Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854

By Muriel Bristol | August 14, 2022

FIRST FREE BAPTIST CHURCH. The First Free Baptist Church was reorganized by Rev. Gershom Lord, in 1802, and consisted of eight members. Samuel Runnells and Bart. Miller were first deacons, and Elder Lord was clerk. Rev. Gershom Lord was the first preacher, and was succeeded by Humphrey Goodwin, who was ordained in 1807, and continued to preach until his removal to Hollis in 1814. Elder David Blaisdell supplied from 1815 to 1830. A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the [Acton] town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840. Theodore Stevens became pastor in 1834, left in 1836, returned in 1839, and was succeeded, in 1843, by Elder J. Fullerby; Horace Stanton, in 1847; and subsequently by Z. Jordan, Wm. Hurlin, Seth Perkins, Aaron Ayer, Dexter Waterman, James Potter; Rev. Mr. McLain, in 1872; Hosea Quimby, 1875; and at Mr. Quimby’s death, in October 1878, by Rev. B.F. Sherwood, who remained until about 1880, when Rev. H.P. Mansur came. He remained until about 1885. The following have been pastors since that time: Revs. G.A. Anderson, 1887; C.E. Hurd, 1888-93; E.W. Fernald, 1894-7; R.W. Churchill, 1898- (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

The Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist ministers described from this period were: Gershom Lord, Humphrey Goodwin, David Blaisdell, Theodore Stevens, Joseph F. Fullonton, Horace Stanton, Zachariah Jordan, Benjamin F. Hubbard, and William Hurlin (his first and second pastorates).

Rev. Gershom Lord – 1802-07

Gershom Lord was born in Lebanon, ME, January 18, 1752, son of Elder Ebenezer and Martha (Emery) Lord.

Gershom Lord, son of Elder Ebenezer Lord, was born in 1752, and died in 1817, in Lebanon; he married Esther Hanson (Cutter, 1926).

Gershom Lord married in Dover, NH, September 30, 1776, Esther Hanson, both of Dover, NH. Rev. Jeremy Belknap performed the ceremony. (Rev. Jeremy Belknap, D.D, was pastor of Dover’s First (Congregational) Church). She was born circa 1757.

Gershom Lord was one of some hundred inhabitants of Dover, NH, and vicinity that petitioned, August 30, 1786, for a lottery to finance refurbishing the bridge at the [Dover] Falls (Hammond, 1882).

State of New Hampshire } AN ACT TO ENABLE GERSHOM LORD TO FILE A COMPLAINT AT THE NEXT SUPERIOR COURT OF JUDICATURE FOR THE COUNTY OF STRAFFORD
[Passed February 7, 1788. Not found in Original Acts; recorded Acts, vol. 5, p. 403].
Whereas Gershom Lord of Dover in the County of Strafford and said State, Potter, hath Petitioned the General Court setting forth that at the inferior Court common pleas holden at Dover in and for said County on the third Tuesday of November AD., 1786, he recovered Judgment against Jona Simonds of said Dover, sadler, for the sum of thirty-six pounds and one penny debt or damage and one pound six shillings and ten pence cost of Suit; from which Judgment the said Simonds appealed to the then next Superior Court of Judicature but failed to enter his said appeal; And that the said Gershom Lord, prevented by sickness, did not file a complaint as the Law directs by means of which the said Lord hath lost the benefit of the said Judgment. Wherefore he prayed that he might be empowered to file a complaint at the next Superior Court for said County if the said Simonds should not then enter his said appeal. Which appearing reasonable.
Therefore be it enacted by the Senate and house of Representatives in General Court convened that the said Gershom Lord be and he hereby is empowered to file a complaint for affirmation of the said Judgment with Interest and cost at the next Superior Court of Judicature to be holden at said Dover in and for said County of Strafford on the third Tuesday of April AD .,1788, if the said Jonathan Simonds should not then enter and prosecute his said appeal as the law in other cases directs which he is hereby enabled to do. And the said Superior Court of Judicature are hereby authourized to take cognizance thereof and render Judgment thereon in the same manner as in other cases of appeal to the said Court (Metcalf, 1916).

Gershom Lord headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], one female [Esther (Hanson) Lord], three males aged under-16 years.

Lord, Rev. Gershom, brother of Rev.’s Tosier and Daniel, was ordained along with John Blaisdell by a council from the New Durham Q.M. convened with the Lebanon church, Me., Nov. 21, 1799. “He appeared to be a serious young man; he had an extraordinary gift in speaking, and was much admired by many.” But a lawsuit between him and the clergyman of the place having been decided against him, he soon moved to eastern Maine (Burgess, 1889).

A council from the New Durham Quarterly Meeting, N.H., convened with the Lebanon church, November 21st [1799], and ordained John BLAISDELL and GERSHOM LORD (Steward, 1862). 

Gershom Lord of Lebanon, ME, was “accepted” at the monthly meeting of the Dover Friends, i.e., Quakers, in 1801. A distinction was made between those “received” and those “accepted” (Tibbetts, 1909). As Rev. Lord was and remained a Free-Will Baptist, one might suppose that new or relocating Friends were “received,” while visiting attendees, such as a Baptist minister, were “accepted.”

Gershom Lord headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 45-plus years [Esther (Hanson) Lord], two females aged 16-25 years [Mary Lord and Esther Lord], two females aged 10-15 years [Abigail Lord and Hannah Lord], and one male aged under-10 years [Gershom Lord, Jr.].

Gershom Lord died in Lebanon, ME, March 5, 1817, aged sixty-five years, one month. Esther (Hanson) Lord died in Lebanon, ME, March 30, 1840.

Humphrey Goodwin – 1807-1814

Humphrey Goodwin was born in Hollis, ME, in January 1774, son of Timothy and Mehitable Goodwin.

Humphrey Goodwin married in Biddeford, ME, circa 1795, Hannah Long. She was born in Andover, MA, October 1, 1778, daughter of Josiah and Mary “Molly” (Carlton) Long.

Humphrey Goodwin headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census, His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 10-15 years, and two males aged under-10 years [Timothy Goodwin].

Goodwin, Humphrey - 1802Humphrey Goodwin signed the Rochester Division petition of May 28, 1802. (See Rochester Division Petition – May 1802).

Humphrey Goodwin was ordained in 1807.

Eldr Humpy Goodwin headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 10-15 years [Timothy Goodwin], three males aged under-10 years [Benjamin L. Goodwin, John R. Goodwin, and Josiah L. Goodwin], and two females aged under-10 years [Hannah Goodwin and Harriet Goodwin].

The first Freewill Baptist Church was organized in 1810, in Rodolphus Young’s house, on “Grammar Street.” There were fourteen (or fifteen) members, one of whom, William Tripp, became a Methodist minister, and died in Ripley, Maine. Humphrey Goodwin, who had been ordained as an elder, three years before, became their pastor. There are no records of this church, but there are strong evidences of its organization, possibly as a branch of the Freewill Baptist Church of Shapleigh (Acton). Its existence was not long continued, probably because when Elder Goodwin removed to Hollis from Acton, in 1814, he left them destitute of a leader, and was unable to return at stated intervals (Emery, 1901).

The First Free-Will Baptist Society of Hollis was formed at a meeting held March 21, 1815. John Smith, son Elisha Smith, was chosen Moderator; Benjamin Warren, Clerk; and Elder Humphrey Goodwin, Daniel Smith (3d), and Nathaniel Kimball, Committee to attend to the legal requirements. Elder Humphrey Goodwin was chosen. There were 22 members including Canell Tarbox, James Smith, Joseph Linscott, Amos Mason, Moses Goodwin, Nathaniel Kimball, and others (Clayton, 1880).

FREEWILL BAPTIST [OF HOLLIS]. First society formed March 21, 1815, with 22 members. House of Worship erected 1834-5. Elder Humphrey Goodwin pastor until 1838. Succeeding pastors, Revs. Lewis T. Witham, Perkins Smith, Edwin Brown and others (Mitchell, et al., 1905). 

Humphrey Goodwin headed a Hollis, NH, household at the time of the Fourth (1820) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 26-44 years, one male aged 16-25 years [Josiah L. Goodwin], one male aged 10-15 years [Timoty Goodwin], one female aged 10-15 years, and one male aged under-10 years. Three members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

Son Rev. Josiah L. Goodwin, son of Elder Humphrey and Hannah Goodwin of Hollis, ME, died in Rochester, MA, September 4, 1828, “in the first year of his ministry.”

Humphrey Goodwin headed a Hollis, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 20-29 years, two females aged 20-29 years, one male aged 10-14 years, and three females aged under-5 years.

Elder Humphrey Goodwin died in Hollis, NH, October 3, 1837, aged sixty-three years, ten months. Hannah (Long) Goodwin died in Hollis, NH, December 1, 1846.

Elder David Blaisdell – 1815-1833

David Blaisdell was born in Lebanon, ME, July 28, 1777, son of Ephraim and Hannah (Burrows) Blaisdell.

David Blaisdell married in Lebanon, ME, March 22, 1799, Sarah “Sally” Blaisdell. She was born in Lebanon, ME, January 29, 1782, daughter of Rev. John and Abigail (LeGro) Blaisdell.

David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-25 years [himself], one female aged 16-25 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell] and one male aged under-10 years.

Dean David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], one male aged 10-15 years, three males aged under-10 years, and one female aged under-10 years.

In 1815, when a powerful revival occurred in Lebanon and Acton, “Elder David Blaisdell was invited into Sanford from the place, and many were there converted, and a branch of the Lebanon church was there constituted.” Elder Blaisdell and his brother, Edward, came as evangelists and held meetings in a school-house. According to Rev. C.E. Blake, the brothers Blaisdell came into town in 1817, and organized a branch church of fifteen members. A certificate filed with the town clerk, on September 3, 1817, on behalf of persons desirous of avoiding payment of the legal ministerial tax for the support of a Congregational minister, shows that on that date. Francis Pugsley, Elias Littlefield, Solomon Littlefield, and Theodore Emery (clerk), of Sanford, Benjamin Webber and Edward Standley, of Shapleigh, and James Ridley and John Beedle of Alfred, were members “of the religious society in sd town of Sanford called by the name of the first freewill Baptist Church and Society in sd town of Sanford” (Emery, 1901).

ACTON. … The first Free-will Baptist church was formed in 1801, by Gershom Lord, – its first preacher. In 1818, a house of worship was erected in the west part of the town, near Milton Mills near where their house of worship now stands. A second society, called the Union Society of Acton, was formed in 1840, and a house built the same year at the south part of the town (Varney, 1881). 

A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Elder Davis Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fourth (1820) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], one male aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, one female aged 10-15 years, two males aged under-10 years, and one female aged under-10 years.

Elder David Blaisdell ministered to the church from 1829 to 1833; at first one-fourth of the time, and later, one-eighth. During his ministry, meetings were held at the house of Elias Littlefield, and a school-house at Springvale (Emery, 1901).

David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], two males aged 15-19 years, on female aged 15-19 years, one female aged 10-14 years, and two males aged 5-9 years.

David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 60-69 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], one female aged 20-29 years, two males aged 15-19 years, and one male aged 5-9 years. Two members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

Religious Intelligence. Milton Mills, N.H. A number has been hopefully converted to God and are rejoicing in his love (Free-Will Baptist Quarterly Magazine, March 1841).

Rev. David Blaisdell died in Lebanon, ME, July 25, 1842, aged sixty-five years, eleven months, and twenty-eight years.

Moses E. Varney, a carpenter, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah [(Blaisdell)] Varney, aged forty years (b. ME), Sarah M. Varney, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Isaac Varney (b. ME), aged eleven years (b. ME), George Varney, aged three years (b. ME), Mary Varney, aged five months (b. ME), and Sarah [(Blaisdell)] Blaisdell, aged eighty years (b. ME). Moses E. Varney had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $350.

Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell died in Lebanon, ME, September 3, 1868.

Theodore Stevens – 1834-1836, 1839-1843

Theodore Stevens was born in Limington, Me., October 11, 1812, son of Theodore and Mary (Boyd) Stevens.

Rev. Theodore Stevens died at his home in Saco, Me., Oct. 21, 1880. He was a younger brother of Rev’s James and John Stevens, and was born in Limington, Me., Oct. 11, 1812. He was converted at the age of nineteen, and began to preach when about twenty-one years of age, and in 1835 was ordained in Limington. He first settled in Lebanon, and preached half of the time in Acton, where he married Miss Susan Brackett, who survived him. In 1838 he moved to Great Falls, N.H., but returned to Acton in one year. After three years he settled in Springvale, Me., and was there four years, when he moved to his native town. He never entirely recovered from the arduous toil of these years. In 1847-48 he made a strenuous effort to restore the Saco church to new life. He returned home and for years he could neither preach nor labor. When strength began to return, he supplied at Limerick, Hollis and other places and preached a year and a half at Springvale, when he was forced to retire again. After three years on a farm in Somersworth, N.H., his health improved so that in 1860 he became pastor of the North Berwick church, Maine. After preaching in Lebanon six years he moved to Saco, where he lived the rest is life. During this time, he supplied at Carver’s Harbor a season, two years at Doughty’s Falls, two years at Cape Elizabeth, during which time their house of worship was repaired, and two years at Kennebunk Port. He was a member of the executive committee of the Foreign Mission Society from 1857 to his resignation in 1875, and a member board of corporators of the Printing Establishment from 1847 till his death. With unswerving integrity and a fearless fidelity to convictions he united a tender heart and deep concern for the welfare of men (Burgess & Ward, 1889).

REVIVAL INTELLIGENCE. We design in each number to give a summary of revival intelligence, ordinations, dedication of meeting houses, & c. The following summary embraces the four months ending Aug 31, 1839. … Br. Theodore Stevens of Acton, Me., has baptized 28 in a recent revival in the church in that place (Freewill Baptist Quarterly Magazine, June 1839).

The Baptists of Milton Mills donated $9.00 and those of Acton, ME, donated $4.75 for missionary work in May-June 1839 (Baptist Missionary Magazine, July 1839).

Religious Intelligence. Milton Mills, N.H. A number has been hopefully converted to God and are rejoicing in his love (Freewill Baptist Connection, 1839). 

A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Theodore Stevens headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 20-29 years, one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged under-5 years, and one female aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in the Learned Professions. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ebenezer Osgood and James Berry.

Rev. Theodore Stevens was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Joseph Fullonton, Zachariah Jordan, and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Theodore Stevens, Junr, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Limington, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Susan B. [(Brackett)] Stevens, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Mary A. Stevens, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Jacob B. Stevens, aged eleven years (b. ME), Benjamin F. Stevens, aged ten years (b. ME), Theodore Stevens, 3d, aged eight years (b. ME), Newell F. Stevens, aged eight years (b. ME), Eunice V. Stevens, aged seven years (b. ME), Milton H. Stevens, aged four years (b. ME), and John Q.A. Stevens, aged two years (b. ME). They shared a two-family residence with the household of his father, Theodore Stevens, a farmer, aged seventy-seven years (b. ME). (It was the elder Theodore Stevens that owned the farm, which was valued at $1,300).

Theodore Stevens was the pastor at the Free-Will Baptist church at Doughty’s Falls in [North] Berwick, ME, in the years 1858-60 (Clayton, 1880).

Rev. Theodore Stevens of North Berwick, ME, offered a prayer at the funeral of Rev. Elizas Hutchins of Dover, NH, in September 1859. He was also one of the eight ministers that served as pallbearers (FWB Printing Estab., 1860).

Theodore Stevens, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Census. His household included Susan E. [(Brackett)] Stevens, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), Eunice B. Stevens, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Milton H. Stevens, aged fifteen years (b. ME), John Q. Stevens, aged twelve years (b. ME), Samuel R. Stevens, aged nine years (b. ME), Susan C. Stevens, aged seven years (b. ME), Charles E. Stevens, aged six years (b. ME), Arabella Stevens, aged four years (b. ME), and Hannah F. Stevens, aged one year (b. NH). Theodore Stevens had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $450.

Theodore Stevens was the first pastor at the new Free-Will Baptist church building at Beech Ridge in [North] Berwick, ME, in 1860 (Clayton, 1880).

Thedore Stevens, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan [(Brackett)] Stevens, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), Mary A. [(Stevens)] Hasty, aged thirty-three years (b. ME), Newell T. Stevens, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. ME), Clara Stevens, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Charles Stevens, at school, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Belle Stevens, at school, aged fourteen years (b. ME), Fanny Stevens, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), Frank L. Hasty, at school, aged nine years (b. ME), and James E. Hasty, aged four years (b. ME). Thedore Stevens had real estate valued at $3,250 and personal estate valued at $700.

Theodore Stevens was the pastor at the Free-Will Baptist church at Doughty’s Falls in [North] Berwick, ME, in the years 1871-72 (Clayton, 1880).

Thedore Stevens, a Free Baptist minister, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Saco, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Susan [(Brackett)] Stevens, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, Chas. Stevens, a farmer, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), and Fanny Stevens, a printer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME). His household was on Ferry Road.

Rev. Theodore Stevens died at his home in Saco, Me., October 21, 1880, aged sixty-eight years.

MAINE PERSONAL AND POLITICAL. Elder Theodore Stevens of Saco was taken with apoplexy on the train from Boston to Saco Monday. He is improving (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), October 21, 1880).

MINISTERIAL OBITUARY RECORD. REV. THEODORE STEVENS died in Saco, Me., Oct. 21, 1880, aged 68 (FW Baptist Register, 1882). 

Susan (Brackett) Stevens died in Saco, ME, August 13, 1898.

Elder J. Fullerby [Fullonton]- 1843-1847

Joseph F. Fullonton was born in Raymond, NH, January 31, 1808, son of Deacon Jeremiah H. and Hannah (Dudley) Fullonton.

Joseph Fullonton married in North Hampton, February 26, 1835, Abigail Dow Robinson. She was born in North Hampton, April 9, 1813.

Sources identify him – Joseph Fullonton – as having been the acting pastor of the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church between 1843 and 1847. (The “J. Fullerby” of the Mitchell-Cony directory was some sort of transcription error). While he was the pastor there, he wrote a History of Acton, Maine, which was published in 1847.

Joseph Fullonton, Free Baptist, son of Dea. Jeremiah and Hannah (Dudley) Fullonton, was born Jan. 31, 1808. Preparatory studies at Pembroke and Hampton Academies, and Deerfield Parade High School. Licensed to preach by the New Durham Quarterly Meeting, at Barrington, May 21, 1834. Ordained pastor Danville, Feb. 16, 1837-43. Acting pastor, Acton, Me., 1843-7. Left the ministry on account of failing voice. Editor, The Granite Pillar, a temperance paper, Exeter, 1843-5; Myrtle, a Sunday School paper, Dover, 1847 54. Farmer, Raymond, occasionally supplying there and at Danville, 1847-80. Clerk of the Rockingham Quarterly Meeting 33 years. Died, Raymond, Oct. 27, 1880. Married Abigail D. Robinson of New Hampton, 1834. Publications – (1) History of Acton Me, 1847. (2) History of Raymond, 1875 (Carter, 1906).

Rev. Fullonton summarized his own career in his History of Raymond, N.H., thus:

It has been seen that the author of this History [of Raymond, N.H.,] came up in this church. An Autobiography is not to be written, but a few items may be put down. The Psalmist said, “I am as a wonder unto many.” We are a wonder to none but ourselves. Thirsting for knowledge, an Academy was attended part of three terms. Engaged in teaching; poorly qualified; studied and taught, taught and studied, carrying books on the road into fields and to bed to study. Talked with the learned for improvement, studied the trees, plants, flowers, winds, clouds and stars. Continued thus, teaching and studying much for 25 years. Engaged in the ministry; no chance for Theological training in the denomination of our choice then, so studied as best we could. Ordained at Danville, Feb. 16, 1837, continued there six years, then held a pastorate in Acton, Me., four years. Lost all voice for public speaking, and came here in Jan. 1847 (Fullonton, 1875).

Fullonton, Rev. Joseph - CarterRev. Joseph Fullonton was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Zachariah Jordan, Theodore Stevens, and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Joseph Fullington, a Free Will Baptist clergyman, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Abagail Fullington, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Susan Fullington, aged fifteen years (b. ME), and Sarah Fullington, aged twelve years (b. ME).

Rev. Joseph Fullonton succeeded Rev. Tobias Foss the pastorate of the Free-Will Baptist church in Raymond, NH, in or around September 1853.

Mr. Foss left in September 1853. Rev. Joseph [Fullonton] succeeded as stated supply and continued nineteen years. In 1858 good revival brought an addition of twelve. Rev. John Fullonton, T. Robie, and Rev. Mr. Fullenten became ministers while members of this church and later J. Woodbury Scribner (Hazlett). 

Joseph Fullonton, an F.W.B. preacher, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Abigail Fullonton, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), and Sarah A. Fullonton, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Joseph Fullonton had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000.

Rev. Joseph Fullonton of Raymond, NH, published a paper or sermon entitled Government of God in July 1862 (FWB Printing Establishment, 1862).

Joseph Fullerton, a clergyman, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond (“West Epping P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Abigail Fullerton, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), Sarah A. Fullerton, a school teacher, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and Charles Healey, a farm laborer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). Joseph Fullonton had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $2,000.

John [i.e., Joseph] Fullonton, a retired minister, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Abbigale Fullonton, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), Cyrus M. Roberts, works on railroad, aged forty-one years (b. NH), [Roberts’ wife,] Sarah A. [(Fullonton)] Roberts, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and [Roberts’ son,] Frank F. Roberts, aged five years (b. NH).

Joseph F. Fullonton died of septicemia in Raymond, NH, October 27, 1880, aged seventy-two years. True M. Gould, M.D., signed the death certificate.

MINISTERIAL OBITUARY RECORD. REV. JOSEPH FULLONTON died in Raymond, N.H., Oct. 27, 1880, aged 72 (FW Baptist Register, 1882).

Abigail D. (Robinson) Fullonton died of bronchitis in Raymond, NH, April 25, 1892, aged seventy-five years, and sixteen days. A.W. Mitchell signed the death certificate.

Horace Stanton – 1847

[Horace Stanton appears in both this Mitchell-Cony list of Acton-Milton Mills ministers and – perhaps in error – in another: Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1843-50].

Horace Stanton was born in Lebanon, ME, August 27, 1818, son of James and Sabra (Wentworth) Stanton.

The Farmington, NH, Baptist Elders voted to ordain Brother Horace Stanton [in August 1846].

Tuesday, Aug. 25 — This morning between day and Sunrise we heard and felt the Shock of an Earthquake while at Elder [Edward] Blasdell’s, the only one I have been sensible of hearing for many years. It seemed to pass from South to North, and to be mostly to the west of us. We have since learned it was verry heavey in the central part of New-Hampshire and continued Some two minutes. Went to the New-Durham Q.M. [Quarterly Meeting] at LeGrow’s Corner. I was chosen moderator of the conferance, which will detain me from my journey longer than I intended. We passed through our business rapidly, and in the Elders conferance voted to ordain Br. Horace Stanton (NEHGS, 1998).

Rev. Horace Stanton died in Lebanon, ME, January 28, 1847.

Z. Jordan – 1848-49

Zachariah Jordan was born in Raymond, ME, July 2, 1787, son of Samuel and Sarah (Jackson) Jordan.

It is said of Rev. Zachariah Jordan, the second pastor [of the Second Free Baptist Church of Raymond, ME], that he made a preaching tour of ten weeks, speaking nearly every day, and as a reward for his labor received besides his board, a cotton handkerchief and the munificent sum of twelve and one-half cents. He was born July 2, 1787, was ordained June 10, 1818, and died at Limerick, Me., May 27, 1864, being nearly 87 [77] years of age (Portland Press Herald, November 13, 1894).

The West Falmouth [ME] Church dates from May 6, 1829 when a group met at the Poplar Ridge schoolhouse and termed the church organization. Elders Zachariah Jordan and Hubbard Chandler were present, the former delivering the sermon. Meetings were held in homes and school-houses until through the efforts of Elder Charles Bean the present church building was erected and dedicated. The Rev J.M. Lowdon, a Portland minister preached, the dedication sermon (Portland Evening Express, October 6, 1939).

Zachariah Jordan married (1st) in New Gloucester, ME, May 20, 1832, Esther Merrill, he of Raymond, ME, and she of New Gloucester, ME. Esther (Merrill) Jordan died of cholera morbus in South Berwick, ME, July 3, 1838, aged forty-three years.

Zachariah Jordan married (2nd), April 22, 1840, Sabrina Page. She was born in Parsonsfield, ME, in 1811, daughter of Dudley and Elizabeth (Weeks) Page.

Zachariah Jordan headed a Parsonsfield, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], and one female aged 20-29 years [Sabrina (Page) Jordan]. One member of his household was engaged in the Learned Professions.

Rev. Zachariah Jordan was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Joseph Fullonton, Theodore Stevens, Jr., and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Zachariah Jordon, a trader, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Biddeford, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sabrina P. Jordon, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), Merill P. Jordon, aged seven years (b. ME), and John Knox, aged twenty years (b. ME). Zachariah Jordon had real estate valued at $900.

Zachariah Jordan, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged seventy-one years (b. ME), headed a Limerick, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sabrina Jordan, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), Merrill R. Jordan, a clerk in store, aged seventeen years (b. ME).

Sabrina (Page) Jordan died in Limerick, ME, April 5, 1864, aged fifty-two years. Zachariah Jordan died in Limerick, ME, May 27, 1864, aged seventy-six years.

Benjamin F. Hubbard – 1850-1851?

The Mitchell-Cony list of Acton & Milton Mills Baptist Ministers has a gap between the pastorate of Rev. Zachariah Jordan, which concluded in 1849, and the first pastorate of Rev. William Hurlin, which did not begin until December 1852. However, a Baptist clergyman named Benjamin F. Hubbard, appeared in the Seventh (1850) Federal Census as residing in Milton Mills during that time. (The Acton-Milton Mills parsonage was situated in Milton Mills). He might possibly have been the Baptist minister whose pastorate should perhaps bridge the gap.

Benjamin F. Hubbard was born in Maine, circa 1821.

Rev. B.F. Hubbard was pastor at Sanford, ME, in at least the years 1847-49. Visiting Rev. John Peacock remembered Hubbard and his ordination there:

During these three years that I labored with them, I attended several meetings out of the place. One was at Mount Hope in Sanford, which was considerably blessed to that little church and to several of the impenitent. It continued nearly two weeks in February, 1847. Here the Rev. B.F. HUBBARD was laboring, and was ordained pastor of the church, March 31, 1847. I was called by the council to preach on the occasion (Peacock, 1851).

A discussion was to take place between the Rev. E.H. Lake (Universalist,) and Rev. B.F. Hubbard (Baptist,) at Sanford, Me., last Friday. Question: “Do the Scriptures teach the doctrine of endless punishment, or the final holiness and happiness of all mankind?” (Portland Press Herald (Portland, ME), February 19, 1849).

Benjamin Hubbard, a Baptist clergyman, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Betsy F. Hubbard, aged thirty-four years (b. ME). They were enumerated on the same page as Gilman Jewett, postmaster [of Milton Mills], aged seventy-three years (b. NH).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard succeeded Rev. William H. Copeland as pastor of the Baptist church in Sanford, ME, in 1851-52.

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. Rev. B.F. Hubbard, of Milton, N.H., has become pastor of the First Baptist church, Sanford, Me. (Bigelow, 1851).

Rev. William H. Copeland began to labor among the people in the summer of 1848 and continued his service until the spring of 1850. He was followed the next year by Rev. B.F. Hubbard who preached one year. Rev. Thomas Jameson supplied the pulpit two years (Emery, 1901).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard of Lebanon, ME, was clerk of the Free-Will Baptist York Association in 1852. Its post office address, i.e., his post office address, was Sanford, ME (Burrows, 1852).

Frederic A. Wood married in Lebanon, ME, January 19, 1853, Miss Ruth Libby. Rev. B.F. Hubbard performed the ceremony.

Rev. B.F. Hubbard was clerk of the Free-Will Baptist York Association in 1857. Its post office address, i.e., his post office address, was Lebanon, ME. The York Association comprised thirteen churches, nine ministers, had baptized fourteen converts, making for a total of eight hundred seventy-four congregants (American Baptist Publication Society, 1857).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard was clerk of the Free-Will Baptist York Association in 1860. Its post office address, i.e., his post office address, was Lebanon, ME (Clark & Meeker, 1860).

Benjamin F. Hubbard, Baptist clergy, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a North Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Elisabeth Hubbard, aged forty-one years (b. ME). He had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $150.

Rev. B.F. Hubbard and Rev. James Ferguson were employed as supply preachers by the Baptist church in Springvale, ME, for a time beginning in the summer of 1862.

In August, 1861, W.T. Emerson, a licentiate of the Baptist Church, Saco, accepted a call to preach one year, and in October was ordained to the ministry. The following summer he asked for his dismission, and enlisted in the army. Rev. B.F. Hubbard and Rev. James Ferguson, of Alfred, were his successors in the pulpit supply (Emery, 1901).

Benjamin F. Hubbard, a minister, aged forty-one years (b. ME) registered for the Civil War military draft in Shapleigh, ME, in May or June 1863. He was assessed $1 in US Excise Tax for his carriage in Shapleigh, ME, in May 1865.

Benjamin F. Hubbard appeared in the NH Business Directory of 1868, as proprietor of a Milton Mills country store. (The other Milton Mills country store proprietors were Asa Fox & Son, Bray U. Simes, and John U. Simes).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard died, probably in Milton, September 10, 1870, aged forty-eight years, one month, and twenty-nine years.

Elizabeth Hubbard, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census.

Wm. Hurlin – 1853-1854 and 1856-1858

William Hurlin, Jr., was born in Bethnal Green, London, England, 1814, son of William and Elizabeth (Evans) Hurlin.

William Hurlin married in St. Matthew’s Church, Bethnal Green, London, England, December 25, 1836, Harriet Brown, both of St. Matthew’s Parish. George Parnet and Ann Berkell signed as witnesses.

Rev. William Hurlin was born in London, Eng., July 31, 1814. From his early childhood he was a great reader of history, biography, natural history, voyages and travels, science, religious magazines, etc. He was converted in early life and preached his first sermon in March, 1835, and for five years was a gratuitous lay preacher in London and vicinity. In April, 1840, he became a London city missionary and continued until May 31, 1849. Then on account of ill health he came to this country with his wife and five children, and was pastor of Baptist churches in New England until October, 1878, when he was elected secretary of the New Hampshire Baptist Convention and held that office until October, 1900, twenty-two years. He still preaches occasionally. He married, December 25, 1836, Miss. Harriet Brown, who died December 30, 1905, having commenced the seventieth year of married life. For many years he has resided in Antrim, N.H. – Editor (Granite State Magazine, 1906).

William Hurlin immigrated to New York, NY, arriving there, August 3, 1849. He took up a pastorate in Danville, VT.

William Harlen, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged thirty-six years (b. England), headed a Danville, VT, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Harlen, aged thirty-two years (b. England), Harriet Harlen, aged twelve years (b. England), Elisabeth Harlen, aged ten years (b. England), Wm. Harlen, aged seven years (b. England), Sarah Harlen, aged three years (b. England), and John M. Harlen, aged two years (b. England).

Rev. Hurlin left Danville, VT, in 1851, and held next a pastorate in Alton, NH, until December 1852.

Rev. William Hurlin was pastor of the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church from January 1853 to October 1854. After which he took up a pastorate in Amesbury, MA.

Wm. Hurlin, an F.B. clergyman, aged forty years (b. England), headed an Amesbury, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Harriet Hurlin, aged thirty-seven years (b. England), Harriet Hurlin, aged seventeen years (b. England), Elisabeth Hurlin, aged fifteen years (b. England), Wm. Hurlin, Jr., aged twelve years (b. England), Sarah Hurlin, aged eight years (b. England), John M. Hurlin, aged seven years (b. England), Sophia E. Hurlin, aged four years (b. VT), and Martha A. Hurlin, aged two years (b. ME).

Rev. William Hurlin immigrated in 1849, and held initially pastorates in Danville, VT; and Alton, NH, before his first pastorate at the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church (See Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854). After that he was pastor at Amesbury, MA, before returning to Acton, ME.

Religious Intelligence. Rev. W.H. Hurlin, late of Amesbury, Mass., has accepted the pastorate of the Baptist church in South Acton, Me., where he enters at once on his labors (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), March 15, 1856).

William Hurlin filed a declaration seeking naturalization in Alfred, ME, April 23, 1857. He stated that he had traveled from London, England, arriving in New York, NY, August 3, 1849,

and thence went to reside in Danville in Vermont, where he resided till July, 1851. Thence removed to Alton in N.H. and continued till December 1852, thence to Acton in Maine till Oct. 1854, thence to Amesbury, Mass., residing there till March 1856, and in that month removed again to Acton, & in June 1858 removed to Sumner in our county of Oxford.

William Hurlin of Lewiston, ME, became a naturalized U.S. citizen, in an Androscoggin County court, in Auburn, ME, in September 1859. (He had been born in London, England, in 1814). Orin B. Cheney and G.H. Ricker, both of Lewiston, ME, vouched for him.

William Hurlin, a Cal. Bpst. clergyman, aged forty-five years (b. England), headed a Sumner (“Sumner P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Harriet [(Brown)] Hurlin, aged forty-two years (b. England), Harriet Hurlin, a common school teacher, aged twenty years (b. England), Elizabeth Hurlin, aged nineteen years (b. England), William Hurlin, aged seventeen years (b. England), Sarah Hurlin, aged thirteen years (b. England), John M. Hurlin, aged twelve years (b. England), Sophia E. Hurlin, aged nine years (b. ME), Martha A. Hurlin, aged seven years (b. ME), Albert H. Hurlin, aged three years (b. ME), Charles S. Hurlin, aged two years (b. ME), and Clara M. Hurlin, aged eleven months (b. ME). William Hurlin had real estate valued at $200 and personal estate valued at $750.

William Hurlin, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. England), headed an Antrim, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Hurlin, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. England), Henry Hurlin, at home, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Clara Hurlin, at home, aged eleven years (b. NH). William Hurlin had personal estate valued at $1,200.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. Rev. William Hurlin of Antrim has accepted a call from the Baptist Church in Plaistow, and commences his labors there on the first of March (Boston Globe, February 19, 1873).

William Hurlin, a clergyman, aged sixty-five years (b. England), headed an Antrim, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Hurlin, keeping house, aged sixty-two years (b. England), Henry A. Hurlin, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and Clara M. Hurlin, a schoolteacher, aged twenty years (b. ME).

Recalling a Happy Event. Contoocook, N.H., December 25. Rev. William Harlin and wife of Antrim celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage today. Rev. Mr. Harlin is a native of London, England (Boston Globe, December 26, 1886).

Rev. William Hurlin expressed his opinion that the British and American exhibitors at World’s Columbian Exposition, which was planned to be held in Chicago, IL, in 1893, should close their doors on Sundays.

RELIGIOUS MATTERS. Events and Opinions. The Rev. William Hurlin, writing in the Sunday School Times on International Expositions, notes that of the seven already held, the three in English speaking capitals (two in London, one in Philadelphia) were closed on Sunday, while in a fourth, that in Paris in 1889, the American and English exhibitors closed their departments on the Sabbath day. “With the above facts,” says the writer, “in view, what will the European peoples say of us if the exposition is opened on the Lord’s Day? Should not Christians bring all the influence they have to bear on this question, until it is settled rightly! And should they not declare, and adhere to the declaration, that they will have nothing at all to do with this Exposition unless it is closed on the Lord’s Day?” (Hartford Courant (Hartford, VT), April 2, 1892)

Hurlin, Rev. WilliamWilliam Hurlin, a clergyman, aged eighty-five years (b. England), headed an Antrim, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixty-three years), Harriet [(Brown)] Harlin, aged eighty-two years (b. England). William Hurlin rented their dwelling from their son-in-law, Bennett S. Buckminster, aged seventy-five years (b. NH). (He was married to Lizzie H. [(Hurlin)] Buckminster. Harriet Hurlin was the mother of twelve children, of whom seven were still living.

Harriet (Brown) Hurlin died of pulmonary oedema in Antrim, NH, December 30, 1905, aged eighty-seven years, six months.

CHURCH AND CLERGY. The oldest minister in New Hampshire is Rev. William Hurlin of Antrim, who in his ninety-second year is still preaching the gospel. He preached his first sermon seventy-two years ago (Springfield Reporter (Springfield, VT), August 23, 1907).

William Hurlin died of cardiac failure on North Main Street in Antrim, NH, June 28, 1910, aged ninety-five years, ten months, and twenty-eight days. He had resided in Antrim, NH, for forty-four years.

BUSINESS HOUSES CLOSE. Funeral of Rev. William Hurlin Held at the Baptist Church In Antrim, N.H. ANTRIM, N.H., July 2. – The funeral of Rev William Hurlin was held yesterday at the Baptist church, of which in former years he was a pastor for seven years. Rev C.L. White of New York city, secretary of the American Baptist home mission society, made an address and the Rev O.C. Sargent of Concord, N.H., secretary of the New Hampshire Baptist state convention, delivered the sermon. Rev J.H. Nichols of Derry, N.H., spoke. Rev Oren E. Kendall, pastor of the Baptist church, assisted. The business houses throughout the town were closed and the curtains were drawn during the service, as a token of respect for the memory of the venerable clergyman. Floral tributes were many. Interment was at Maplewood cemetery (Boston Globe, July 2, 1910).


Continued in Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1855-1909


References:

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Author: Muriel Bristol

"Lady drinking tea"

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