Milton Mills’ Miltonia Mill – 1872-14

By Muriel Bristol | July 26, 2020

The Miltonia Mills were built by Henry H. Townsend in 1872. Operations were begun in 1873, Mr. Townsend and his partner, Mr. S.H. Atkins, carrying on the manufacture of felt under the firm name of Townsend & Co. Felt was the output of the mill up to the year 1881, when it was replaced by blankets, and the plant called the Miltonia Mills. The mill with the new factory and additions make up the plant. Mr. Henry Townsend died June 25, 1904, and was succeeded by his son, Mr. John E. Townsend, the present owner. Sixty-five hands are employed, and the industry has grown to extensive proportions (Scales, 1914).

Henry Herbert Townsend – 1872-1904

Henry Herbert Townsend was born in Dorchester, MA, August 12, 1842, son of John and Jane M. (Townsend) Townsend.

Henry Herbert Townsend of Milton, NH, aged seventeen years, graduated from Philips Exeter Academy, in Exeter, NH, with its Class of 1858.

Henry H. Townsend of Milton Mills appeared in a list of First and Second year students at the New Hampton Literary & Biblical Institution, in New Hampton, NH, in 1858 and 1859. (Charles B. Brackett, also of Milton Mills, appeared in the same lists). He appeared also in a list of Middle and Junior year students at the New Hampton Theological School, in 1860. (Charles A. Cutts, also of Milton Mills, and William H. Coffin of West Lebanon, Me., appeared in the same list).

John Townsend, a woolen manufacturer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza A. Townsend, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Jane R. Townsend, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Caroline F. Townsend, aged twenty years (b. NH), Henry H. Townsend, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Ermina [Emma] M. Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Willie B. Townsend, aged ten years (b. NH), and Frank A. Townsend, aged five years (b. NH). John Townsend had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $8,000. His neighbor was [his younger brother,] Joseph Townsend, a woolen manufacturer, aged thirty-seven years (b. England).

John Townsend, a merchant, aged fifty-five years (b. England), headed a Brookline, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) Massachusetts State Census. His household included his wife, Eliza Townsend, aged forty-two years (b. Milton, ME), Jane R. Townsend, aged twenty-nine years (b. Dorchester), Caroline L. Townsend, aged twenty-five years (b. Dorchester), Henry H. Townsend, a clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. Dorchester), Emma M. Townsend, aged nineteen years (b. Milton, N.H.), William B. Townsend, aged fourteen years (b. Milton, N.H.), Frank A. Townsend, aged ten years (b. Milton, N.H.), and Flora G. Townsend, aged two years (b. Milton, N.H.), and [his servant,] Mary Welsh, aged twenty years (b. Ireland).

John Townsend was a principal owner and treasurer of the Littleton Woolen Company of Littleton, NH, between 1865 and 1869. Henry H. Townsend worked there first as a clerk and later as the superintendent.

John Townsend was treasurer, and Leland, Allen & Bates selling agents, while Henry H. Townsend, a son of the treasurer, became superintendent. In 1869 Jordan, Marsh & Co. purchased controlling interest and Capt. William H. Stevens became and agent (Jackson, 1905).

Henry H. Townsend married in Milton, June 7, 1870, Agnes J. Brierley, he of Boston and she of Milton, NH. She was born in Lowell, MA, May 17, 1844, daughter of Edward and Margaret M. (Thompson) Brierley. (See also Milton Mills’ Brierley Mill – c1864-18). He was a merchant, aged twenty-seven years; she was aged twenty-six years. Rev. N.D. Adams of Union, NH, performed the ceremony. (This record appeared also in Boston vital records).

Victorian Table Cloth-Piano Cover
Victorian Table Cloth / Piano Cover

H.H. Townsend appeared in the Milton directories of 1873, 1874, and 1875, as a manufacturer of table covers, or table and piano covers.

Henry H. Townsend, of Milton Mills, NH, filed for a U.S. Patent (#137,638), January 17, 1873, for his invention of “Presses for Printing Fabrics.” R.H. Eddy and S.N. Piper signed as his witnesses (U.S. Patent Office, January 1873). Robert H. Eddy was a Boston patent solicitor, the first in fact, and civil engineer. S.N. Piper, was a mechanical expert, who worked with him (American Publishing, 1889).

A soap salesman interviewed Henry Townsend in Milton Mills, in or around 1877, and “sold him,” i.e., convinced him to place an industrial soap order. Soap is used in the fulling process.

Townsend & Co. appeared in the Milton directories of 1876, 1877, 1880, 1881, and 1882, as manufacturers of table and piano covers. The “company” of Townsend & Co included now his brother-in-law, Sullivan H. Atkins, as his partner.

Sullivan Holman Atkins was born in Canaan, ME, February 14, 1837, son of Thomas and Lucinda (Fairbanks) Atkins. He married (1st) in Somersworth, NH, April 30, 1857, Frances Wilkins. She was born in Waterford, ME, June 18, 1838, daughter of William K. and Lorena (Lovejoy) Wilkins. She died in Berwick, ME, January 26, 1865, aged twenty-six years.

Atkins appeared in the Boston directory of 1867, as a partner in the woolen firm of Atkins, Remick & Brackett, with its offices at 47 Summer street, and his home at Somerville, MA.

Sullivan H. Atkins married (2nd) in Brookline, MA, December 25, 1865, Jane R. “Jennie” Townsend, he of Great Falls, i.e., Somersworth, NH, and she of Brookline, MA. He was a merchant, aged thirty years and she was aged twenty-nine years. She was born in Dorchester, MA, in 1836, daughter of John and Jane M. (Townsend) Townsend (and elder sister of Henry H. Townsend). She died of consumption, i.e., tuberculosis, in Holyoke, MA, June 23, 1869, aged thirty-two years.

Sullivan H. Atkins married (3rd) in Boston, MA, May 14, 1870, Sarah A. “Abby” Ricker, he of Boston and she of Great Falls, i.e., Somersworth, NH. He was a salesman, aged thirty-four years, and she was aged twenty-five years. She was born in Great Falls. NH, circa 1845, daughter of Stephen and Sarah Ricker.

Sullivan Atkins, a dry goods clerk, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included his [third] wife, Abbie Atkins, keeps house, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and his daughter, Winnie Atkins, at school, aged eight years (b. NH). Sullivan Atkins had personal estate valued at $2,000.

Sullivan H. Atkins, of Melrose, MA, filed for a U.S. Patent (#136,636), in April 1873, for his invention of “Water-Proof Furze Fabrics.” His invention was intended to line overshoes, boots, horse blankets, carriage robes, and various other purposes. The same Robert H. Eddy that served as patent solicitor for Henry H. Townsend signed as his witnesses, along with J.R. Snow (U.S. Patent Office, March 1873).

Sullivan H. Atkins and Luther Harris were elected as Milton’s state representatives in March 1876 (Boston Post, March 15, 1876).

Townsend & Company’s woolen felt factory suspended production for a time in early 1878.

TELEGRAPHIC NOTES. Townsend & Co., at Milton Mills, N.H., have suspended, throwing 30 hands out of employment (St. Albans Daily Messenger,  January 3, 1878).

Sullivan H. Atkins, a felt manufacturer, aged forty-five years (b. ME), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his [third] wife, Sarah A. Atkins, keeping house, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), his children, Winnifred Atkins, at house, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Mary E. Atkins, at house, aged six years (b. NH), and George K. Atkins, at house, aged four years (b. NH), and his sister, Emma J. Atkins, at house, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME).

Henry H. Townsend bought out Sullivan H. Atkins’ share in Townsend & Company in 1880. (The partnership name continued to appear in Milton business directories for several years). Sullivan H. Atkins remained in the area for a time. He went on to become a Baptist minister (Pastor, Emmanuel Baptist Church in West Roxbury, MA, in 1905). He died in Melrose, MA, May 5, 1918, aged eighty-one years.

Alton. Mr. Sullivan Atkins, of Milton Mills, preached at the Baptist church Sunday forenoon and lectured on temperance in the evening. Mr. Atkins is a very forcible speaker and handled the great question without gloves. He believes in being radically right and has little confidence in lukewarm work. He dealt out some heavy blows to the tobacco users that made the chewing deacons and the smoking church members, as well as the sinner who indulges in the pernicious habit, squirm in their seats. Ich Dien (Farmington News, February 5, 1886).

(“Ich Dien” is German for “I Serve,” which has been the motto of the English royal heir since the Battle of Crecy (1346). Whether it relates somehow to the article or is a pseudonym for its author is not entirely clear).

Henry H. Townsend, a woolen manufacturer (felt), aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Agnes J. Townsend, keeps house, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), and his children, John E. Townsend, at school, aged eight years (b. NH), and Grace M. Townsend, at house, aged six years (b. NH).

Davis & Furber Wool Carding Machine - 1880
Davis & Furber Wool Carding Machine – 1880

It would later be said that Henry H. Townsend “met with reverses” in this period, but overcame them honestly, paying in full his obligations. It was about this time also that he began to manufacture blankets, as well as his previous line of table and piano covers.

TRADE EMBARASSMENTS. NEW HAMPSHIRE. MILTON MILLS. Henry H. Townsend, flannel manufacturer, assigned. He claimed about $20,000 in mills, machinery, etc. (Bradstreet, 1884). 

H.H. Townsend appeared in the Milton directories of 1884, 1887, 1889, 1892 [John Townsend], 1894, 1898, 1901, and 1904, as a manufacturer of woolen goods.

Henry H. Townsend, who had 2 sets of cards in his Milton Mills factory, endorsed a circular letter or petition opposing removal or reduction of wool tariffs, in July 1885 (National Association of Wool Manufacturers, 1885). (The nearby Waumbeck Co., who had 10 sets of cards in its Milton Mills factory, also endorsed).

Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Townsend of Milton Mills, NH, were guests at the Bay View hotel in Wells, ME, in late July 1888 (Boston Globe, July 29, 1888).

Hy. H. Townsend was agent in 1888 for the East Lake Mills, a Milton Mills woolen blanket manufacturer, with 3 sets of cards and 16 looms. (“East Lake Mills” might be thought to have been the name of Townsend’s mill prior to its being named “Miltonia Mills”).

Miltonina Mills Adv Card-Walbridge
Card Insert from a Miltonia Mills Blanket

Milton Mills experienced a contentious shoe factory strike in 1889. (The strike took place against the Varney & Lane company, who had taken over the former Brierley Mill). Townsend’s brother-in-law, Edward J Brierley, who was then a dry goods merchant, spoke in favor of the strikers.

Henry H. Townsend represented Milton Mills on a citizens’ committee formed in 1890 to promote construction of a railroad branch line between Wakefield, NH’s Union station and Portland, ME. It would have been tremendously beneficial for his mill to have a railroad connection.

MILTON MILLS. There is a scheme now in progress to run a connecting branch line of railroad, tapping the Boston & Maine near Union, passing through Milton Mills, Horne’s Mills, this state, Acton, North Shapleigh, Newfield, Limerick and Cornish, Me., to the Portland and Ogdensburg. This will be about thirty-five miles long, through some of the best country in Maine and Eastern New Hampshire. Opening up thirteen fine water privileges and several large ponds with excellent facilities for ice cutting. A committee of five has been chosen, one from each town, to solicit subscriptions for the survey, $1,000 being required or $200 from each town benefited. The following well-known citizens comprise this committee: Milton Mills, H.H. Townsend; Acton, E.J. Brierly; Shapleigh, Edward Hargraves; Limerick, Luther Moore, and Newfield, George Hannaford. The spirit prompting this enterprise is of the right kind; New England men applying their energy and push to “booming” New England towns, instead of going “West,” as advised by the late Horace Greeley, cannot fail to reap a bright reward in the near future (Farmington News, March 21, 1890).

Despite the enterprising spirit, energy and push mentioned, construction of this proposed branch line never took place.

H.H. Townsend of Milton Mills, NH, was a guest at the American House hotel in Boston, MA, in early October 1891 (Boston Globe, October 9, 1891).

Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend died December 26, 1891, aged forty-seven years.

MACHINERY WANTS. The East Lake mills, Milton Mills, N.H., are expected to put in new cards and machinery (Fibre & Fabric, January 16, 1892).

Henry H. Townsend, of Milton Mills, was a guest at the Kearsarge House hotel in North Conway, NH, in August 1894 (Boston Globe, August 5, 1894). Henry H. Townsend (and the estate of his late father, John Townsend,) appeared in the Boston directories of 1894 through 1906, as having an office at Room 223 in the John Hancock Mutual Insurance Company building, at 178 Devonshire street in Boston, MA, with his house at Milton, NH.

Henry H. Townsend, a woolen manufacturer, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. He was a widower, residing alone.

NEWS OF THE STATE. Charles Johnson of Hollis and Fred Googins of Sanford, Me., are in Milton Mills where they are building a brick wheel house and mixing room for H.H. Townsend. They will also build foundations for an engine and dynamo for the same party. In all they will lay about two hundred thousand bricks (Farmington News, July 19, 1901).

Wool Manfrs. NEW HAMPSHIRE. MILTON MILLS, Stafford, Co. (S.E.) Pop. 680. Stage. Union (4m), RR107. Townsend, H.H. Miltonia Mill, Blankets, 3 Sets Cards, 21 Broad Looms, 720 Sp., Dye and Finish. 1 Boiler, 2 W.W. Thos. Kelly & Co., N.Y., Boston and Chicago, S. Agts. (Davison, 1901).

Henry H. Townsend died in Milton Mills, June 25, 1904, aged sixty-one years, ten months, and thirteen days.

DEATHS. TOWNSEND – In Milton Mills, N.H., June 25. Henry H. Townsend, 62 yrs. Funeral at Milton Mills, N.H., Wednesday, June 29, at 2 p.m.. Relatives and friends invited to attend without further notice (Boston Globe, June 27, 1904).

Knowles Fancy LoomHENRY H. TOWNSEND. Mr. Henry H. Townsend of Milton Mills, N.H., who died there recently was born at Dorchester, Mass., on August 12, 1842. He commenced his career in the business world as book-keeper for the Littleton, N.H., woolen mills and in 1871 he began manufacturing felt at Milton Mills, N.H. In 1882 he started to manufacture blankets in a small way, gradually increasing the capacity of the concern until it is now one of the best-equipped mills in New England, although not very large. It consists of three sets of cards, 24 Knowles fancy looms and an output or 225 to 250 pairs per day. Mr. Townsend met with reverses in his business earlier in life, but overcame them honestly, paying in full his obligations, and has been very successful in later years. He commenced to learn the woolen business in his father’s mill when not attending school, and, in fact, he was always around the mill from boyhood. Mr. Townsend was a very charitable man in his way, never seeking notoriety as to his bequests and never turning away those who were needy or worthy. He continued in active business until a few weeks prior to his decease (American Textile Reporter, 1904).

Deaths. Henry H. Townsend of Milton Mills, N.H., died recently. In the early seventies he formed á copartnership and commenced the manufacture felt goods for the rubber trade, etc. Later he built a new mill and began weaving blankets. This mill has since been enlarged and refitted with the most modern and up-to-date machinery and considered one of the best equipped mills in state. Mr. Townsend will be very much missed, not only by his only family, but by a very wide circle of friends and by his employees (Lord & Nagle, 1904).

Henry H. Townsend of Milton had signed his last will in Milton, September 26, 1895. Elbridge W. Fox, Everett F. Fox, and George S. Lovering signed as witnesses. The will was proved in Dover, NH, in late July 1904 (Strafford County Probate, 124:76). E.W. Fox appeared in the Milton Mills directory of 1894 as a conveyancer, i.e., someone who wrote up deeds, bills of sale, and, apparently, wills. His son, E.F. Fox kept a Milton Mills furniture store. George S. Lovering was a peddler and traveling salesman, who lived on Church street in Milton Mills.

John Edward Townsend – 1904-1914

Townsend Mill
Townsend’s Mill, Milton Mills, N.H.

John E. Townsend was born in Milton Mills, September 9, 1872, son of Henry H. and Agnes J. (Brierley) Townsend.

John E. Townsend was educated at Milton Mills and Lindsey University, Me. He afterward entered his father’s office and continued therein until the latter’s death. He then took charge and operated the mill until 1906, when he bought the plant of the estate and conducts the mill along the line of fine blanket manufacturing, affording constant employment to sixty-five men. As superintendents he has men well-known for their efficiency, including F.H. Simms, A.T. Loud, J.F. Archbold and E.A. Wentworth. This mill is classed as a 4-set mill and is equipped with electricity, the plant site covering two acres (Scales, 1914).

F.H. Simes of Milton Mills, NH, received a U.S. patent for a loom invention in late 1901 (Boston Globe, January 4, 1902). F.H. Simes, a woolen mill weaver, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Mary A. [(Smith)] Simes, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and his boarder, Ethel Birch, a woolen mill weaver, aged twenty years (b. ME). F.H. Simes owned their house, free-and-clear. Mary A. Simes was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living. Frederick H. Simes (1868-1953) was mill superintendent in 1920 and 1930.

Archie T. Lowd, a woolen mill finisher, aged forty years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Clara M. [(Page)] Lowd, aged forty years (b. NH), his children, Albert P. Lowd, aged eight years (b. ME), and Marion P. Lowd, aged two years (b. ME), and his mother, Sarah E. [(Tasker)] Lowd, a widow, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH). Archie T. Lowd owned their farm, free-and-clear. Clara M. Lowd was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Archie Tasker Lowd (1870-1930) was boss finisher in 1920.

John Frank Archibald (1852-1924) appeared in the Milton directory of 1900, as boss carder at the woolen mill, with his house at 92 Main street, Milton Mills. John F. Archibald, a wool carder, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills Village”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Hannah [(Greenleaf)] Archibald, aged forty-five years (b. NH), and his daughter, Emma Archibald, a shoe closer-on, aged nineteen years (b. NH). John F. Archibald rented their house. Hannah Archibald was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. He was a packer in 1910 and foreman in 1920.

Edgar A. Wentworth (1856-1932). Edgar A. Wentworth, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his [second] wife (of nineteen years), Cora [(Lord)] Wentworth, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), and his daughter, Dora Wentworth, aged seventeen years (b. NH). Edgar A. Wentworth owned their farm, free-and-clear. Cora Lowd was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Mr. Townsend married Miss Eda B. Loud, a daughter of Elbridge and Melissa Loud of Acton, Me., and they have two children: Henry A., attends the Brunswick School at Greenwich, Conn., and Agnes M., who is a student at Brookline, Mass. In politics a Republican Mr. Townsend was elected in 1903 a member of the New Hampshire legislature. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and belongs also to the Odd Fellows at Milton Mills. The handsome family residence is on the corner of Western avenue and Church street, Milton Mills (Scales, 1914).

John E. Townsend married in Milton, January 28, 1896, Eda B. Lowd, he of Milton, and she of Acton, ME. He was a clerk, aged twenty-four years, and she was a milliner, aged twenty-four years. Rev. R.L. Sheaff, of Wakefield, NH, performed the ceremony. She was born in Acton, ME, 1870, daughter of Elbridge and Melissa M. (Buck) Lowd.

In an 1897 Boston Globe article extolling the wonders of Great East Lake as a fishing destination, John Townsend’s steam-powered launch was mentioned.

There are two steam launches on the pond. One of these belongs to the Goodall camp. and the other is owned by John Townsend of Milton Mills (Boston Globe, August 29 1897).

John E. Townsend, a woolen mill superintendent, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of four years), Eda B. Townsend, aged thirty years (b. ME), and his children, Henry A. Townsend, aged two years (b. NH), and Agnes M. Townsend, aged zero years (b. NH, May). John E. Townsend owned their house, free-and-clear. Eda B. Townsend was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

John E. Townsend and Dr. Jeremiah S. Elkins advertised for someone knowledgeable in photography in 1902. They appear to have been amateur photographers seeking some professional advice. (Other interpretations are possible).

The Henry H. Townsend Estate appeared in the Milton directory of 1905-06 as a Milton Mills manufacturer of woolen goods. John E. Townsend appeared in the Milton directories of 1909 and 1912, as a Milton Mills manufacturer of woolen goods.

White Auto - 1905
White Steam Car Advertisement, 1905

John E. Townsend was among the first to have an automobile in Milton Mills, and in the state. He had initially a 10-horsepower White Sewing Machine Company steam automobile, registered with license plate #204 (Blanchard, 1905). In the following year his registration / license plate was #1055, likely reflecting a change in vehicle. By 1909 he had a 45-horsepower Nordyke & Marmon company gasoline automobile, registered as #3100, as well as a 40-horsepower Overland gasoline automobile, registered as #4600. His cousin (and brother-in-law), John C. Townsend, was also a motorist. (See also Milton Automobiles in 1906-07 and Milton Automobiles in 1909-10).

MACHINERY WANTED AND FOR SALE. FOR SALE. 2 Davis & Furber Mules, 240 Spindles, 1¾-inch gauge. In good condition, may be seen at work. 3-11 Roll Cleveland Condensers, one nearly new. JOHN E. TOWNSEND, Milton Mills, N.H. (American Textile Reporter, 1908).

Milton Mills, N.H. The blanket mill closed recently for a few days for repairs to the boiler and to give the employes a day off to attend the Rochester fair (Fibre & Fabric, October 2, 1909).

Some later Miltonia Mills advertisements promoted Admiral Peary’s use of their blankets on his polar expeditions. (Peary claimed to have reached the North Pole in 1909).

MILTON MILLS, Stafford Co. (S.E.) Pop. 1,600. Stage, Union (4m), RR47. Townsend, John E. Miltonia Mill. Blankets. 3 Sets Cards. 28 broad Looms. 720 Sp. Dye and Finish. 1 Boiler. 2 W.W. Electric Power. Employ 65. Thos. Kelly & Co. N.Y. and Boston, S. Agts. (Davison, 1910).

John E. Townsend’s fur-lined coat was stolen from his stable office in Milton Mills in February 1910. He traveled to Fresno, CA, in March 1910. (It would have taken the better part of a week to get there by train).

PERSONAL MENTION. J.E. Townsend of Milton Mills, New Hampshire, is at the Sequoia [Hotel] (Fresno Morning Republican (Fresno, CA), April 8, 1910).

John E. Townsend, a woolen blankets manufacturer, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton Mills”) household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Eda B. Townsend, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), and his children, Henry A. Townsend, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Agnes M. Townsend, aged ten years (b. NH). John E. Townsend owned their house, free-and-clear.

Richard Edward Brierley married in the First Methodist Church in Rochester, NH, October 26, 1910, Gertrude Alberta Ricker, he of Fitchburg, MA, and she of Rochester. John E. Townsend of Milton Mills, who was Brierley’s cousin, was an usher at the ceremony (Boston Globe, October 27, 1910).

HELP WANTED. WANTED. One or two families of weavers. One loom work. White warp and filling. Low rents. MILTONIA BLANKET MILLS, Milton Mills, N.H. (Fibre & Fabric, April 15, 1911).

Enlargements and Improvements. New Hampshire, Milton Mills. A new engine for the blanket mill of John E. Townsend has been received. As noted several weeks ago the mill has been running only part of the time on account of low water in the mill pond (McGraw-Hill, 1911).

TOWNSEND, JOHN E. (MILTONIA MILL.) Milton Mills, N.H. Production and Equipment: Blankets; 3 sets of cards; 28 wide looms; 720 mule spindles; 1 boiler, 2 water wheels; electric power. Dye and finish. Employ 65 (Bennett, 1912).

John E. Townsend died in Milton Mills, September 8, 1914, aged forty-two years, eleven months, and thirty days.

John E. Townsend Dead. MILTON MILL, N.H, Sept 9 – John E. Townsend, a prominent blanket manufacturer died yesterday after a long illness. He leaves a wife, son and daughter (Boston Globe, September 9, 1914).

DEATHS. TOWNSEND – In Milton Mills, N.H., Sept. 8, John E. Townsend, in his 43d year. Funeral Saturday, Sept. 12, at 2 P.M. (Boston Globe, September 10, 1914).

Eda B. (Lowd) Townsend died in Haverhill, MA, February 2, 1932.

To be continued.


See also Milton Mills Mfg. Co. & the Waumbeck Companies – 1837-98 and Milton Mills’ Brierley Mill – c1864-18.


References:

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Youtube. (2015, July 12). Bemidji Woolen Mills Carding Machine. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hVwpGxM5Aw

Youtube. (2016, June 7). Crompton & Knowles Power Loom Running. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IicxSu9rHro

Youtube. (2011, October 20). Spinning Mule. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=RczuXg5nhMI

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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