discriminating against freedom and in favor of oppression; by its cheapening the value of personal liberty and rendering its enjoyment insecure to every citizen of the Free States, is in direct violation of the letter and spirit of the Constitution of the United States, and in derogation of the rights and sovereignty of the several States, and ought to be essentially modified or repealed.
Resolved, That we are firmly and unalterably opposed to the extension of slavery over any portion of American soil now free, and in the event of any attempt to introduce it into the territories of the United States, it will be the imperative duty of our Senators and Representatives in Congress to oppose such extension by all constitutional means in their power.
Resolved, That the people of New Hampshire reiterate their strong and unalterable attachment to the glorious Constitution and Union of these States – that these feelings and sentiments are and ought to be of the broadest national character, embracing our whole country, however bounded, and that we will assert and forever maintain the constitutional rights of every portion of the same.
Resolved, That His Excellency the Governor be requested to transmit copies of the foregoing resolutions to the Governors of the several States of the Union, and also a copy of the same to each of the Senators and Representatives of this State in the Congress of the United States.

Rep. Smith of Henniker, NH, moved to table the resolution, i.e., prevent it from coming to a vote, and the sponsor, Rep. Chase, requested a roll call vote on that tabling motion. Rep. Osgood of Milton voted with the 77 representatives [35.6%] that opposed tabling the resolution, rather than with the 139 representatives [64.4%] that favored tabling the resolution.

As for the representatives from surrounding communities, Reps. Peter M. Horne (1815-1898) and Jeremiah Roberts (1807-1892), both of Farmington, NH, voted to table the resolution, while Reps. James C. Cole (1791-1867) and Stephen Shorey (1809-1879), both of Rochester, NH, voted against tabling. Reps. Charles French (1817-1878) of Middleton, NH, and Ebenezer Garvin, Jr. (1815-1889) of Wakefield, NH, do not seem to have voted. (Rep. Garvin had been granted a leave of absence – for the remainder of the session – earlier that same day).

(Resolution tabler Rep. Lewis Smith (1815-1877) of Henniker, NH, was a lawyer. He had addressed an anti-slavery gathering in Henniker, NH, in February 1843. He was a Democrat and had several terms in the NH House in the 1840s, where he had been both the House Assistant Clerk or Clerk under Democrat majorities. He removed to Minnesota in 1856, where he would be elected to the MN House. He would be President of the MN Democrat Convention in 1860).

(Resolution sponsor Rep. Leonard Chase (1811-1868) of Milford, NH, was a merchant and manufacturer. He managed the “underground railroad” activities aiding fugitive slaves in Milford, NH, and vicinity. He sponsored an anti-slavery gathering in Milford, NH, in January 1843. He had several terms in the NH House in the 1840s. He seems to have been a Whig at that time, but would be identified later as a Republican when elected to the NH Senate in 1862 and the NH Executive Council in 1864. Both representatives were local justices-of-the-peace and temperance promoters).

In the second year of Rep. Osgood’s two-year biennium, i.e., 1852, he was joined by another Milton Representative, Congregational minister James Doldt. This would seem to be the beginning of a roughly 25-year run of Milton having two NH state representatives.

Inspired by the recent passage in the neighboring state of the so-called “Maine Law,” which strictly prohibited alcohol consumption, the NH legislature spent a substantial amount of time trying to craft a New Hampshire version. A June draft version was deemed unconstitutional by the NH Supreme Court. A November election referendum result rejected such measures by a small majority.

A general question was submitted to the people of New Hampshire, at the late Presidential election [November 2, 1852], whether they were in favor of a law embracing the principle and provisions in substance of the Maine Law; and that question the people decided in the negative by a small majority. The Judges of the Superior Court of New Hampshire have decided that in eight several details the Liquor bill of last June session of the Legislature conflicts with the Constitution (Daily Journal (Montpelier, VT), November 22, 1852).

Despite the referendum result, a less comprehensive prohibition bill was put forward. It was entitled “An act for the suppression of drinking houses and tippling shops.” A number of floor votes were taken over several weeks regarding amending the underlying bill, dividing or amending amendments, or simply tabling the underlying bill. On Thursday, December 16, 1852, several floor amendments were rejected and another accepted. A motion to simply send the bill back to its committee failed too.

Rep. Horace C. Stanley (1806-1888) of Hopkinton, NH, moved to amend the bill by striking out its Section 10, replacing it with a new section:

Sec. 10. Any person who shall sell any spurious or adulterated liquors, whether licensed or otherwise, shall forfeit and pay the sum of thirteen dollars and thirty-three cents for each and every violation of the provisions of this section, to be recovered on complaint of any person in an action before any justice of the peace.

Rep. Osgood and Rep. Doldt were among the 130 representatives [50%] that voted against this Stanley floor amendment, rather than among the 130 representatives [50%] that voted for it. The House Speaker, who votes only to break such ties, voted in favor of the Stanley amendment.

The NH House took a vote on this stripped-down “Maine Law” bill, December 30, 1852, regarding whether or not to indefinitely postpone further consideration. Rep. Osgood and Rep. Doldt both voted with the 128 members [46.5%] opposed to postponement, while a majority of 147 members [53.5%] voted in favor of postponement.

Summary of News. The New Hampshire House of Representatives has defeated the “Maine” liquor law by 19 votes (Brattleboro Eagle (Brattleboro, VT), January 7, 1853).

NEW HAMPSHIRE. The New Hampshire House of Representatives has voted, 147 to 128, to indefinitely postpone the “Maine liquor” bill, only 15 members being absent. Ichabod Bartlett and W.H.Y. Hackett, both of Portsmouth, and eminent lawyers in the Granite State, voted for indefinite postponement (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), January 7, 1853).

But NH-level Prohibition would reappear in another session and pass. (See Milton Under “Semi-Prohibition” – 1855-02).

Milton - 1856 (Detail) - Wallingford, D
Milton Mills, 1856 (Detail) – The home of E. Osgood (indicated with red arrow) on Main Street. His house was bracketed then by neighbors M. Foley and Jos. Townsend.

Son F.H. [Hubbard W.] Osgood married (1st) in Milford, VA, October 16, 1856, Martha S. Trainham. She was born in Milford, VA, circa 1838, daughter of Larkin and Elizabeth C. (Owen) Traynham. (Larkin Trainham of Caroline County, VA, a farmer, aged sixty years, appeared in a list of Confederate prisoners-of-war dated May 6, 1865).

Daughter-in-law M.S. Traynham [Osgood] died in Caroline County, VA, July 8, 1857, aged eighteen years. (Elizabeth E. Osgood – daughter of Hubbard W. and Martha S. (Trainham) Osgood – died in Caroline County, VA, December 31, 1857, aged five months, i.e., born in July 1857).

Son Francis H. [Hubbard W.] Osgood married (2nd), in Stafford, VA, December 28, 1859, Susan Amelia Douglas. (One may see in subsequent records that Susan A. Douglas was the second wife of Hubbard W. Osgood). He was a widower, aged twenty-five years (b. Strafford County, NH, son of Ebenezer and Ellen), and she was single, aged seventeen years. She was born in Stafford, VA, April 6, 1841, daughter of Triplet and M. Eliza (Whaling) Douglas.

E. Osgood, a blacksmith, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eleanor C. [(Burrows)] Osgood, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), Hubbard W. Osgood, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and Almira B. Osgood, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of L.D. Reed, landlord of the Milton Mills Hotel, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Joseph Townsend, a woolen manufacturer, aged thirty-seven years (b. England).

Francis H. [Hubbard W.] Osgood, an engineer, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), headed a Caroline County (“Milford P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Susan A. [(Douglas)] Osgood, aged eighteen years (b. VA), and William I. Osgood, aged seven months (b. VA). (William Osgood – son of Hubbard W. and Susan A. [(Douglas)] Osgood – would die of a brain infection in Cambridge, MA, November 13, 1864, aged five years, sixteen days (b. VA)).

Milton - 1856 (Detail) - Wallingford, D
Milton Mills, 1871 (Detail) – The home of [E.] Osgood (indicated with red circle) on Main Street. His house was bracketed then by neighbors A.A. Fox and C.F. Hart.

Ebenezer Osgood, a blacksmith, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elizabeth C. [(Burrows)] Osgood, keeping house, aged sixty-three years (b. NH). Ebenezer Osgood had real estate valued at $2,500 and personal estate valued at $1,000. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of John O’Neil, a spinner in woolen mill, aged forty years (b. Ireland), and Cyrus F. Hart, a farm laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH).

Hubbard W. Osgood, a jour. [journeyman] machinist, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Chelsea, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan A. [(Douglas)] Osgood, keeping house, aged twenty-six years (b. VA), Chas. F. Osgood, aged ten years (b. VA), and Effie L. Osgood, aged five years (b. VT). Hubbard W. Osgood had personal estate valued at $400.

Previous to 1871, the Calvin Baptists and Congregationalists of Milton Mills united in maintaining public worship in the old “Union” meetinghouse erected in 1834. Theological students supplied the pulpit here until the Congregational Church was organized Sept. 26, 1871. The church, at its formation, had a membership of about twenty people. Ebenezer Osgood and Benjamin G. Adams were the first deacons; William McGibbon, the first clerk (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

The Union Congregational Church at Milton Mills was organized on the 26th day of September, 1871, with a membership of sixteen, viz., Benjamin G. Adams, Sophia [(Nutter)] Adams, Dr. Reuben Buck, Mary Buck, Mary E. Brown, Margaret [(Thompson)] Brierly, Sarah E. [(Buck)] Fox, Josiah Gerrish, Wm. McGibbon, Mary [(Lang)] McGibbon, Betsey [(Weeks)] Hubbard, Helen Miller, Ebenezer Osgood, Ellen C. [(Burrows)] Osgood, Almira B. Osgood, Ann E. Simes (Scales, 1914).

Ebenezer Osgood appeared in the Milton directories of 1873, 1874, 1875, and 1876, as a Milton Mills blacksmith.

John Meikle of Wakefield, NH, suffered a financial reverse in 1877, which was associated with his felt mill at Union, NH. The court appointed Nathan Wimpfheimer of Somersworth, NH, as a receiver and his account included $40.00 owed to the account of Eben Osgood.

Eleanor C. (Burrows) Osgood died in Milton, December 27, 1877.

Ebenezer Osgood, a blacksmith, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Almira B. Osgood, keeping house, aged forty-seven years (b. NH). Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Winfield Miller, a farmer, aged thirty years (b. ME), and Luther B. Roberts, a storekeeper, aged thirty-four years (b. ME).

Hubbard W. Osgood, a machinist, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Chelsea, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Susan A. [(Douglas)] Osgood, keeping house, aged thirty-nine years (b. VA), and his children, Charles F. Osgood, a clerk in store, aged nineteen years (b. VA), Effie L. Osgood, at school, aged fifteen years (b. MA), and Minnie L. Osgood, at school, aged eight years (b. MA). They resided at 42 Broadway street. This particular census enumerator recorded their state of health. Hubbard W. Osgood and his two daughters were recorded as being in “Good Health,” while his wife was said to have “Consumption,” and his son was said to have “White Swelling.”

Ebenezer Osgood appeared in the Milton directories of 1880, 1881, and 1882, as a Milton Mills blacksmith.

Milton - 1892 (Detail) - Wallingford, D
Milton Mills, 1892 (Detail) – The house of E. Osgood (indicated with red arrow) on Main Street. His house was bracketed then by neighbors A.A. Fox and W.E. Pilsbury, M.D.

Ebenezer Osgood died of heart and brain failure in Milton, April 23, 1892, aged eighty-four years, three months, and one day. W.E. Pillsbury, M.D., signed the certificate.

Son Hubbard W. Osgood died of apoplexy at 40 Parker Street in Charlestown, Boston, MA, November 8, 1897, aged sixty-seven years. He was a machinist, who had been born in Milton Mills. (“We miss the face we all did love so dear, We miss the one who all our lives did cheer.”).

DEATHS. OSGOOD – In Charlestown, Nov. 8, Hubbard W. Osgood, 67 yrs. Funeral from his late residence, 40 Parker st., Thursday, Nov. 11, at 1 p.m. (Boston Globe, November 10, 1897).

Lyman Towle, a carpenter laborer, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed an Everett, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Minnie L. [(Osgood)] Towle, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), his daughter, Hazel Towle, at school, aged five years (b. MA), and his mother-in-law, Susan [(Douglas)] Osgood, a widow, aged fifty-nine years (b. VA). Lyman Towle rented their house at 2 Oliver Street. Minnie L. Towle was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Susan Osgood was the mother of one child [SIC], of whom one [SIC] was still living.

Almira B. Osgood, a home-keeper, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. She owned her house, free-and-clear. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Elijah T. Libby, a jeweler, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and Elbridge W. Fox, a storekeeper, aged sixty-five years (b. NH).

Almira Osgood, a woolen mill weaver, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. She owned her house, free-and-clear. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Frank B. Day, a woolen mill finisher, aged forty-two years (b. ME), and Levi Pillsbury, a general farm farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. ME).

Daughter Almira B. Osgood died of an intestinal obstruction in Acton, ME, October 18, 1916, aged eighty-three years, eight months, and fifteen days. She had resided in Acton, ME, for seven months, with her prior residence having been in Milton Mills. H.E. Anderson, M.D., signed the death certificate.

S.A. [(Douglas)] Osgood, a widow, aged seventy-seven years (b. VA), headed an Everett, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. She shared a two-family residence at 169 Vine Street with the household of Frank E. Hogaboom, an electric co. iron worker, aged sixty-one years (b. VT).

Daughter-in-law Susan A. (Douglas) Osgood died in Everett, MA, December 22, 1925, aged eighty-three years.

DEATHS. OSGOOD – In Everett, Dec. 22d, Susan Amelia, widow of Hubbard Osgood, 83 years, 8 months, 16 days. Funeral services will be held at residence of her daughter, Mrs. Effie Norris, 133 Vine st., Thursday, Dec. 24 at 2.30 p.m. Relatives and friend are invited to attend (Boston Glober, December 23, 1925).


References:

Find a Grave. (2010, January 7). Leonard Chase. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/46422670/leonard-chase

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Almira B. Osgood. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114682107/almira-b-osgood

Find a Grave. (2014, April 14). Capt. Ebenezer Chase Osgood. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/127967447/ebenezer-chase-osgood

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Ebenezer Osgood. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114682156/ebenezer-osgood

Find a Grave. (2019, August 12). Hubbard W. Osgood. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/202077907/hubbard-w-osgood

NH General Court. (1851). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=thQtAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA353

NH General Court. (1853). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3vlBAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA327

Wikipedia. (2023, April 22). Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_Slave_Act_of_1850

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

One thought on “Milton Mills Blacksmith Ebenezer Osgood (1807-1892)”

  1. Hi, your watching the river flow and meticulous documentation are amazingly enjoyable. Thank you. I reside at the Townsend-Kibbe residence and have served as a Chair, Milton BOS and currently serve on the ZBA. Thank you again for being Marvelous.

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