West Milton Manufacturer John E. Goodwin (1820-1893)

By Muriel Bristol | December 4, 2022

John Elkins Goodwin was born in Middleton, NH, September 14, 1820, son of Deacon Joseph and Anna (Hanson) Goodwin. (Joseph and Anna Goodwin would be in 1827 two of the ten founding members of Milton’s Christian Church, in which Joseph Goodwin would be a deacon).

Joseph Goodwin headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Anna (Hanson) Goodwin], and three males aged 15-19 years [John E. Goodwin, Shepard K. Goodwin, and Charles H. Goodwin]. Four members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

John E. Goodwin married (1st), probably in West Milton, September 14, 1844, Leah Hayes Wentworth. She was born in Milton, June 7, 1826, daughter of Joseph C. and Tryphena R. (Burnham) Wentworth.

Son Henry Clayton Goodwin, was born in Milton, May 14, 1846. (He seemed also to be known, at least initially, as Joseph Henry Goodwin or Joseph Henry Clayton Goodwin). Daughter Leah Helen Goodwin was born in Milton, September 18, 1848.

Milton - 1856 (Detail) - GoodwinvilleJohn E. Goodwin and his younger brother, Charles H. Goodwin, opened a shoe manufactory in the Goodwinville area of West Milton in the mid to late 1840s.

MILTON. Among the early manufacturers of shoes in this town were John E. Goodwin & Co., at West Milton, who gave employment to 25 or 30 hands in cutting and putting up stock, to be fitted and bottomed by the people of the town (NH Bureau of Labor, 1896)).

It seems unlikely that Goodwinville had the ability to run water-powered machinery. This description aligns with accounts of older hand methods. Their staff of 25-30 hands were employed to cut out the various shoe components from leather. Then those shoe components might be distributed to local households for assembly into shoes on a piece-work basis. This would have been a welcome part-time sort of job for agricultural workers, especially during any “down” periods, such as wintertime.

Leah H. (Wentworth) Goodwin died September 22, 1848.

John E. Goodwin married (2nd) in Milton, March 11, 1849, Eliza Hayes, both of Milton. Rev. James Doldt performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, July 23, 1825, daughter of Ichabod and Sarah “Sally” (Card) Hayes.

Brother Charles H. Goodwin married in Milton, September 8, 1849, Susan E. Wentworth, both of Milton. Rev. J.T. Colby performed the ceremony. She was born in Milton, June 13, 1832, daughter of Joseph C. and Tryphena R. (Burnham) Wentworth. (She was a sister of the late Leah H. (Wentworth) Goodwin).

At West Milton, formerly called Goodwinville, John E. and Chas. Goodwin built and operated a shoe factory which soon made that village a prosperous place. After the business had been carried on with success for a dozen or fifteen years, the factory was closed, John E. Goodwin going to Dover to take charge of a factory there, and Charles to become a traveling salesman for a Boston firm (Mitchell-Cony, 1908). 

John E. Goodwin, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eliza [(Hayes)] Goodwin, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Joseph H. Goodwin, aged three years (b. NH), and Leah H. Goodwin, aged two years (b. NH). John E. Goodwin had real estate valued at $3,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles H. Goodwin, a trader, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and Shepherd Goodwin, a shoemaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). (The household of his brother, Daniel B. Goodwin, a blacksmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), appeared higher up on the same page; and that of his father, Joseph Goodwin, a blacksmith, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), appeared lower down on the same page).

John E. Goodwin received an initial five-year appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, July 5, 1850. (Charles C. Hayes was also appointed that same day).

Daughter Laura May Goodwin was born May 26, 1851. Daughter Alice Eliza Goodwin was born in Milton, March 19, 1853.

John E. Goodwin and another twenty-one Milton inhabitants petitioned the NH legislature in July 1855, seeking removal of then Strafford County Sheriff, George W. Brasbridge (1784-1856) of Somersworth, NH. The Milton petition was only one of seven similar petitions seeking this Sheriff’s removal (NH General Court, 1855). Many other NH county officials, especially judges and sheriffs, were singled out for removal too. One might suppose it had something to do with their enforcement of the controversial Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. The officials petitioned against were possibly Democrats or pro-slavery Whigs. (See also Milton and Abolitionism).

Milton’s NH state representatives for the 1855-56 biennium were Eli Wentworth and David Wallingford. On Thursday, July 12, 1855, a majority of 169 NH State Representatives (71.9%), including Rep. David Wallingford, voted to concur with a NH State Senate vote to remove Sheriff Brasbridge from office. A minority of 66 NH State Representatives (28.1%), including Rep. Eli Wentworth, voted not to concur in removing Sheriff Brasbridge (NH House, 1855).

The Whig party was then in its death throes. An American or Native-American party – known also as the “Know-Nothing” party, due to its semi-secret nature – was one of the political entities that sought to fill the vacuum left by the collapse of the Whigs. The “Know-Nothings” were opposed to slavery, and proponents of women’s rights, temperance, increased government regulation, and inflationary government spending. But they are associated often with their opposition to immigration, especially any non-Protestant immigration. (The tide of largely Irish Catholic famine immigrants in the east and Chinese immigrants in the west was then flowing).

“Know-Nothings” had won 51% of NH state elections of November 1854. (But the Brasbridge removal proportion of 71.9% was greater than that “Know-Nothing” proportion alone).

An anti-“Know-Nothing” Washington editor characterized the NH legislative majority of 1855-56 as a “miserable, shameless faction”:

We feel some repugnance to allude to the general character and conduct of the New Hampshire legislature during its recent session. It was such a legislature as that noble little State never had before, and we are satisfied never will have again. She has had the misfortune, with many other northern States, to fall temporarily into the hands of a miserable, shameless faction, which the great majority of her people at this day both condemn and despise, and are only anxious to prove to the world how heartily they have repented of their political folly at their last election. We have neither the space nor the disposition to review the proceedings of this legislature during its recent session, much as it offers for useful comment; but the passage from its history imbodied in the “list of acts, resolutions, and addresses passed June session, 1855,” may serve to show not only what is the spirit, the elevation of purpose, the patriotism of know-nothing legislatures, but also how false is the allegation of the recent Commissioner of the Land Office. By the list above referred to, and which we give below, it will be seen that the legislature have adopted addresses for the removal of more than twenty officers, including judges, sheriffs, and others, whose term of service had not expired, and would not expire in many instances for years, and none of whom could be removed from office but by the extraordinary method of address – a proceeding so unusual and so unparalleled that no officers have thereby, except for incompetency, been removed in that State since the “reign of terror” in 1813, when many democrats – and among them Governor Benjamin Pierce, father of the present Chief Magistrate of the United States – were “addressed” out of office by the then federal legislature for their bold and persistent advocacy and defence of the principles which brought about, and the men who carried on, that second war of independence (Washington Union (Washington, DC), July 21, 1855).

A new anti-slavery Republican party was rising also at this time. Its initial adherents were an assemblage of former Whigs, Free-Soilers, Liberty party adherents, anti-slavery Democrats, and others, and would include even some admixture from the short-lived “Know-Nothing” party. The Republican party’s first presidential candidate, in November 1856, would be Sen. John C. Fremont, of California. (Their second presidential candidate, in November 1860, would be Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois).

Son John Fremont Goodwin was born in West Milton, January 12, 1857. (He was likely a namesake for Sen. John C. Fremont, of California).

Milton sent John E. Goodwin and Daniel E. Palmer to the NH House of Representatives for the 1859-60 biennium.

John E. Goodwin received a renewal of his five-year appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 27, 1860.

Goodwin, John E.John E. Goodwin, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“West Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Eliza [(Hayes)] Goodwin, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), J.H. [Joseph H.] Goodwin, aged fourteen years (b. NH), L.H. [Leah H.] Goodwin, aged twelve years (b. NH), L.M. [Laura M.] Goodwin, aged nine years (b. NH), A.B. [Alice E.] Goodwin, aged seven years (b. NH), and J.F. [John F.] Goodwin, aged three years (b. NH). John E. Goodwin had real estate valued at $7,000 and personal estate valued at $5,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of George F. Nute, a shoe cutter, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and his brother, Daniel B. Goodwin, a farmer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH).

C.H. Goodwin, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“West Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Susan E. [(Wentworth)] Goodwin, aged twenty-five years. and Abba A. Goodwin, aged six years (b. NH). Charles H. Goodwin had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $600. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of [his brother,] George W. Goodwin, a merchant, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and a vacant house.

Daughter Eliza Hayes Goodwin was born and died in Milton, October 15, 1861. Her mother, Eliza (Hayes) Goodwin, died in Milton on that same day, October 15, 1861.

John E. Goodwin married (3rd) in Concord, NH, May 7, 1862, Pamelia N. (Davis) Pinkham, he of Milton and she of Concord, NH. He was a shoemaker, aged forty-one years, and she was aged thirty-three years. Rev. E.E. Cummings performed the ceremony. Mrs. Pinkham was born in Alton, NH, in 1829, daughter of Rev. Jacob and Lois (Kelley) Davis. (Her first husband, James H. Pinkham, had died of consumption in Milton, December 21, 1853, aged twenty-nine years, five months).

John E. Goodwin of Milton paid $9.96 as a 3% tax on 430 pairs of shoes (valued at $332) for the month of December in the US Excise Tax of 1862. (See also Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1862).

John E. Goodwin of Milton paid $20.63 as a 3% tax on 15 cases of shoes (valued at $687) for the month of January in the US Excise Tax of 1863. He paid $130.68 as a 3% tax on 4,440 pairs of shoes (valued at $4,356) in April 1863. He paid $66.23 as a 3% tax on 2,652 pairs of shoes (valued at $2,207.80) in June 1863.

John E. Goodwin of Milton, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty-two years (b. NH) registered for the Class II military draft in June 1863. Brother Charles H. Goodwin of Farmington, NH, registered there June 30, 1863.

John E. Goodwin of Milton paid $83.97 as a 3% tax on 3,050 pairs of shoes (valued at $2,799) for the month of August in the US Excise Tax of 1863. He paid $64.89 as a 3% tax on 35 cases of shoes (valued at $2,163) in November 1863. (See also Milton’s US Excise Tax of 1863).

John E. Goodwin & Co. transferred its shoe operations from Goodwinville in West Milton to Dover, NH, in the latter part of 1863. They had access perhaps to water power there or, at least, access to a larger labor pool.

The major shop locations [in Dover, NH,] were at the corners of Chestnut and Third, Chestnut and Fourth, Chestnut and Lincoln, Chestnut and Sixth, and 10 Grove Street. And like the Hayes Brothers, most of the men who ran these shops: John H. Hurd, John E. Goodwin, Alvah Moulton, Jonathan Bradley, Ira W. Nute, and E.C. Kinnear came here from Farmington (Dover Heritage Group, 1993).

John E. Goodwin & Co. of Dover, NH, paid $43.98 as a 3% tax on 1,500 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,466) for the month of January in the US Excise Tax of 1864. The firm paid $67.53 as a 3% tax on 2,520 pairs of shoes (valued at $2,251) in February 1864. It paid $82.47 as a 3% tax on 2,868 pairs of shoes (valued at $2,749) in March 1864.

John E. Goodwin & Co. paid $119.16 as a 3% tax on 3,768 pairs of shoes (valued at $3,972) in April 1864. The firm paid a $10 tax for a manufacturer’s license, in May 1864. Goodwin paid a $1 tax on his carriage (valued at $75), in May 1864. John E. Goodwin & Co. of Dover, NH, paid $218.64 as a 3% tax on 4,968 pairs of shoes (valued at $7,288) in June 1864. (See also Milton’s US Excise Tax of May 1864).

John E. Goodwin & Co. of Dover, NH, paid $492.65 as a 5% tax on 6,432 pairs of shoes (valued at $9,853) for the month of September in the US Excise Tax of 1864. The firm paid $69.05 as a 5% tax on 1,020 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,381) in September 1864. It paid $76.15 as a 5% tax on 1,320 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,523) in October 1864. It paid $59.90 as a 5% tax on 1,176 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,198) in December 1864.

Goodwin, J.E. & Co. - 1865John E. Goodwin & Co. (John S. Wheeler) appeared in the Dover, NH, directory of 1865, as shoe manufacturers in Pray’s building on Fourth Street, with John E. Goodwin having his house on St. John street, at its corner with Charles street. His partner, John S. Wheeler (1835-1909), boarded at Rev. J.F.G. Colby’s, on Brick street. (Wheeler would marry in Dover, June 12, 1866, Mary Emma Frost, he of Newmarket, NH, and she of Dover, NH).

Then, just around the middle of the 19th century, a new industry took hold in this part of Dover: shoe manufacturing. Up until this time, a boot or shoe was made throughout by one person who precisely measured the food of his customer: length, width around heel, ankle, and instep, around joints at toes “making allowances for corns and bunions” and then hunted through his pile of lasts for one the right length. Then the shoemaker glued on the pieces of leather till it made the exact shape of the foot. The cordwainer’s trade, often promoted door-to-door with whole families “footed out” at a time, ended in Dover in 1865 when John Goodwin and John S. Wheeler introduced steam-powered machinery at their shoe shop on Fourth Street: equipment that “could cut soles as rapidly as a dozen men could do by hand” (Dover Heritage Group, 1993).

John E. Goodwin & Co. of Dover, NH, paid $454.60 as a 5% tax on 6,768 pairs of shoes (valued at $9,092) for the month of February in the US Excise Tax of 1865. The firm paid $101.76 as a 6% tax on 1,476 pairs of shoes (valued at $1,696) in April 1865. It paid 307.92 as a 6% tax on 4,776 pairs of shoes (valued at $5,132) in June 1865. It paid $329.22 as a 6% tax on 4,788 pairs of shoes (valued at $5,487) in July 1865.

John E. Goodwin of Dover, NH, paid a $1 tax on his carriage (valued at $75), a $1 tax on his watch (valued at $75), and $17.55 as a 5% tax on his personal income of $351.00 in the US Excise Tax of August 1865.

John E. Goodwin & Co. paid $508.20 as a 6% tax on 7,908 pairs of shoes (valued at $8,470) for the month of August in the US Excise Tax of 1865. The firm paid $881.34 as a 6% tax on 14,689 pairs of shoes in November 1865. It paid $1,096.20 as a 6% tax on 9,900 pairs of shoes (valued at $18,270) in December 1865.

(Note the price increase of a pair of shoes, from 77¢ in December 1862 to a high of $1.35 in September 1864. The U.S. Treasury note (or “Greenback”) of 1862-63 was an inflationary “fiat” currency, i.e., backed by nothing, and its value fluctuated with sentiment regarding the war. Confederate paper currency (or “Grayback”) would collapse completely. Note also that the manufacturers’ excise taxes rose over the same period, doubling in fact, from 3% to 6%).

Brother-in-law William Hays, a shoemaker, aged forty-six years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA State Census. His household included Lucy L. [(Crawford)] Hays, aged forty-two years (b. NH), [his two nieces:] Laura M. Goodwin, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Alice E. Goodwin, aged twelve years (b. NH), William Wosten, a shoemaker, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), Mira Wosten, aged twenty-eight years (b. MA), Eunice Coy, aged thirty years (b. ME), Caroline E. Austin, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), William H. Crawford, an engineer, aged thirty years (b. NH), Jefferson Hays, a shoemaker, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and Maria Stewart, aged twenty-two years (b. NH).

John E. Goodwin and Joseph D. Guppy were Dover Ward 2 aldermen in 1866. There were seven alderman in all and Mayor Joshua G. Hall (City of Dover, 1866)).

John E. Goodwin of Dover, NH, paid a $2 tax on his piano, a $1 tax on his watch, and $131.90 as a 5% tax on his personal income of $2,638.00 in the US Excise Tax of May 1866.

Daughter [Leah] Helen Goodwin married in Dover, NH, May 7, 1867, William Brown Dennis, both of Dover, NH. He was a clerk, aged twenty-three years, and she was aged nineteen years. Rev. I.D. Stewart performed the ceremony. Dennis was born in Dover, NH, May 18, 1844, son of Samuel and Lydia N. (Varney) Dennis.

John E. Goodwin received an initial five-year appointment as a Dover, NH, justice-of-the-peace, January 3, 1868.

Father Joseph Goodwin died in Milton, March 13, 1868, aged eighty-five years.

Peace Jublilee - BT690611Mrs. John E. Goodwin was a soprano singer in the Dover Choral Union in 1869. Her choral group traveled to Boston, MA, to perform in the National Peace Jubilee and Great Music Festival, which was held there for five days beginning June 15, 1869 (Gilmore, 1871). There were hundreds of performers with an audience of tens of thousands in attendance.

John E. Goodwin, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty-seven years, headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Pamelia [((Davis) Pinkham)] Goodwin, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), Henry Goodwin, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Alice Goodwin, attending school, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Fremont Goodwin, attending school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Erie Pinkham, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Lovey Ricker, teaching school, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH).

William B. Dennis, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), headed a Lynn, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included L. Helen [(Goodwin)] Dennis, keeping house, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Joseph H. Dennis, at home, aged two years (b. NH), Gideon Dennis, no occupation, aged forty-six years (b. RI), Lydia N. [(Varney)] Dennis, no occupation, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), and M. Lizzie French, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-two years (b. MA). They lived in a two-family dwelling with the household of N.H.P. Ireson, a bookkeeper, aged fifty-two years (b. MA).

William Hayes, works in shoe factory, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lucy L. [(Crawford)] Hayes, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), Laura L. Goodwin, works in shoe factory, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Richard Hayes, a school teacher, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and Jefferson Hayes, operates pegging machine, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH). William Hayes had real estate valued at $4,000 and personal estate valued at $300. (William Hayes was the maternal uncle of Laura M. Goodwin).

Charles Goodwin, a wholesale shoe store salesman, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA. household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan [(Wentworth)] Goodwin, keeping house, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), Abbie A. Goodwin, at school, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Tryphonia [(Burnham)] Wentworth, at home, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH). They shared a two-family residence with the household of Josiah Vinton, a drill-maker, aged forty-six years (b. ME).

John E. Goodwin & Co.’s Dover shoe factory burned down in the early hours of Tuesday, November 1, 1870.

DESTRUCTIVE FIRE IN DOVER, N.H. – John E. Goodwin’s large shoe manufactory at Dover, N.H., was discovered on fire about half-past two o’clock yesterday morning and was totally destroyed, with its contents. The fire next caught a smaller shoe factory occupied by the same firm, which was also burned. The old Catholic church was next burned, and a building occupied by C.E. & S.C. Hayes. From the old church the fire caught the new Catholic church now building, and the priest’s residence, which were also burned. The high wind carried the cinders a long distance and roofs of buildings were repeatedly on fire. Had it not been for the rain on Tuesday the fire would have been much more disastrous. Goodwin & Co. were insured for $27,000 on their stock. The building was owned by Benjamin Pray and was insured for $4,000. There was no insurance on the churches (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), November 2, 1870).

Son Henry C. Goodwin married, June 25, 1872, Emma M. Horne. She was born in Dover, NH, in 1845, daughter of Dr. Jeremiah and Harriet (Chamberlin) Horne.

John E. Goodwin received a renewal of his five-year appointment as a Dover, NH, justice-of-the-peace, January 3, 1873. (In the column for his next renewal, which would have been in January 1878, there was instead a notation of “Mass.,” i.e., he was ineligible for a renewal as he had moved to Massachusetts at some time prior to 1878).

Mother Annie (Hanson) Goodwin died of pneumonia in Milton, March 20, 1875, aged eighty-seven years, ten months, and four days. (There is a question mark next to the “75” of 1875 on the death certificate).

Daughter Alice E. Goodwin married in North Brookfield, MA, September 4, 1878, Gilbert Thornton Webber, Jr., both of North Brookfield, MA. He was a tinsmith, aged thirty-six years, and she was aged twenty-five years. He was born in Chelsea, MA, March 3, 1842, son of Gilbert T. and Julia A. (Boothby) Webber. His previous wife, Amanda (Hudson) Webber had died in 1871.

Son John F. Goodwin married (1st) in Dover, NH, October 26, 1879, Vienna Belle Sanborn, he of North Brookfield, MA, and she of Dover, NH. He was a merchant, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged eighteen years. Rev. George B. Spaulding performed the ceremony. She was born in Pittsfield, NH, September 23, 1861, daughter of Charles H. and Vienna M. (Prescott) Sanborn.

John E. Goodwin, works in shoe factory, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a North Brookfield, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Pamelia N. [((Davis) Pinkham)] Goodwin, keeping house, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), his son, John F. Goodwin, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his daughter-in-law, V. Belle [(Sanborn)] Goodwin, at home, aged eighteen years (b. NH).

Henry C. Goodwin, an apothecary, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma M. [(Horne)] Goodwin, keeps house, aged thirty-four years (b. MA), his children, Maria B. Goodwin, aged six years (b. NH), Alice E. Goodwin, aged eleven months (b. NH), his father-in-law, Jeremiah Horne, a physician, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), his mother-in-law, Harriet [(Chamberlin)] Horne, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his brother-in-law, Frederick E. Horne, a clerk in store, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). They resided on Nelson Street.

William B. Dennis, a fancy goods dealer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Helen L. [(Goodwin)] Dennis, keeping house, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Joseph H. Dennis, at home, aged twelve years (b. NH), James S. Dennis, at home, aged seven years (b. NH), William V. Dennis, at home, aged eight months (b. MA), and his domestic [servant], Kate Boyle, does housework, aged eighteen years (b. NY). They resided on Maple Street.

Wm. Hayes, works in shoe factory, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucy L. [(Crawford)] Hayes, keeping house, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), his niece, Laura Goodwin, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), and his lodgers, Eunice Coy, works in shoe factory, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), and James Whepley, a farm laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. New Brunswick).

Gilbert T. Webber, a tinsmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. MA), headed a North Brookfield, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Alice E. [(Goodwin)] Webber, keeping house, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and Jennie I. Webber, at school, aged eleven years (b. MA). They lived in a two-family dwelling with the household of Enoch H. Jones, works in shoe factory, aged forty-four years (b. NH).

Chas. H. Goodwin, a commercial traveler, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and his wife, Susan E. [(Wentworth)], aged forty-six years (b. NH), were two of the ten boarders in the Somerville, MA, household of Nathaniel Millikin, a R.R. freight clerk, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census.

Son-in-law William B. Dennis died of rheumatism in Dover, NH, January 24, 1883, aged thirty-eight years. He had been a merchant.

TOWN TALK. Mrs. Geo. W. Boyden of Dover, N.H., and Mrs. John E. Goodwin of North Brookfield, Mass., are guests of Mr. and Mrs. M.G. Day (Vermont Tribune (Ludlow, VT), August 14, 1885).

A business publication published a sketch of son Henry C. Goodwin and his pharmacist’s shop in Dover, NH, in 1887.

Henry C. Goodwin, Pharmacist and Stationer, No. 1 Bracewell Building, Central Street, corner First. – This house was established by its present proprietor in 1874, and is included among the finer class of pharmacies in this city. The store is spacious in size, admirably fitted up, and replete with everything required to constitute a first-class drug and prescription establishment. The extensive and well-selected stock embraces a full line of pure drugs, chemicals and medicines, toilet and nursery articles, fancy goods and school books, confectionery and cigars, soda and mineral waters, and a carefully assorted stock of such patent or proprietary medicines as are known to possess virtues and curative properties devoid of deleterious or injurious elements. Mr. Goodwin also makes a line of preparations that are highly prized by his patrons and have a large sale, among which are sarsaparilla, tooth powder, all-healing ointment, anti-bilious bitters, kidney and liver medicine, stomach bitters, Lewis’ cholera cordial, cough mixture, etc., etc. The compounding of physicians’ prescriptions and family recipes receives that careful and intelligent professional attention which their important character so imperatively demands, and accuracy and precision invariably prevail in every department of the business. Mr. Goodwin is a native of Milton, N.H., and an accomplished pharmacist and a reliable and trustworthy business man (Intl. Pub. Co., 1887).

Son Henry C. Goodwin removed his pharmacy business to Malden, MA, circa 1890.

BOSTON. In Malden the aldermen have concluded to grant licenses to these druggists: Levi W. Rockwell, M.G. Croscombie, Henry C. Goodwin, Walter P. Sheldon, John J. McCarthy, J. Inglis Street, J.R. Colby, W.F. Weld, C.A. Charles, Albert B. Morgan, Winslow B. Southworth Jesse W. Sargent, Daniel W. Kelly and N.G. Cofran. Other licenses will soon be granted (Pharmaceutical Era, May 15, 1891).

John E. Goodwin of Malden, MA, made his last will, August 18, 1892. He devised $200 to his wife, Pamelia N. Goodwin for her immediate use. He bequeathed $25 to his son, Henry C. Goodwin; $25 to Eri W. Pinkham; $300 to daughter Leah Hellen Dennis; $200 to daughter Laura May Goodwin; $25 to daughter Alice E. Webber; and $500 and his gold watch to son John Freemont Goodwin. He bequeathed all the rest and residue to Gilbert T. Webber of North Brookfield, MA, Edward L. Goodwin of Boston, MA, and John Fremont Goodwin of Malden, MA, as a trust for the comfortable support and maintenance of his widow during her natural life. He devised his furniture to his widow, with the proviso that she should pass such as she did not want to his children. He devised one-fourth of his original estate, if any be remaining after her decease, to the Freewill Baptist Home and Missionary Society, and the other three-fourths to his son, John Fremont Goodwin. He appointed Gilbert T. Webber, Edward L. Goodwin, and John Fremont Goodwin as joint executors. Robert C. Fanning, Horace D. Gove, and Jesse M. Gove signed as witnesses (Strafford County Probate, 104:428).

(Edward L. Goodwin (1839-1922) was a son of brother Daniel B. Goodwin); Eri W. Pinkham (1848-1904) was a son of Pamelia N. ((Davis) Pinkham) Goodwin).

John E. Goodwin died of heart disease in Malden, MA, May 29, 1893, aged seventy-two years, eight months, and seventeen days. He had been a shoe manufacturer, who had been born in Middleton, NH, son of Joseph and Annie (Hanson) Goodwin.

The last will of John E. Goodwin was proved in Middlesex County Probate court, July 11, 1893 (Middlesex County Probate, 531:442).

Daughter-in-law Vienna Belle (Sanborn) Goodwin died of septicemia in Malden, MA, September 6, 1893, aged thirty-one years, eleven months, and fourteen days. She had been born in Pittsfield, NH, daughter of Charles H. and Vienna (Prescott) Sanborn.

MALDEN. Henry C. Goodwin of Clifton is visiting at his old home in Rochester, N.H. (Boston Globe, September 3, 1895).

Son John F. Goodwin married (2nd) in Malden, MA, December 25, 1895, Grace C. Richards, both of Malden, MA. He was a clerk, aged thirty-seven years, and she was aged twenty-six years. Rev. Benjamin H. Bailey performed the ceremony. She was born in Melrose, MA, March 5, 1869, daughter of Charles E. and Elizabeth A. “Lizzie” (Dearborn) Richards.

Goodwin-Richards. MALDEN, Dec 25. Miss Grace C. Richards, a well-known young woman of this city, and Mr. John P. Goodwin of Boston were married this noon at the home of Mrs. S.O. Dearborn, on Pleasant st., by Rev. B. Bailey, pastor of the Unitarian church of this city, in the presence of the immediate friends and relatives of the bride and groom (Boston Globe, December 26, 1895).

Reed, John - BG980309Henry C. Goodwin of Malden, MA, was impaneled as a Middlesex County juror in a larceny fraud case against John Reed, the so-called “King of the Bunco Men,” in March 1898.

The Jury which was impanelled with the greatest care, was composed as follows: Hiram F. Bean of Hudson, Edward J. Ryan of Marlboro, Nelson W. Jenny of Lexington, Henry B. Badger of Reading, Edwin A. Bennet of Burlington, Edwin A. Brown of Belmont, Edward E. Chapman of Medford, Henry C. Goodwin of Malden, George T. Freeman of Arlington, George F. Heeland of Dracut, Harry C. Whlttemore of Cambridge, and Charles A. Sherburn of Tyngsboro (Boston Evening Transcript, March 8, 1898).

Reed was convicted and sentenced to not less than four years and not more than five years in prison. Other sentences would be added to his total. He would escape from custody in Worcester, MA, October 30, 1898, while being transported, and would resurface later in London, England.

Daughter Alice E. [(Goodwin)] Webber, of North Brookfield, MA, was selected to be a delegate to the Women’s Relief Corps National Encampment in Philadelphia, PA, in September 1899 (Boston Globe, February 26, 1899).

Henry C. Goodwin, a druggist, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Emma [(Horne)] Goodwin, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), his children, Maria B. Goodwin, a teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Elizabeth Goodwin, aged twenty years (b. NH), his [step-] mother, Amelia M. [((Davis) Pinkham)] Goodwin, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), and his boarders, Minna Parker, a bank clerk, aged thirty-nine years (b. Japan), and Marjorie G. Parker, at school, aged eight years (b. MA). Henry C. Goodwin owned their house at 207 Clifton Street. Emma Goodwin was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living. Amelia M. Goodwin was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living; and Minna Parker was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living.

Leah H. [(Goodwin)] Dennis, a fancy goods dealer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Samuel J. Dennis, a teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH). Leah H. Dennis owed their farm on Horne Street. She was the mother of six children, of whom five were still living.

William Hayes, aged eighty-two years, headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-four years), Lucy L. [(Crawford)] Hayes, aged seventy-seven years, and his niece, Laura M. Goodwin, a shoe factory stitcher, aged forty-nine years (b. NH). William Hayes owned their house at 17 Hancock Street, free-and-clear. Lucy L. Hayes was the mother of no children.

Gilbert T. Webber, a tinsmith, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a North Brookfield, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Alice E. [(Goodwin)] Webber, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), Frank G. Webber, at school, aged eighteen years (b. MA), Paul T. Webber, at school, aged twelve years (b. MA), and Alice E. Webber, at school, aged nine years (b. MA). Gilbert T. Webber owned their house on Gilbert Street, free-and-clear. Alice E. Goodwin was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

John F. Goodwin, an express agent, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of four years), Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, aged thirty-one years (b. MA), and his daughter, Annie M. Goodwin, aged sixteen years (b. MA). John F. Goodwin rented their house at 40 Gould Street.

Frederick G. Nickerson, a R.R. auditor, aged forty-four years (b. MA), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-one years), Abbie A. [(Goodwin)] Nickerson, a music teacher, aged forty-six years (b. NH), his daughter, Florence A. Nickerson, aged twenty years (b. MA), his boarders, Charles H. Goodwin, insurance, aged seventy-five years (b. MA [SIC]), [his wife of fifty years,] Susan E. [(Wentworth)] Goodwin, aged sixty-six years (b. MA [SIC]), and his servant, Katie Waldron, aged twenty-four years (b. Ireland). Frederick G. Nickerson rented their house at 29 Spring Street. Abbie A. Nickerson and Susan E. Wentworth were each the mother of one child, each of whom was still living.

Brother Charles H. Goodwin died of old age in Malden, MA, May 25, 1904, aged seventy-nine years, eight months, and fourteen days. He had been a retired merchant.

Pamelia N. ((Davis) Pinkham) Goodwin died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Malden, MA, October 11, 1904, aged seventy-five years, six months, and twenty-three days. She had been born in Alton, NH, daughter of Rev. Jacob and Flois (Kelley) Davis. Her step-son, Henry C. Goodwin, supplied the personal information.

Mrs. Pamelia N. Goodwin, widow of John E. Goodwin of Malden, died yesterday at the home of her son, Henry C. Goodwin, in the seventy-sixth year of her age. She was a native of Alton, N.H., and the daughter of Rev. Jacob Davis of Gilmanton (Boston Evening Transcript, October 12, 1904).

Sister-in-law Lucy L. (Crawford) Hayes died of old age in her home at 17 Hancock Street in Stoneham, MA, February 28, 1905, aged eighty-three years, seven months, and sixteen days.

Brother-in-law William Hayes died of apoplexy in his home at 17 Hancock Street in Stoneham, MA, February 5, 1908, aged eighty-nine years, ten months, and twenty-five days.

DEATHS. HAYES. – At Stoneham, Feb 5, William Hayes, 89 yrs., 10 mos., 25 dys. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 P.M., at late home, No. 17 Hancock street, Stoneham, Mass. Friends are invited. Kindly omit flowers. Train from North Station at 1.13 P.M. (Boston Evening Transcript, February 7, 1908).

(Their house at 17 Hancock Street in Stoneham, MA, passed to his niece, Laura M. Goodwin).

Henry C. Goodwin, a retail druggist, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Emma M [(Horne)] Goodwin, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), and his daughter, Maria B. Goodwin, a school teacher, aged thirty-six years (b. NH). Henry C. Goodwin owned their house at 207 Clifton Street, with a mortgage. Emma Goodwin was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

John A. Dennis, a glass works clerk, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Union, PA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of five years), Mary Dennis, aged thirty-four years (b. PA), Helen Dennis, aged four years (b. PA), John A. Dennis, Jr., aged four months (b. PA), his mother, Leah H. [(Goodwin)] Dennis, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), and his servant, Mary Mckinney, a housework servant, aged sixty-four years (b. PA). John A. Dennis rented their house on Monongahela River Road. Mary Dennis was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Laura M. Goodwin, a candy store saleslady, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. She owned her house at 17 Hancock Street, free-and-clear.

Gilbert T. Webber, a plumber, aged sixty-eight years (b. MA), headed a North Brookfield, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-one years), Alice E. [(Goodwin)] Webber, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and Ethel A. Webber, aged eighteen years (b. MA). Gilbert T. Webber owned their house on Gilbert Street, free-and-clear. Alice E. Goodwin was the mother of three children, of whom three were still living.

John F. Goodwin, a storage house storekeeper, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Pittsburgh, PA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of fourteen years), Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, aged forty-one years (b. MA). John F. Goodwin rented their portion of a two-family residence at 12 Hemlock Street.

Son-in-law Gilbert T. Webber died in North Brookfield, MA, April 11, 1917.

Daughter Leah H. (Goodwin) Dennis died in Washington, DC, May 31, 1917.

DIED. Dennis – Leah Helen Dennis died at the home of her son, Samuel James, 6937 Georgia Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., June 1st, 1917. Her remains were taken to Dover, New Hampshire, and laid beside those of her husband, William Brown Dennis, who died in 1883. She is survived by four sons, Samuel James, of Washington, D.C.; William Varney, of Moorestown, N.J.; Lindley Hoag, of Harrisburg, Pa.; and John Alfred, of San Dimas, California. A devoted Christian mother and loyal member of the Dover Monthly Meeting for fifty years (The American Friend (Richmond, IN), January 21, 1917).

Henry C. Goodwin, a drug store salesman, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma [(Horne)] Goodwin, aged seventy-four years (b. NH), and his aunt, Mary Bangs, aged eighty-three years (b. NH). Henry C. Goodwin rented their house at 141 Clifton Street.

Laura M. Goodwin, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Stoneham, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Laura M. Goodwin owned her house at 17 Hancock Street, free-and-clear.

John F. Goodwin, a printing shop shipper, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, aged fifty years (b. MA). John F. Goodwin rented their house at 18 Savin Hill Avenue.

Son Henry C. Goodwin died in Malden, MA, January 13, 1920, aged seventy-three years.

MALDEN. Funeral services for Henry C. Goodwin, a well-known druggist, will be held tomorrow afternoon at the home of the family, 141 Clifton st. He was 73 years old, a native of Milton, N.H., and had lived here 30 years. He was a member of the First Congregational Church and the Schubert Club (Boston Globe, January 15, 1920).

Mary Bangs died of accidental gas asphyxiation in the home of her step-niece, Emma (Horne) Goodwin, November 8, 1920, aged eighty-three years. She was a younger sister of Dr. Jeremiah Horne’s first wife, Maria (Bangs) Horne.

MALDEN. Miss Mary Bangs was found dead from gas asphyxiation yesterday at the home of her niece, Mrs. Henry C. Goodwin, 141 Clifton st., was 83 years old, a native of Dover, and had lived here the past three years. Death was accidental (Boston Globe, November 9, 1920).

Nephew (and co-executor) Edward L. Goodwin died in Roslindale, MA, January 14, 1922.

DEATHS. GOODWIN – In Roslindale, Jan. 14, Edward L., husband of Jane T. Goodwin. Services at residence, 6 Tappan st., Tuesday, at 1 p.m. Relatives and friends invited. Farmington, N.H., papers please copy (Boston Globe, January 16, 1922).

Sister-in-law Susan E. (Wentworth) Goodwin died in Malden, MA, April 22, 1929, aged ninety-six years.

Daughter Laura May Goodwin died in Stoneham, MA, May 1, 1929, aged seventy-seven years.

MRS. [MISS] LAURA M. GOODWIN. STONEHAM, May 1 – Miss Laura M. Goodwin, a resident of Stoneham since 1861, died today at the home of Mrs. Ada DeMariano, 112 Hancock st. Miss Goodwin was born in West Milton, N.H., in 1851. She was a member of the Eastern Star and of Evergreen Rebekah Lodge. A sister, Mrs. Alice E. Webber of Springfield, and a brother, J.S. [J.F.] Goodwin of Brighton, survive her. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at the home of C.E. Bockus, 17 Hancock st. (Boston Globe, May 1, 1929).

Emma [(Horne)] Goodwin, a widow, aged eighty-four years (b. MA), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. She owned her house on Clifton Street, which was valued at $6,500.

John F. Goodwin, a printery elevator operator, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-four years), Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, aged sixty-one years (b. MA). John F. Goodwin rented their portion of a two-family residence at 22 Allston Street, for $25 per month. They had a radio set.

Daughter-in-law Emma M. (Horne) Goodwin died in a fall in Malden, MA, November 29, 1935, aged ninety years.

FALL DOWN STAIRS KILLS MALDEN WOMAN, AGE 90. MALDEN, Nov 29. Mrs. Emma M. Goodwin, 90 years old, was killed late this afternoon when she fell down the cellar stairs at her home, 141 Clifton st. She was found by her daughter, Mrs. Frederick R. Perry, with whom she lived, when Mrs. Perry returncd home about 5 o’clock. Dr. Leo J. Lynch, who was called, said she had suffered a fractured skull and had been dead about two hours (Boston Globe, November 30, 1935).

Son John F. Goodwin died in Boston, MA, December 26, 1937 (given as 1938 on gravestone).

Death Notices. GOODWIN – In Dorchester, Dec. 26, John F. Goodwin, of 38 Mount Vernon st. Services at the Burroughs’ Funeral Home, 21 Virginia st., Uphams Corner, on Wednesday, Dec. 29, at 2 o’clock (Boston Globe, December 27, 1937).

Andrew R. Pomeroy, a retail milk owner, aged fifty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Longmeadow, MA, household at the time of the (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ethel A. [(Webber)] Pomeroy, a housewife, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), his children. Edward R. Pomeroy, a public-school teacher, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), and Richard W. Pomeroy, aged eighteen years (b. MA), and his mother-in-law, [Alice] Elizah [(Goodwin)] Webber, aged eighty-seven years (b. NH). Andrew R. Pomeroy owned their house at 1195 Longmeadow Street, which was valued at $7,500.

Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, a widow, aged seventy-one years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the (1940) Federal Census. She rented her apartment at 11 Everett Avenue. She had resided in the “same place,” i.e., Boston, MA, in 1935.

Daughter Alice E. (Goodwin) Webber died in Longmeadow, MA, in 1941.

Grace R. [(Richards)] Goodwin, a widow, aged eighty-one years (b. NH [SIC]), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the (1950) Federal Census. She rented her apartment at 41 Rockland Street.

Daughter-in-law Grace R. (Richards) Goodwin died in 1953.


References:

City of Dover. (1866). Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Dover. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=LWkvAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA11-PA55

Dover Heritage Group. (1993). 1993 Heritage Walking Tour. Retrieved from www.dover.nh.gov/government/city-operations/library/research-learn/Heritage-Walking-Tours/1993-heritage-walking-tour/

Find a Grave. (2008, August 29). Leah Helen Goodwin Dennis. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/29398622/leah-helen-dennis

Find a Grave. (2020, January 5). Charles H. Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/205974618/charles-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2020, January 5). Henry Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/205974050/henry-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2008, March 3). John Elkins Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/25013298/john-elkins-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2008, August 25). John Fremont Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/29287167/john-fremont-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2021, December 16). Laura M. Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/234959644/laura-m-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2008, Augusr 25). Pamelia N. Davis Pinkham Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/29287220/pamelia-n-pinkham-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2015, April 29). William Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/145760462/william-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, November 1). Eri W. Pinkham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/138151762/eri-w.-pinkham

Find a Grave. (2017, June 22). Alice E. Goodwin Webber. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/180612033/alice-e.-webber

Find a Grave. (2015, May 27). John S. Wheeler. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/147066948/john-s.-wheeler

Gilmore, Patrick S. (1871). History of the National Peace Jubilee and Great Musical Festival: Held in the City of Boston, June, 1869, to Commemorate the Restoration of Peace Throughout the Land. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=NcM5AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA723

Intl. Pub. Co. (1887). Leading Manufacturers and Merchants of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Hbwo8EbCc1kC&pg=PA81

NH Bureau of Labor. (1896). Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=dEQbAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA23

NH General Court. (1855). Journal of the Senate of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=fVJNAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA172

NH House. (1855). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=wzswAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA508

Wikipedia. (2022, October 30). Free Soil Party. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_Soil_Party

Wikipedia. (2022, November 27). Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_Slave_Act_of_1850

Wikipedia. (2022, November 19). Know Nothing. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Know_Nothing

Wikipedia. (2022, November 8). Whig Party (United States). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States)

Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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