Rochester Lumber Remonstrance – August 1785

By Muriel Bristol | July 31, 2022

Three hundred and fifteen inhabitants of Rochester, NH, signed a remonstrance petition, August 30, 1785, intended for an October 1785 Concord, NH, session of the NH General Court.

Merriam-Webster’s dictionary defines a remonstrance as being

an earnest presentation of reasons for opposition or grievance, especially: a document formally stating such points.

The British surrender at Yorktown, VA, had marked the end of Revolutionary War land operations in October 1781, although the formal Treaty of Paris had not been signed until September 1783. Under the Articles of Confederation, the separate states had still considerable latitude over foreign relations, including tariffs, duties, regulations, etc., and the petitioners of August 1785 evidently found New Hampshire’s restrictions burdensome.

The petitioners presented themselves as being involved with the lumber industry and sought repeal of several recently enacted NH lumber laws and regulations, as well as restrictions and duties on overseas lumber sales, especially those destined for the British West Indies.

Less prudent was their proposed alternative that a fresh round of NH paper currency, or “Bills of Credit,” be issued. Merchants and lenders tended to lose under such a paper currency regime, while borrowers, including often farmers, tended to gain, as they could repay their nominal debts in depreciating inflationary currency. In the following year, the NH legislature would be literally besieged by an armed crowd demanding issuance of paper currency in the “Exeter Riot” or “Paper Money Riot” of September 1786 (for some details of which see Milton Justice William Palmer, Esq. (1757-1815)).

NH 40-Shilling Note -1775-82New Hampshire was at this time under “The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union,” which preceded the U.S. Constitution. Several years later, the U.S. Constitution would forbid issuance by the states of Bills of Credit.

Article I, Section 10, Clause 1 prohibits the states from issuing Bills of Credit. The prohibition of states issuing Bills of Credit came in direct response to how states managed their financial policy during the era of the Articles of Confederation. While all states in theory recognized the American Continental as their official currency, in reality, nearly every state issued its own Bills of credit, which further devalued the Continental and led to its eventual collapse as a currency (Wikipedia, 2022).

The salutation was directed initially to “His Excellency the President,” as New Hampshire’s Governor was then known. Paper was much more expensive then than it is now, so frugal Yankees might simply line out a mistake when changing course, rather than starting anew with a fresh piece of paper.

As for spelling, dictionaries were not commonly available. The first English one, with 3,000 of the more difficult words only, had been published in 1604, and Samuel Johnson’s famous two-volume English dictionary, regarded when completed as the definitive source, had been published in 1755, although the fully revised editions came only years later. These would have been quite expensive. Noah Webster’s initial “American” dictionary would be published in 1806, although his more comprehensive editions would not appear until 1828.

Contractions were (and are) regarded as a spoken usage rather than something that should be written out, especially in a formal document. Nevertheless, one may note the contraction “don’t” for “do not” rendered without its apostrophe as “dont” in the final paragraph.

Familiar names from what are now Milton and Farmington, NH, are present also in this remonstrance, as those towns were at this time the Northeast and Northwest parishes, respectively, of Rochester, NH. (See Northeast Parish in the First (1790) Federal Census and Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

State of New Hampshire, Strafford Ss. }

To His Excellency the President and the To the Honorable the Senate & House of Representatives, and General Assembly Convened at Concord on the 3d Wednesday in October 1785 ~

The Petition of us the Subscribers, free Holders and Inhabitants of the Town of Rochester, Humblely Sheweth, that we are largely Concerned in Lumber, and we understand your Excellency & Honours has passed some late acts at your last Session, verry hurtfull and Injurious to us and we believe to all Other Towns Concerned in the lumber way therefore and pray you would repeal the act that requires all boards to be Inch thick And Square Edgeed and Other lumber in propotion ~ And likewise to repeal the new acts prohibiting any Vessel Carrying Lumber [to] the Brittish Islands in the West Indies that can procure Brittish papers for that purpose ~

And to repeal the Other act with regard to the Duty Layed on tunnage on Ships or Vessells belonging to foreigners which Duty we Look Upon to be Equal to Shuting up our ports against them, but if your Excellency and Honours Dont see fit to grant the prayer of this Petition Wee would request a paper Currency on a Loan or in Such other way as your wisdom may Direct you to Support the Credit of Said Moneys, as in Duty bound we ever pray ~
Rochester, Augst 30th 1785

Pg. 2:

[Column 1:]

James Jennes, David Place, Abner Hodgdon, Ebenezer Place Junr, Ebenzr Place Senr, Moses Place, Amos Place, Joseph Thompson, Joseph Thompson Junr, Alexander Hodgdon, Eleazer Hodgdon, Joseph Pearl, Moses Hammet, John Hammet, Dimon Pearl, James Young, Joseph Clark, Tobias Ricker, Cornelius Jenness, Jonathan Place, Moses Waymoth, Thomas Drew, John Richson, James Dearing, Moses Varney, Jonathan Leighton, John Place, Jonathan Place, Thomas Varny, Elijah Varney, Reubin Heard, Benjami[n] Meder, Ephraim Ham, Eleazer Ham, James Ham, Isaac Brown,

[Column 2:]

George Place, Moses Roberts, Epharim Wentworth, William Wentworth, Wentworth Hayes, Daniel McNeal, Joshua Merrow, Josiah Folsom, Edward Rollins, John Goodwin, Benja Odiorne, Paul Harford, Daniel Watson, Jonathan Heard, Richard Hilton, Ebenezer Horn, Benjamin Rollins, Ebenezer Ricker, Joseph Dame, Peter Cushing, Eleazar Ham, Joshua Knight, John Place the 3d, Jonathan Wallingford, Stephen Lee, Benjamin Hoyt, John Randall, John Ham, Simon [Herd?], Paul Place, John Russet Place, James Jackson, Caleb Jackson,

[Column 3:]

Joshua Downing, Epharim Trickey, Paul Cook, Timothy Ricker, William Jones, Nathaniel Jones, Samuel Palmer, Robert M[—], James Wentworth, Thomas Plumer, John Glidden, Barnabas Palmer, Gersum downs, David Morrison, John Bickford, Daniel Calef, John Roberts, Ephraim Parker, Elazar Ham, Joseph Runels, James Rogers the third, William Huntress, Jona Norris, Josiah Wentworth, Samuel Richards, Timothy Robarts, Francis Meder, Daniel Brewster, Samuel Plummer, Moses goodwin, Zebulon dam, Richerd Perkins, Silas Dame,

Pg. 3:

[Column 1:]

Enoch Burnham, Lemuel Richardson, William McDuffee, John Richards, Jona Richard Jr, Jonathan Laighton, Joseph Knight, Daniel goodwin, nehemiah kimbel, Solomon Perkins, Bening Colbath, Geo: R. Downing, Ebenezer Varney, Joseph Bickford, Ebenezer Varney Ju, John Bickford, Samuel Varney, Moses Varney, John Rawlings, Anthony Rawlings, Joshua Rawlings, John Cloutman, Ebenr Twombly, Isaac Libby, George Snell Hayes, David Corson, John Bergon, Jonathan Twombly, Elijah Horn, Benjamin Copps, Richard Manson, William Hanson, Paul Copps, Beard Plumer, Enoch Hayes, Daniel Cook,

[Column 2:]

Nich Wentworth, David Horn, John Carr, Ebenezer Wentworth, Daniel Garland, Ephraim Twombly, Daniel Kimbal, John walker, John Hanson, Jeams Edley, Nathan Nock, Mark Miler, Joseph Chapan, John Wentworth, Elihu Wintworth, Samuel Jennes, Garsom Downs Jnr, Joseph Plumer, David Walanford, Moses hamblin, Ha[tevil] Knight, Joseph Roberts, Simon Torr, Timo Courson, James McDuffee, Robert Walker, David Langley, Ephraim Perkins Jr, Jonathan Richards, William Wingate, Benjamin Varney, James Chesley, John Place Jr,

[Column 3:]

Thomas Roberts, James Downs, William Palmer, Saml Nute, Isaac Wentworth, [—-] place, barnebas Palmer Junr, Richard Wentworth, Peter Horn, Moses Horn Junr, Joseph Walker, Tristram heard, Nathaniel Heard, Tristram Heard, Jas Adams, Samuel Austin, Jacob Elles, Samuel Wingate, Benja Wingate,  Elijah Tebbetts, John Trickey, Samuel Door, Silas Tebbets, Heard Roberts, David Tebbets, Joseph Tebbets, Ichabod Cossen, William Elles, David Wingate, Samuel Allen, Joshua Allen, Micah Allen, Samuel Downing, Stephen Furnald,

Pg. 4:

[Column 1:]

Benjamin Forse Junr, Josiah Main, Saml Furbur, Ephraim Kimbel, David Twombly, Daniel Page, Nathanel Garland, Benjamin Page, Moses Jennes, Joseph Drown, Richard Furbur Junr, Tobias Twombly Junr, John Knowles, Joseph Heard Junr, Thoms Virney, Aaron Downs, Ephram Down Junr, Wentworth Twombly, Moses Downs, Ebenezr Ricker Junr, Edmund Tebbets, Joseph Knight, Dudley Wentworth, Daniel Bruster, Stephen Wentworth Junr, Eleazer Coleman, James Coleman, James Rogers Junr, Moses Horn, Jeams Bery, John Bery, Willam Bery, David Hanson, John Tanner,

[Column 2:]

Abraham Cooke, Richd Walker, John Wentworth Jr, Hunking Colbath, Abraham Cooke Junr, Rueben Heard, Jacob Wallingford, Morris Alles, Thomas Peavey, Daniel Peavey, Anthony Peavey, David Watson, Edmund Wingate, Jonathan Merry, Benjamin Chase, Ezekiel Ricker, Nathnil Jonson, Richard Nutter Junr, Joseph Holmes, Jonathan Wentworth, Joseph Heard Junr, Enoch Hoyt, Ichabod Corson Junr, Thoms Pinkam, Jona Pinkham, John Rand, John Ham, John Stanton, Daniel Page Junr, Joseph Page, Valetine Rallins, David Jenness, Joseph Meader Jnr, Winthrop Nutter, William Whitehouse, Aaron Whitehouse, George Meader,

[Column 3:]

Pelatiah Cartlan, John Tucker, Jacob Hanson, Isaiah Jenkins, Joseph meder, Hatevil Laighton, Solomon Drown, John Drown, Joseph Tasker, natthel meedor, William Heard, Jonthan Meder, William hodgdon, Robert Evans, James Place, Paul Jennes, Samuel Robeson, Gorge Laighton, timothy Richson, Clem hays, Stephen harfot, John Davis, Joshua Corson, Dodavah Garlan Junr, Dodavah Garlan, Jonathan Elles, Joshua Elles, Richd Furber, Benja Furber, Robart tebets, Benjamin Wentworth, David Allard, Job Allard, James Runnels, Jona Bigford, James French, Edward Varney 3, Moses Varney Junr, Thoms Davise, James Twombley, John Palmer, Amos place.


See also Salmon Falls Sawmill Petition – 1797 and Milton Road Weight Petition – 1816


References:

Hammond, Isaac W. (1884). Provincial Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=OFgSAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA342

NH Department of State. NH Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 20: June 12, 1785-Oct 21, 1785. Concord, NH

Wikipedia. (2022, July 5). Articles of Confederation. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_Confederation

Wikipedia. (2022, July 17). Bills of Credit. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bills_of_credit

Wikpedia. (2022, July 18). A Dictionary of the English Language. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Dictionary_of_the_English_Language

Wikipedia. (2022, April 26). Webster’s Dictionary. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webster%27s_Dictionary

Celestial Seasonings – August 2022

By Heather Durham | July 30, 2022

Greetings from Heather and welcome to the August 2022 issue!CS-August 22-1

August is the primary month for the Perseid Meteor Showers as you may or may not remember.  This shower is as colorful as it is prolific!

There will also be the fourth and final Supermoon of this year 2022. This month’s Moon is commonly referred to as the Sturgeon Moon.  

CS-August 22-2I have included several very interesting and informative YouTube videos for you to see, including one specifically for the Perseid Shower. The others tend to go into more depth than I usually do that are just as intriguing as anything I could have written. I do hope that they add to your monthly view of astronomical events. As well, I have added some photos of the shower. (Photos by D.F. Ford).


August 5. The new moon will be at first quarter.

August 11. This will be the fourth Supermoon of 2022, named the Sturgeon Moon. Saturn and the Moon will rise towards the right.

August 12. The Moon and Saturn will appear close to one another.

CS-August 22-3August 13. This month’s major event is the Perseid meteor shower will perform at its peak today, but may be visible before and after this date. The meteors might be colorful. Coming from the Constellation Perseus, the display will happen all through the night.

August 14. Saturn, from the Constellation Capricornus will lie opposite to the Sun. This planetary position is commonly known as opposition.

August 15. The Moon and Jupiter will rise towards the right and will appear close to each other.

Mercury will ascend to its highest altitude in the night sky.

August 19. The Moon and Mars will ascend to the right and appear close to each other. Today will bring the last quarter of the Moon.

August 27. Mercury will have traveled to its furthest point away from the Sun.

August 29. Only half of Mercury will be visible this evening.


References:

Ford, D.F. (n.d.). 2022. Retrieved from in-the-sky.org

Now Next. (2022, January 17). August 2022 Astronomical Events. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/sp-Rz5mlQP8

Sky of Stars. (July 2022). Perseid Meteor Shower, August 2022. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/5pL6md_Kr-g

Sky of Stars. (July 2022). Upcoming Astronomical Events August of 2022. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/dC7fvuXOdPM.

Milton Merchant John F. Hart (1829-1896)

By Muriel Bristol | July 24, 2022

John Francis Hart was born in Dover, NH, January 4, 1829, son of Mark H. and Elizabeth “Betsy” (Downs) Hart.

(The known children of Mark H. and Elizabeth (Downs) Hart were: Lydia A. Hart (1826-1906), John Francis Hart (1829-1896), Mary Jane Hart (1831–1851), Sarah Elizabeth Hart (1833–1834), Mark H. Hart [Jr.] (1835–1851), Daniel Quimby Hart (1838–1916), Sophia Elizabeth Hart (1841–1870), Sarah Abigail Hart (1842–1857), Hannah Susan Hart (1843–1862), and Albert Nathaniel Hart (1847–1851)).

Sister Lydia A. Hart was born in Milton, June 2, 1826.

Father Mark H. Hart headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Elizabeth (Downs) Hart], one male aged 10-14 years [John F. Hart], one female aged 10-14 years [Mary J. Hart], one female aged 5-9 years [Sarah E. Hart], and two males aged under-5 years [Mark H. Hart, Jr., and Daniel Q. Hart]. Two members of his household were engaged in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Daniel Place and [her brother,] Moses J. Downs.

Paternal grandmother Betsy (Cornell) Hart died in Rochester, NH, April 7, 1845.

Father Mark H. Hart, a farmer, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Elizabeth Hart, aged forty-five years (b. NH), Mary J. Hart, aged nineteen years, Mark Hart, a shoemaker, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Daniel Hart, aged twelve years (b. NH), Sophia Hart, aged ten years (b. NH), Abby Hart, aged nine years (b. NH), Susan Hart, aged six years (b. NH), and Nathaniel Hart, aged three years (b. NH). Their house appeared in the enumeration between those of Joshua Hanson, a cooper, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), and Samuel Twombly, a farmer, aged seventy years (b. NH).

Ira F. Howe, a farmer, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary Howe, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Thomas J. Howe, a farmer, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Mary A. Howe, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and John F. Hart, a shoemaker, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). Ira F. Howe had real estate valued at $2,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Johnathan Howe, a farmer, aged sixty-seven years, and Simeon S. Wakeham, a shoemaker, aged twenty-two years (b. NH).

Brother Albert Nathaniel Hart died in Milton, June 21, 1851, aged four years, one month. Brother Mark H. Hart, Jr., died of bronchitis in Milton, October 21, 1851, aged sixteen years. Sister Mary J. Hart died in Milton, December 13, 1851, aged twenty years, three months.

Weep not for me dear mother, though cold may be my brow. The angels call me, mother! I hear their voices now. – Mary J. Hart epitaph.

Sister Sarah Abigail Hart died in Milton, March 8, 1857.

Sister Lydia A. Hart married in Somersworth, NH, December 7, 1858, Andrew J. Remick, both of Milton. He was aged twenty-three years, and she was aged thirty-two years. Rev. S. Holman performed the ceremony. Remick was born in Tamworth, NH, December 3, 1835, son of Nathaniel and Esther (Nickerson) Remick.

Mother Elizabeth (Downs) Hart died in Milton, April 16, 1859, aged fifty-three years, nine months.

Father Mark H. Hart married (2nd), circa 1859, Mary J. “Jane” ((Glidden) Davis) Wright. She was born in Gilford, NH, April 26, 1828, daughter of Elijah and Mary (Horne) Glidden. She had married (1st) Jeremiah Davis (1815-1856), and (2nd) Warren E. Wright.

(The known children of Mark H. and [his second wife,] Mary J. (((Glidden) Davis) Wright) Hart were: Alice J. Hart (1860-1922), Mark A. Hart (1862-1912), Arthur Robert Lee Hart (1868-), and Mary G. Hart (1870-), and Warren W. Hart (1872-1943)).

Mark H. Hart, a shoemaker, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. Hart, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Daniel Q. Hart, a shoemaker, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), Sophia A. Hart, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Susan Hart, aged sixteen years (b. NH), H.S. Hart, aged one month (b. NH), and F.H. Wright, aged three years (b. NH). Mark H. Hart had real estate valued at $1,500 and person estate valued at $500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of A.J. Remick, a shoemaker, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Dearborn Ellis, a shoemaker, aged forty years (b. NH). (Another near neighbor (same page) was Daniel Quimby, a farmer, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), for whom Daniel Quimby Hart was presumably a namesake).

A.J. Remick, a shoemaker, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included L.A. [(Hart)] Remick, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and John F. Hart, a shoemaker, aged thirty-one years (b. NH). A.J. Remick had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at$200. John F. Hart had personal estate valued at $500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles Ricker, a shoemaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and John F. Hart’s father, Mark H. Hart, a shoemaker, aged fifty-two years (b. NH).

John F. Hart married, circa 1860, Mary Abbie Twombly. She was born in Milton, June 24, 1833, daughter of James M. and Eunice (Burrows) Twombly.

[Correction: We formerly misreported her as being the Mary A. Twombly that was born in Lebanon, ME, September 28, 1836, daughter of John P. and Lois H. (Clark) Twombly. The 1891 death certificate of Mary A. (Twombly) Hart alerted us to the error].

Brother Daniel Q. Hart married, circa 1860, Ellen Viana Ricker, both of Farmington, NH. She was born in Farmington, NH, June 8, 1830, daughter of William and Mary (Ames) Ricker.

Son Delta C. Hart was born in Milton, November 3, 1861. Son Cisco Wade Hart was born in Milton, February 12, 1864. Daughter Pauline Eunice “Lena” Hart was born in Milton, February 9, 1866. Son Dana Byron Hart was born in Milton, June 30, 1867.

Sister Hannah Susan Hart died in Milton, Match 25, 1862, aged eighteen years, six months.

Father Mark H. Hart of Milton paid a $10 tax for being a retail dealer in the U.S. Excise Tax of 1866. Mark H. Hart appeared in a NH business directory of 1868, as proprietor of a Milton country store. (The directory defined a country store as one “Where is kept a general assortment of dry goods, groceries, agricultural implements, etc. Those who deal in but one kind of goods will be found under their appropriate headings”). Mark H. Hart appeared in the Milton business directory of 1869-70, as a Milton merchant.

Andrew J. Remick, works for shoe factory, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lydia A. [(Hart)] Remick, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and Anna A. Remick, at school, aged nine years (b. NH). Andrew J. Remick had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $500. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of John H. Glidden, a shoe finisher, aged forty-four years (b. NH), and Mark H. Hart, a retail grocer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH).

Mark H. Hart, a retail grocer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. Hart, keeping house, aged forty-two years, Allice J. Hart, at school, aged ten years, Mark A. Hart, at school, aged eight years, Arthur L. Hart, aged two years, and Mary G. Hart, aged one month (b. NH). Mark H. Hart had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $550. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Andrew J. Remick, works in shoe factory, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and Dearborn Ellis, a works in shoe factory, aged fifty years (b. NH).

John F. Hart, works in shoe factory, aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. Hart, keeping house, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), Delta A. Hart, at school, aged eight years (b. NH), Cisco W. Hart, at school, aged six years (b. NH), Paulina Hart, at school, aged four years (b. NH), and Dana B. Hart, aged two years (b. NH). John F. Hart had real estate valued at $750 and personal estate valued at $1,015. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles H. Pease, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Robert Mathes, a farm laborer, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH).

Daniel K. [Q.] Hart, a farmer, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Ellen P. Hart, keeping house, aged forty years (b. NH), Rosco L. Hart, at home, aged eight years (b. NH), and Mary E. Hart, aged four years (b. NH). Daniel K. Hart had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $700. Ellen P. Hart had personal estate valued at $100.

Sister Sophia Elizabeth Hart died in Milton, October 11, 1870, aged twenty-nine years, two months, and ten days.

Milton - 1892 (Detail) - Hart, JF
Milton in 1892 (Detail). Two properties of “J.F. Hart” are indicated in red on Main Street near the dam (with “Dr. C.D. Jones” between them). The upper one would be that depicted in the Google Street photo below, while the other would be the same described as being opposite the A.O.U.W Hall, and buildings of  “I.W. Duntley” and “N.G. Pinkham.” Near the bottom of this detail, on intersecting Silver Street, is indicated in red a building owned by “Mrs. M.H. Hart” [Watson], who had a widow’s life-estate in the homestead of J.F. Hart’s late father, Mark H. Hart. It was flanked by a property of brother-in-law “A.J. Remick,” as mentioned in M.H. Hart’s last will, and another of “W. Downs.”

Father Mark H. Hart appeared in the Milton business directory of 1871, as a Milton merchant.

Father Mark H. Hart of Milton made his last will, July 8, 1871. He bequeathed $1 each to his children, Daniel Q. Hart and Lydia A. Remick. He bequeathed a lot of land in Milton to his son, John F. Hart. It had a barn and was bounded southeasterly by Ira S. Knox, southwesterly by Andrew J. Remick, southeasterly by the Wakefield Road, and northwesterly by a line beginning at a point equidistant from the barn and the old Woodman House on the Wakefield Road and running from there parallel to the original Knox line back to the start. He bequeathed a life-estate in his homestead, as well as all of his household furniture, to his wife, Mary Jane Hart. The homestead was bounded by land of Andrew J. Remick and Silver Street. Finally, he bequeathed all the rest and residue of his estate to [his stepson,] Frank Wright, and [the children of his second marriage,] Mark A. Hart, Alice J. Hart, Arthur Robert Lee Hart, and Mary Getrude Hart. He named his son, John F. Hart, as executor. Nathaniel G. Pinkham, Robert Brown, and Charles H. Looney signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 84:31).

Father Mark H. Hart died of cancer in Milton, January 2, 1872, aged sixty-four years. He was a merchant. His last will was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held in Somersworth, NH, February 6, 1872 (Strafford County Probate, 84:31).

It would seem that John F. Hart, who had been a shoeworker, took over his father’s retail grocery business at about this time.

J. Hart appeared in the Milton business directories of 1873, 1874, 1875, and 1876, as a Milton merchant. Mrs. J.F. Hart appeared as a Milton merchant of fancy goods in 1875 and 1876). John F. Hart appeared in a NH business directory of 1877, as a Milton merchant.

Daughter Bernice Annie Hart was born in Milton, circa August 1872. She died of scarlatina in Milton, May 10, 1875, aged two years, eight months, and nineteen days. (Scarlatina is also known as scarlet fever).

Daughter Bridie Bernice Hart was born in Milton, March 24, 1876. (She appeared in documents alternately as either Bridie Bernice Hart, Birdie Bernice Hart, B. Bernice Hart and, finally, just Bernice Hart).

Step-mother Mary J. (((Glidden) Davis) Wright) Hart married (4th) in Dover, NH, December 2, 1877, Joseph Watson, Jr. He was born in Gilmanton, NH, March 9, 1821, son of Joseph and Mary (Peterson) Watson.

J.F. Hart appeared in the Milton business directory of 1880, as a Milton merchant. (Mrs. J.F. Hart appeared as selling fancy goods). J.F. Hart appeared also as a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

(John Fox Hart [(1855-1916)] and his younger brother, George E. Hart [(1859-1920)], appeared also in the directories of this time as Milton Mills carriage merchants. By the mid 1880s, these other Harts would relocate to the Pacific northwest, where they would become wealthy lumbermen, railroad proprietors and real estate developers. (Some of their family lingered). Neither these Milton Mills Harts nor Dr. M.A.H. Hart seem to have been related closely, if related at all, to our subject, John Francis Hart (1829-1896)).

Joseph Watson, a farmer, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed an Alton, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary J. Watson, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), his children, Willie H. Watson, at home, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Fred D. Watson, at home, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and his children-in-law, i.e., step-children, Mary E. Hart, aged ten years (b. NH), and Warren W. Hart, aged eight years (b. NH).

Andrew J. Remick, farming, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, keeping house, Lydia A. [(Hart)] Remick, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), his adopted daughter, Eva A. Vibbert, aged nineteen years (b. ME), and his boarder, Frank H. Young, a clergyman, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of George A. Hayes, a box-maker, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and Charles E. Ricker, works on shoes, aged forty-five years (b. Canada).

Hart, John Francis (1829-1896)
John F. Hart (1829-1896)

John F. Hart, a merchant, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. Hart, keeps house, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), Delta C. Hart, works on shoes, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Cisco W. Hart, works on shoes, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Paulina E. Hart, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Dana B. Hart, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Bridie B. Hart, aged four years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Hiram V.R. Edgerly, a carpenter, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and Henry Downs, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. Canada).

Daniel W. [Q.] Hart, works in shoe factory, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Helen B. Hart, keeping house, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), and his children, Roscoe L. Hart, works in shoe factory, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Mary E. Hart, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH).

J.F. Hart appeared in the Milton business directories of 1881, 1882, 1884, and 1887, as a Milton merchant. (Mrs. J.F. Hart appeared as selling fancy goods). J.F. Hart appeared also as a Milton justice-of-the-peace in 1881 and 1882, but not thereafter.

Half-sister Alice J. Hart married in New Durham, NH, June 3, 1883, Manoah G. “Noah” Glidden, she of Alton, NH, and he of Belmont, NH. He was a farmer, aged thirty years, and she was aged twenty-three years. Rev. M.A. Quimby performed the ceremony. Glidden was born in Gilford, NH, May 21, 1853, son of Daniel and Mary W. (Bennett) Glidden.

Daughter Pauline Eunice “Lena” Hart married in Milton, April 5, 1886, C. Dana Jones, both of Milton. He was a physician, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. [Dr.] Frank Haley performed the ceremony. Jones was born in Milton, September 22, 1863, son of Charles and Elizabeth “Betsy” (Varney) Jones.

Son Dana B. Hart married in Middleton, NH, August 28, 1886, Mattie J. Stevens, both of Milton. He was a cutter, i.e., a shoe cutter, aged nineteen years, and she was aged eighteen years. Rev. George S. Butler of Wakefield, NH, performed the ceremony. She was born in Middleton, NH, November 28, 1867, daughter of Jonathan B. and Sarah J. (Garland) Stevens.

Son Delta C. Hart married (1st) in Lebanon, ME, October 19, 1886, Mary Elma Stanton, he of Milton and she of Lebanon, ME. He was aged twenty-four years and she was aged twenty-six years. Rev. Nathan C. Lothrop performed the ceremony. She was born in Lebanon, ME, January 10, 1860, daughter of James B. and Catherine (White) Stanton.

Mrs. J.F. Hart appeared in the Milton business directory of 1889 as a Milton seller of fancy goods.

Son Cisco W. Hart was elected moderator for the Milton fire precinct in March 1890. (Here one may see an early appearance of what would become eventually the Milton Fire Department).

MILTON. The annual meeting of Milton fire precinct Saturday evening resulted in election of the following officers: Moderator, Cisco W. Hart; clerk, William T. Wallace; fire wards, Brackett F. Avery, Charles E. Ricker, John H. Maddox (Farmington News, March 21, 1890).

An older relative once spoke of his own native town as being the sort of place “where they rolled the sidewalks up a night.” That is to say, each store had a wooden sidewalk, which was raised via pullies at closing time to form an overnight barrier across the storefront.

MILTON. Among recent village improvements we mention the plank sidewalk in front of the estate of John F. Hart, Esq., also on the opposite side of the street around the corner stone of J.D. Willey. The cross walks at the postoffice and in front of Roberts Burrows’ store have also been raised up and reset (Farmington News, August 29, 1890).

Hart Block - 547 White Mountatin Highway
Google Street View of 547 White Mountain Highway. Note the “Hart” in the pediment, signifying that this was the “Hart Block.” (This view was formerly attributed – in error – to  Dr. M.A.H. Hart, but the 1892 map detail above shows that this property actually belonged to “J.F. Hart”).

MILTON. The Ancient Order of United workmen have leased a lot of land from the Great Falls Manufacturing company and commenced the foundation of a building, with a frontage of seventy-five feet, on Main street and thirty-five feet deep. This occupies the ground for several years taken up by Duntley’s blacksmith shop and two small buildings owned by John F. Hart, and will be devoted to business and lodge purposes. The plan provides for three stores and a grand entrance on the ground floor, a large hall for dramatics and other entertainments on the second floor, with Lodge room and necessary ante room on the upper floor. The small building used by F.A. Mark as a jeweler’s shop has been moved across the street and now stands on the hill just south of Kennett market. The blacksmith shop is on its journey and will stand partially in the rear of N.G. Pinkham‘s shoe store (Farmington News, October 10, 1890).

MILTON. John Hart lost his horse by the bursting of a blood vessel while hauling a load of wood from the plains. He can ill afford the loss of the animal (Farmington News, January 23, 1891).

The NH legislature authorized dissolution of the Milton Classical Institute and sale of its building by its seven trustees, including brother-in-law Andrew J. Remick, in March 1891.

Mary A. (Twombly) Hart died of gastric fever in Milton, September 3, 1891, aged fifty-eight years

Son Cisco Wade Hart married in Weymouth, MA, October 18, 1891, Anna May Denbroeder, both of Weymouth, MA. He was an operative, aged twenty-seven years, and she was at home, aged twenty-four years. Rev. Daniel Evans performed the ceremony. She was born in Weymouth, MA, May 1, 1867, daughter of Adrianus and Elizabeth (Roode) Denbroeder.

Daughter-in-law Mary E. (Stanton) Hart in Milton, January 4, 1892.

MILTON. Mrs. Mary Stanton Hart died at her home Jan. 4, after a brief illness with pneumonia. She was a member of the Congregational church and was greatly respected and admired by all who knew her. She will be greatly missed by all. The funeral occurred Wednesday. Immediately following her death, her mother, who had come to care for her, was stricken, and died Saturday. She was buried Monday. The family have the sympathy of the entire community in their affliction (Farmington News, January 15, 1892).

(Her mother, Catherine (White) Stanton, died in Lebanon, ME, January 9, 1892).

MILTON. John F. Hart is erecting a new building on the Lebanon side (Farmington News, September 9, 1892).

Son Delta C. Hart was elected president of the Milton Young People’s Society of Christian Endeavor (Y.P.S.C.E.) in December 1892.

MILTON. At a meeting of the Y.P.S.C.E., Dec. 6, Mr. Delta Hart was chosen president and Miss Sarah L. Benson (Farmington News, December 23, 1892).

Daughter Bridie B. Harte was elected chaplain of the Lewis W. Nute Grange in December 1892 (Farmington News, December 23, 1892).

MILTON. Benjamin, the young son of Delta Hart, died of diphtheria Saturday morning and was buried at 2 o’clock in the afternoon (Farmington News, July 23, 1893).

UNION. Mrs. John C. Penney has gone to Milton to work for Delta C. Hart and her daughter Millie is to attend the Nute high school (Farmington News, September 8, 1893).

Brother-in-law Andrew J. Remick died in Milton, February 22, 1895, aged fifty-nine years, two months, and nineteen years.

Son Delta C. Hart married (2nd) in Lebanon, ME, June 19, 1895, Minnie E. Knox, both of Lebanon, ME. She was born in Lebanon, ME, August 12, 1869, daughter of George A. and Angie (Kenney) White.

MILTON. The marriage of Minnie Knox, of Lebanon, Me., and Delta C. Hart, of Milton, occurred last week (Farmington News, June 28, 1895).

John F. Hart died in Milton, January 3, 1896, aged sixty-seven years.

WEST MILTON. The Milton Congregational church manual is to be revised by Rev. Mr. Dickey and Deacon B.B. Plummer and Delta Hart (Farmington News, January 29, 1897).

MILTON. Walter Dixon of Farmington, Me., has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Delta C. Hart on [in or of] Lebanon this week (Farmington News, October 15, 1897).

Step-mother Mary J. ((((Glidden) Davis) Wright) Hart) Watson died of diabetes in Alton, NH, January 11, 1898, aged sixty-nine years, nine months, and fifteen days.

LOCALS. Mary Jane Watson, wife of Joseph Watson of South Alton, died January 11, at the age of 70 years. She was a lady well known in this section and her death will be mourned by a large circle of relatives and friends (Farmington News, January 28, 1898).

Son Warren Winslow Hart of Gorman [Gorham], NH, graduated from Boston University’s School of Law with the degree of L.L.B., in June 1899 (Boston Globe, June 7, 1899).

Lydia A.H. [(Hart)] Remick, home keeper, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. She owned her house, free-and-clear, and was a widow, with no children.

Miss B. Bernice Hart appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as a shoe stitcher, with her house on Main street, over the Milton P.O. Her brother Delta C. Hart appeared as a shoe shop employee, with his house north of the bridge, on the Lebanon side. Her brother Dana B. Hart appeared as a shoe shop employee, with his house on Main street, opposite J.D. Willey’s store.

Delta C. Hart, a machinist, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Minnie C. Hart, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and his daughter, Bessie B. Hart, at school, aged eleven years (b. ME). Delta C. Hart owned their house, free-and-clear.

Cisco W. Hart, a shoe shop foreman, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Weymouth, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Annie M. Hart, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), and his children, Francis D. Hart, aged seven years (b. MA), Pauline E. Hart, aged four years (b. MA), and D. Milton Hart, aged one year (b. MA). Cisco W. Hart owned their house on Hill Court Road, free-and-clear.

Dana B. Hart, a shoe factory foreman, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirteen years), Mattie M. Hart, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and his children, Bernice Hart, aged twelve years (b. ME), and Abbie Hart, aged five years (b. ME). Dana B. Hart rented their house 20 Elmore Street.

Birdie B. Hart, a home keeper, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. She owned her house, free-and-clear.

Daniel Q. Hart, a R.R. flagman, aged sixty-two years, headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-nine years), Ellen Hart, aged sixty-nine years. Daniel Q. Hart owned their house at 13 Knight Street, free-and-clear. Ellen Hart was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Daughter Miss B. Bernice Hart appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as having moved to Roxbury, MA. Her brothers, Delta C. Hart and Dana B. Hart, appeared also, as having moved to Farmington, NH.

Sister Lydia A. [(Hart)] Remick made her last will September 8, 1903. She devised to her brother, Daniel Q. Hart, “… the House and lot where I now live, with the passway between said House and the House which my Father formerly owned and where he lived.” She devised $25 each to Mrs. Susie Rathburn of Marlboro, Mass., Miss Eni Goudy of Lynn, MA, and Mrs. Emma [(Goudy)] Brownell of Lynn, MA. She bequeathed to the Milton First Baptist Church a payment of $500 and a church pew. The money came from a legacy made to said church by her late husband, Andrw J. Remick. (She likely had the interest income on this sum during her life, with the reversion given over to the church). She bequeathed the rest and residue, if any, to her brother, Daniel Q. Hart. She named Stephen D. Wentworth as her executor. Elnora Hill, Annette Hill, and Stephen D. Wentworth witnessed her signature (Strafford County Probate, 124:440). (Elnora Hill (1857-1927) and Annette Hill (1862-1936) were daughters of Daniel and Betsy (Rankin) Hill, and Stephen D. Wentworth (1834-1923) was a Rochester, NH, neighbor of Daniel Q. Hart and judge of their local Rochester police court).

Sister-in-law Ellen V. (Ricker) Hart died of uremic poisoning at 13 Knight Street in Rochester, NH, May 18, 1904, aged seventy-three years, eleven months, and ten days. She had lived in Rochester, NH, for thirty-three years, i.e., since circa 1871, having come there from Milton.

PERSONAL. As Mrs. Cisco Hart and two sons, of East Weymouth, Mass., were spending a fortnight with Mr. and Mrs. Dana B. Hart at Brookside farm, a family gathering was given in their honor, Sunday, August 21. Among those present were Mr. C.D. Jones and family, of Milton, and Delta C. Hart and family, of Farmington. Miss Bernice Hart expects to accompany Mrs. Hart in her return to East Weymouth, for a short visit (Farmington News, August 26, 1904).

Sister Lydia A. (Hart) Remick died of chronic nephritis in Milton, June 17, 1906, aged eighty years, fifteen years. Her last will was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held at Dover, NH, July 3, 1906 (Strafford County Probate, 124:440).

AUTOMOBILES. FOR SALE – Stanley car, good condition, 2 full seats, speedometer, searchlight, extra tires, wheel steer, newly painted. CISCO W. HART, 66 Hillcrest rd, East Weymouth (Boston Globe, July 14, 1907).

Son-in-law Charles D. Jones died of typhoid fever in Milton, July 2, 1908, aged forty-four years, nine months, and ten days.

Daughter Bridie Bernice Hart married in Milton, October 12, 1908, Walter Brown, she of Milton and he of New York, NY. He was a widowed carpet salesman, aged forty-four years, and she was a bookkeeper, aged thirty-two years. Rev. R.M. Peacock performed the ceremony. Brown was born in St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, circa 1863, son of Silas and Sarah (Burns) Brown.

Delta C. Hart, a shoe factory foreman, aged thirty-seven years [forty-seven years] (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Minnie E. Hart, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), and his daughter, Bessie B. Hart, a school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). Delta C. Hart rented their house on North Main Street. Minnie E. Hart was the mother of two children, of whom none were still living.

Cisco W. Hart, a shoe factory foreman, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Bridgewater, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nineteen years), Annie Hart, aged forty-three years (b. MA), Francis D. Hart, aged seventeen years, Pauline E. Hart, aged fourteen years (b. MA), D. Milton Hart, aged eleven years (b. MA), and J. Stanley Hart, aged six years (b. MA), and his mother-in-law, Elizabeth Denbroeder, aged eighty-two years (b. Holland).  Cisco W. Hart rented their house at 34 Hall Street. Annie Hart was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

Dana B. Hart, a farmer, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Mattie J. Hart, aged forty-three years (b. NH), his children, Bernice N. Hart, a servant (working out), aged twenty-two years (b. ME), Abbie B. Hart, aged fifteen years (b. ME), Mattie A. Hart, aged eight years (b. NH), and Donald B. Hart, aged three years (b. NH), and Sarah J. Stevens, a widow, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH). Dana B. Hart owned their farm on the Ridge Road, free-and-clear. Mattie J. Hart was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living. Sarah J. Stevens was the mother of five children, of whom five were still living.

Rainford W. Brown, a shoe factory heel compressor, aged forty-six years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Bernice H. Brown, a shoe factory buttonholer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his boarder, Carl H. Wedgworth, aged fourteen months (b. NH). Rainford W. Brown rented their house on East Grove Street. He was an alien, having immigrated in 188[1 or 4].

Daniel Q. Hart, a widower, living on his own income, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. He owned his house at 13 Knight Street, free-and-clear. He seems to have sublet a part of it to the household of Edgar E. Seavey, own income, aged forty-three years (b. NH).

Daughter Pauline E. (Hart) Jones died of pneumonia (with pulmonary tuberculosis as a secondary cause) in Milton Mills, February 12, 1910, aged forty-four years, and three days.

LOCAL. Mrs. Lena Hart Jones, widow of Dr. Jones of Milton, passed away at her home in that town Sunday evening, of pneumonia, aged forty-four years. Mrs. Jones is survived by four children, the youngest two years old, and by two brothers, Delta and Dana Hart, and one sister, Mrs. Walter Brown, all of this town. The funeral was held at Milton Tuesday (Farmington News, [Friday,] February 18, 1910).

Son Mark A. Hart died in Arcata, CA, June 29, 1912, aged forty-nine years.

Brother Daniel Quimby Hart died of mitral regurgitation at the NH State Hospital in Concord, NH, September 29, 1916, aged seventy-nine years, eight months, and twenty-five days.

Son Warren Winslow Hart of Boston, MA, appeared in a Boston University alumni catalog of 1918.

SCHOOL OF LAW. Warren Winslow Hart, L.L.B., ’99’; pres. William E. Russell Club; Lawyer; Boston City, Appalachian Mountain and Alpine Golf (Canada) Clubs; New England Historical and Genealogical Soc. 53 State and 139 Worcester Sts., Boston, Mass.

Half-brother-in-law Menoah G. Glidden died in Belmont, NH, April 24, 1918, aged sixty-four years.

LOCAL. Walter R. Brown lost his family horse last Saturday (Farmington News, August 22, 1919).

Delta C. Hart, a shoe shop foreman, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Minnie E. Hart, aged forty-nine years (b. ME). Delta C. Hart rented their apartment at 639 Central Avenue.

Cisco W. Hart, aged fifty-five years (b. NH), headed a Bridgewater, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Annie D. Hart, aged fifty-two years (b. MA), his children, Pauline E. Hart, a trust company clerk, aged twenty-four years (b. MA), D. Milton Hart, an order clerk for a wholesale leather co., aged twenty years (b. MA), and J. Stanley Hart, aged sixteen years (b. MA), and his lodgers, Samuel Norton, a trust company treasurer, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), and Estella Gummaw, a private secretary for a lawyer, aged twenty-six years (b. MA). Cisco W. Hart owned their house at 76 South Street, free-and-clear.

Dana B. Hart, a shoe shop foreman, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mattie J. Hart, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and his children, Althea Bernice M. Hart, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Donald B. Hart, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Dana B. Hart owned their farm on the Ridge Road, free-and-clear.

Walter R. [Rainford] Brown, a shoe factory foreman, aged fifty-five years (b. Canada), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Bernice H. Brown, a shoe factory back stayer, aged forty-four years (b. NH). Walter R. Brown rented their house on North Main Street. He was an alien, having immigrated in 1883.

Daughter-in-law Mattie J. (Stevens) Hart died in Farmington, NH, March 22, 1922, aged sixty-four years.

IN MEMORIAM. Mrs. Mattie J. Hart. Mrs. Mattie J. Hart, wife of Dana D. Hart, succumbed to a long illness at her home early Wednesday evening. She was 64 years old and a native of Middleton. She was a daughter in a family of five children of Jonathan B. and Sarah J. (Garland) Stevens. Most of her life had been spent in Farmington where she had made many friends who remained true to the last. Mrs. Hart possessed the virtues of sympathy and charity and combined them admirably with a noble heart that cherished the fondest affection for those about her. She is survived by her husband, three daughters, Mrs. Ralph C. Jenkins of Now Durham, Mrs. Joseph Tierney of Lynn, Mass., and Miss Althea Hart of this town, one son, Donald Hart, two sisters, Mrs. Elmer Stevens of Salem, Mass., and Mrs. Belle Penney of Rochester, two brothers, Henry Stevens of New York and Frank B. Stevens of Dover and one grandchild, Dorothy Jenkins of New Durham. Funeral will be held from the home Saturday afternoon at 1.30, with Rev J.G. Haigh officiating. Remains will be taken to Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, March 24, 1922).

Half-sister Alice J. (Hart) Glidden died in Worcester, MA, May 2, 1922, aged sixty-two years.

Son Delta C. Hart died of chronic nephritis in Farmington, NH, March 27, 1926, aged sixty-four years, four months, and twenty-four days. He was a foreman in a stich room, who had resided in Farmington, NH, for fourteen years. J.L. McLaughlin signed the death certificate.

IN MEMORIAM. Delta C. Hart. Mr. Delta C. Hart passed away last Saturday morning after a long illness following influenza. For the last few weeks he had been critically ill, but his own courage to the end had given the hopefulness of his recovery to his family in spite of his serious condition. Mr. Hart was born in Milton, Nov. 3, 1862. His father was John F. Hart and his mother was Mary Abby (Twombly) Hart. He was married in 1886 to Mary E. Stanton in Milton. They had two children, a son, Benjamin Stanton, and a daughter, Bessie Bonita. In 1892 Mr. Hart lost his wife and son, and in 1895 was married to Minnie E. Knox of Lebanon, Me. In 1901 Mr. Hart came to this town as foreman of the stitching room for the firm that soon afterward was known as the Farmington Shoe Company. He remained with that company until it removed to Dover, where he went with it as super[intendent]. Mr. Hart had the stitching department. Except for two years when Mr. Hart had the stitching department for Sears Roebuck in Springvale, Maine, he worked with the Farmington Shoe Company until three years ago. This winter until December he was foreman at the Richard-Varney factory. As a workman he was faithful and skillful. He took pride in fine work and when it became a question of quality or quantity, he insisted upon quality. He gave the best of his life and energy to careful workmanship. His association with his employes was a pleasure to him, and now there are a great many people who feel his loss as the loss of a fine man in factory business, and as a fair and kind friend to those who worked for him. Mr. Hart was a deacon at the Congregational church in Milton. He was a member of the orders of Odd Fellows and Red Men. His greatest pleasure was in his family and home life and now his loss is mourned with deepest sorrow by his widow, Mrs. Minnie E. Hart, and his daughter, Bessie B. Hart. He is also survived by a sister, Mrs. Walter Brown of Milton, and two brothers, Dana Hart of this town and Cisco W. Hart of St. Petersburg, Florida. The funeral services were held in the Congregational church here at two o’clock on Tuesday, the Rev. Lewis E. Purdrum of the First Congregational church in Dover officiating, with Mrs. Clarence Sanborn as soloist (Farmington News, April 2, 1926).

R. WALTER BROWN HAS CURRENCY OF 1830. R. Walter Brown of this town is the possessor of an unusual specimen of currency not now in legal circulation, but nevertheless of considerable premium value. It is a perfectly preserved banknote of the Holyoke National bank of Holyoke Mass., issued to Thomas Currie, a local merchant in 1830. Further, it is significant to observe that the banknote is of the $3 denomination, and is numbered 103, showing that it is among the first issues of this specie from that bank. The bill is an heirloom, Mr. Brown having inherited it from his grandmother, Sarah Burns, who lived to the age of 75 years and passed away about forty years ago. The printing designs for currency in those days was considerably different from the present complicated patterns and apparently much easier to counterfeit from the fact of its simplicity. Only one side is printed and the other left blank so it is reasonable to suppose that the phrase, “face value,” originated as a coincident of this method of designing and printing currency. It is of further interest to note that the date, number and signature of the bank president appearing on the note are written in with pen and ink, so it is obvious that the treasury department furnished the various national banks with a supply of the various denominations and the bank officials adapted the number and the date to the transaction. While it is certain that this banknote has an antique, if not a premium value, Mr. Brown prefers to keep it as a curio and heirloom rather than convert it into legal tender of the present day (Farmington News, December 28, 1928).

Cisco W. Hart, a shoe factory sole sorter, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), headed a Bridgewater, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Annie D. Hart, aged sixty-two years (b. MA). Cisco W. Hart owned their house at 113 Park Avenue, which was valued at $7,000. They had a radio set.

Dana B. Hart, a shoe factory shoe operator, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his boarder, Antoine Martell, a farm laborer, aged forty-nine years (b. Canada (Fr.)). Dana B. Hart owned their house on the Ten Rod Road, which was valued at $1,000. Theor household appeared in the numeration next to that of Donald B. Hart, a farmer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH).

Charles E. Fullerton, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma C. Fullerton, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), and his roomers, Walter R. Brown, a shoe factory cutter, aged sixty-six years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and Bernice Brown, a shoe factory stitcher, aged fifty-four years (b. NH). Charles E. Fullerton owned their house of Garfield Street, which was valued at $2,500.

Bernice B. (Hart) Brown died of lobar pneumonia on Garfield Street in Farmington, NH, March 4, 1931, aged fifty-four years, eleven months, and seven days. She had resided there for twenty-two years, having come there from New York, NY.

IN MEMOBIAM. Mrs. Walter Brown. Mrs. Bernice Hart Brown, wife of Walter Brown, succumbed to bronchial pneumonia Wednesday evening of this week after ten days of illness at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fullerton where they made their home. The deceased was one of the most talented literary women of this locality and had been a respected resident of Farmington since her marriage to Mr. Brown 22 years ago. She was 55 years of age, a native of Milton, a descendent of one of the oldest families of that locality and the younger daughter among five children born to John and Mary Hart. She was educated in the public schools of her native town and graduated from Nute high school. Later she completed a course at the Bryant and Stratton Business college in Boston, and subsequently followed religious secretarial work in Boston for several years. She united with the Congregational church of Beverly, Mass., many years ago and remained a faithful member. For several years she had been employed in the stitching departments of the various local shoe factories. A devoted wife and firm friend, her passing will cause sincere sorrow. She is survived by her husband, two brothers, Cisco Hart of Bridgewater, Mass., and Dana Hart of Farmington and several nieces and nephews. Funeral will be held from the home Saturday afternoon at 1.30, with Rev. Stanley R. Hopper officiating (Farmington News, March 6, 1931).

Son-in-law Rainsford W. [i.e., Walter R.] Brown died of coronary sclerosis at Pleasant Street in Farmington, NH, April 5, 1932, aged sixty-eight years, one month, and twenty-six days. He was a widowed shoeworker. Albert E. Bascomb, M.D., signed the death certificate.

IN MEMORIAM. Walter R. Brown. Walter Raindsford Brown, a well-known citizen of this town, passed away at the home of Mr. I.O. Ricker on Pleasant street late Tuesday afternoon, after an acute illness that lasted one week. He was 68 years old, a native of St. Johns, N.B., one of several children born to Silas H. and Sarah C. Brown, and came to the state when a small boy. Mr. Brown was a man of education and ability and had filled responsible positions in New York and Philadelphia, before coming to Farmington about 25 years ago. During his local residence he was highly regarded and served as a stockroom foreman and operative in most of the local shoe manufacturing plants. He was a draftsman and artist of ability and a man of sterling character and honesty. Mr. Brown sustained the loss of his wife somewhat over a year ago and since her death had not enjoyed good health, although he kept to his usual industrious habits and was making plans for the future when he was taken critically ill. He is survived by one brother, David Brown of Montreal, and a sister-in-law, Mrs. Alice Brown of St. Johns, N.B., to whom he was most devoted. Funeral services will be held from the home of Mrs. Ricker on Saturday afternoon at 1.30, with Rev. Emery L. Wallace officiating. Interment will be in Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, April 8, 1932).

Daughter-in-law Minnie E. (Knox) Hart married (2nd) in Dover, NH, January 12, 1934, Albanus M. White, she of Lebanon, ME, and he of East Rochester, NH. She was at home, aged sixty-three years and he was a shoe operative, aged sixty-two years. Rev. Leon Morse performed the ceremony. White was born in Lebanon, ME, circa 1871, son of Martin V.B. and Martha (Blaisdell) White.

Son Cisco Wade Hart died in Bridgewater, MA, April 29, 1935, aged seventy-one years.

CISCO W. HART, 71, DIES IN BRIDGEWATER. BRIDGEWATER, April 29. – Cisco W. Hart, 71, died yesterday at his home on Park av. Mr. Hart had been a resident of the town for a number of years and formerly lived in East Weymouth. He was foreman for one of the departments at a shoe company. Mr. Hart was a member of Crescent Lodge, I.O.O.F., of East Weymouth. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at a local funeral parlor, and burial will be in Fairmount Cemetery, East Weymouth (Boston Globe, April 29, 1935).

Son Dana Byron Hart died of pneumonia and endocarditis in Rochester, NH, November 27, 1941, aged seventy-four years, four months, and twenty-eight days. He was a widowed shoe-worker.

IN MEMORIAM. Dana Byron Hart. Dana Byron Hart, aged 74, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Lucien Boucher, of Rochester last Thursday evening following a short illness. Mr. Hart was born in Milton the son of John and Mary (Twombly) Hart and for the past forty years has been a resident of Farmington where he had been well-known shoeworker and for a long time was a soleleather foreman. Among other achievements during his long life, Mr. Hart owned and worked a large farm in the New Durham Ridge section if the town. The deceased formerly was a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge, of Farmington and also a member of the Red Men in Milton. Surviving relatives include three daughters, Mrs. Ralph Jenkins of New Durham, Mrs. Joseph Tierney of Lynn, Mass., Mrs. Lucien Boucher of Rochester; one son, Donald Hart of Farmington, and eight grandchildren. Funeral services were held last Saturday afternoon at the Otis funeral parlor, with Rev. Robert Bracey of New Durham officiating and burial was at Farmington cemetery (Farmington News, December 5, 1941).

Son Warren W. Hart died in Bryantville, Pembroke, MA, August 28, 1943, aged seventy-five years.

Death Notices. HART – In Bryantville, August 28, Warren W. Hart of Boston, age 75 years. Funeral services at his late home, Plymouth St., Bryantville, on Wednesday September 1, at 2 p.m. Interment in Bryantville. Train leaves Boston for Whitman at 12:15. Cars at Whitman station. Trains leave South Hanson for Boston at 3:55 p.m. (Boston Globe, August 31, 1943).

IN MEMORIAM. Warren W. Hart. Friends of Warren W. Hart, former resident of Milton and Alton, regret to learn of his death which occurred at his summer home in Bryantville, Mass., Saturday, August 28. Mr. Hart was born in Milton, February 28, 1868. Before going to Massachusetts, where he made his home, he also lived for a time near Stockbridge Corner near Alton. He was a graduate Dartmouth College and Boston University Law School and was a practicing attorney in Boston for many years. He is survived by one sister, one brother and three nieces. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, September 1. Burial was in Bryantville, Mass. (Farmington News, September 10, 1943).

Daughter-in-law Anna M. (Denbroeder) Hart died in St. Petersburg, FL, October 2, 1953, aged eighty-six years.

OBITUARIES. Mrs. Annie D. Hart; Moved Here In 1935. Mrs. Annie Denbroeder Hart, resident of St. Petersburg since 1935 when she moved here from Bridgewater, Mass., died last night at her home, 5702 26th Avenue South. Mrs. Hart, 86, was the wife of the late Cisco Wade Hart. She was a member of the First Congregation Church, St. Petersburg. Surviving are three sons, Francis D. Hart, Del Mar, Cal., Dana M. Hart, West Dennis, Mass., and John S. Hart, Bridgewater, Mass.; a daughter, Mrs. Charles W. Burrill, Brockton, Mass.; and four brothers, Jacob, South Weymouth, Mass., Will and Charles of East Weymouth, Mass., and Louis Denbroeder, Brookfield, Mass. The funeral party will leave this morning for services and burial in East Weymouth. John S. Rhoades, Inc., is in charge of local arrangements (Tampa Bay Times, October 3, 1953).

Daughter-in-law Minnie E. ((Knox) Hart) White died of circulatory failure at Frisbie Hospital in Rochester, NH, October 12, 1954, aged eighty-four years, two months.

IN MEMORIAM. MRS. MINNIE E. WHITE. Mrs. Minnie E. White of Lebanon, Me., aged 86 years, widow of Albanus White, died Tuesday October 12, at the Frisbie hospital in Rochester. Mrs. White formerly lived in Farmington and was an occasional visitor here as long as she was able. She leaves a daughter, Miss Bessie Hart of Brockton, Mass., a brother, Leslie Knox of Center Lebanon, Me., and a sister, Mrs. Nettie Lord, also of Center Lebanon. Funeral services were held Friday afternoon from the East Rochester Baptist church, with the Rev. Ralph Townsend officiating. Burial was in Prospect Hill cemetery, Lebanon, Me. (Farmington News, October 22, 1954).


References:

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Albert Nathaniel Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215292806/albert-nathaniel-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Bernice A. Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215296370/annie-bernice-hart

Find a Grave. (2018, September 1). Betsey Cornell Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/192744508/betsey-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Betsey Cornell [Downs] Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215292643/betsey-hart

Find a Grave. (2012, August 25). Cisco W. Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/95909952/cisco-w-hart

Find a Grave. (2016, November 16). Daniel Quimby Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/172836541/daniel-quimby-hart

Find a Grave. (2011, February 28). Delta C. Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/66261786/delta-c.-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). John Francis Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215294543/john-francis-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Hannah Susan Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215293728/hannah-susan-hart

Find a Grave. (2017, August 17). Mark Albert Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/182482861/mark-albert-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 8). Mark Hunking Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215292430/mark-hunking-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Mark H. Hart [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215294073/mark-h-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Mary Jane Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215294004/mary-jane-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Sarah Abigail Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215293844/sarah-abigail-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Sarah Elizabeth Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215292835/sarah-elizabeth-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Sophia Elizabeth Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215293261/sophia-elizabeth-hart

Find a Grave. (2015, June 30). Warren W. Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/148464036/warren-w-hart

Find a Grave. (2020, October 21). Lydia A. Hart Remick. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217546799/lydia-a-remick

Find a Grave. (2013, March 4). Mary J. Hart Watson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/106148022/mary-j-watson

Find a Grave. (2021, November 21). Minnie E. Knox White. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/234197228/minnie-e-white

Milton’s NH State Representatives – 1803-1902

By Muriel Bristol | July 17, 2022

New Hampshire’s legislature or General Court is a bicameral one. It has lower and upper houses, known respectively as the House of Representatives and the Senate. All of its officers, including its Governor and his Executive Council, are elected for two-year periods known as “biennia.”

The NH provincial legislature sat at Portsmouth from 1689 to 1775. During and immediately after the Revolutionary War, when seacoast Portsmouth would have been exposed to possible attack by sea, the legislature moved inland. (Sometimes it held a Spring session at one location and a Fall one in another). It met at Exeter (1775-84, 1786, 1789, 1790, 1792-93, 1796, 1799-00, 1803, 1805, 1812-13, and 1815), Amherst (1778 and 1794), Concord (1785, 1788, 1791, 1795, 1797, 1802, 1804, 1808-11, and 1814), Charlestown (1787), Portsmouth (1780, 1782, 1784-91, 1797, 1805, and 1812), Dover (1792), and Hopkinton (1798, 1801, and 1806-07).

Concord has been said to have become the de facto capitol in 1808 and the de jure one in 1816. The current capitol building in Concord, NH, opened its doors in 1819. Milton Rep. Theodore C. Lyman would been the first Milton representative to have had a seat there.

NH-State-House-5The building described in 1833 did not yet have a dome or portico, as it does now.

The New Hampshire State House 150 feet long, centre 57 feet deep, wings 49 feet deep, walls of stone, cornice wood, roof shingled – without a dome or portico, and cost $81,827 (Vermont Patriot & State Gazette, November 11, 1833).

By 1865, its dome had been added and a cupola was being placed atop it, with an eagle atop the cupola. Its granite portico was under construction.

The designs of Mr. Architect Bryant begin to assume form and shape in the progress of the work on the New Hampshire State House. The cupola is framed, and the old eagle, after a long season of rest and refreshment, again faces the rising sun, and this time from a higher perch than before. Along the front of the reconstructed edifice are to be reared twelve massive granite columns hewn from the same quarry whence were taken the immense masses of the Concord City Hall (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), September 23, 1865).

Prior to the advent of trains and automobiles, most state representatives and senators would have simply resided in the capitol city for the duration of the legislative session, rather than travel back and forth. Some sources – directories, manuals, and registers – identified the various boarding houses and hotels in which the members were residing. (For example, Milton Rep. Charles W. Gross occupied seat 03-27 in the House chambers and boarded at 45 Park street during the 1887-88 biennium).

Prior to being set off as its own town, Milton – then called the Northeast Parish of Rochester – had been represented by men sent from its parent town. Milton came into its own in 1802, which was too late to send its own representative to the 1801-02 biennium.

In some periods Milton had two representatives, usually when it constituted a larger proportion of the state’s total population than it does at present.

Milton Population, 1800-2020
Milton Population, 1800-2020, as reported in Federal Census records. Milton’s nineteenth century population peaked at 1,862 persons in 1860. While the Civil War (1861-65) might account for some of the decline and stagnation that followed, the larger factor was simply that its rural farm economy had reached its capacity. Not even the larger local manufacturing concerns that would arise would be sufficient to sustain greater numbers. Its 1860 population peak would not be matched again until 1970.

John Scales provided in his 1914 History of Strafford County the names of the person or, for a period beginning in 1853, the two persons, representing Milton in the NH House of Representatives (Scales, 1914). Scales drew heavily upon an earlier work by Charles C. Hayes of Milton, whose list ended with the 1881-82 biennium. Consequently, Scales’ list ran only from the 1803-04 biennium up through that of 1881-82. (Where external sources provided party affiliations they have been included ([d]=democrat, [f]=federalist], [nr]=national republican, [r]=republican, or [w]=whig)).

The representatives for the same period are as follows: 1803, 1805-08, Beard Plumer [d]; 1804, 1809-10, John Fish; 1811-12, 1818-19, Theodore C. Lyman; 1813-15, William Plumer [Palmer]; 1816-17, John Remick, Jr.; 1820-21, Daniel Hayes; 1822-24, Levi Jones; 1825-27, Hanson Hayes; 1828-29, 1835-36, Thomas Chapman; 1830-32, Stephen M. Mathes; 1833-34, Stephen Drew [d]; 1837-38, James M. Twombly [d]; 1839-40, James Berry; 1841-43, John H. Varney; 1844-45, Charles Swasey; 1846-47, Ichabod Wentworth; 1848-49, Asa Fox [w]; 1850, Robert Mathes; 1851-52, Ebenezer Osgood;

There were originally fewer NH representatives overall and their number increased gradually until it was capped at the current total of four hundred. (See The Mathematical Limits of Representation).

New Hampshire has the 3rd largest legislature in the English-speaking world, just behind the British Parliament and the United States Congress. While the State Senate has fairly consistently set itself at 24 members since the late 1870s, the size of the House of Representatives has varied. In 1819 when Representatives’ Hall opened, there were 192 members. By the time the Civil War rolled around, the House had 331 members and by 1900 there were 360 members. Although we have kept the number to around 400 consistently since the latter half of the 1940s, there have been times when the legislature eclipsed that number, such as 1929 when there were 421 members and 1944 when there were 443 members (House Republican Office, 2022).

Next came a twenty-five-year period in which Milton had two NH Representatives.

1853, James Doldt, John D. Lyman; 1854, John D. Lyman, Samuel Washburn; 1855-56, Eli Wentworth, David Wallingford; 1857-58, Luther Hayes, [r,] Lewis Plumer; 1859-60, John E. Goodwin, Daniel E. Palmer [r]; 1861-62, Enoch W. Plumer, Charles Varney; 1863-64, Charles Jones, Theodore Lyman; 1865-66, H. Wentworth, Thomas H. Roberts; 1867-68, John U. Simes, Hiram V. Wentworth; 1869, George Lyman, Samuel G. Chamberlain; 1870, George Lyman, Samuel W. Wallingford; 1871, Samuel G. Chamberlain, George W. Tasker; 1872, George W. Tasker, Bray Simes; 1873, Joseph Plumer, Elbridge W. Fox [r]; 1874-75, Charles C. Hayes, George E. Simes; 1876, Sullivan H. Atkins [r], Luther Hayes [r]; 1877, Luther Hayes [r], William F. Cutts; 1878, Luther F. Cutts, Samuel H. Roberts;

At which time Milton’s representation dropped back down to a single NH representative per biennium.

1879-80, Ira A. Miller; 1881-82, A. Fox (Scales, 1914).

Here is compiled a twenty-year list that extends the Hayes-Scales list from the 1883-84 biennium through that of 1901-02. (Where sources provided party affiliations they have been included (d=democrat, p=prohibition, or r=republican)).

1883-84, John F. Hart; 1885-86, Charles H. Looney, r; 1887-88, Charles W. Gross, r; 1889-90, Joseph H. Avery, r; 1891-92, Elbridge W. Fox, r; 1893-94, Samuel W. Wallingford, r; 1895-96, Charles A. Jones, r; 1897-98, Frank G. Horne, r; 1899-00, Freeman H. Lowd, r; 1901-02, Malcolm A.H. Hart, r;

Milton’s NH State Senators – 1802-88
Beard Plumer on Republican Ticket
Beard Plumer. Esq., as a candidate on the statewide Republican ticket. The party names of this period can be a bit confusing. This is a Democratic-Republican ticket, i.e., a Democrat ticket. The other party were the Federalist-Republicans or the Federalists.

Senate districts encompassed multiple towns. That being the case, Milton did not have a Milton-resident senator in every year. Here follows those listed by Scales from the 1803-04 biennium up through that of 1887-88 (Scales, 1914)

1809-10, 1810-11, 1811-12, 1812-13, 1816-17, Beard Plummer; 1860-61, 1861-62, Eli Wentworth; 1879-80, Luther Hayes; 1887-88, Charles H. Looney (Scales, 1914).

NH Sen. Beard Plumer, Esq., of Milton died near the end of the first year of his fifth NH Senate biennium. The mechanism then in place required the NH House to choose his replacement from the two runners-up (if that many there were) of the election that put him in office. That is to say, the Federalist loser of the election would now replace the deceased Democrat winner.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. In the Senate of this State there are two vacancies, one occasioned by the acceptance of a judiciary appointment by the Hon. B. Badger, and the other by the decease of the Hon. Beard Plumer. These vacancies are likely to occasion some embarrassment in the government of that state. They are required by the constitution to be filled by election by the other House, from the two remaining highest candidates in their several districts. In each of the present cases it is said that the highest remaining candidates are federalists, so that the other House, though democratic, will be under the necessity of supplying the vacancies with federalists, an event which would destroy the predominance of the democratic party in the Senate, and give the federalists a check upon the proceedings. Another report is, that there are no two highest candidates in either district, all the votes in each being given to one man, except that two other persons in each district had each one vote (Burlington Gazette (Burlington, VT), December 5, 1816).

(Mr. Plissken observes that this same notion is sometimes put forward when replacing local officials. It sounds reasonable on its face, but one might argue instead that this method has a conceptual flaw, even apart from the complication of opposing political parties. In choosing or promoting the candidate with the next biggest total, one is preferring what was specifically not preferred by the majority of voters when an alternative was present).

Before the fall session, District No. 5 was vacated by the decease of Beard Plumer, and No. 6 by the appointment of William Badger judge in the court of common pleas. These two vacancies were not filled. Jonathan Harvey was chosen president in place of William Badger (NH General Court Manual, 1891).


Continued in Milton’s NH State Representatives – 1903-2022


References:

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA512

SeacoastNH. (1998). All about the Old NH Statehouse [in Portsmouth]. Retrieved from www.seacoastnh.com/all-about-the-old-nh-statehouse/?showall=1

Milton Senator Beard Plummer (1754-1816)

By Muriel Bristol | July 10, 2022

Beard Plummer was born in Rochester, NH, August 12, 1754, son of John and Elizabeth (Titcomb) Plummer.

Beard Plummer, son of John and Elizabeth Titcomb Plummer, was born in Rochester, N.H., to which place his father had moved from Newbury [MA] (Scales, 1914).

(His surname was usually rendered as “Plumer” in these early years, and “Plummer” only later. His unusual Christian name, and those of the many namesakes that would follow him, is rendered in the records as “Beard” and, later, “Bard.” It originated as “Beard,” which was the surname of his paternal grandmother, Elizabeth Beard, wife of Richard Plumer, as well as her relatives, i.e., his Beard uncles, aunts, and cousins).

(His known siblings were Elizabeth Plummer (1750–1841), Joseph Plumer (1752–1821), and John Plumer (1761–1824)).

Mother Elizabeth (Titcomb) Plummer died in Rochester, NH, January 28, 1770, aged forty-one years.

Father John Plumer married (2nd), circa 1770, Lydia ((Waterhouse) Colby) Dennett, he of Rochester, NH, and she of Portsmouth, NH. She was born in Portsmouth, NH, circa 1727-28, daughter of Timothy and Ruth (Moses) Waterhouse. She had married (1st) in Portsmouth, NH, August 23, 1747, Spencer Colby (1725-1751); (2nd) in Kittery, ME, February 24, 1751, Ephraim Dennett (1718-1770); and (3rd) John Plumer (1719-1815). She had a son, Jeremiah Dennett (1752-1818), who became a stepbrother to Beard Plumer and his siblings.

One of the ship masters employed by Sir Wm. Pepperell was Capt. [Spencer] Colby, who married Lydia Waterhouse. More than ninety years ago she became a widow, and afterwards was married to Ephraim Dennett, and resided at the above old mansion on Christian-shore [in Portsmouth, NH].
Years rolled on, and she again found herself a widow. Like a good housewife, in those days when no factories were in operation, she kept her flock of sheep, and attended to the various processes of converting their product into cloth; and her fame extended beyond the limits of the town. Near the house is a good spring which still flows on as of old. It was a time for wool washing. Laying aside the widow’s weeds, dressed in a leather apron, a man’s broad-brim hat, and other apparel to match she was washing her wool at the spring, when a stranger on horseback approached, and inquired for the residence of the widow Dennett. Nothing daunted, she pointed to the house, directed him to the front door, while she stepped round and entered the back way. He was not long in waiting before the lady of the house in comely apparel appeared.
The gentleman introduced himself as John Plummer of Rochester. He had heard of her good reputation, said perhaps it was too soon to come a courting, but would ask the privilege in proper time of proposing himself to her favorable consideration. In due time Judge Plummer came again, and they were married. They lived happily together many years, and their grave stones in Rochester record the ages of each at about ninety years.

Whether he ever inquired who it was he found washing wool at the spring, we have never been informed. If the events at the well where Rebecca was found were sufficient importance to be perpetuated, there is certainly enough of the primitive simplicity in the meeting at that spring to keep it in lasting remembrance by the descendants of that respectable family. To us, whenever we pass the premises – or are reminded of its history by seeing the elevated old mansion even across the millpond – there ever appears the vision of the Judge on his horse, and the industrious widow disguised under her broad-brim and leathern apron (Brewster, 1878). 

Sister Elizabeth Plumer married December 25, 1770, Aaron Wingate, she of Rochester, NH. He was born in Dover, NH, November 23, 1744, [twin] son of John and Sarah (Ricker) Wingate.

The Hon. Aaron Wingate settled in Farmington when it was almost a wilderness. He was a gentleman of distinguished ability, a sober, grave, judicious, man; for many years a member of the legislature; a counselor from 1797 to 1803; and for a succession of years, chief justice of the common pleas in Strafford county (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Beard and Joseph Plumer, sons of John Plumer of Rochester, also settled at the [Plummer’s] Ridge, and may have been residents here even prior to the [c1771-72] arrival of Mr. [Benjamin] Scates (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

He [Beard Plumer] himself moved from Rochester to the town of Milton and located on what has since been the Plummer homestead. The old house, still standing, was remodeled in 1848, the clapboards and the nails all being hand-made. At the time Beard Plummer arrived there were but few families in the town, the accommodations were primitive and their hardships many.

New Hampshire’s last Royal Governor, John Wentworth (1737-1820), appointed father John Plumer as a Justice of the Court of Common Pleas in 1773. They were said to have been friends. (Gov. Wentworth fled the province in 1775).

Hon. John Plumer was the first magistrate in the town [of Rochester, NH]. Governor Wentworth appointed him Justice of the Court of Common Pleas for Strafford county in 1773; the Provincial Congress reappointed him in 1776, and he held the office until 1795, when he resigned; during the later years of his service he was Chief Justice (Scales, 1914).

Beard Plummer was among the one hundred ninety-eight men who signed the revolutionary Association Test in Rochester, NH, June 1, 1776. (Brother Joseph and their father, Barnabas Plummer, signed also, as did Samuel Plummer, and Thomas Plummer).

WE, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our Lives and Fortunes, with ARMS, oppose the Hostile Proceedings of the British Fleets, and Armies, against the United American COLONIES (Batchellor, 1910).

Twenty-two Rochester men “refused” to sign. Another twenty-two Rochester Friends, i.e., “Quakers,” did not “choose” to sign, i.e., they were conscientious objectors.

Beard Plummer received £12 19s 7d for his service in Capt. John Hill’s company, in Col. Joshua Wingate’s Regiment, when it served with the Continental army in Rhode Island, in August 1778. Col. Wingate’s regiment was a part of Gen. John Sullivan’s Rhode Island expedition.

In the Summer of 1778, the French fleet, France having become our ally, was to attack, in concert with Gen. Sullivan, the British forces at Newport, R.I. A call upon the militia of New England to take part in the “Rhode Island Expedition” brought to the standard of Sullivan an army of 10,000 men. Col. Wingate led a regiment, partly of Madbury men, to the expedition, they going as Volunteers. A storm dispersed the fleets, both of British and of French, and Gen. Sullivan, thus left alone and finding it unsafe to remain longer, retreated, was pursued and attacked, but, gallantly resisting, repulsed the British. Then with face to the foe he beat a safe and discreet retreat (Wingate, 1886).

Captain Hills’ account included also a charge for thirty horses at £10 apiece. (There were thirty soldiers in his muster list). The soldiers were paid an additional two days’ wages to allow for their travel home after being discharged in Rhode Island.

Brother Joseph Plumer married in Rochester, NH, November 30, 1778, Hannah Bickford, both of Rochester, NH. She was born in 1756.

(Their known children were Betsy Plumer (1779–1815), who married Levi Jones, Sally Plumer (1782–1782), John Plumer (1785–1796), and Hannah Plumer (1788–1800)).

Beard Plummer married in Rochester, NH, September 7, 1780, Susanna Ham. She was born in Rochester, NH, October 9, 1762, daughter of Captain Jonathan and Elizabeth (Ham) Ham.

This hardy pioneer married Susannah Ham and their children were Jonathan, Enoch, Joseph, Betsy, John, Susan, and Bard (Scales, 1914).

(Their known children would be Jonathan Plumer (1782–), Enoch Plumer (1784–1824), Joseph Plumer (1786–1826), Betsy Plumer (1788–1885), John Plumer (1791–1817), Susan Plumer (1795-1829), and Beard Plumer (1797-1817).

Son Jonathan Plumer was born in Rochester, NH, May 6, 1782. Son Enoch Plumer was born in Rochester, NH, May 31, 1784. Son Joseph Plumer was born in Rochester, NH, August 13, 1786. Daughter Betsy Plumer was born in Rochester, NH, September 26, 1788.

Beard Plummer headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 16-plus years, four females, and four males aged under-16 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Timothy Gerrish and Joseph Plummer. (See also Northeast Parish in the First (1790) Federal Census).

Father John Plummer headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included four males aged 16-plus years, four females, and one male aged under-16 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Isaac Brown and Benja Odiorne. (See also Northeast Parish in the First (1790) Federal Census).

Stepbrother Jeremiah Dennett of Portsmouth, NH, had a good harvest that year.

PORTSMOUTH, Nov. 4. On a piece of land owned by Jeremiah Dennett, Esq., of this town, which is rather short of eight rods, was raised this season, apples to make nine barrels and half of cyder, eight bushels peas, four bushels potatoes, three bushels and an half quinces, two bushels of beans and four hundred of good hay (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), December 28, 1790).

Beard Plumer was one of one hundred eighty-three inhabitants of Dover, Rochester, Somersworth, Barrington, and other places that petitioned the NH legislature, in January 1791, seeking a replacement Cocheco River bridge near the lower falls at Dover, NH. It would connect again the public road running from Portsmouth to Rochester and the “Upper Towns.” Prior bridges had been swept away by freshets in 1772 and 1785. Since the most recent bridge loss in the “memorable” freshet of October 1785, which took out many bridges, those seeking to cross the river at Dover had been obliged to travel much greater distance – and that involving a large hill – to the lower bridge near the landing.

… But in addition to these inconveniencies it Very frequently happens from the great Quantity of Lumber hauled to the landing that the lower road is in fact so Crowded with Teams that it is Difficult for horses & almost impracticable for Carriages to pass that way.

The petitioners suggested a lottery to finance the new bridge. They estimated its cost at about £300. Benjamin Scates, Ezekiel Hayes, and John Plumer signed also. (See also Salmon Falls Sawmill Petition – 1797 and Milton Road Weight Petition – 1816).

Son John Plumer was born in Rochester, NH, April 25, 1791.

Beard Plumer was a subscriber of the Rochester Social Library in 1792, as were Levi Jones, Jotham NuteBarnabas Palmer, Lt. William Palmer, and Joseph Walker (McDuffee, 1892).

Father-in-law Captain Jonathan Ham died in Rochester, NH, in 1793.

David Corson, husbandman, of Rochester, for 40 pounds money, provisionally conveyed to Beard Plumer, husbandman, of Rochester, land in Rochester drawn to original right of Tobias Hanson, Lot # 66, 3rd Division, containing 140 acres, with the provision that if the above amount is paid with interest by September 24, next, this deed becomes void. The deed was witnessed by Joseph Clark and Anna Clark; deed dated on June 4, 1793, and recorded on June 25, 1793. The loan was paid off on January 3, 1794. (Strafford [County Deeds], 16:195/197, 1793) (Colson, 1991).

Daughter Susan Plumer was born in Rochester, NH, March 21, 1795.

In a later [1844] court case, ownership of the Fernald lot in Milton would be in question. A recitation of its neighboring Denbow lot owners in 1795 included Beard Plumer and his brother, Joseph Plumer.

In relation to the “Fernald lot,” it appeared that in 1795 Samuel Palmer, Beard Plumer and Joseph Plumer, senior, owned and occupied the Denbow lot, as tenants in common; Palmer owning one half and the Plumers each one quarter (NH Supreme Court, 1851). 

Beard Plumer was a Rochester, NH, selectman in the years 1797-99.

Beard Plumer was one of twenty-four petitioners from Wakefield, Rochester & Dover, as well as Massachusetts, that signed the Salmon Falls sawmill petition of June 1797. (See Salmon Falls Sawmill Petition – 1797).

Son Beard Plumer, Jr., was born in Rochester, NH, August 8, 1797.

Beard Plumer and two other Rochester selectmen, Richard Dame and Joshua Allen, petitioned for incorporation of Rochester’s First [(Congregational)] Parish, June 3, 1799. (See also Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

Humbly shew ~ The subscribers, Selectmen of the town of Rochester for the year 1799, that the Congregational Society in the town of Rochester, commonly called the first parish in said town, has always hitherto been and continued unincorporated; that many inconveniences result to them from their continuing in that situation ~
Wherefore they pray that an act for the purpose of incorporating said parish, by the name of the First parish in Rochester, may be passed under such regulations as you in your wisdom may think reasonable and just and as in duty bound will ever pray ~
Rochester, June 3, 1799.
Richd Dame, Beard Plumer, Joshua Allen { In behalf of said town and Selectmen of the same  

Beard Plummer headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Susanna (Ham) Plummer], two males aged 16-25 years, two females aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, one female aged 10-15 years, two males aged under-10 years, and one female aged under-10 years. (See also Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Father John Plumer headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years, one female aged 45-plus years, one male aged 26-44 years, one female aged 26-44 years, one male aged 16-25 years, one female aged 16-25 years, two males aged 10-15 years, and one female aged 10-15 years.

Beard Plumer was the moderator at Milton’s first Town Meeting, August 30, 1802.

The first town meeting in Milton was called by William Palmer, Esq., and held at the dwelling-house of Lieut. Elijah Horn (now the dwelling house of Lewis B. Twombly) on the 30th day of August 1802, at which meeting Beard Plumer was chosen moderator; Gilman Jewett, town clerk; and William Palmer, John Fish, John Remick, Jr., selectmen (Hurd, 1882).

This meeting convened at the tavern of Lieut. Elijah Horne, August 30, 1802, only a short time after the charter, which gave Milton its independent existence, had been signed by Governor Gilman. This instrument had been granted at the June session of the legislature of New Hampshire at the petition and largely through the efforts of Capt. Beard Plumer, one of the representatives from Rochester, who, with others, felt that the time had come for Milton to sever the ties which bound her to the mother town (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Susanna (Ham) Plummer died in Milton, February 20, 1803.

Beard Plumer was Milton’s first NH State Representative in 1803. He was succeeded by John Fish for the year 1804.

Beard Plummer married (2nd) in Dunbarton, NH, circa March 1804, Achsah Page, he of Milton and she of Dunbarton, NH. She was born in Dunbarton, NH, September 25, 1759, daughter of Jeremiah and Sarah (Merrill) Page.

MARRIED. At Dunbarton, Beard Plumer, Esq., of Milton, to Miss Achsah Page, daughter of the Hon. Jeremiah Page, of Dunbarton (NH Courier (Concord, NH), April 4, 1804).

Beard Plumer was a member of the Milton meetinghouse committee in 1804. (See also Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

The first meetinghouse in Milton was erected on the Ridge in accordance with a vote passed at the annual meeting in 1802. John Fish, Beard Plumer and Gilman Jewett, were the executive committee. The lot on which the building was erected was purchased of Thomas and Aaron Downes for $26. The meetinghouse was completed at a cost of about $2,400, by Caleb Wingate, Capt. Daniel Hayes and Gilman Jewett. The net cost of the church, however, was not so large, as the pews were sold for nearly $2,000. The first service was held in 1804 and from that time until after 1830, the meetinghouse was constantly in use. The first preachers to occupy the pulpit were Rev. Gideon Burt and Rev. Christopher Page both of whom were here in 1804 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Beard Plumer was Milton’s NH State Representative in 1805-08. (John Fish had replaced him in that position in 1804 and would succeed him again in 1809-10).

Beard Plumer was one of forty-seven men that petitioned the NH legislature, June 17, 1807, for incorporation “for the purpose of Uniting the waters of the Winnipissiokie Pond [Lake Winnipesaukee] with that branch of the Piscataqua, called Dover River, by means of Locks, Canals and Slips.” This never happened, but these men certainly dreamt big.

Daughter Betsy Plumer married in Wakefield, NH, September 9, 1807, Joshua G. Hall, she of Milton and he of Wakefield, NH. Rev. Asa Piper performed the ceremony. Hall was born in Wakefield, NH, July 19, 1779, son of Samuel and Bridget (Gilman) Hall.

NH Governor John Langdon gave an address which, among other things, spoke in favor of the Federal Embargo Act of 1807. The NH House prepared a resolution urging the Governor to instead oppose the shipping embargo. The House Speaker ruled it out of order, December 2, 1808, and a vote was taken on his ruling. Rep. Beard Plumer voted with those that agreed with the Speaker, and their vote prevailed, by 89 to 71 votes. Rep. Plumer than voted with those that favored the resolution, which passed 96-68. US President Thomas Jefferson, who was the source of the embargo, and NH Governor Langdon were both Democratic-Republicans, i.e., Democrats (although then called Republicans), as was Rep. Plumer. Rep. Plumer would run for the NH Senate in the next biennium.

Beard Plummer of Milton received an appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, December 12, 1808.

Capt. Bard Plumer of Milton appeared in a list of those who had letters awaiting them at the post office in Burlington, VT, in January 1809. As he lived in Milton, NH, rather than Milton, VT, it was not likely he would have picked it up there, nor to have been even aware of its presence there. (“List of Letters Remaining in the Post Office at Burlington, Vermont, which will be sent to the General Post Office at Washington City, unless called for on or before the first day of April next”) (Sentinel & Democrat (Burlington, VT), January 20, 1809).

Plumer, Beard - WA18090306Beard Plummer of Milton was a NH State Senator (for the district that included Milton (District 5)) from June 1809 through June 1813. He had been preceded by Richard Dame of Rochester, NH, and would be succeeded by Jonas C. March (1764-1820) of Rochester, NH

.… Mr. Plummer was the first senator chosen to represent the town of Milton (Scales, 1914).

At his time, both parties presented themselves as being Republicans. They were styled the Federalist Republicans, i.e., Federalists, and the Democratic Republicans, i.e., Republicans, although their successors, in terminology at least, would be called Democrats. Sen. Plumer, Esq., was a Democratic Republican.

Beard Plumer was one of twenty-three Strafford County residents that petitioned the NH Governor and Council, January 31, 1810, seeking appointment of Amos Cogswell, Esq., as Strafford County sheriff. Col. Amos Cogswell (1752-1826), Esq., of Dover, NH, was a Massachusetts native. He had been a Revolutionary officer, beginning as a 2nd lieutenant and rising to the rank of brevet major by the end of the war. (His rank of colonel was his post-war militia rank).

Cogswell represented Dover in the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1807 to 1810, in 1812, 1814, and 1815, and perhaps in other years; was in the State Senate, 1818, 1819, and 1820 and was one of the Presidential electors in 1816 (Wentworth, 1878).

Plumer, Beard - Signature - 1810Cogswell was a Democratic-Republican, who were then termed Republicans, but who would now be called Democrats. Theodore C. Lyman, Levi Jones, and William Jones signed also.

Beard Plummer headed a Milton household at the time of the Second (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 45-plus years, one male aged 26-44 years, two males aged 16-25 years, two females aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, and one female aged 10-15 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joseph Plummer and Peter Gerrish.

Father John Plummer, Esqr, headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 45-plus years, one female aged 45-plus years, one male aged 16-25 years, one female aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, and one female aged 10-15 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Benjan Hayes and Jonathan Heard.

Son Joseph Plumer, Jr., married in Hampton Falls, NH, October 8, 1810, Sally Brown, he of Milton and she of Hampton Falls, NH. Rev. Jacob Abbott performed the ceremony. She was born 1785, daughter of Nathan and Miriam (Smith) Brown.

Joseph Plummer, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, married Sally Brown and the names of their children were Jonathan, Caroline, Enoch W., Bard, Joseph, and Sarah. All were reared on the home farm (Scales, 1914).

Sister-in-law Mrs. Hannah (Bickford) Plumer died in Milton, in February 1811.

Beard Plumer was a Milton selectman in 1811, with William Palmer and John Remick, Jr.

Stepmother Lydia ((Waterhouse) (Colby) Dennett) Plumer died in Rochester, NH, August 4, 1812, aged eighty-four years.

Beard Plummer of Milton received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, November 5, 1813. (He would live to complete only three years of this final five-year term).

Beard Plumer signed the Milton Congregational Society petition of June 1814. His brother Joseph Plumer signed also. (See Milton Congregational Society Petition – 1814).

Father John Plummer died in Rochester, NH, in 1815, aged ninety-six years.

DIED. In Rochester, N.H., Hon. John Plummer, aged 96 years (Columbian Centinel (Boston, MA), November 29, 1815).

Beard Plummer of Milton was elected again as a NH State Senator (for the district that included Milton (District 5)) from June 1816 until his death. He died before he could complete this final term. He had been preceded by Jonas C. March (1764-1820) of Rochester, NH, and would be succeeded by Col. Amos Cogswell (1752-1826), Esq., of Dover, NH.

Due to a volcanic eruption in Asia in the prior year, the year 1816 would be known in New England (and the world) as the infamous “Year Without a Summer.”

The whole face of nature appeared shrouded in gloom. The lamps of heaven kept their orbits, but their light was cheerless. The bosom of the earth on a mid-summer day was covered with a wintry mantle; and man, and beast, and bird, sickened at the prospect. On the 6th of June the snow fell several inches deep, followed by a cold, frosty night, and on the two following days, snow fell and frost continued. On the 11th of July a deep and deadly frost came which killed most vegetables; corn which had the appearance of maturity was destitute of its natural taste or substance; rye was good and supplied the article of bread for the inhabitants (Wadleigh, 1913).

Beard Plumer, Esq., of Milton made his last will in Milton, October 5, 1816. He devised a life estate in a chamber and another room in his new house, along with support, to Achsah Plumer. He devised $100 to his son, Enoch Plummer; $1 to granddaughter Mary Plummer (daughter of deceased son Jonathan Plummer), and an additional $99 when she became eighteen years of age; $500 to daughter Betsy Hall (wife of Joshua G. Hall); $500 to daughter Susanna Plummer, along with $300 worth of neat stock and furniture, and two feather beds and bedding; land in Milton, and a half a pew on the “town floor” of the Milton Meeting-House, to son Joseph Plumer; $600 to son Beard Plumer when he became twenty-one years of age; and a one eighth and one-half share of a one-eighth share of Lot #120 in the Fourth Division (purchased of Joseph Plumer, Jr.), and the use of his “wall pew” in the Milton Meeting-House. He named his two sons, Joseph Plumer and John Plumer, as executors. Joseph Plumer, Ann Nutter, and Levi Jones signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 17:525).

Beard Plummer died in Milton, October 7, 1816, aged sixty-two years.

OBITUARY. In Milton, New Hampshire, Hon. Beard Plumer, aged 62 (Christian Disciple (Boston, MA), November 1816).

His last will was proved in a Strafford County Probate court held at Dover, NH, October 23, 1816 (Strafford County Probate, 17:525). Achsah Plumer, widow of Beard Plumer, Esq., late of Milton, waived her bequest as set out in his will, and requested instead to have her dower assigned to her as if he had died intestate (Strafford County Probate, 17:529).

NEW-HAMPSHIRE. … In the Senate of this State there are of the Legislature, two vacancies, one occasioned by the acceptance of a judiciary appointment by the Hon. B. Badger, and the other by the decease of the Hon. Beard Plumer. These vacancies are likely to occasion some embarrassment in the government of that state. They are required by the constitution to be filled by election by the other House, from the two remaining highest candidates in their several districts. In each of the present cases it is said that the highest remaining candidates are federalists, so that the other House, though democratic, will be under the necessity of supplying the vacancies with federalists, an event which would destroy the predominance of the democratic party in the Senate, and give the federalists a check upon the proceedings. Another report is, that there are no two highest candidates in either distinct, all the votes in each being given to one man, except that two other persons in each district had each one vote (Burlington Gazette (Burlington, VT), December 5, 1816).

Brother John Plumer of Rochester, NH, made his last will, June 20, 1817. He devised $100 to John Plumer Dennett of Portsmouth, NH; $100 to John P. Plumer March, son of the late Jonas C. March, Esq., of Rochester, NH; and all the rest and remainder to his son, John Plumer, 3d, who he also named as executor. John McDuffee, Benjamin Hayes, and Abigail McDuffee witnessed his signature (Strafford County Probate, 32:113). John Plumer Dennett (1785-1867), son of stepbrother Jeremiah Dennett, was a step-grandson and namesake of Judge John Plumer (1719-1815). John Plumer March. (1811-1897), son of Jonas C. and Lydia (Wingate) March, was a grandson of Elizabeth (Plumer) Wingate and great grandson of John Plumer.

Son Beard Plummer, Jr., died in Milton, September 5, 1817, aged twenty years. Son John Plummer [“Jr.”] died in Milton, September 25, 1817, aged twenty-six years.

Daughter Susan Plummer married in Milton, July 25, 1819, Adam Brown, she of Milton and he of Wolfeboro, NH. Levi Jones, Justice-0f-the-Peace, performed the ceremony. Brown was born in Ossipee, NH, January 9, 1793, son of Moses and Lydia (Kimball) Brown.

Son Enoch Plummer died in New Geneva, PA, March 24, 1820, aged thirty-five years.

Brother Joseph Plumer died April 27, 1821, aged sixty-nine years. (For details of his last will see Milton Taverner Levi Jones (1771-1847)).

Brother-in-law Aaron Wingate died in Farmington, NH, in May 1822, aged seventy-eight years.

DIED. In Farmington, N.H., Hon. Aaron Wingate, Judge in the Court of Common Pleas for the County of Strafford, N.H., aged 78 years (Columbian Centinel (Boston, MA), May 9, 1822).

Hon. Aaron Wingate, for many years a member of the legislature, a counsellor from 1797 to 1803, and for sometime chief-justice of the common pleas in Strafford, died here in 1822, aged 78 years (New England Gazetteer, 1839).

Judge Wingate left a worthy family. Madam Wingate survived her husband a number of years (Wyatt, 1854).

Achsah (Page) Plumer married (2nd) in Dunbarton, NH, April 18, 1822, Enoch Coffin, she of Dunbarton, NH, and he of Concord, NH. Rev. Walter Harris, V.D.M.

MARRIAGES. Mrs. Achsah Plummer, widow of Hon. Beard Plummer, married Capt. Enoch Coffin of Concord, N.H., in Dunbarton, N.H. (Columbian Centinel (Boston, MA), May 22, 1822). 

Mother-in-law Elizabeth (Ham) Ham died in October 1822.

Brother John Plumer died in Rochester, NH, in 1824, aged sixty-three years. His last will was proved in Strafford County Probate court, May 17, 1824 (Strafford County Probate, 32:114).

DIED. In Rochester, N.H., John Plumer, aged 63 years (Columbian Centinel (Boston, MA, May 22, 1824).

Son Joseph Plumer of Milton, husbandman, made his last will, June 18, 1825. He devised $1,000, his horse and chaise, and his household furniture, excepting that furniture otherwise devised, to his beloved wife, Sally Plumer. He devised a life estate in a lower front room and chamber in his house to his wife, Sally Plumer, and daughters, Caroline Plumer and Sarah Plumer. He devised his real estate, excepting the rooms mentioned already, to his sons, Enoch W. Plumer and Joseph Plumer, when they reached the age of twenty-one years; and his sawmill right, when they reached the age of twenty years. He devised $3,000 to his second son, Bard Plumer. He devised $1,000 and a featherbed to his eldest daughter, Caroline Plumer, when she either married or reached the age of twenty-one years. He devised all the rest and remainder to his children, Enoch W. Plumer, Joseph Plumer, Bard Plumer, Caroline Plumer, and Sarah Plumer. He named his brother-in-law, Joshua G. Hall, as guardian of his minor children. He named his wife, Sarah Plumer, as executrix. Levi Jones, Levi Wentworth, and Joseph P. Jones signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 34:24).

Son Joseph Plummer died in Milton, January 3, 1826, aged forty-one [or thirty-nine] years. His last will was proved in Strafford County Probate court, January 26, 1826 (Strafford County Probate, 34:26).

DIED. In Milton, on the 3d inst., Mr. Joseph Plumer, son of Hon. Beard Plumer, aged 39. The deceased was one of the most useful and respectable inhabitants of the town. He has left an afflicted wife, a family of young children, and an extensive circle of friends and relations, to lament their loss.

Daughter Susan (Plummer) Brown died in Ossipee, NH, November 15, 1829, aged thirty-five years.

Sister Elizabeth (Plummer) Wingate died in 1841. Achsah ((Page) Plummer) Coffin died in Dunbarton, NH, September 30, 1841.

Daughter-in-law Frances ((Wheat) Plummer) Fitch died in Morgantown, WV, April 18, 1861, aged sixty-eight years. Son-in-law Joshua G. Hall died in Wakefield, NH, November 13, 1862. Daughter-in-law Sally (Brown) Plumer died in Milton, July 25, 1867, aged eighty-two years

Son-in-Law Adam Brown died in Wolfeboro, NH, November 25, 1880.

Daughter Betsy (Plummer) Hall died in Wakefield, NH, August 9, 1885.


References:

Batchellor, Albert S. (1910). Miscellaneous Revolutionary Documents of New Hampshire: Including the Association Test, the Pension Rolls, and Other Important Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MIhQAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA127

Brewster, Charles W. (1878). Rambles about Portsmouth. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=fHIUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA345

Claremont Manufacturing Co. (1851). New Hampshire Register and Farmer’s Almanac. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rgEXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA27

Colson. David. (1991). Descendants of Cornelius Cursonwhit of Dover, New Hampshire. Leesburg, VA: TAL Publications.

Find a Grave. (2012, July 6). Susan Plummer Brown. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/93127926/susan-plummer-brown

Find a Grave. (2013, March 23). Achsah Page Plummer Coffin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/107137685/achsah-plummer_coffin

Find a Grave. (2004, February 19). Frances [Wheat Plummer] Fitch. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/8405152/frances-fitch

Find a Grave. (2020, April 25). John Plumer March. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/209485252/john-plumer-march

Find a Grave. (2014, May 21). Betsey Plumer Hall. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130124830/betsey-hall

Find a Grave. (2021, November 8). Beard Plumer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/233852302/beard-plumer

Find a Grave. (2011, September 30). Enoch Plummer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/77408426/enoch-plummer

Find a Grave. (2010, February 20). Hon. John Plumer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/48404230/john-plumer

Find a Grave. (2010, February 20). John Plumer [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/48404231/john-plumer

Find a Grave. (2021, November 4). Joseph Plumer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/233700428/joseph-plumer

Find a Grave. (2021, November 8). Joseph Plumer [“Jr.”]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/233852590/joseph-plumer

Find a Grave. (2011, February 20). Lydia Waterhouse [Dennett] Plumer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/48404229/lydia-plumer

Find a Grave. (2011, December 29). Joshua Wingate. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/82637471/joshua-wingate

Gilmore, George C. (1899). State Senators 1784-1900: And New Hampshire Men at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=FlLphZGPBVwC&pg=PA22

Hammond, Isaac W. (1886).
Provincial and State Papers: Rolls of the Soldiers in the Revolutionary War, May 1777, to 1780. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=8tlKAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA576

Metcalf, Henry H. & McClintock, John N. (1878, April). Granite Monthly: Hon. Joshua G. Hall. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=L7MVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA321

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA98

NH Secretary of State. (1891). New Hampshire Manual for the General Court with Complete Official Succession. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=0jdAAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA135

NH Supreme Court. (1851). NH Reports: Great Falls Company versus Worster. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=k1ktAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA412

Wadleigh, George. (1913). Notable Events in the History of Dover, New Hampshire: From the First Settlement in 1623 to 1865. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=A3ywiDfSrY8C&pg=PA205

Wikipedia. (2022, January 7). Embargo Act of 1807. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embargo_Act_of_1807

Wikiedia. (2021, December 18). Freshet. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freshet

Wikipedia. (2022, May 6). Year Without a Summer. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Without_a_Summer

Wingate, Charles E.L. (1886). History of the Wingate Family in England and in America. Exeter, NH: James D.P. Wingate

Wyatt, Sophia Hayes. (1854). Autobiography of a Landlady of the Old School. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=GSbjtNCHpIoC&pg=PA72

Milton’s A.O.U.W. Hall – 1890-1925

By Muriel Bristol | July 3, 2022

Milton’s three-story A.O.U.W. Hall was built as both an investment and meeting place by Milton’s Ancient Order of United Workmen (A.O.U.W.) in 1890. The A.O.U.W. was a national fraternal organization (founded in 1868), whose members participated also in its innovative life insurance or death benefit program.

The Milton A.O.U.W. branch would have also a building association from May 1891. This building association would have made building loans and mortgages and occupied thus the niche usually filled by a local bank.

MILTON. Strafford Lodge, No. 2, A.O.U.W., had one new application at their last meeting, and expect to instruct two in the mysteries of the order at the next session (Farmington News, May 23, 1890).

MILTON. Strafford Lodge, A.O.U.W., is well represented in foreign countries this week; the following members being on a fishing trip in Canadian waters: Geo. I. Jordan, W.P. Mitchell, George Wentworth, S. Lyman Hayes and D.V. Osborne (Farmington News, July 4, 1890).

Milton’s Strafford Lodge of the Ancient Order of United Workmen (A.O.U.W.) was incorporated with a capital stock of $4,000, December 13, 1890; and its Building Association was incorporated with a capital stock of $4,000, May 7, 1891 (NH Secretary of State, 1908).

MILTON. The Ancient Order of United workmen have leased a lot of land from the Great Falls Manufacturing company and commenced the foundation of a building, with a frontage of seventy-five feet, on Main street and thirty-five feet deep. This occupies the ground for several years taken up by Duntley’s blacksmith shop and two small buildings owned by John F. Hart, and will be devoted to business and lodge purposes. The plan provides for three stores and a grand entrance on the ground floor, a large hall for dramatics and other entertainments on the second floor, with Lodge room and necessary ante room on the upper floor. The small building used by F.A. Mark as a jeweler’s shop has been moved across the street and now stands on the hill just south of Kennett market. The blacksmith shop is on its journey and will stand partially in the rear of N.G. Pinkham‘s shoe store (Farmington News, October 10, 1890).

Milton - 1892 (Detail) - AOUW HallMILTON. The “Strafford” lodge, A.O.U.W., will dedicate their new hall on Friday evening Jan 23. A dance and supper will be the order of the evening. A general good time is expected.
Don’t forget the A.O.U.W. concert, dance and supper, Friday, 23d (Farmington News, January 23, 1891).

MILTON. The grand opening concert and ball given by Strafford lodge, A.O.U.W., Friday evening, Jan. 23, was an event in this quiet village that will long be pleasantly remembered. Spain’s orchestra of Rochester, furnished music, and the lovers of dancing enjoyed themselves to the utmost until an early hour in the morning. Fred A. Dowe officiated as floor manager with a competent board of assistants, and everything passed smoothly along. Refreshments were served in the dining room all through the evening, so there was no rush and guests and waiters appreciated the foresight in thus arranging. Seventy-five couples were counted on the grand march. Many visitors were present from Farmington, Rochester, East Rochester, Springvale, Milton Mills, Union and other places in the section. The gold watch, contested for by W.T. Wallace and Henry R. Johnson, was won by the latter, he having received $94.75, while his opponent had $71.40. The handsome cake basket presented to the lodge by Mr. Byers of Reading, Mass., was awarded to Mrs. Carrie Willey Kimball, who had $69.45 against $34.20 in the hands of Mrs. F.A. Dowe. In the upper hall various games were in progress, among the younger members of the audience, and every one had a good time. The affair was a financial success as well as a social one, about $400 being returned to the treasury of the lodge (Farmington News, January 30, 1891).

Arthur C. Watson (1865-1957) of North Shapleigh, ME, opened a grocery store within Milton’s A.O.U.W. Hall in 1891. He appeared later as a grocer in Sanford, ME, at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census.

MILTON. Arthur C. Watson, from North Shapleigh, has opened a grocery store in the A.O.U.W. building and has a fine line of family supplies. Gene Maddox has charge of the order department (Farmington News, January 30, 1891).

MILTON. The concert at A.O.U.W. hall, last Friday evening, was a very enjoyable affair and well attended. A snug little sum accrued from it, which is devoted towards payment for the new church organ. Building operations are brisk (Farmington News, June 12, 1891).

U.S. Senator Henry W. Blair (1834-192o) of Manchester, NH, gave an address to the Milton Republican Club in Milton’s A.O.U.W. hall in September 1892 (Farmington News, September 30, 1892). He introduced constitutional amendments favoring prohibition and women’s suffrage, and bills favoring prohibition, pensions, and common school funding.

Andover Academy elocution instructor J. Wesley Churchill, M.A. (1839-1900) of Andover, MA, gave a reading in the A.O.U.W. Hall in October 12, 1892, for the benefit of the Ladies Aid Society of the Milton Congregational Church.

MILTON. A reading is to be given here on Wednesday evening, Oct. 12, at 7.30 o’clock, in A.O.U.W. hall, by Prof. J. Wesley Churchill of Andover, Mass., in behalf of the Ladies Aid society of the Congregational church. Prof. Churchill’s name and fame have travelled all over New England among the very best audiences. Those who have once heard him will spare no effort to hear him here, and those who have not may realize that there is something still in store for them which they had not mistrusted. Admission 25 cents, children under twelve 15 cents (Farmington News, October 7, 1892).

In a similar reading Prof. Churchill had given in Fitchburg, MA, five months earlier in May 1892, he read selections from Victor Hugo, Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe and others. “His selections are serious, imitative and humorous.” He had been accompanied by a vocalist (Fitchburg Sentinel, May 5, 1892).

A Mr. Nash, likely lawyer John B. Nash (1848-1921), of North Conway, NH, spoke to the local Democrats at the A.O.U.W. Hall. This would have been just prior to the Presidential election of November 1892, in which Democrat former President Grover Cleveland prevailed over Republican incumbent President Benjamin Harrison and Populist former Congressman James B. Weaver. (Incumbent President Harrison won in New Hampshire).

MILTON. Mr. Nash of North Conway addressed the democrats at the A.O.U.W. hall last week Thursday (Farmington News, October 21, 1892).

MILTON. Christmas tree at A.O.U.W. hall Saturday evening (Farmington News, December 23, 1892).

AOUW CertificateA.O.U.W. The founding, growth and success of the Ancient Order of United Workmen within the last quarter of a century has added a new feature and given a new interpretation to the social and fraternal relations of mankind and is solving a financial problem which for ages has battled the efforts and investigations of the philanthropist and economist. It has been made plain and demonstrated man’s duty to man brought him in contact with the wants of his fellow beings, opened his heart and purse-strings to the sufferings and deprivations of those less fortunate than himself and discovered and exemplified an easy and sure way for the future care and protection of loved and dependent ones. The St. Louis A.O.U.W. labor bureau since organization has received 1,200 applications for employment and has procured positions for about 700, or nearly 65 per cent of those applying. Texas jurisdiction is making rapid strides in gaining new members and organizing new lodges. Two hundred Winnipeg Workmen, accompanied by the grand master and other grand officers, attended church in a body lately and were headed by a band of music. Ancient Order of United Workmen, organised 1868, not a labor organization, but purely fraternal, paying $2,000 to wife, family or other dependents of members. Membership in the United States over 831,000, representing every profession, trade and business. Total amount paid beneficiaries, over $40,000,000 (Farmington News, August 25, 1893).

A.P. White gave an illustrated lecture on the World’s Columbian Exhibition, which had been held in Chicago, IL, in 1893.

MILTON. Mr. A.P. White’s lecture on the World’s Fair was delivered at the A.O.U.W. hall Saturday evening. With the lecture were displayed 100 stereopticon views (Farmington News, April 13, 1894).

J.E.W. Smith of East Parsonsfield, ME, was almost totally blind for four years from about 1882. Upon recovering his eyesight in 1886, he began giving select and dramatic readings (Bangor Daily Whig and Courier, October 25, 1886). He gave one at Milton’s A.O.U.W. Hall in August 1894.

MILTON. Prof. J.E.W. Smith gave a select reading at A.O.U.W. hall Monday evening (Farmington News, August 10, 1894).

MILTON. The ladies’ circle of the Congregational church hold a fair at the A.O.U.W. Hall Thursday and Friday of this week, afternoon and evening. Very complete preparations have been made and it can not prove anything but a success (Farmington News, December 7, 1894).

Here one may glimpse one the antecedents of the Milton Fire Department as a private fire association having its sixth annual ball at the A.O.U.W. Hall in January 1895. (One might assume that its first annual ball was held in 1889 and that the fire association and its fire company might have predated that first ball).

MILTON. Tri-Echo Fire Association of Milton will give its sixth annual ball at the A.O.U.W. hall, in that place, Friday evening of this week (Farmington News, January 25, 1895).

The Milton Town Report for the year ending March 1, 1897 included payments of $7.00 to W.T. Wallace, A.O.U.W., for town office rent; and $45.08 for a crossing in front of the A.O.U.W. building.

Shoe-cutter Samuel Y. Davis (1859-1920) of Farmington, NH, visited Milton’s A.O.U.W. Hall in his capacity of A.O.U.W. District Deputy in May 1897.

LOCALS. District Deputy Samuel Y. Davis, of the Ancient Order United Workmen, made on official visit to the new lodge at Milton on Wednesday evening of last week (Farmington News, May 28, 1897).

The local Madokawando “Tribe” of the rather unfortunately named Improved Order of Red Men (I.O.R.M. or “Red Men”), and its auxiliary, the Minnewawa “Council” met regularly at the A.O.U.W. Hall on alternating Mondays in 1897.

Madokawando, No. 21, Milton, 1st and 3d Monday, A.O.U.W. Hall; Edwin L. Leighton, P.O. Box [???], Milton.

Minnewawa, No. 15, Milton, 2d and 4th Monday, A.O.U.W. Hall; Mrs. Dora Hayes, P.O. Box 115, Milton (I.O.R.M., 1897). 

The Strafford Lodge, A.O.U.W., appeared in the Milton directory of 1898, as a Milton society. The Milton Town Report for the year ending March 1, 1898 included a payment of $7.00 to the A.O.U.W. for town office rent.

The Milton Social Club held its third annual masquerade ball at the A.O.U.W. hall in Milton, in February 1899 (Boston Globe, February 4, 1899). (See Milton in the News – 1899). The Milton Town Report for the year ending March 1, 1900 included a payment of $7.00 to the A.O.U.W. Association for town office rent.

LOCAL. Mrs. Fred P. Jones gave a fine musical entertainment in A.O.U.W. hall in that town on Monday evening, May 27. Mrs. Grace Coffin and J.G. Coffin of Rochester with B.O. Danforth of West Lebanon (formerly of Cambridge) assisted as vocalist; Miss Annie Kimball, violinist; W.H. Willey, cornetist; Mark Dickey, pianist (Farmington News, May 31, 1901).

MILTON. The memorial exercises last Thursday afternoon, which were held at the A.O.U.W. hall, were largely attended. Rev. C. Osborne, of the Free Baptist church, was president of the day. There were several speakers and appropriate singing. The decorations were the best ever seen here, the work being done by Mrs. J.B. Hart, Mrs. C.H. Looney, and Robert Looney (Farmington News, September 27, 1901).

The Strafford Lodge, A.O.U.W., appeared in the Milton directory of 1902, as a Milton Society.

MILTON. There was a Congregational church fair at the A.O.U.W. hall Wednesday afternoon, and about forty dollars were realized as the result (Farmington News, December 26, 1902).

MILTON. The Relief Corps gave an entertainment at A.O.U.W. hall, Monday evening. Mrs. James E. Hayes, president of the Farmington corps, gave an interesting and inspiring talk. There was prize speaking and Mary Jones of Prospect Hill school, and Robert Peacock of Nute Ridge school received a $5 prize each. There was a piano duet by Miss Bessie Chipman and her teacher, Miss Alice Fox; singing by a girl’s choir led by Mark Dickey. The entertainment was excellent and was largely attended (Farmington News, January 2, 1903).

The Strafford Lodge, A.O.U.W., appeared in the Milton directory of 1904, as a Milton society.

The Milton Dramatic Club gave their second annual masquerade ball at the A.O.U.W. hall in Milton, January 8, 1904 (Boston Globe, January 8, 1904). Shove S. Symonds, a visiting MA A.O.U.W official gave a “smoke talk” at the Strafford Lodge, A.O.U.W. hall in Milton in November 1904 (Boston Globe, November 27, 1904) (See Milton in the News – 1904).

The local Madokawando “Tribe” of the Improved Order of Red Men (I.O.R.M. or “Red Men”), and its auxiliary, the Minnewawa “Council” met regularly at the A.O.U.W. Hall on alternating Mondays in 1906.

Madokawando, No. 21, Milton, 1st and 3d Monday, A.O.U.W. Hall; Chas. A. Gilmore, P.O. Box 112, Milton.

Minnewawa, No. 15, Milton, 2d and 4th Monday, A.O.U.W. Hall; Mrs. Dora Hayes, Milton (I.O.R.M., 1906). 

LOCAL. The members of Milton lodge of Ancient Order of United Workmen expect to worship at Nute chapel, next Sunday forenoon, September 20. Service at 10.45 o’clock. All brethren of the order will be cordially welcomed (Farmington News, September 18, 1908).

The Strafford Lodge, A.O.U.W., appeared in the Milton directory of 1909, as a Milton Society.

ANCIENT ORDER OF UNITED WORKMEN. Strafford lodge of Milton, N.H., will have its officers publicly installed Wednesday evening by District Deputy Perkins of South Wolfboro. William J. Sullivan of the committee on laws will be the speaker (Boston Globe January 17, 1909).

MYSTIC ORDERS. Strafford lodge of Milton, N.H., will have a public installation Wednesday evening, District Deputy Perkins officiating. John J. A’Hearn, PMV, will be the speaker (Boston Globe, January 30, 1910).

The Woman’s Relief Corps, which was the women’s auxiliary of the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) Civil War veterans’ organization, held a benefit supper at the A.O.U.W. Hall in December 1911.

Milton. The Woman’s Relief Corps will hold a baked bean supper, and sale of fancy articles, ice cream, candy and mysteries, in A.O.U.W. hall, Tuesday afternoon and evening, Dec. 12 (Farmington News, December 8, 1911).

The Strafford Lodge, A.O.U.W., appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as a Milton Society.

A 1914 thumbnail biography of Ralph M. Kimball (c1860-1922) of Milton identified him as having been treasurer of Milton’s A.O.U.W. for the past seventeen years, i.e., since circa 1896, and a member also of the local Knights of Pythias (Scales, 1914). His wife, Carrie E. (Willey) Kimball (1867-1949), won a cake basket at an 1891 A.O.U.W. event.

Local. A fine time was enjoyed at the Thanksgiving ball given under the auspices of Charity Temple No. 44, Pythian Sisters, at A.O.U.W. hall, Milton, Tuesday evening of last week. About 75 couples were in attendance. The grand march was led by Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Hodgdon, the next in order being Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Beaton. Music was furnished by the Peerless orchestra of Rochester. A fine supper was served and all in all a good time was enjoyed by everybody. About $64 was cleared, which fund is to be used for the benefit of the new shoe firm which is to locate in Milton. Ralph Whitehouse was the successful contestant in the silver service contest. The committee of arrangements consisted of Mrs. E.A. Hodgdon, Mrs. H.A. Beaton and Mrs. S.G. Blaisdell (Farmington News, December 4, 1914).

Local. Friendship Lodge, No. 72, Knights of Pythias, will hold its sixth annual masquerade ball Tuesday evening February 16, at A.O.U.W. hall in Milton. Charity Temple, Pythian sisters will serve the supper and the Dover Opera House orchestra will furnish music (Farmington News, February 12, 1915).

AOUW-Seal

The Knights of Pythias held a masquerade ball in the A.O.U.W. Hall at Milton in January 1916.

Local. Don’t fail to attend the masquerade ball and concert in A.O.U.W. hall at Milton, under the auspices of Friendship lodge, K. of P., of that town, Friday evening, January 21; music by Dover Opera House orchestra (Farmington News, January 14, 1916).

John W. Avery (1869-1936) appeared in the Milton business directory of 1917, as recording secretary of the Strafford Lodge, A.O.U.W.

Insurance secretary Charles C. Fearing (1868-1951) of Boston, MA, visited Milton’s A.O.U.W. Hall in his capacity of A.O.U.W. Grand Recorder in December 1919.

Ancient Order of United Workmen. Charles C. Fearing, GR, will visit Strafford Lodge of Milton, N.H., Wednesday evening (Boston Globe, [Sunday,] December 14, 1919).

The A.O.U.W Building Association paid $87.50 in State, County, Town and School taxes on its A.O.U.W. Hall building, which was valued at $3,500, in the year ending January 31, 1924.

Grand Master Workman Thomas H. Canning visited a number of local A.O.U.W. lodges in September 1924, including Milton’s Strafford Lodge (Boston Globe, [Sunday,] September 7, 1924). (See Milton in the News – 1924).

The A.O.U.W Building Association paid $70.00 in State, County, Town and School taxes on its A.O.U.W. Hall building, which was valued at $3,500, in the year ending January 31, 1925.

LOCAL. Friends of W.E. Young, proprietor of the chain of Strand theaters in this locality, are congratulating him on his enterprise in purchasing the A.O.U.W. block in Milton. For some time past, Mr. Young has conducted movies in the hall of this building and will continue, while other parts of the building will be used for lodge and commercial purposes (Farmington News, December 11, 1925).

The A.O.U.W Building Association paid $88.20 in total taxes on its A.O.U.W. Hall building, which was valued at $3,500, in the year ending January 31, 1926.

The A.O.U.W. sold the A.O.U.W Hall to promoter Walter E. Young (1888-1956) of Farmington, NH, in December 1925, it had then a second life as the Silver Slipper dance hall and movie theater.

Walter E. Young paid $91.35 in total taxes on the former A.O.U.W. Hall building, which was valued at $3,500, in the year ending January 31, 1927.

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. Strafford ss. Superior Court. February Term, 1926. Respectfully represents the Ancient Order of United Workmen Building Association, Incorporated, of Milton, in said county of Strafford, that on December eighth, 1890, Articles of Agreement therefor were subscribed by Henry R. Johnson, William T. Wallace, Fred B. Roberts, Elmer R. Durgin and Joseph H. Avery, all of said Milton; that said Articles of Agreement were recorded in the office of the clerk of said town of Milton, being the town in which its business was to be carried on, December eleventh 1890, and afterwards, on December thirteenth 1890, in the Office of the Secretary of State of said State of New Hampshire, and the said parties, their associates, successors and assigns did become a voluntary corporation under Chapter 152 of the General Laws of New Hampshire, under the aforesaid name and title; that on February 27th, 1891, said articles of incorporation were amended; and that said amendment and said articles of incorporation, as amended were recorded in the office of the clerk of said town of Milton, its place of business, on March 13th, 1891, and in the office of said Secretary of State on March 17th 1891.
That said corporation was organized for the following purposes: To lease, purchase, hold, sell, convey, mortgage and pledge its real or personal estate, to erect thereon buildings, and to rent and lease any or all portions of said buildings and any part or all lands purchased or leased by said corporation. That there was an authorized capital stock of $4,000, divided into four hundred shares of the par value of ten dollars; and that there are now issued and outstanding 204 shares of such stock.
That said corporation under its articles of original agreement and under such articles as amended, has continuously carried on its business at said Milton.
That said corporation did secure leases and rights to land, and that it did thereon erect and construct a large three story wooden block for commercial and other purposes, and that it has continuously carried on its business of renting and leasing such structure.
That at a special meeting of said corporation, duly called for such purpose, and held on November 28th, 1925, at 7.30 o’clock in the evening, and at which meeting there were represented 176 shares of the capital stock of the corporation, it was unanimously voted:
First: To sell its building and to authorize its president and treasurer to make due conveyance to the purchaser or purchasers.
Second: That the Ancient Order of United Workmen Building Association be dissolved; that the president and treasurer of said association take all necessary steps to carry this into effect; and that the assets of said association be divided among its stockholders on the basis of stock held. That said corporation in pursuance of said vote, did sell and convey its said building; and now that its assets consist wholly of cash on deposit in Banks and Trust Companies.
Said corporation especially avers, that it has no outstanding claims or indebtedness against it; that the business of said corporation should be concluded; that its assets should be paid to the stockholders on the basis of the shares of stock held, and that said corporation should be dissolved in accordance with the vote of dissolution aforesaid.
Wherefore it is Prayed: That said corporation may be dissolved, that its assets may be decreed to be paid to its stockholders on the basis of shares of stock held; and for such other decrees and relief as may be just, Ancient Order of United Workmen Building Association. By Ira W. Jones, President, and By Fred B. Roberts, Treasurer.
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE Strafford, ss. Superior Court. February term, 1923. The foregoing petition having been filed in the office of the Clerk of the Superior Court on the fifteenth day of February 1926, it is ordered, that said petitioners notify the creditors and all other persons interested therein to appear at a session of said Court to be holden at Dover, in said County of Strafford on the twenty second day of March 1926, and answer said petition by causing a true and attested copy of said Petition and this order thereon to be published in the Farmington News, a newspaper printed at Farmington, in said County of Strafford, it being the newspaper published nearest the location of said Ancient Order of United Workmen Building Association, three successive weeks, at intervals of not less than seven days, the last publication to be at least fourteen days prior to said twenty second day of March, 1926. February 15, 1926. William H. Roberts, Clerk.
The foregoing is a true copy of Petition for Dissolution of Corporation, and of the order of notice thereon. Attest: William H. Roberts, Clerk
(Farmington News, February 19, 1926).


Milton’s A.O.U.W. Hall was occupied next by Milton’s Silver Slipper Dance Hall – 1925-1948


References:

Find a Grave. (2020, August 18). John W. Avery. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/214558616/john-w-avery

Find a Grave. (2010, October 6). John Wesley Churchill. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/59692497/john-wesley-churchill

Find a Grave. (2016, December 5). Samuel Young Davis. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/173506327/samuel-young-davis

Find a Grave. (2011, June 24). Charles Cushing Fearing. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/71901104/charles-cushing-fearing

Find a Grave. (2012, October 27). Arthur C. Watson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/99677932/arthur-c-watson

Find a Grave. (2016, October 16). George Edward Willey. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/171347155/george-edward-willey

Find a Grave. (2014, November 24). Walter Eugene Young. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/139179254/walter-eugene-young

I.O.R.M. (1897). Record of the Great Council of the United States of the Improved Order of Red Men. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=YfBEAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA355

I.O.R.M. (1906). Record of the Great Council of the United States of the Improved Order of Red Men. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ivNEAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA501

NH Secretary of State. (1908). Reports. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Ww2rLP3LxToC&pg=RA2-PA79

Wikipedia. (2021, September 21). Ancient Order of United Workmen. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Order_of_United_Workmen

Wikipedia. (2022, June 10). World’s Columbian Exhibition. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World%27s_Columbian_Exposition

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