Milton’s Railroad Line

By Muriel Bristol | May 28, 2018

Railroad - 1860

The railroad line that passes through Milton was built by the Great Falls and Conway Railroad. The railroad was incorporated in 1844, and was then

… authorized and empowered to locate, construct, and finally complete a railroad, beginning at or near the depot of the Boston and Maine Railroad, in Somersworth, and thence running through said Somersworth, Rochester, Milton, Wakefield, Ossipee, Effingham, Freedom, or Tamworth, to any place in Conway (Gregg and Pond, 1851).

The Great Falls and Conway line connected in Somersworth to the Great Falls and Berwick Railroad, which in turn connected to Portsmouth and beyond. The two railroad companies merged under the name Portsmouth, Great Falls & Conway Railroad (PGF&C) in 1848.WW-1851

Construction began at the Somersworth (Great Falls) end and the stretch between there and Rochester opened on February 28, 1849. It had reached “South Milton” by 1850.

An 1851 tourist guide had Gt. Falls & Conway Railroad service terminating in Rochester. Chestnut Hill, Milton, and points beyond were accessible by stage only.

A blasting accident injured three members of a railroad construction crew extending the tracks beyond Milton in December 1852.

Milton was said to be the “terminus” in 1854, but construction had reached Wakefield’s Union village by 1855. There it stalled due to financial difficulties.

A Boston & Maine advertisement of 1861 mentioned that its Portland, ME, train connected with the Great Falls & Conway Railroad at Great Falls, NH, i.e., Somersworth. Wakefield’s Union village is the end of the line; travel beyond there was by stagecoach.

The 8.46 AM Train from Portland connects at Great Falls with the Cars of the Great Falls and Conway Railroad, for Rochester, Milton and Union Village, and Stages for Milton Mills, Wakefield, Ossipee, Conway, etc.; and at Dover, with the Cars of the Cocheco Railroad, for Rochester, Farmington, Alton, and Alton Bay; and with Steamer Dover, in Summer, on Lake Winnipiseogee, for Wolfboro, Center Harbor and Meredith Village, with Stages from Center Harbor for Conway and White Mountains (Willis, 1861).

Railroads have rarely been economically viable. The history of railroads is a history of government subsidies and interventions in favor of railroads. (A notable exception was James J. Hill and his Great Northern Railroad). But the Republican administrations that dominated the post-Civil War era were not overly attached to free market principles. As a general rule, they favored “internal improvements” (now called “infrastructure spending” or government “investment”), including railroad subsidies and other interventions.

The moribund Portsmouth, Great Falls and Conway railroad (PGF&C) construction was revived in July 1865, at least to some degree. But serious progress did not happen until the Eastern Railroad (eastern Massachusetts with branches) leased the PGF&C lines in September 1870 (it guaranteed the PGF&C’s bonds).

NEW HAMPSHIRE. At the meeting of the stockholders of the Eastern Railroad in New Hampshire, and the Portsmouth, Great Falls and Conway Railroad; held in Portsmouth, on Monday, the lease ot the latter road to the former was voted (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), September 24, 1870).

Leasing was a often a mechanism to eliminate competition; mergers often followed those leases.

The Eastern Railroad extended the PGF&C lines from Union to Wakefield, and then on to West Ossipee, between September 1870 and October 1871.

WHIFFS FROM NEW HAMPSHIRE. Last week at a town meeting, Ossipee voted five per cent. of its valuation to aid in extending the Great Falls and Conway railroad from Union Village to West Ossipee. There has been a wrangle over this railroad for several years, the track has been surveyed three times, each time locating somewhat better (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), September 13, 1870).

NEW HAMPSHIRE. Ossipee, having voted five per cent to have a railroad, is puzzled which of the three routes surveyed to choose, and will have to let the conformation of ground, and scarcity or abundance of rocks settle the question for it (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), September 24, 1870).

NEW HAMPSHIRE. The first passenger train over the Portsmouth, Great Falls and Conway extension passed to Wakefield station, six miles beyond Union, on Monday (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), [Saturday,] July 1, 1871).

The Great Falls and Conway Railroad is open to West Ossipee, N.H. (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), October 14, 1871).

By the beginning of July 1872, the Eastern Railroad was advertising that

THE PORTSMOUTH, GREAT FALLS AND CONWAY RAILROAD Is completed and running Trains to North Conway, and in connection with the Eastern Railroad forms the Shortest, Quickest and Only Route to North Conway and White Mountains … (Boston Globe, July 1, 1872).

The North Conway station was built in 1874. The PGF&C connected to the Portland and Ogdensburg Railway line at Intervale in 1875.

The Milton station depicted in old postcards and pictures was built in 1873. The original station stood on the “Lebanon side,” i.e., still in Milton, but on the other side of the Salmon Falls River..

Historian Sarah Ricker seemed to think the station and the ice business began together in 1873, although she did not specify whether the chicken or the egg came first. She further reported that “… the area’s ice industry experienced tremendous success in the 1880s. The Milton Ice Company, one of five such businesses in town, shipped up to 100 carloads of ice to Boston every day.” Ice cutting is a seasonal affair, of course. Those ice companies remained active until the late 1920s.BG820722-Excursion

The Eastern Railroad renewed its lease on the PGF&C line for a period of 60 years in 1878, but the whole was taken over by the Boston & Maine Railroad in 1890, which operated it as its Conway Branch line.

Transporting lumber and ice were early mainstays of the railroad. Mills sprang up, especially in places that had both the train and water power. That added raw materials and finished products to the freight. Milton participated in both ice and manufacture, but the mills and trains enabled also an exodus of sorts. An 1882 description of Milton mentioned that “there has been a small [net] decrease in population during the last twenty years, many leaving town for the cities and larger manufacturing towns for the purpose of engaging in other business than farming.”

The White Mountain Art movement predated railroad access to the White Mountains. This landscape painting movement began with stagecoaches in the early nineteenth century and had its heyday in the mid-nineteenth century. But it did enjoy improved railroad access for a time and it encouraged an initial wave of tourists to the White Mountains. Those tourists came by train. By the latter part of the nineteenth century, the White Mountain Art movement was being supplanted by the Hudson River School, Rocky Mountain art, and photography.

According to the Conway Scenic Railroad, North Conway is the “birthplace of American skiing.” Snow trains began running in 1932 to serve those skiers. “Countless skiers rode the snow trains as the sport of skiing grew with the development of ski lifts.” (See also Milton in the News – 1952 for a description of a snow train journey).

By the early 1950s, improved highways and America’s love affair with the automobile led to a decline in passenger service. Passenger service to Boston ended on December 2, 1961, as a single B&M Budliner headed south never to return. Freight customers continued to decline, too, and the last freight train departed on October 30, 1972 (Conway Scenic Railroad, n.d.).

The Portsmouth Herald published a list of fifteen Boston and Maine Railroad stations that would close as of June 1, 1958:

Here is a list of the 15 Boston & Maine Railroad stations in New Hampshire where passenger service will be discontinued June 1. Bath, Sugar Hill, Jefferson, Randolph, Fitzwilliam, Troy, Keene, Walpole, Hayes, Milton, Union, Burleyville, Mountainview, Mount Whittier, and Madison (Portsmouth Herald, May 9, 1958).

Ray’s Marina had supplanted the Milton Train Station by May 1963. The B&M went bankrupt in 1970. The last passenger train between Rollinsford and North Conway ran in 1972.

The railroad line continues in a limited way under the New Hampshire Northcoast Railroad (NHN). Ossipee is now its northern terminus. (Several disconnected stretches north of there are run as tourist attractions). It carries no lumber, ice, mill products, artists, skiers, or tourists now. It services only the sand pits of Ossipee with twice daily runs. They pass right on through and do not stop here.

Ray’s Marina closed in 2012. The train station’s freight depot building still remains, as a part of the Ray’s Marina complex. (Facing the marina buildings and the pond, it is the small building or shed on the left-hand end).


See also Milton’s Railroad Station Agents


References:

American-Rails.com. (2018). Surviving New Hampshire Railroad Stations. Retrieved from https://www.american-rails.com/support-files/new-hampshire-railroad-stations.pdf

Conway Scenic Railroad. (n.d.). A Brief History of Our Station. Retrieved from https://www.conwayscenic.com/history/station-history/

Foster’s Daily Democrat. (2016, May 12). Obituary: Rheaume J. (Ray) Lamoureux. Retrieved from http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/fosters/obituary.aspx?n=rheaume-j-lamoureux-ray

Gregg, W.P. and Pond, Benjamin. (1851). Railroad Laws and Charters of the United States. Boston, MA: Charles Little and James Brown

Historic Wakefield. (n.d.). Heritage Park Railroad Museum. Retrieved from http://www.historicwakefieldnh.com/heritage-park-.html

Hurd, D. Hamilton. (1882). A History of Rockingham and Strafford Counties. Philadelphia, PA: J.W. Lewis & Co. (also retrievable from Archive.org: https://archive.org/stream/historyofrocking00hurd#page/n5/mode/2up)

Jonathan (The Shark (102.1 & 105.3 FM)). (2016, April 1). Restaurants Eyeing The Site Of Ray’s Marina In Milton. Retrieved from http://shark1053.com/restaurants-eyeing-the-site-of-rays-marina-in-milton/

Marvel, William (Conway Daily Sun). (2018, May 2). Then and Now: A Conspicuous Manisfestation of Industry, 1890. Retrieved from https://www.conwaydailysun.com/community/history/then-and-now-a-conspicuous-manifestation-of-industry/article_279bf71c-4969-11e8-b663-b7d076758d9e.html

Poor, Henry V. (1860). History of the Railroads and Canals of the United States of America. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=M0YKAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA53

Ricker, Sarah. (1999). Milton and the New Hampshire Farm Museum. Arcadia Publishing: Charleston, SC, Chicago, IL, Portsmouth, NH, and San Francisco, CA

Rochester Courier. (1960, January 7).  Close [Sanbornville] R.R. Station. Rochester Courier: Rochester, NH

Rochester Courier. (1960, January 28). B and M Requests Permission to Drop Passenger Service Entirely on Conway Branch. Rochester Courier: Rochester, NH

Wikipedia. (2018). Portsmouth, Great Falls and Conway Railroad. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portsmouth,_Great_Falls_and_Conway_Railroad

Wikipedia. (2018, March 10). White Mountain Art. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Mountain_art

Williams, W. (1851). The Traveller’s and Tourist’s Guide Through the United States of America, Canada, etc. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=OKAoECHHbM4C&pg=PA10

Willis, William. (1861). A Business Directory of the Subscribers to the New Map of Maine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mKm9lz1RH_0C&pg=PA307

Boots Meets a Bobcat

By Muriel Bristol | May 24, 2018

Boots the cat met a bobcat in his backyard on Park Place in Milton last Tuesday (May 22).

Nancy West was in her kitchen in the early Tuesday afternoon when she heard what she thought was her cat Boots howling or hissing out back. She went to check, expecting some spat between Boots and a neighbor’s cat. She looked out the back door to see a bobcat at the foot of her back stairs. He saw her but made no attempt to move.

She turned for her camera and in so doing realized that Boots was hunkered on the porch rail nearest the house, She scrapped the camera idea and opened the door to get her cat. The bobcat turned and ran off as soon as she opened the door.

My Boots is okay but obviously nervous, his little heart was beating really fast when I scooped him up. He stayed very close to me for some time afterwards. Never had that occur in the 32 years I have lived here. The day before Boots had  acted nervous when he went out in the am, sniffing everything and looking out in all directions from the front porch. He came in shortly after and continued to act nervous for quite a while, staying very close to me. Wonder if the Bobcat had been there that day.

According to NH Fish & Wildlife Department, bobcats are the most common wildcat in North America. Males are larger than females but, on average, they measure 19-22″ in height at the shoulder, 28-49″ in length, and weigh between 15-35 pounds. They have a characteristic “yellowish-brown or reddish-brown (more gray in winter) color with indistinct dark spotting and streaks along its body. … Their upper legs have dark horizontal bands. The face has thin, black lines stretching onto broad cheek ruff and their ears are tufted.” Their name derives from their short “bobbed” tail, typically 4-7″ in length with 2 or 3 black bars and black tip above and white beneath.

Bobcats live in scrubby or broken forests (hardwood, coniferous or mixed), swamps, farmland, semi-deserts, scrubland, and rocky or bushy arid lands. Their home ranges vary in size depending on sex, season and prey distribution and abundance. Bobcats mark their territory with urine, feces, anal gland scent, and scrapes on physical markers, such as trees. Individuals have one natal den and other auxiliary dens for protection located throughout their home ranges. Dens can be found in caves, hollow logs, brush piles, rock ledges, or stumps (NH Fish & Wildlife, n.d.).

Bobcats are predators that usually follow consistent hunting paths to prey on snowshoe hares and cottontails. However, their diet also includes mice, squirrels, woodchucks, moles, shrews, raccoons, foxes, domestic cats, grouse and other birds, reptiles, porcupines and skunks. The bobcat is capable of fasting during periods of limited food availability, but will occasionally kill large prey, such as deer and livestock, during harsh conditions (NH Fish & Wildlife, n.d.).

 Ms. West reported that the bobcat she saw “looked be about 15-18 lbs., possibly as much as 20 lbs. It definitely had the bobbed tail, which I could see clearly when he turned to run off toward the woods out back. He was kind of spotted brownish and black. with some white on its chest.”

I have had several bear visits over the years.  Most recently one knocked down the metal pipe I have a bird feeder on. Several weeks earlier a bear was seen at my mailbox  by a neighbor early one morning before dawn . That day another neighbor told me a bear had been in their  yard. Earlier in the spring there were several sighting of bears close by  (Hare Road, Governors Road and Route 153 in Milton).  I have taken pictures of bears in my yard several times in years past. I sure wish I was able to get one of that Bobcat, but I had to rescue my Boots.

Boots had a narrow escape. He showed good tactical sense. He had his back to a wall and had positioned himself up on a rail midway between the back door (and the potential of rescue) and a leap to the ground with access to several different options of flight. He did not have to use any of his nine lives.

References:

New Hampshire Fish and Wildlife Department. (n.d.). Bobcat – Lynx Rufus (Felis Rufus). Retrieved from https://wildlife.state.nh.us/wildlife/profiles/bobcat.html

Wikipedia. (2018, May 17). Bobcat. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobcat

 

Milton in 1859

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | May 21, 2018

A description of Milton as it appeared in an 1859 gazetteer:

MILTON, in the southeastern [SIC] part of Strafford County, is an irregularly-shaped town, containing 27,000 acres, and is forty miles from Concord. It formerly belonged to Rochester, from which it was set off and incorporated June 11, 1802. The settlers came principally from Dover, Madbury, Rochester, and towns in that vicinity, and were a hardy, industrious, and intelligent people, early manifesting an interest in religion and education. The Congregational church was organized September 8, 1815, under the labors of Rev. Curtis Coe, who continued to preach as long as he was able; but prior to his settlement they had occasional preaching. With the exception of Teneriffe Mountain, which runs along the east part, the surface is comparatively level, and the soil good for pasturage. This is an agricultural community, and stock is raised to some extent. Salmon Falls river runs along the whole eastern boundary, thirteen miles, while a branch of the same river crosses from the south part of Wakefield, uniting near the centre of the eastern boundary. Milton pond and Gould pond are the only bodies of water. There are three villages – Milton Three Ponds, South Milton, Goodwinville, and Milton Mills; two church edifices – Congregational and Christian; twelve school districts, and three post-offices – Milton, Milton Mills, and West Milton. The Milton Mills, with a capital of $50,000, have eighteen looms and 1,200 spindles, and manufacture woolen and cotton goods to the amount of $90,000. The boot and shoe industry is also prosecuted to a considerable extent, there being $480,000 invested. The Great Falls and Conway Railroad passes through Milton. Population, 1,629; valuation, $494,066.


Previous in sequence: Milton in 1857


References:

Coolidge, Austin J., and Mansfield, John B. (1859, April). A History and Description of New England, General and Local. Boston, MA: Austin J. Coolidge

Hot Water for Itchy Bug Bites

By Muriel Bristol | May 15, 2018

The itching caused by bug bites, as well as that caused by poison ivy and poison oak, may be relieved by the brief application of hot water.

Run the affected part under the hot water tap, or soak it in a bath of hot water, or apply a washcloth soaked in hot water. It should be as hot as you can stand it, but for just a few moments (about 5-10 seconds or so). (The water should be 120 to 130 degrees in temperature, which should not be damaging during such a brief exposure. (120 degrees is the mandated upper limit for modern water heaters)).

Obviously, when you can no longer stand it, withdraw the body part. DO NOT SCALD YOURSELF. This should not be used for open irritated wounds or more chronic skin diseases.

This should provide localized itch relief for 2-3 hours, at which point it could be repeated, if necessary.

This method is a folk remedy of long standing. It appeared in print in the 1961 textbook Dermatology: Diagnosis & Treatment. It is thought to work because itch and pain receptors are intertwined. Overloading them with hot water blocks the itch.


See also Black Flies Return


References:

Graedon, Joe. (2009, August 9). Hot Water for Itchy Bug Bites. Retrieved from https://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2009/08/01/hot-water-for-itchy-bug-bites/

Sulzberger, Dr. Marion B., et al. (1961). Dermatology: Diagnosis & Treatment. Chicago: Year Book Medical Publishers

Wolf, Lauren K. (2011). Itching to Know More about Itch. Retrieved from https://pubs.acs.org/cen/science/89/8927sci1.html

 

Black Flies Return

By Muriel Bristol | May 11, 2018

The very last vestiges of packed snow situated in shady spots disappeared by Mayday. The Spring warmth that dissipated the snow also brought out the black flies. They are typically a nuisance between about Mother’s Day and Father’s Day. I try to remember what my grandfather always said: we need the black flies, as they are food for the fish and birds.

According to a UNH Cooperative Extension fact sheet, New Hampshire is home to 40 species of black flies, of which only 4 or 5 are considered to be either annoying or “significant” human biters. Only the female bites and most species feed on birds or other animals.

Black flies breed in running water. Females lay their eggs on stream vegetation or the water surface. When the larvae hatch (as water temperatures reach the 40-to-50 degree range), they attach themselves to rocks, leaves, grass or other submerged objects. The larvae pupate underwater and emerging adults rise to the surface to fly in Spring or early Summer. They mate near their hatching site and female seeks a blood meal (you) before laying eggs to begin the cycle again.

Only two species of black flies in New Hampshire consistently and abundantly bite humans. These are Prosimulium mixtum and Simulium venustum. Simulium venustum, the so-called “white-stockinged” black fly emerges in early to mid-May in southern New Hampshire and remains a pest until the end of May. In the north, it emerges in late May to early June and can remain abundant until the end of June in some areas and even into July in higher mountain localities (UNH/CE, 2009).

Light clothing colors such as orange, yellow and light blue are less attractive to black flies than dark green, brown and red. They are drawn also to perfumes and aftershaves.

The same remedies used for mosquitoes work also on black flies, although less effectively. The Centers for Disease Control recommend DEET, Picaridin, IR3535, and Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus for use in repelling biting anthropods, including black flies.

Years ago, Ole Time Woodsman Fly Dope was considered quite an effective repellent (although it had a very strong smell) and it was widely available in sporting goods stores. Johnson’s Baby Oil was said to be effective also.

Black flies are active only during the day. They do not bite at night. Depending on weather, black flies tend to be more active at certain times of day. Activity peaks tend to occur around 9:00 to 11:00 AM and again from 4:00 to 7:00 in the late afternoon and early evening, or until the sun falls below the horizon. They tend to be most active on humid, cloudy days and just before storms. If possible, avoid activity during times when black flies are most active. Early morning, midday and late evenings are the best times to work outside (UNH/CE, 2009).

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension has been quoted as saying that

Generally black fly bites cause some itching and minor swelling from the first few bites of the season, following which an immunity develops, with subsequent reduced reactions.  Nonetheless, even individuals who have lived all their lives in black fly country and are exposed every season, can have greater effects if they get an unusually high number of bites on their first exposure of the season, or have some significant change in their physical condition or medical status.

Good luck.


See also Hot Water for Itchy Bug Bites


References:

Ole Time Woodsman. (n.d.). [Home Page] Retrieved from https://oletimewoodsman.com/

University of Maine Cooperative Extension. (2012). Insect Repellents [Fact Sheet]. Retrieved from https://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/ipddl/publications/5108e/

University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension. (2009, July 1). Black Flies [Fact Sheet]. Retrieved from https://extension.unh.edu/resource/black-flies-fact-sheet

Walmart. (2018). Coleman Mosquito Head Net. Retrieved from https://www.walmart.com/ip/Coleman-Mosquito-Head-Net/13848609

 

Milton’s NH Employment Security (NHES) Community Profile

By Muriel Bristol | April 30, 2018

New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) produced an update to its Milton statistics in its NH Community Profiles in December 2017. Most of its figures were updated to 2015.

It included US Census Bureau figures, which estimated Milton’s population at 4,606 inhabitants as of 2015. This would be an increase of 0.3% of the 4,592 inhabitants estimated in 2014. Milton’s net population had not increased significantly since the 2010 census, when it had 4,598 inhabitants.

224 (4.7%) of Milton’s 4,606 inhabitants were aged under 5 years of age, 883 (19.2%) were aged 5-19 years of age, 815 (17.7%) were aged 20-34, 1,223 (26.6%) were aged 34-54 years of age, 803 (17.4%) were aged 55-64 years of age, and 658 (14.3%) were aged 65 years of age or over. There were 2,294 males (49.8%) and 2,312 (50.2%) females. The median age was 43.1 years (an increase of 4.6% over the prior year).

Milton had 2,058 housing units in 2015. Single-Family Units, Detached or Attached accounted for 1,616 (78.5%) of them, Mobile Homes (and Other Housing Units) accounted for 242 (11.6%), 2-4 Unit Multi-family Structures, i.e., apartment buildings, accounted for 107 (5.2%), and 5-or-more Unit Multi-family Structures accounted for 93 (4.5%) housing units.

By computation, the average Milton housing unit sheltered 2.2 inhabitants.

Milton’s single largest employer by far was the Milton town government, whose 247 employees (132 Municipal Services and 115 Education) made up 11.3% of the 2,185 employed inhabitants. Next largest was Index Packaging with 157 employees, Eastern Boats with 38 employees, Iron Mountain with 20 employees, and ProLine with 13 employees.

Most of Milton’s Working Residents (87.5%) commuted to employment out of town. Most of them (78.2%) commuted to another NH community, while some (9.3%) commuted to employment out of state. The mean travel time was 31 minutes. Only 12.5% worked in Milton.

Some 124 inhabitants (5.4%) were unemployed in 2015. (This had declined to 73 inhabitants (3.1%) by 2016).

The Per Capita income was $33,495 in 2015 (an increase of 0.9% over the previous year). The Median Family income was $67,991 and the Median Household income was $60,000. Individuals below the poverty level were 8.8% of the population.

References:

New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES). (2017, December 5). New Hampshire Community Profiles. Retrieved from https://www.nhes.nh.gov/elmi/products/cp/

Milton in the Third (1810) Federal Census

by Muriel Bristol | April 23, 2018

Milton made its first appearance as its own town in the Third Federal Census (1810). (It had separated from Rochester in 1802). It had 1,005 residents on Monday, August 6, 1810: 477 males (47.5%) and 528 females (52.5%).

Milton had 163 households with an average 6.2 inhabitants per household. Only 6 households (3.7%) were headed by a female (5 of them were titled “Widow”).

The surnames represented as heads of household (all other inhabitants were identified as counts only by age and sex) were: Adams, Applebee, Amos, Berry, Brackett, Bragdon, Bunker, Burham, Cate, Chamberlain, Chapman, Chase, Colby, Cook, Copp, Courson, Couston, Dearborn, Dore, Downs, Drew, Ellis, Fisk, Foss, Garland, Gate, Gerrish, Goodwin, Grant, Hanson, Harford, Hartshorne, Hayes, Henderson, Hierd, Horne, How, Jenkins, Jennings, Jewett, Jones, Libby, Lord, Lyman, McDuffee, Matthews, Merry, Meservey, Miller, Moulton, Nute, Nutter, Palmer, Paul, Peavey, Perkin, Phifield, Pinkum, Plumer, Prumer, Remick, Ricker, Rines, Robers, Roberts, Scates, Smith, Stevens, Tibbetts, Tuttle, Twombly, Varna, Varner, Varney, Wakeham, Waker, Wallingford, Watson, Wentworth, Whitehouse, Whitham, Whittum, Willey, Wingate, Worcester, and Young.

326 of Milton’s inhabitants were aged under 10 years of age (161 males and 165 females), 153 were aged 10-15 years of age (66 males and 87 females), 206 were aged 16-25 (97 males and 109 females), 166 were aged 26-44 years of age (76 males and 90 females), and 153 were aged over 45 years of age (76 males and 77 females). All of these were “free white” inhabitants. Peter Gerrish was the only inhabitant in the “all other free persons” category.

Merrill’s Gazetteer of the State of New Hampshire (1817) described Milton seven years later as having “3 religious societies, 1 meeting house, 3 grain mills, 3 sawmills, 1 clothing mill, and 3 trading stores.”


Previous in sequence: Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census; next in sequence: Milton in the Fourth (1820) Federal Census


References:

Wikipedia. (2018, November 9). 1810 United States Census. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1810_United_States_Census