Milton Mills’ Buck Family of Physicians (1819-1885)

By Muriel Bristol | December 13, 2020

Dr. Reuben Buck of Wilmington (and Malden), MA, moved to Shapleigh, ME, in or around 1819, where he set up as a physician. He removed from there to neighboring Acton, ME, or perhaps just had the boundaries change around him when Acton was created in 1830. He practiced medicine (there and in Milton Mills) into the late 1860s. He trained and mentored two sons-in-law (Jonathan S. Calef and Charles E. Swasey), two sons (Jeremiah C. Buck and Horatio B. Buck), as well as several others, non-family members, in the medical profession. (A grandson (William C. Buck) took up also the profession of medicine).

Reuben Buck (1787-1871)

Reuben Buck was born in Wilmington, MA, August 16, 1787, son of Reuben and Esther (Harnden) Buck. (The elder Reuben Buck (1759-1805) had been a Revolutionary soldier).

Reuben Buck of Wilmington, MA, aged nineteen years, attended Phillips Academy in Andover, MA, with its Class of 1806. He went from there to Harvard College.

Reuben Buck married in Wilmington, MA, November 17, 1809, Alice Jacquith, both of Wilmington. She was born in Wilmington, MA, January 6, 1787, daughter of Nathan D. and Anna (Crosby) Jacquith.

Ruben Buck headed a Wilmington, MA, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-25 years [himself], one female aged 16-25 years (Alice (Jacquith) Buck], and one male aged under-10 years. (This eldest child, who was born apparently in the 1810 census year itself, likely died young, as he is not seen in subsequent enumerations).

Reuben Buck of Malden, MA, attended medical lectures at Harvard College during the 1818-19 academic year (Harvard, 1819). Dr. Reuben Buck practiced for a time in Shapleigh, ME, beginning in 1819 (Clayton, 1880).

PHYSICIANS. Dr. Reuben Buck of Wilmington, Mass., entered upon the practice of medicine at Hubbard’s Corner [Shapleigh, ME] in 1819. He afterwards moved to the western border of the town, to a place called Milton Mills, where he and a son of his still have an extensive practice (Loring, 1854).

Dr. Reuben Buck headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Fourth (1820) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-45 years [himself], one female aged 26-45 years [Alice (Jacquith) Buck], one male aged under-10 years [Reuben A. Buck], and three females aged under-10 years [Almira A. Buck, Susan Buck, and Mary Buck]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Jonathan Palmer and Mrs. Elizabeth Gilman. (This first Susan Buck apparently died young, as a younger daughter would receive later the same name).

Shapleigh’s original school committee members were [Dr.] Whiting Stevens, [Dr.] Reuben Buck, and William Trafton (Clayton, 1880). R. Buck served on the Shapleigh School Committee in the years 1820, 1823-28, and [that of Acton, ME, in] 1832 (Fullonton, 1847).

Dr. Reuben Buck of Shapleigh, ME, functioned as an auxiliary or agent for the Boston-based American Tract Society in dispensing religious literature locally in the years 1828 through 1832 (American Tract Society, 1832).

Dr. Reuben Buck is said to have moved to Acton, ME, in 1830. In so doing, he did not have to move very far. Acton, ME, was established from the western portion of Shapleigh, ME, March 6, 1830. (The portion of Acton, ME, to which he moved, that adjoining Milton Mills, NH, seems to have been regarded as functionally a part of Milton Mills). [York County Deeds might tell the tale].

At Milton Mills the first physician to carry on an extensive practice was Dr. Reuben Buck, a native of Massachusetts, who lived in Acton, and visited patients in this village as early as 1830, and continued to reside here until his death. Prior to Dr. Buck’s practice here, Dr. [Charles] Powers of Acton and Dr. [Richard] Russell of Wakefield attended sick calls (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Reuben Buck, M.D, served as instructor to Maine Medical students John O. Adams, of Lebanon, ME, and Jonathan S. Calef, of Lyman, ME, who were attending medical lectures at Bowdoin College, in February-May 1830. (Adams and Calef were both members of the Maine Medical School Class of 1831 at Bowdoin College).

Reuben Buck headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Alice (Jacquith) Buck], three males aged 20-29 years [John O. Adams, Jonathan S. Calef, and one other, perhaps Ezra Kimball], two females aged 15-19 years [Almira A. Buck and Rachel F. Buck], one male aged 15-19 years [Reuben A. Buck], one female aged 10-14 years [Mary Buck], one male aged 5-9 years [Jeremiah C. Buck], two females aged 5-9 years [Sarah E. Buck and Susan C. Buck], and one male aged under-5 years [John C. Buck].

R. Buck, M.D, served as instructor to medical student Ezra Kimball, of Shapleigh, ME, who was attending medical lectures at Dartmouth College, in October 1832. (Kimball was a member of the Junior class (Class of 1834)) (Dartmouth, 1832).

Whiting Stevens [of Shapleigh, ME], Reuben Buck, and Jonathan S. Calef, all practicing physicians and surgeons, submitted certificates to the U.S. Congress in 1832, in support of a War of 1812 veteran’s invalid pension claim. The veteran was Heard Brackett of Acton, ME (US Congress, 1832).

Reuben Buck of Acton, ME, received a patent for a fireplace invention, July 1, 1836 (U.S. Patent Office, 1847).

Doctr. Ruben Buck headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Alice (Jacquith) Buck], one male aged 20-29 years [Reuben A. Buck], one female aged 20-29 years [Mary Buck], one male aged 15-19 years [Jeremiah C. Buck], two females aged 15-19 years [Sarah E. Buck and Susan C. Buck], and one male aged 10-14 years [John C. Buck], and one male aged 5-9 years [Horatio B. Buck]. One member of his household was employed in a learned profession, one in manufacture and trade, and two in agriculture.

R. Buck testified in the Shapleigh, ME, land case of Benjamin Nason versus Joseph Grant, et alia, which was heard in the Maine Supreme Judicial Court, in April 1842.

The defendant then called R. Buck, who testified, that he once owned the premises; and on October 13, 1836, gave a deed thereof to Grant, sen., with other lands, constituting the farm on which the tenants now live and have lived since the Spring of 1837, and at the same time, took back a mortgage from him to secure notes amounting to $1025, part of the consideration, and the whole thereof, excepting about one hundred dollars, then paid him by J. Grant, jr., and W. Grant, sons of Grant, sen., and then both minors; that nothing had since been paid to him; that on January 12, 1839, neither the deed nor mortgage back having been recorded, at the request of Grant, sen., and his two sons, he, having no knowledge of any attachment thereon, took back and cancelled the deed of the farm, including the demanded premises, and gave up the notes secured by the mortgage to be cancelled, and made a deed to Grant, jr., the tenant, and W. Grant, and took back from them a mortgage to secure the payment of all the original purchase money, excepting the $100 paid; and that the deed from him to Grant was given back and cancelled, and a new one given principally to save expense (ME Supreme Judicial Court, 1843). 

R. Buck, M.D, and his son, J.C. Buck, M.D., served as instructors to Maine Medical student William Buzzell Reynolds, of Acton, ME, who was attending medical lectures at Bowdoin College, in February-May 1849 (Bowdoin College, 1849).

Bowdoin College. Non-Graduates. William Buzzell Reynolds, M.D., Dartmouth, 1852. b. 14 Aug. 1828, Acton, Me. Med. Sch., 1849. Asst. Surg., 2d U.S.S.S., 1861; Surg., 1863-65. Physician, Acton, Me., 1852-55, Union, N.H., 1855-61, Lynn, Mass., 1865-77. d. 11 Jan. 1877, Lynn, Mass. (Bowdoin College, 1916). 

(Reynolds was a non-graduate at Bowdoin College, because he transferred to Dartmouth College. He also studied at Jefferson College. He married (1st), in 1851, Clara Ellen Swasey (1829-1867), sister of Dr. Charles E. Swasey).

Ruben Buck, a physician, aged sixty-one years (b. MA), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Alice [(Jacquith)] Buck, aged sixty-one years (b. MA), Mary Buck, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), Susan Buck, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Sarah Buck, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), John C. Buck, a farmer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), and Horatio Buck, a farmer, aged eighteen years (b. ME). Ruben Buck had real estate valued at $3,000. (Sadly, Mary Buck, was said to be “insane”). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Daniel Tebbetts, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. ME), and Reuben A. Buck, a farmer, aged thirty-three years (b. MA).

Reuben Buck, M.D., was an honorary member of the Literary Adelphi, of the New Hampton Academical and Theological Institution at New Hampton, NH, in 1852. (Elbridge W. Fox was its recording secretary, and Charles E. Swasey was its corresponding secretary).

THE LITERARY ADELPHI. The Literary Adelphi was founded A.D., 1827. Its object is to develop the mind. It has a spacious and convenient Reading-Room, containing a cabinet of minerals, and a valuable library. By the liberality of its patrons it is furnished with about twenty newspapers from various sections of the country. Besides this the society received several valuable periodicals. To those who have aided, by the contribution of books, newspapers, periodicals, & c., we tender out heartfelt thanks. Additions are made to the library, from time to time, as the state of the funds of the society will permit.

Reuben Buck, a physician, aged seventy-one years (b. MA), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Alace Buck, a matron, aged seventy-one years (b. MA [SIC]), Mary Buck, a house maid, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), John C. Buck, a farmer, aged twenty-nine years (b. ME), and Edward P. Buck, aged thirteen years (b. ME). Reuben Buck had real estate valued at $4,500 and personal estate valued at $2,525. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John Miller, a farmer, aged sixty-four years (b. ME), and Sally Merrill, a matron, aged sixty-four years (b. ME).

Reuben Buck appeared in a Maine business directory of 1862, as a physician and surgeon at Acton, ME. (His son, J.C. Buck, appeared under that heading too).

Alice (Jacquith) Buck died in Acton, ME, March 23, 1864, aged seventy-seven years.

John C. Buck, a farmer, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Hannah Buck, keeping house, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), Herbert H. Buck, aged one year (b. ME), Ruben Buck, a retired physician, aged eighty-two years (b. ME [SIC], and Mary Buck, housework, aged forty-nine years (b. ME [SIC]. John C. Buck had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $700. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Thomas Reed, a block printer, aged twenty-eight years (b. Scotland), and Joseph Shearp, a mechanic, aged sixty years (b. England).

R. Buck appeared in the Milton business directory of 1871 (and posthumously in those of 1873 and 1874) as a Milton Mills physician.

Dr. Reuben Buck died in Acton, ME, September 17, 1871, aged eighty-four years.

Dr. Reuben Buck, and his daughter, Mary Buck, were listed among the sixteen founding members of the Union Congregational Church at Milton Mills, September 26, 1871 (Scales, 1914). (He may have been active in the preliminaries, but died shortly before the actual founding day).

The Maine Missionary Society of the Congregational Church noted a $50 bequest from “Doct. Reuben Buck, late of Milton Mills, N.H.,” in 1875 (ME Missionary Society, 1875).

[The children of Reuben and Alice (Jacquith) Buck were: 1. Alice Almira Buck, born in Wilmington, MA, August 14, 1811. She married Jonathan Sears Calef; 2. Reuben Anzel Buck, born in Wilmington, MA, August 8, 1813; 3. Rachel Furbush Buck, born in Wilmington, MA, December 13, 1815. She married Samuel S. Hart; 4. Susan Buck, born, probably in Malden, MA, in 1816. She evidently died before 1825; 5. Mary Buck, born, probably in Malden, MA, in 1818, she died June 24, 1879; 6. Jeremiah Crosby Buck, born in Acton, ME, in 1822; 7. Sarah Elizabeth Buck, born in 1824. She married Elbridge Wood Fox; 8. Susan Gresham Buck, born June 27, 1825. She married Charles Emerson Swasey; 9. John C. Buck, born in Acton, ME, November 21, 1826; and 10. Horatio Bardwell Buck, born in Acton, ME, January 27, 1832].

Jonathan S. Calef (1806-1866)

Alice Almira “Almira” Buck was born in Wilmington, MA, August 14, 1811, daughter of Reuben and Alice (Jacquith) Buck.

Reuben Buck, M.D, served as instructor to Maine Medical students Jonathan S. Calef, of Lyman, ME, and John O. Adams, of Lebanon, ME, who were attending medical lectures at Bowdoin College, in February-May 1830. (Calef and Adams were both members of the Maine Medical School Class of 1831 at Bowdoin College).

Jonathan S. Calef would seem to have been one of three males aged 20-29 years who were enumerated in the Acton, ME, household of Reuben Buck, at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census.

Alice A. Buck married in 1831, Jonathan Sears Calef. He was born in Lyman, ME, October 14, 1806, son of Rev. Jonathan L. and Grace S. (Atwood) Calef.

Dr. Jonathan S. Calef, who came from Maine, married one of Dr. Buck’s daughters and settled here not many years after the latter’s arrival. He remained for some time, going from Milton to Manchester, later to Boston, Mass., and finally to San Francisco, Cal., where he died (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Whiting Stevens [of Shapleigh, ME], Reuben Buck, and Jonathan S. Calef, all practicing physicians and surgeons, submitted certificates to the U.S. Congress in 1832, in support of a War of 1812 invalid veteran’s pension claim. The veteran was Heard Brackett of Acton, ME (US Congress, 1832).

Jonathan S. Calef headed a Fairfield, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [Jonathan S. Calef], two females aged 20-29 years [Almira A. (Buck) Calef, and one other], and one male aged under-5 years [Charles E. Calef]. One member of his household was engaged in a learned profession. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Lemuel Jones and Joshua Nye, 2d.

Jonathan S. Calef, of Maine, graduated from the Medical Department of the University of New York, with its Class of 1842.

Alumni of the School of Medicine. 1842, University Medical College. Jonathan S. Calef*, Fellow Mass. State Med. Soc., ’49, d. ’66, San Francisco, Cal. (NYU, 1916). 

Almira A. (Buck) Calef, wife of Dr. J.S. Calef, died of consumption in Manchester, NH, December 17, 1845, aged thirty-four years.

Jonathan S. Calef married (2nd) in Stonington, CT, October 30, 1847, Henrietta S. Chalwell, he of Manchester, NH, and she of Lowell, MA. Rev. J.M. Willey performed the ceremony. She was born in the West Indies, circa 1812.

(Henrietta S. Chalwill, aged thirty years, traveled on the brig Jane from Guayama, Puerto Rico, to New York, NY, arriving June 4, 1842. She traveled with Mrs. H.A. Chalwill, aged twenty-eight years, and her daughter, aged nine years, as well as Bethiah S. Clotworthy, aged eighteen years, and John S. Clotworthy, aged fourteen years. They all  intended to take up residence in America).

J.S. Calef appeared in the Boston directory of 1849, as a physician, at 141 Broadway, corner of C street. Jonathan S. Calef, of South Boston, MA, joined the Massachusetts Medical Society in or around May 1849 (MA Medical Society, 1854).

It has proven difficult to find Dr. Calef in the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Since he appeared next in San Francisco, CA, one might suppose that he was in transit to there (as were many people (“Forty-Niners”) during the California Gold Rush of 1849 and thereafter).

California_Clipper_500Dr. J.S. Calef, a physician, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a San Francisco, CA, household at the time of the California State Census of 1852. His household included Henrietta S. Calef, aged forty-two years (b. West Indies), Charles E. Calef, a clerk, aged fifteen years (b. ME), Mary B. Calef, aged twelve years (b. ME), Frances Calef, aged ten years (b. ME), Samuel A. Clotworthy, a gentleman, aged twenty-four years (b. West Indies), and Mrs. Clotworthy, aged twenty-two years (b. West Indies). They had all last resided in Boston, MA.

J.S. Calef, M.D., appeared in the San Francisco, CA, directory of 1854 as a druggist at 4 Bay State Row in San Francisco.

J.S. Calef, a physician, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed a San Francisco [Eighth District], CA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Henrietta S. Calef, aged forty-eight years (b. West Indies), Charles E. Calef, a clerk, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), Mary B. Calef, aged nineteen years (b. ME), Frances Calef, aged seventeen years (b. ME), and John Dunning, aged twenty-five years (b. MA). J.S. Calef had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $600.

MARRIAGES. In San Francisco, August 27th, Robert Crouch, of Napa City, to Mrs. Mary B. Bean, eldest daughter of Dr. J.S. Calef (Sacramento Bee, August 29, 1862).

Jonathan S. Calef, appeared in the San Francisco, CA, directories of 1864 and 1865, as a physician, with his office at 726 Washington street. His dwelling was at 312 Post street in 1865.

Jonathan S. Calef died of chronic liver disease in San Francisco, CA, February 21, 1866, aged fifty-nine years. (He was buried in the Lone Mountain Cemetery).

DEATHS. In this city, Feb. 21st, Dr. J.S. Calef, aged 59 years (San Francisco Examiner, February 222, 1866).

Henrietta S. (Chalwell) Calef died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Los Angeles, CA, May 23, 1900, aged ninety years, three months, and two days.

DEATH RECORD. CALEF – At the residence of her daughter, No. 1200 West Twenty-third street, Mrs. Henrietta J. Calef, a native of the West Indies, aged 90 years (Los Angeles Times, May 24, 1900).

LOCAL HAPPENINGS. F.E. Johnston received word Thursday morning of the death, at Los Angeles, of Mrs. Calef, [step-] mother of Mrs. Robt. Crouch. The body was brought to San Francisco last evening. Mr. Johnston went to San Francisco to make arrangements for the funeral (Napa Journal (Napa, CA), May 25, 1900).

Jeremiah C. Buck (1822-1885)
Buck, JC - Per Katherine Ayers
Dr. Jeremiah C. Buck (per Katherine Ayers)

Jeremiah Crosby Buck was born in Acton, ME, in 1822, son of Reuben and Alice (Jacquith) Buck.

Jeremiah Crosby Buck appeared in a list of Senor Class medical students at Dartmouth College in the 1843-44 academic year. Doctors Reuben Buck, M.D., and O.P. [Chemistry Prof. Oliver Payson] Hubbard, M.D., were his instructors (Dartmouth, 1843).

J.C. Buck, M.D, and his father, R. Buck, M.D., served as instructors to Maine Medical student William Buzzell Reynolds, of Acton, ME, who was attending medical lectures at Bowdoin College, in February-May 1849.

Jeremiah C. Buck married in Milton, January 16, 1850, Eunice C. Swasey, he of Acton, ME, and she of Milton. Rev. B.F. Hubbard performed the ceremony. She was born in 1819, daughter of Charles and Eunice (Buck) Swasey.

Dr. Jeremiah Crosby Buck, a son of Dr. Reuben, began practice here during the latter years of his father’s residence in this locality, and continued in active practice almost up to the time of his death, which occurred about the year 1890 [1885] (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Jeremiah C. Buck, a physician, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eunice Buck, aged twenty-four years (b. NH).

Jeremiah C. Buck, M.D., served as instructor or preceptor for [his younger brother,] Horatio Bardwell Buck of Milton Mills, NH, who was a student attending a course of medical lectures at the Maine Medical School of Bowdoin College during the February-May 1854 academic term (Bowdoin, 1854).

Jeremiah C. Buck, a physician, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eunice C. Buck, a lady, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Abby D. Buck, aged nine years (b. ME), Hattie A. Buck (b. ME), aged eight years, and Charles S. Buck, aged six years (b. ME). Jeremiah C. Buck had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of William W. Reynolds, a shoemaker, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and John Brackett, a mechanic, aged forty-nine years (b. NH).

J.C. Buck appeared in a Maine business directory of 1862, as a physician and surgeon at Acton, ME. (His father, Reuben Buck, appeared under that heading too).

Jeremiah C. Buck, of Acton, ME, physician, aged forty-one years (b. ME), registered for the Class II military draft in July 1863. (Class II was for older men). His younger brother, John C. Buck, also of Acton, ME, a farmer, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), registered for the Class I military draft. George Dowly, of Acton, ME, enlisted in the U.S. Army, October 14, 1864, as a paid substitute for Jeremiah Buck, also of Acton, ME.

Jeremiah C. Buck, a physician, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Eunice C. Buck, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. NH), Abby D. Buck, a schoolteacher, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Hattie A. Buck, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Charles S. Buck, aged sixteen years (b. ME), and Willie C. Buck, aged three years (b. ME). Jeremiah C. Buck had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Lorenzo D. Goodwin, a farmer, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and Joshua Sanborn, a farmer, aged forty-three years (b. ME).

J.C. Buck appeared in the Milton business directories of 1871, 1873, 1874, 1875, 1876, 1877, and 1880 as a Milton Mills physician.

Jeremiah C. Buck, a physician, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eunice C. Buck, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and his children, Hattie A.W. Buck, a music teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), Charles S. Buck, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), and Willie C. Buck, at school, aged thirteen years (b. ME). Census enumerator John U. Simes listed their household between those of Benjamin G. Adams, superintendent of the woolen mills, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), and Asa Jewett, a trader and farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. NH).

J.C. Buck appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, 1882, and 1884, as a Milton Mills physician.

Jeremiah C. Buck died in Milton, March 15, 1885. Eunice (Swasey) Buck died in August 1885.

Charles E. Swasey (1829-1907)

Susan Gresham Buck was born in Milton, June 27, 1825, daughter of Reuben and Alice (Jacquith) Buck.

Dr. Chas. E. Swasey, who had been an army surgeon during the Civil War, married another of Dr. Reuben Buck’s daughters, and began the practice of his profession shortly after the close of the war. He remained here about five years, removing, at the end of that time, to Rochester, from which place he went to Somersworth, where he died May 30, 1907. His remains were brought to his native town and buried in the Roadside Cemetery just outside the village (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Charles Swasey, a baker, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eunice Swasey, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), Joseph Swasey, a sailor, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Clarissa Swasey, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Charles E. Swasey, a baker, aged twenty years (b. NH), Sarah Swasey, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and George A. Swasey, aged fourteen years (b. NH). Charles Swasey had real estate valued at $1,700. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Asa Jewett, a lumberman, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and James Marsh, a shoemaker, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME).

Charles Emerson Swasey of Milton Mills, NH, was corresponding secretary of the Literary Adelphi, of the New Hampton Academical and Theological Institution at New Hampton, NH, in 1852. (Dr. Reuben Buck was an honorary member, and Elbridge W. Fox was recording secretary).

Susan G. Buck married, December 31, 1851, Charles Emerson Swasey. He was born in Milton, NH, November 14, 1829, son of Charles and Eunice (Paul) Swasey. (His parents were founding members of the Milton Baptist Church, October 28, 1834. His father was Milton NH State Representative in 1846-47).

Charles E. Swasey studied at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, PA. Their daughter, Sarah Jessie Swasey, was born in Philadelphia, PA, August 4, 1857.

Eunice Swasey, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included Clara Reynolds, aged thirty years (b. NH), Everett G. Reynolds, aged seven years (b. NH), Horatio Reynolds, aged five years (b. NH), Charles E. Swasey, a medical student, aged thirty years (b. NH), Susan G. Swasey, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Sarah J. Swasey, aged three years (b. NH). Eunice Swasey had personal estate valued at $1,000. Her household appeared in the enumeration between the households of George A. Swasey, a house carpenter, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Asa Fox, a farmer, aged forty-five years (b. NH).

Charles Emerson Swasey received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania with its Class of 1861. Charles E. Swasey of Milton enlisted as an Assistant Surgeon with the U.S. Volunteers Medical Staff, November 7, 1862. He was promoted to Surgeon, August 15, 1863.

He was in service in Columbia College Hospital and subsequently in care of wounded officers quartered in Frederick, Md., after the battle of Gettysburg, and at Ft. Smith, Ark., where he was in charge of several hospitals (Swasey, 1910).

CASE 179 – Private J.M. Hayse, Co. K, 14th Kansas Cavalry, was accidentally wounded May 19, 1864, and admitted to hospital at Fort Smith. Surgeon C.E. Swasey, U.S.V., reported “Gunshot wound of left thigh into abdomen, fracture of neck of femur. Death resulted from perforation of the bowels on May 20, 1864” (US Surgeon General, 1883).

He was ultimately “brevetted” to Lt. Colonel, October 12, 1865, just before he mustered out of the service at Little Rock, AK, October 19, 1865.

Charles E. Swazey appeared in the Milton business directories of 1868, 1869-70, as a Milton Mills physician.

Chas. E. Swazey, a physician, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, (“Gonic P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sussie G. Swazey, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. ME), and Sarah J. Swazey, at home, aged thirteen years (b. PA). They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of Alfred F. Marsh, an orthodox minister, aged thirty-three years (b. MA). Chas. E. Swazey had personal estate valued at $3,000.

The Council [of the Strafford District Medical Society] reported [December 13, 1876,] that Drs. Charles E. Swasey and Wm. H. Sylvester of Great Falls possessed the qualifications requisite for membership in the society and these gentlemen were then elected members (NH Medical Society, 1876). 

Chas. E. Swasey, a doctor, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth (“Village of Great Falls Common”), NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Susan G. Swasey, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), and his daughter, Saddie J. Swasey, aged twenty-three years (b. PA).

MARRIAGES. BARNET-SWASEY – At Great Falls, N.H., Dec. 14, by Rev. S.W. Webb, R.A. Barnet of Boston to Sarah Jessie, daughter of Dr. Charles E. Swasey of Great Falls (Boston Post, December 21, 1881).

Superintendent C.E. Swasey reported that the average attendance at the Gt. Falls, Somersworth, NH, Congregational Sunday School was 100 students, and that 32 had joined the church (General Association, 1884).

Charles E. Swasey appeared among the Somersworth, NH, veterans in the surviving Veterans’ Schedule of the Eleventh (1890) Federal Census. He had been a surgeon with the U.S. Volunteers for two years and one month.

Dr. C.E. Swazey declared a man who had committed suicide to be officially dead in Great Falls, i.e., Somersworth, NH, in October 1890.

… The body hung within two feet of the floor and near by was a four-foot saw-horse, from which he jumped. Dr. C.E. Swazey, who was present, declared life extinct, and that the man had been dead for some hours. The body was carried to the first floor, where it was given in charge of an undertaker (Boston Globe, October 28, 1890).

Dr. C.E. Swasey attended the Twenty-Fifth Reunion of the Society of the Army of the Potomac in Concord, NH, June 21-22, 1894 (Society of the Army of the Potomac, 1894).

More Diphtheria at Somersworth, N.H. SOMERSWORTH, N.H., Dec. 22. – Diphtheria has again broken out here. and six houses are quarantined. Dr. C.E. Swasey has been appointed sanitary officer, to make a thorough investigation and endeavor to prevent the spread of the disease, from which a score of children have died in the past three months (Boston Globe, December 22, 1894).

Charles E. Swasey, formerly a surgeon with the U.S. Volunteers, filed for an invalid’s pension, December 23, 1895.

Charles E. Swasey of Somersworth, NH, made out his last will at Somersworth, November 25, 1899. He devised $1 to his daughter, Sarah J. Barnett. He devised all the rest and residue to his “beloved” wife, Susan G. Swasey, who he also named as executor. Carrie E. Chapman, James A. Edgerly, and William S. Mathews signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 128:24).

Charles E. Swasey, a physician, aged seventy years (b. NH), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-seven years), Susan G. Swasey, aged seventy-five years (b. ME). Charles E. Swasey rented their house on High Street. Susan G. Swasey was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

A smallpox and scarlet fever epidemic struck the town [of Rollinsford, NH,] with extreme severity between February 24, 1904, and May 4, 1904. No one died from the smallpox afflictions, but six persons lost their lives as a result of scarlet fever. The home of Louis and Herbert Sias was rented as a pest house at a cost of $150 and Charles E. Swazey was paid $645 for a period of forty-three days to serve at the bedsides. Watchmen were paid to keep those afflicted with this contagious disease within the pest house and a large number of deaths occurred in 1904 (Catalfo, 1973).

The low general mortality from scarlet fever is doubtless due to methods of isolation and disinfection now carried out by local boards of health, and were it not for such precautions a much greater death rate would probably result. The mild, unrecognized, “walking” cases are the prolific source of the spread of the infection, and are, by their very nature, beyond the control of health authorities (Clarke, 1904).

Charles E. Swasey died of apoplexy, i.e., a stroke, in Somersworth, NH, May 30, 1907, aged seventy-seven years, six months, and sixteen days.

DEATHS. Charles E. Swasey, M.D., University of Pennsylvania, Department of Medicine, Philadelphia, 1861; assistant surgeon, U.S.V.; later brevetted colonel, and at the close of the war medical director and medical purveyor of the District of the Frontier, and in charge of the U.S. General Hospital, Little Rock, Ark.; city physician of Somersworth, N.H., for eight years, died at his home in that city, May 30, from cerebral hemorrhage, after an illness of four days, aged 77 (American Medical Association, 1907).

Funeral of Dr. C.E. Swasey. SOMERSWORTH, N.H., June 2. – The funeral of Dr. Charles E. Swasey was held this afternoon at his late residence on High st. Rev. Alfred C. Fulton of the First Congregational church officiating. Libanus lodge of Masons performed the Masonic burial service. Delegations were present from the Strafford district medical society and the Grand Army. The burial will be in the family lot at Milton Mills tomorrow afternoon (Boston Globe, June 3, 1907). 

Susan G. Swasey, widow of Charles E. Swasey, filed for a widow’s pension, June 24, 1907.

Susan G. (Buck) Swasey died in Somersworth, NH, January 17, 1908.

Horatio Bardwell Buck (1832-1891)
Buck, HB - per Katherine Ayers
Dr. Horatio B. Buck (per Katherine Ayers)

Horatio Bardwell Buck was born in Acton, ME, January 27, 1832, son of Reuben and Alice (Jacquith) Buck.

When he had mastered the branches of learning taught in the common schools he entered an academy, and at the age of 19 began the study of medicine under the direction of his father and brothers. In the meantime, while pursuing his studies at home he engaged in teaching a district school in Lebanon, and in instructing a private class in Acton (MacGrath, et al., 1902).

Jeremiah C. Buck, M.D., served as instructor or preceptor for [his younger brother,] Horatio Bardwell Buck of Milton Mills, NH, who was a student attending a course of medical lectures at the Maine Medical School of Bowdoin College during the February-May 1854 academic term (Bowdoin, 1854).

Then came his matriculation in the medical department of Bowdoin college, which he left to enter the Jefferson Medical college of Philadelphia, for that city was then considered the center of medical lore. He began practice in Philadelphia and soon secured a large and growing practice, but in 1862, when the need of surgeons in the army became urgent, he put aside all personal consideration and business and going to Washington offered his aid to the government (MacGrath, et al., 1902).

Horatio B. Buck married in Philadelphia, PA, March 24, 1863, Elizabeth “Lizzie” Heller. She was born in Cheltenham, PA, September 2, 1836, daughter of George K. and Sarah (Nice) Heller.

They [his services] were accepted, and the next six months he was on at Columbian College Hospital, in Washington. He then took the necessary examination for a surgeon’s commission in the army, procured such commission the United States volunteer rank, signed by President Lincoln, making the position equivalent to the regular army rank, and went to the front with the Second Army Corps as surgeon in charge of its regular artillery. Subsequent to the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, the artillery of the corps was consolidated into a brigade of six batteries, of which he had full charge while on duty in field. He was with the Army of the Potomac throughout its campaigns of 1863, and late in the following autumn, going into winter quarters, applied for transfer to a post which would admit of a larger hospital experience. His request was granted, he being appointed surgeon in chief of the central rendezvous of Illinois troops at Springfield (MacGrath, 1902).

Arrived upon his new field, he found a condition which challenged the highest exertion his professional and executive abilities. The sick and wounded soldiers were miserably housed in common barracks receiving insufficient medical and surgical aid; but Dr. Buck soon changed all this. He prepared plans and specifications calling for nine spacious and modern hospital buildings, secured the government’s approval and supervised their construction. The new buildings were planned with a view to the needs and mental well being of the disabled soldiers, even to the details of tasteful decoration in the grounds; and the fact of their beneficence was emphasized by the reduction of mortality by over fifty cent. In connection with this work Dr. Buck also had charge of the sick at officer’s headquarters and at the Soldiers Home of Springfield. He completed his official labors at Madison, Wisconsin, whither he was transferred from Springfield, and where, together with Dr. Culbertson, of Ohio, he was for six months engaged in closing up an extensive general hospital (MacGrath, 1902).

Assistant Surgeon and Brevet Captain Horatio B. Buck mustered out of the service, October 9, 1865 (US Adjutant General, 1866).

In the fall of 1865 he returned to Springfield to permanently locate, and has since been continuously and very successfully occupied with his private practice in that city. Dr. Buck became strongly attached to this [Springfield, IL] city, and as soon as his labors in behalf of the government were completed he returned here, where he resided continuously since the fall of 1865 (MacGrath, 1902). 

ALLOPATHY. Proceedings of the Illinois State Medical Society. OBSTETRICS. Dr. H.B. Buck, of the Committee on Obstetrics, read a paper, in which he ably treated the above subject, and made many valuable suggestions (Chicago Evening Post, May 19, 1869).

H.B. Buck, an M.D., aged thirty-eight years (b. IL [SIC]), headed a Springfield, IL, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. his household included Lizzie Buck, keeping house, aged twenty-eight years (b. PA), Alice Buck, aged five years (b. IL), Bertha Buck, aged three years (b. IL), Clara B. Buck, aged one year (b. IL), Emma Taylor, a domestic servant, aged fifty years (SC), Maggie Muer, a schoolteacher, aged twenty-two years (PA), and George Benjamin, a laborer, aged twenty-one years (KY).

Opening an office, it was not long before he had an extensive private practice and was accorded a most prominent position as a representative of the medical fraternity. His prominence in his chosen profession, the breadth of his learning and his splendid success gained him a name and fame throughout the country, while his contributions to medical literature have been invaluable. From the time when as a representative of the government, he came to superintend the surgical work of the army in this city, down to his death, Dr. Buck was accounted one of the leading residents of the capital city of the state of Illinois (MacGrath, et al., 1902).

H.B. Buck, a physician, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Springfield, IL, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Elizabeth Buck, keeps house, aged forty years (b. PA), Bertha Buck, attends school, aged thirteen years (b. IL), Clara Buck, at school, aged eleven years (b. IL), George B. Buck, at school, aged nine years (b. IL), and Maggie Buck, aged five years (b. IL), and his servants, John Lamken, a servant, aged twenty-nine years (b. Oldenburg), and Mary Powell, a servant, aged twenty years (b. IL). H.B. Buck resided at 426 West Edwards street.

DURING the thunder storm yesterday morning, the residence of Dr. H.B. Buck, at Springfield, was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The loss amounted to between $6,000 and $7,000, which was partially covered by insurance. About the same hour the residence of Mayor Dickason, of Danville, was struck and slightly damaged (Decatur Daily Republican (Decatur, IL), March 17, 1881).

SPRINGFIELD SOCIETY. Miss Bertha Buck, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. H.B. Buck, who has been spending several months in San Antonio, Texas, returned home this week, much to the delight of her many friends (The Interocean (Chicago, IL), June 7, 1890).

DORWIN-BUCK. A Prominent Springfield Couple United In Wedlock. SPRINGFIELD, Ill., March 31. Special. The marriage of Mr. Harry F. Dorwin and Miss Bertha Buck occurred at noon today at the residence of the bride’s father. Dr. H.B. Buck, in the presence of a limited number of relatives and close friends. Mr. Dorwin is business manager of the State Journal and the nephew of Senator Shelby M. Cullom. His bride is a woman of culture and many social graces. Mr. and Mrs. Dorwin left this afternoon for a tour of southern points (The Pantograph (Bloomington, IL), April 1, 1897).

Elizabeth (Heller) Buck died in Springfield, IL, April 22, 1898.

In April, 1898, Mrs. Buck died, leaving five children, viz.: Bertha – Mrs. H.F. Dorwin, of Springfield – Clara Bell; George H.; Margaret W.; and Horatio B., Jr. (MacGrath, 1902). 

Racheal [Horatio] Buck, a physician, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Springfield, IL, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his children, Clara Buck, none [no occupation], aged thirty-one years (b. IL), Margarette Buck, none, aged twenty-five years (b. IL), and Racheal [Horatio] Buck, Jr., at school, aged eighteen years (b. IL), and his servants, Maggie Sullivan, a domestic, aged thirty-one years (b. Ireland), and Frank Marshall, a hostler, aged twenty-six years (b. IA). [The census enumerator evidently misheard or misread “Horatio” as “Racheal,” twice]. Horatio Buck owned their house at 606 South Fourth Street, free-and-clear. Maggie Sullivan was literally right off the boat. She had entered the U.S. in late 1899 and had been there only six months.

Horatio B. Buck died in Springfield, IL, January 23, 1908, aged seventy-six years.

Died, at 9 o’clock Thursday night, Jan. 23, 1908, at the family residence, 606 South Fourth street, of a complication of diseases, Dr. Horatio B. Buck, aged 76 years, 11 months and 26 days (MacGrath, et al., 1902).

DR. BUCK DIES IN SPRINGFIELD. He Was Prominent Surgeon and Member of Pension Board. Springfield, Ill., Jan. 23. Dr. Horatio B. Buck, is dead, aged 76 years. During the civil war he was surgeon of the second corps, and later supervised the building of modern hospital buildings for a central rendezvous of Illinois troops at Springfield. He was once vice-president of the Illinois state medical society, and president of the Tri-state Medical society. With the exception of the period of President Cleveland’s administration he has been a member of the pension board since 1877, and for several years was its chief executive officer (Herald and Review (Decatur, IL), January 24, 1908).

William Crosby Buck (1867-1893)
Buck, WC - per Katherine Ayers
Dr. William C. Buck (per Katherine Ayers)

William Crosby Buck was born in Acton, ME, January 20, 1867, son of Jeremiah C. and Eunice C. (Swasey) Buck (and grandson of Reuben and Alice (Jacquith) Buck).

William Crosby Buck of Milton Mills, NH, was a freshman student at Bates College in the 1883-84 academic year. He boarded at the corner of Brooks and Prescott streets (Bates College, 1883).

William Crosby Buck of Milton Mills, NH, was one of thirty-three sophomore students at Bates College in the 1884-85 academic year. He boarded in Parker Hall (Bates College, 1884).

William Buck appeared in the New England business directory of 1889, as principal of the Lebanon Academy, in West Lebanon, Lebanon, ME. (His next stop, the Somerset Academy, of Athens, ME, appeared but without a principal) (Sampson, 1889).

Bates College. LEWISTON, June 25. Main street church was crowded to listen to the graduating exercises of Bates College, which occurred at 10 o clock. The degree of A.B. conferred on the graduating class. The degree of A.M. was conferred on William C. Buck, class of 87; Bert M. Avery, Florence M. Nowell, Mattie G. Pickering, George W. Snow, Alvin E. Thomas, Berlin W. Tucker, class of ’88, graduates of Cobb Divinity School, E.C. Hayes, Chas. G. Mosher, Geo. M. Wilson, honorary degrees, A.M., on Hon Chas. E. Littlefield, of Rockland, D.D., on Rev. D.B. Randall (Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, ME), June 26, 1891).

The US Department of the Interior reported that William C. Buck received $1,2o0 in compensation in 1891. He was a native of Maine, who had been appointed from New Hampshire, and was being paid for work at the US Census Office in Washington, DC (US Interior Department, 1892).

William C. Buck appeared in the Washington, DC, directories of 1891, 1892, and 1893, as a clerk in the Census Office, resident at 1338 G street, NW.

LEWISTON, ME. W.C. Buck, Bates, ’87, now clerk in one of the departments at Washington, who has been visiting in Lewiston, returned to Washington yesterday (Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, ME), August 30, 1892).

William C. Buck died in Washington, DC, April 29, 1893, aged twenty-six years, three months, and eight days.

PRIZES AWARDED. Yesterday afternoon at the [Columbian University] commencement at Albaugh’s, the award of medical prizes was made by Dr. W.W. Johnston. The first prize, $50 in gold, had no claimant, and he explained that W.C. Buck, who had won the prize by making 135.5 points out of a possible 140, had died within a few days after taking the examination. Mr. Buck was at the time of his death in the employ of the Children’s Hospital, where he was combining practical work with the pursuance of his studies at the college. During the epidemic of measles which had lately swept through the institution, attacking patients, nurses and physicians alike, he had done more than his share of work in caring for the sick, and soon after the last of his examinations at the college he had been taken ill at the hospital and died after a short sickness. The prize which he had won was reserved by the faculty to be forwarded to Mr. Buck’s family as a memento of his successful work in the university (Washington (DC) Evening Star, May 5, 1893).

[Bates College] CLASS OF 1887. *WILLIAM CROSBY BUCK, A.M., Son of Dr. Jeremiah C. and Eunice C. (Swasey) Buck, b. Acton, Me., Jan. 20, 1867. Fitted for college at Nichols Latin Sch., Lewiston, Me., Prin. Lebanon Acad., West Lebanon, Me., 1887-88; ditto Somerset Acad., Athens, Me., 1888-89; ditto High Sch., Broad Brook, Ct. 1889-90. Since 1890 graduate student at Columbian Univ. Med Coll., Washington, D.C., and Clerk in the Census Office and in the War Dep’t in succession, 1890-. Dec. 24, 1892, he resigned his position in the War Dep’t to accept a position of Resident Student in the Children’s Hospital of Washington, where he died April 28, 1893. He had already passed the final examination at the Medical College. The first prize for rank was to be awarded him. The prize of fifty dollars in gold was afterwards sent to Mr. Buck’s family (Bates College, 1893). 


References:

American Medical Association. (1907). Journal of the American Medical Association. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=DiYzAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA207

American Tract Society. (1832). Annual Report of the American Tract Society, Parts 1823-1832. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=l2IsAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA8-PA24

Bates College. (1893). General Catalogue of Officers and Graduates of Bates College Including Cobb Divinity School, 1863-1891. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=7TlAAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA64

Bowdoin College. (1849). Catalogue of Bowdoin College and the Medical School of Maine, 1849. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rXbOAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA11

Bowdoin College. (1854). Catalogue of Bowdoin College and the Medical School of Maine, 1854. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=8nbOAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA25

Catalfo, Alfred. (1973). The History of the Town of Rollinsford, New Hampshire, 1623-1973. Rollinsford, NH: NH Printers

Clarke, Arthur E. (1904). Report of the State Board of Health of the State of New Hampshire. v. 18, 1903/04. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=cnACxe5QkDoC

Clayton. W. Woodford. (1880). History of York County, Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-e8gAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA436

Dartmouth College. (1832). Catalogue of Officers and Students of Dartmouth College, October 1832. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=EtHOAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA9

Dartmouth College. (1843). Catalogue of Officers and Students of Dartmouth College for the Academical Year 1843-44. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=edHOAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA8

Find a Grave. (2015, July 20). Dr. John O. Adams. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/149559319/john-o-adams

Find a Grave. (2007, August 8). Dr. Horatio Bardwell Buck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/20843862/horatio-bardwell-buck

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Dr. Jeremiah C. Buck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114692005/jeremiah-c-buck

Find a Grave. (2013, August 13). John C. Buck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115368959/john-c-buck

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Mary Buck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114552628/mary-buck

Find a Grave. (2012, November 26). Reuben Buck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/101319632/reuben-buck

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Dr. Reuben Buck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114552668/reuben-buck

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Reuben A. Buck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114552650/reuben-a-buck

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Dr. William Crosby Buck. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114575358/william-crosby-buck

Find a Grave. (2012, August 15). Almira Calef. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/95410047/almira-calef

Find a Grave. (2012, November 21). Charles E. Calef. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/101078596/charles-e.-calef

Find a Grave. (2017, April 27). Henrietta J. Calef. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/178817270/henrietta-j.-calef

Find a Grave. (2013, July 31). Sarah Elizabeth Buck Fox. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114673519/sarah-elizabeth-fox

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Rachel F. Buck Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114577310/rachel-f-hart

Find a Grave. (2014, July 14). Dr. Oliver Payson Hubbard. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/132810566/oliver-payson-hubbard

Find a Grave. (2009, December 20). Dr. Ezra Kimball. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/45663183/ezra-kimball

Find a Grave. (2013, November 9). Dr. Charles Powers. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/120047214/charles-powers

Find a Grave. (2013, July 29). Dr. William Buzzell Reynolds. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114610282/william-buzzell-reynolds

Find a Grave. (2015, August 23). Dr. Whiting Stevens. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/151124682/whiting-stevens

General Association of New Hampshire. (1884). Minutes of the … Annual Meeting of the General Association of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=6XwG1ofuyuwC&pg=RA4-PA66

Harvard University. (1819). Catalogue of the Officers and Students of the University in Cambridge. October, 1819. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vAdDb_8dm3oC&pg=PA8

Hubbard, Oliver P. (1880). The Early History of the New Hampshire Medical Institution: With a Sketch of Its Founder, Nathan Smith. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=JhUJAAAAIAAJ

MacGrath, Hyland, and Reed, George I. (1902). Encyclopaedia of Biography of Illinois. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=KPA1AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA233

MA Medical Society. (1854). Medical Communications. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=H-wF2ZonrlYC&pg=PT5

ME Missionary Society. (1875). General Conference of the Congregational Churches in Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=yX7q934s9ikC&pg=RA2-PA256

ME Supreme Judicial Court. (1843). Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Judicial Court of the State of Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=UUhIAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA160

NH Medical Society. (1876). Transactions of the NH Medical Society. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=OTPkjwokYLsC&pg=RA1-PA70

NYU. (1916). General Alumni Catalogue of New York University, 1916. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Ds5EAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA206

Reynolds, William B., M.D. (1865). Resection of the Humerus. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=NlosAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA198

Sampson & Murdock. (1889). New England Business Directory and Gazetteer for 1889. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=1as0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA1781

Society of the Army of the Potomac. (1894). Reunion. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=6I0-AAAAYAAJ&pg=RA3-PA6

Swasey, Benjamin F. (1910). Genealogy of the Swasey Family. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MxBWAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA465

US Adjutant General’s Office. (1866). Official Register of the Army of the United States for 1866. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=csNOAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA142

US Congress. (1832). Reports of Committees: 16th Congress, 1st Session – 49th Congress, 1st Session. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=NqEFAAAAQAAJ&pg=RA12-PP45

US Interior Department. (1892). Official Register of the United States. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=jRBSAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA741

US Patent Office. (1847). List of Patents for Inventions and Designs: Issued by the United States, from 1790 to 1847, with the Patent Laws and Notes of Decisions of the Courts of the United States for the Same Period. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-glWAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA127

US Surgeon General’s Office. (1883). The Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion. (1861-65). Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3do5AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA84

Wikipedia. (2020,October 15). Allopathic Medicine. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allopathic_medicine

Wikipedia. (2020, December 9). California Gold Rush. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Gold_Rush

Wikipedia. (2020, October 28). Enrollment Act. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enrollment_Act

Willis, William. (1862). A Business Directory of the Subscribers to the New Map of Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mKm9lz1RH_0C&pg=PA151

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s