Milton Selectman Hanson Hayes (1792-1851)

By Muriel Bristol | October 2, 2022

Hanson Hayes was born in Milton, January 13, 1792, son of James C. and Elizabeth (Twombly) Hayes.

(The known children of James C. and Elizabeth (Twombly) Hayes were: James Hayes (1790–1845), Hanson Hayes (1792–1851), Abra Hayes Fish (1795–1879), Chesley Hayes (1798–1835), and Sally Hayes Junkins (1803–1828)).

3rd Lt. Hanson Hayes was promoted to 2nd Lt. in NH’s Thirty-Third Regiment of militia, February 10, 1814. He replaced 2nd Lt. T. Buckminster, who had been promoted to 1st Lt., and he was himself replaced by Ensign Joshua B. Hartford (US Senate, 1828). (3rd Lt. Joshua B. Hartford (1795-1826) would be wounded in an action at La Cole Mill, Lower Canada, March 30, 1814).

Lt. Hanson Hayes marched to Portsmouth, NH, with Capt. William Courson’s Milton militia company in September 1814. (See Milton in the War of 1812).

2nd Lt. Hanson Hayes was promoted to 1st Lt. in NH’s Thirty-Third Regiment of militia, October 2, 1814. He replaced 1st Lt. Scammon, who had resigned, and he was himself replaced by 3rd Lt. Samuel Powell (US Senate, 1828).

Hanson Hayes married in Dover, NH, July 3, 1817, [Mrs.] Sophia (Swasey) Hanson, both of Milton. Rev. Joseph W. Clary performed the ceremony. She was born in Dover, NH, January 5, 1796, daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah (Somersby) Swasey (Dover Historical Society, 1894). (Her first husband had been John Hanson, who died April 30, 1814).

(The known children of Hanson and Sophia (Swasey) Hanson were: Susan Augusta Hayes (1818–1853), Mary Dearborn Hayes (1821–1904), Sarah Elizabeth Hayes (1824–1874), Clara Jane Hayes (1827–1897), John Hanson Hayes (1830–1912), Andrew Jackson Hayes (1832–1905)).

Daughter Susan Augusta Hayes was born in Milton, June 2, 1818.

Hanson Hayes, H. Meserve, and John Remick, Jr., were the Milton selectmen of 1819-20. One of the issues with which their board had to deal was the Milton militia dispute of 1820. (Hanson Hayes had been a Milton militia officer in 1814).

Milton Selectmen - 1820
Selectmen Hn Hayes, Hopley Meserve, and John Remick, Jr., recommended the appointment of Gilman Jewett as a Milton justice of the peace in November 1820, while the earlier appointment of James Roberts seemed to be in some doubt. The elaborate calligraphy of Hayes’ signature certainly stands out in a crowd. Hayes and Meserve would be selectmen together with Roberts in the following year.

Jas. Roberts, H. Hayes, and H. Meserve were the Milton selectmen of 1821 and 1822.

Hanson Hayes was one of twelve incorporators of the Humane Lodge of Masons of Rochester, NH, in June 1821. Incorporators Levi Jones (1771-1847), Dr. Stephen Drew (1791-1872), Ira Fish (1790-1872), and Jones’ older brother William Jones (1769-1845) were also Milton men; Giles W. Burrows (1821-1900) and Nathaniel Lord (1790-1870) were from Lebanon, ME; and John Chapman, Joseph Cross, Charles Dennett (1788-1867), Rev. Harvey Morey (1789-1830), and John Roberts, Jr. (1789-1861) were from Rochester, NH.

Daughter Mary Dearborn Hayes was born in Milton, September 12, 1821.

H. Hayes, Hopley Meserve, Jotham Nute, and James Roberts of Milton were among the many inhabitants of Alton, Brookfield, Farmington, Milton, Middleton, Rochester, Wakefield, and Wolfeborough, NH, that recommended Dr. Joseph Hammons for appointment as a Farmington justice of the peace, in 1822. (Dr. Hammons (1787-1836), a Jacksonian Democrat, would be elected later to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1828. He was appointed Farmington postmaster in 1833).

The NH legislature authorized incorporation of the Milton Social Library by nine Milton men, including Hanson Hayes, June 14, 1822. Gilman Jewett was empowered to call its first meeting and preside over it as its moderator pro tem.

H. Hayes, H. Meserve, Jos. Plumer were the Milton selectmen of 1823. H. Hayes, H. Meserve, I.H. Wentworth were the Milton selectmen of 1824

Daughter Sarah Elizabeth Hayes was born in Milton, September 12, 1824. (1824–1874).

Milton sent Hanson Hayes to Concord, NH, as its NH State Representative in 1825-27. (He seems to have been a Democratic-Republican, i.e., a Democrat). He received 240 votes in the election.

Hanson Hayes received his initial appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 21, 1825.

Justices of the Peace. MiltonJotham Nute, D. Hayes, John Remich, jr., J. Roberts, Hanson Hayes (Farmer, 1824). 

H. Hayes, John Kimball, and Ezekiel Kimball recommended Stephen M. Mathes for appointment as a Milton justice of the peace at the Three Ponds, on the Salmon fall river, in June 1826. John Chadwick, David Davis, Joseph Hammons, H. Hayes, and Thomas Tash, Jr., recommended Jacob R. Pilsbury for appointment as a Middleton, NH, justice of the peace, in June 1826. Pilsbury was then the Middleton coroner.

In June 1826, Rep. H. Hayes acknowledged receipt of “the first & second parts of the third Vol. of New Hampshire Reports, respectively, for the towns we severally represent in the Legislature of N.H. the current year, and against which towns our names are placed.” (He did not sign this time with his former flourish).

On Saturday, June 10, 1826, Rep. Knowlton moved for reconsideration of the previous day’s vote “for supplying the members with certain newspapers during the present session,” at State expense. Rep. Hayes of Milton voted with the 158 representatives that opposed reconsideration, as opposed to the 20 representatives in favor. That is to say, he voted in favor of supplying the newspapers at State expense (NH General Court, 1826).

On Wednesday, June 28, 1826, Rep. Hayes voted with the 88 representatives in favor of “an act to establish the rate at which sheep shall be valued in making and assessing taxes,” as opposed to the 97 representatives that opposed the measure (NH General Court, 1826).

On Thursday, June 29, 1826, Rep. Hayes voted with the 87 representatives that voted in favor of incorporating the Somersworth Bank, as opposed to the 121 representatives that voted against the measure (NH General Court, 1826).

On Tuesday, July 4, 1826, Rep. Hayes voted with the 118 representatives that voted in favor of appropriating $2,500 for improving “the road through the town of Lincoln in the direction from the Franconia notch to the town of Peeling,” as opposed to the 66 representatives that voted against the measure (NH General Court, 1826). (Peeling is known now as Woodstock, NH).

Daughter Clara Jane Hayes was born in Milton, September 13, 1827.

Son John Hanson Hayes was born in Milton, April 26, 1830.

Hanson Hayes received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 28, 1830.

Hanson Hayes headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Sophia ((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes], one male aged 10-14 years, one female aged 10-14 years [Susan A. Hayes], two females aged 5-9 years [Mary D. Hayes and Sarah E. Hayes], one female aged under-5 years [Clara J. Hayes], one male aged under-5 years [John H. Hayes]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of James Moulton and Moses Chamberlain.

Son Andrew Jackson Hayes was born in Milton, August 17, 1832. His name suggests that his father was an admirer of Democrat President Andrew Jackson, who was president between 1829 and 1837.

Hanson Hayes received a renewal of his appointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace on June 15, 1835.

Justices of the Peace. MiltonLevi Jones, Daniel Hayes, John Remich, James Roberts, Hanson Hayes, Stephen M. Mathes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, Samuel S. Mason, Stephen Drew, Israel Nute, John L. Swinerton, Thomas Chapman (Hayward, 1834).

Daughter Susan A. Hayes married in Milton, September 15, 1839, Cyrus Ferguson. He was born in South Berwick, ME, September 10, 1808.

Hanson Hayes headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Sophia ((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes], one female aged 15-19 years [Sarah E. Hayes], one female aged 10-14 years [Clara J. Hayes], one male aged 10-14 years [John H. Hayes], and one male aged 5-9 years [Andrew J. Hayes]. Two members of his household were engaged in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Sarah Chamberlain and Asa Brackett.

Cyrus Ferguson headed a South Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], and one female aged 30-39 years [Susan A. (Hayes) Ferguson]. One member of his household was engaged in Manufacture and the Trades. (Son Alfred H. Ferguson (1840-1861) would be born in South Berwick, ME, August 15, 1840).

Daughter Mary D. Hayes married (1st), February 5, 1843, Brackett Merrill. He was born in Acton, ME, March 15, 1815, son of Nathan and Sarah “Sally” (Brackett) Merrill.

Son-in-law Brackett Merrill succeeded John L. Swinerton as Milton Mills postmaster, April 10, 1843.

Justices of the Peace. MiltonLevi Jones, Stephen Drew, Daniel Hayes, Hanson Hayes, John Nutter, Theodore C. Lyman, John L. Swinerton, Joseph Cook, John J. Plumer, Daniel Hayes, jr., Enoch Banfield, Daniel P. Warren, Joseph Cook, James Berry, Wm. B. Lyman (Farmer & Lyon, 1844).

Son-in-law Cyrus Ferguson died of consumption in South Berwick, ME, December 31, 1848, aged forty years.

Hanson Hayes, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sophia [((Swasey) Hanson)] Hayes, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and Andrew J. Hayes, a farmer, aged seventeen years (b. NH). Hanson Hayes had real estate valued at $2,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of David M. Corson, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), and James A. Ricker, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. NH).

Susan A.H. [(Hayes)] Furguson, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a South Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Alfred H. Furguson, aged ten years (b. ME), and John H. Hayes, a laborer, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Susan A.H. Furguson had personal estate valued at $900.

Brackett Merrill, a lumber dealer, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary [(Hayes)] Merrill, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Charles Javett Merrill, aged six years (b. NH), Sarah Hayes, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Frank Hayes, aged three years (b. NH). Brackett Merrill had real estate valued at $1,500. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joseph Rines, a farmer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), and Josiah N. Witham, a farmer, aged forty-six years (b. NH). (Asa Jewett, a lumber dealer, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), and Bray U. Simes, a trader, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), appeared further down the same page, i.e., the Merrill house was in Milton Mills).

Hanson Hayes died in Milton, December 1, 1851.

Daughter Clara J. Hayes married in South Berwick, ME, June 13, 1852, Joseph A. Hanson, she of Milton, and he of South Berwick, ME. Rev. John Richardson performed the ceremony. Hanson was born in North Berwick, ME, December 16, 1828, son of Stephen and Mindwell (Boston) Hanson.

Daughter Susan A. (Hayes) Ferguson died in South Berwick, ME, October 3, 1853, aged thirty-five years.

Son John H. Hayes married in South Berwick, ME, November 1, 1853, Henrietta Dwight Stone. She was born in Union, ME, May 27, 1833, daughter of Henry and Jane M. (Richardson) Stone.

He [John H. Hayes] was a carriage maker and they resided in Newmarket and Suncook, N.H. (Bartlett, 1918).

Sophia ((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes married (3rd) in Milton, January 29, 1854, Ebenezer Adams, both of Milton. (Her pension claim gave the marriage date as February 15, 1854). He was aged sixty-one years and she was aged fifty-eight years. Rev. Loren E. Gordon performed the ceremony. He died in Milton, April 4, 1855.

Daughter Sarah E. Hayes married in Milton, January 6, 1855, Jacob S. Adams, both of Milton. He was aged twenty-six years and she was aged thirty years. Rev. James Doldt performed the ceremony. Adams was born in Milton, September 1, 1828, son of Ebenezer and Betsy (Sanborn) Adams. (He was the son-in-law of Sophia (((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes) Adams twice over, first as the son of her third husband, Ebenezer Adams, and then again as the husband of her daughter, Sarah E. (Hayes) Hanson).

Sophia [(((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes)] Adams of Milton filed for a War of 1812 widow’s pension (and bounty land warrant #21332-160-55), based upon her late third husband Ebenezer Adams’ service in Captain William Courson’s Milton militia company in September 1814. (See Milton in the War of 1812). File remarks indicated that “Sophia Adams previously married John Hamon [Hanson], who died April 30, 1814, and Hamon [Hanson] Hayes, who died Dec. 1851. Soldier first married Betsy Sanborn, who died April 30, 1852.”

Catherine [(Schoenborn)] Pelky, aged thirty-one years (b. France), headed a Racine, WI, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included Joseph Pelky, aged twelve years (b. WI), William Pelky, aged ten years (b. WI), Elizabeth Pelky, aged five years (b. WI), Cornelia Pelky, aged two years (b. WI), and Bracket Merrill, a saloon keeper, aged forty-four years (b. ME).

Jacob S. Adams, a shoemaker, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah E. [(Hayes)] Adams, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Sophia [(((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes)] Adams, a domestic, aged sixty-four years (b. NH). Jacob S. Adams had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $125. Sophia Adams had personal estate valued at $200.

Joseph A. Hanson, a manufacturer, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), headed a South Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. his household included Clara J. [(Hayes)] Hanson, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Frank E. Hanson, aged five years (b. ME), Susan A. Hanson, aged three years (b. ME), Alphida Hanson, aged two years (b. ME), and Alfred H. Ferguson, a student, aged twenty years (b. ME). Joseph A. Hanson had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $300.

John H. Hayes, an overseer in mill, aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Newmarket, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Henrietta [(Stone)] Hayes, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), Mabel F. Hayes, aged seven months (b. ME), Thomas H. Cord, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and Louisa J. Hanscom, aged twenty-two years (b. MA). John H. Hayes had personal estate valued at $200. Thomas H. Cord had personal estate valued at $350.

Son-in-law Brackett Merrill died in Racine, WI, in November 1862. His widow, daughter Mary D. (Hayes) Merrill married (2nd) in Seneca, OH, March 8, 1864, Michael R. Moltz, he of Tiflin, OH. He was born in PA, October 11, 1814.

Son Andrew J. Hayes married in Wakefield, NH, February 11, 1865, Susan M. Stevens. Nathaniel Barker performed the ceremony. She was born in Middleton, NH, April 8, 1839, daughter of John D. and Martha (Buzzell) Stevens.

Edwd. W. Junkins, a marble-cutter, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the MA State Census of 1865. His household included Helen P. Junkins, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), Alice H. Junkins, aged five months (b. MA), Andrew J. Hayes, a clerk, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), and Susan [(Stevens)] Hayes, aged twenty-six years (b. NH).

Jacob S. Adams, a road master, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield (“Union”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah E. [(Hayes)] Adams, keeping house, aged forty-six years (b. NH), Sophia [(((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes)] Adams, at home, aged seventy-four years (b. NH). Jacob S. Adams had real estate valued at $1,800 and personal estate valued at $300.

Joseph A. Hanson, works in cotton mill, aged forty-four years (b. ME), headed a South Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Clara J. [(Hayes)] Hanson, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), Frank E. Hanson, at home, aged fifteen years (b. ME), Susan A. Hanson, attending school, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Etta H. Hanson, aged twelve years (b. ME), Lutie M. Hanson, aged four years (b. ME), and Sophia [(((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes)] Adams, aged seventy-four years (b. NH). Joseph A. Hanson had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000.

John H. Hayes, works in cotton mill, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Pembroke (“Suncook P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Henrietta D. [(Stone)] Hayes, keeping house, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Mabel F. Hayes, attending school, aged ten years (b. ME), and Henry S. Hayes, attending school, aged seven years (b. NH). John H. Hayes had personal estate valued at $1,000.

Andrew J. Hayes, a farm laborer, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Peabody, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan A. [Stevens] Hayes, keeping house, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Horace Magoon, a farm laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. VT), Humphrey Haley, a farm laborer, aged thirty-three years (b. Ireland), Amasa Smith, a farm laborer, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Albert A. Paul, a farm laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Stephen Paul, a farm laborer, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), Oscar Fellows, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. NH), and William Churchill, a farm laborer, aged thirty years (b. Nova Scotia). They shared a two-family residence with the household of Stephen Kelley, a gardener, aged fifty-four years (b. Ireland).

Daughter-in-law Henrietta D. (Stone) Hayes died in Pembroke, NH, November 15, 1870.

… after the death of his wife, he [John H. Hayes] lived in Amesbury, Mass., and Attica, O., and finally in Whitehouse, O., where he d., 11 Jan. 1912 (Bartlett, 1918). 

LOCAL CORRESPONDENCE. ATTICA NEWS. An itinerant dry goods auctioneer is holding forth in the store room of M.R. Moltz (Tiflin Tribune (Tiflin, OH), January 9, 1873).

Daughter Sarah E. (Hayes) Adams died of typhoid fever in Woburn, MA, September 29, 1874, aged fifty years, five months.

Widowed son-in-law Jacob S. Adams married (2nd) in Stoneham, MA, May 2, 1876, Elmira E. “Myra” Clement, he of Union, [Wakefield,] NH, and she of Stoneham, MA. He was a roadmaster, aged forty-seven years, and she was aged thirty-six years. Rev. J.O. Knowles performed the ceremony. She was born in Brookfield, NH, circa 1840, daughter of John and Mehitable (Sanborn) Clement.

Sophia [(((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes)] Adams’ War of 1812 widow’s pension file bears a clerical notation that her residence had become North Berwick, ME, by 1878.

Michael R. Moltz, a retired merchant, aged sixty-five years (b. PA), headed an Attica, OH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary D. [((Hayes) Merrill)] Moltz, keeping house, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), and his [her] niece, Mable F. Hays, aged twenty years (b. ME).

Jacob S. Adams, a carpenter, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Myra E. [(Clement)] Adams, keeping house, aged forty years (b. NH), and his son-in-law, Herbert E. Clement, clerk in store, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). (They appeared on the same enumeration page as John Meikle).

Joseph A. Hanson, keeps hardware store, aged fifty-two years (b. ME), headed a North Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Clara J. [(Hayes)] Hanson, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), his children, Susie A. Hanson, at home, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), Etta H. Hanson, at home, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Lutia M. Hanson, at school, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Sophia [(((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes)] Adams, aged eighty-four years (b. NH). Sophia Adams was said to have a “heart complaint.”

Harriet [(Gale)] Osgood, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), headed a Salisbury, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her children, George G. Osgood, carriage trimming, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA), Ella B. [(Osgood)] Maytham, helping keep house, aged twenty-three years (b. MA), her son-in-law, George A. Maytham, a carriage trimmer, aged twenty-four years (b. OH), and her boarder, John Hayes, a carriage wood worker, aged fifty years (b. NH).

Andrew J. Hayes, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Peabody, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Susan M. [(Stevens)] Hayes, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and his laborers, John E. Higgins, a farm laborer, twenty-five years (b. ME), Charles E. Hinckley, a farm laborer, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), Charles Jordan, a farm laborer, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), Andrew C. Perkins, a farm laborer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Alexander Frazier, a farm laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. Nova Scotia), Nelson Truel, a farm laborer, aged twenty-seven years (b. Nova Scotia), and Ezra Roberts, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. Nova Scotia),. They resided at 3 Gardner Street.

Sophia (((Swasey) Hanson) Hayes) Adams died in North Berwick, ME, November 25, 1881, aged eighty-four years, ten months.

Bankruptcy Matters. … A voluntary petition of insolvency was filed by Joseph A. Hanson & Son, grocers, 43 Kneeland street. No schedules were filed with the petition (Boston Globe, December 27, 1881).

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. NORTH BERWICK – Nov. 25. Joseph A. Hanson of Malden, Mass., to George M. Hanson of Somersworth, N.H., land and buildings in No. Berwick for $3,600 (Biddeford-Saco Journal (Biddeford, ME), December 16, 1885).

Son-in-law Joseph A. Hanson died of phthisis in Malden, MA, January 20, 1886, aged fifty-seven years, one month, and four days. He was a grocer.

UNION. Andrew J. Hayes and wife returned home to Peabody, Mass., Tuesday (Farmington News, November 14, 1890).

Daughter-in-law Susan M. (Stevens) Hayes died in Union, Wakefield, MA, July 6, 1896.

Daughter Clara J. (Hayes) Hanson died of chronic heart disease in Malden, MA, April 15, 1897, aged sixty-nine years, seven months, and two days.

Son-in-law Michael R. Moltz died October 8, 1898, aged eighty-three years.

Mary D. [((Hayes) Merrill)] Moltz, a widow, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH), headed a Venice, OH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. She owned her house, free-and-clear. She was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living.

Jacob S. Adams, aged seventy-one years, headed a Wakefield (“Union Village”), NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-four years), Elmira E. [(Clement)] Adams, aged sixty years. He owned her house, free-and-clear. She was the mother of one child, who was no longer living.

H.S. Hayes, a physician, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Whitehouse, OH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seventeen years), Etta [(Carson)] Hayes, aged thirty-eight years (b. OH), his children, Frank C. Hayes, a student, aged sixteen years (b. OH), Earnest E. Hayes, aged fifteen years (b. OH), Alus M. Hayes, aged twelve years (b. OH), Berne Hayes, aged ten years (b. OH), and his father, John H. Hayes, a retired merchant, aged seventy years (b. NH). Etta Hayes was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

Lydia F. [(Stevens)] Mitchell, a widow, aged sixty-six years, headed a Wakefield (“Union Village”), NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her boarder, Andrew J. Hayes, a widower, aged sixty-seven years. Lydia F. Mitchell owned her house, free-and-clear. She was the mother of on child, who was still living.

Son-in-law Jacob S. Adams died of senility in Union, Wakefield, NH, July 14, 1901, aged seventy-two years, ten months, and fourteen days. He had resided in Wakefield, NH, for forty years, i.e., since circa 1860-61, and a former railroader. C.E. Rogers, M.D., signed the death certificate.

UNION, N.H. Andrew Hayes, who has been confined to the house by sickness for several weeks, is improving in health (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), November 9, 1904).

Daughter Mary D. ((Hayes) Merrill) Moltz died in Attica, OH, December 31, 1904.

Son Andrew J. Hayes died of acute enteritis (and valvular disease) in Union, Wakefield, NH, June 20, 1905, aged seventy-two years, ten months, and three days. H.A. Moody, M.D. signed the death certificate.

Harry S. Hayes, a steam shovel crane-man [SIC], aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Waterville, OH, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. [“The records in our [medical licensing] office show that the certificate of Harry S. Hayes was revoked Oct 3, 1905, and was restored to him on Oct 22, 1914”]. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Luetta [(Carson)] Hayes, aged forty-eight years (b. OH), his children, Frank C. Hayes, a steam plumber, aged twenty-six years (b. OH), Ernest E. Hayes, a government clerk, aged twenty-four years (b. OH), Olus M. Hayes (b. OH), aged twenty-two years, Berne Hayes, aged twenty years (b. OH), and his father, John H. Hayes, own income, aged seventy-nine years (b. NH). Harry S. Hayes owned their house on Waterville Street, with a mortgage. Luetta Hayes was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living.

Son John H. Hayes died in Whitehouse, OH, January 11, 1912, aged eighty-one years.


References:

Bartlett, Joseph G. (1918). Gregory Stone Genealogy: Ancestry and Descendants of Dea. Gregory Stone of Cambridge, Mass., 1320-1917. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ZxsVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA727

Dover Historical Society. (1894). Collections of the Dover, N.H., Historical Society. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=QhpU3FwGl6gC&pg=PA179

Farmer, John. (1824). New Hampshire Annual Register and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=O0g9AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA45

Farmer, John, & Lyon, G. Parker. (1844). New-Hampshire Annual Register, and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=BJIBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA50

Find a Grave. (2018, April 15). Ebenezer Adams. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/188842465/ebenezer-adams

Find a Grave. (2021, October 10). Sarah E. Hayes Adams. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/232907594/sarah-e-adams

Find a Grave. (2013, August 14). Susana E. Hayes Ferguson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/115495247/susana-e-ferguson

Find a Grave. (2007, March 6). Joseph Hammons. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/18267613/joseph-hammons

Find a Grave. (2016, October 5). Clara J. Hayes Hanson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/170888507/clara-j-hanson

Find a Grave. (2021, October 10). Andrew J. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/232908978/andrew-j-hayes

Find a Grave. (2021, October 10). Hanson Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/232909065/hanson-hayes

Find a Grave. (2013, December 20). Henrietta Dwight Stone Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/121955023/henrietta-dwight-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). James Chesley Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130395278/james-chesley-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, April 17). John Hanson Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/128100644/john-hanson-hayes

Find a Grave. (2011, April 14). Mary D. Merrill Moltz. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/68349146/mary-d.-moltz

Hayward, John. (1834). New-England and New-York Law-Register, for the Year 1835. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RXc8AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA86

NH General Court. (1921). Laws of New Hampshire: Second Constitutional Period, 1821-1828. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=pr9GAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA383

NH General Court. (1826). Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of New-Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=FQBGAQAAMAAJ

US Senate. (1828). Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=IblDAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA553

Milton Postmaster James M. Twombly (1798-1885)

By Muriel Bristol | September 25, 2022

James Meserve Twombly was born in Rochester, NH, i.e., in its Northeast Parish that would become Milton, November 3, 1798, son of John Jr. and Abigail (Meserve) Twombly.

James M. Twombly married, circa 1824, Eunice Burrows. She was born in Lebanon, ME, June 4, 1799, daughter of Edward Jr. and Margaret (Chamberlain) Burrows.

(The known children of James M. and Eunice (Burrows) Twombly were: Irene B. Twombly (1826–1894), Ezra H. Twombly (1830–1883), Mary Abigail Twombly (1833–1891), John E. Twombly (1836–1888), and Lilian A. Twombly (1864–1885)).

Daughter Irene B. Twombly was born in Milton, April 26, 1826.

James M. Twombly received his first Federal appointment as Milton postmaster, September 26, 1827. Twombly was appointed during the presidency of Democratic-Republican John Q. Adams and continued in office throughout the presidency of Democrat Andrew Jackson, from which one might infer that he too was a Democrat (at that time). He would be succeeded by [Dr.] Stephen Drew, June 17, 1837, during the presidency of Democrat Martin Van Buren.

James M. Twombly appeared in the U.S. Postal Guide of 1828 as Milton postmaster. Milton was 525 miles from Washington, DC, and 58 miles from the NH State capitol in Concord, NH. John Nutter was postmaster at Milton Mills (US Post Office Dept., 1828).

Son Ezra H. Twombly was born in Milton, January 6, 1830.

Jas. M. Twombly headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Eunice (Burrows) Twombly], one female aged under-5 years [Irene B. Twombly], and one male aged under-5 years [Ezra H. Twombly]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Stephen Maine, and John Willey.

James M. Twombly appeared in the US Register of 1831, as having received $10.14 in compensation for being Milton postmaster (US Dept. of State, 1831).

James M. Twombly appeared in the NH Register of 1833, as being the Milton postmaster. Israel Nute was postmaster at Chestnut Hills and John Nutter was postmaster at Milton Mills (Farmer & Lyon, 1833).

Daughter Mary Abigail Twombly was born in Milton, June 24, 1833.

J.M. Twombly appeared in the US Register of 1835, as having received $10.90 in compensation for being Milton postmaster. John Nutter had received $7.51 for being Milton Mills postmaster in that same period (US Dept. of State, 1835).

Son John E.B. Twombly was born in Milton, January 3, 1836.

J.M. Twombly appeared in the US Register of 1838, as having received $20.90 in compensation for having been Milton postmaster in 1837. John Nutter had received $12.49 for being Milton Mills postmaster in that same period (US Dept. of State, 1838).

Milton sent James M. Twombly to Concord, NH, as its NH State Representative for the 1837-38 biennium. He was preceded in that office by [Dr.] Stephen Drew and succeeded by James Berry (Scales, 1914).

Representative James M. Twombly sat in 1838 on the Committee on Military Accounts, with Representatives Joseph S. Pollard of Plaistow, NH, Trueworthy Hill of Lee, NH, Richard M. Nelson of Lyman, NH, and Jason Saunders of Grafton County, NH (NH General Court, 1838).

Mr. Twombly presented the petition of John French and others, citizens of Milton (NH General Court, 1838).

The Milton petition was one of a number of such petitions: “All praying for the enactment of a law to prevent disturbances at religious meetings.” The meetings for which protection was sought were so-called “Camp” Meetings. The bill was laid upon the table, i.e., set aside.

James M. Twombly headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Eunice (Burrows) Twombly], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 10-14 years [Irene B. Twombly], one male aged 10-14 years [Ezra H. Twombly], one female aged 5-9 years [Mary A. Twombly], and one male aged 5-9 years [John E. Twombly]. Two members of his household were engaged in Commerce. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Benjamin Willey, 2d, and Elizabeth Gerrish.

James M. Twombly was Milton Town Clerk in the years 1841 to 1851. He was preceded in that office by Stephen M. Mathes and succeeded by Robert Mathes (Scales, 1914).

Irene B. Twombly married, probably in Milton, circa 1849, Daniel P. Warren. He was born in Rochester, NH, March 26, 1815, son of William and Susan (Roberts) Warren.

Jas. M. Twombly received his second Federal appointment as Milton postmaster, January 18, 1850. Twombly was appointed during the presidency of Whig Zachary Taylor, from which one might infer that he had become a Whig at some time since his prior appointment ended in 1837. Taylor died in office and his vice-president, Millard Fillmore, completed his term. Twombly continued as postmaster throughout the Fillmore’s term. Fillmore would be the last Whig president. The Whigs merged subsequently with anti-slavery Democrats and others to form the Republican party.

James Twombly, a farmer, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eunice [(Burrows)] Twombly, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), Ezra Twombly, a trader, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), Mary A. Twombly, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and John E.B. Twombly, aged fourteen years (b. NH). James Twombly had real estate valued at $3,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of George Worster, a machinist, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and Stephen Downs, a farmer, aged forty-one years (b. NH).

Daniel P. Warren, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Irene B. Warren, aged twenty-four years (b. NH). Daniel P. Warren had real estate valued at $2,500. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Leonard Ricker, a shoemaker, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and George Carlisle, a blacksmith, aged fifty-four years (b. ME).

James M. Twombly appeared in the NH Register of 1851, as being the Milton postmaster. J. Pearl was postmaster at Chestnut Hills and Gilman Jewett was postmaster at Milton Mills (Claremont Mfg. Co., 1851).

Milton postmaster, James M. Twombly, received $112.81 and his post office had net proceeds of $148.10. Postmaster Gilman Jewett received $56.88 in compensation for his work at the Milton Mills post office in 1851, and his post office had net proceeds of $77.66.  (US Dept. of the Interior, 1851).

J.M. Twombly served as Milton postmaster through April 19, 1853, being replaced then by James Connor. Twombly’s compensation, as well as that of Connor through June 30, amounted to $72.08. (Other sources report Twombly’s last day as having been April 2, 1853). The net proceeds of the post office in that same period ran to $81.54. Connor received his appointment at the beginning of the presidency of Democrat Franklin Pierce. Postmaster Gilman Jewett received $51.62 in compensation for his work at the Milton Mills post office in 1851, and his post office had net proceeds of $55.29 (US Dept. of the Interior, 1853).

Son Ezra H. Twombly married in Dover, NH, March 5, 1855, Lucinda K. Hanson, he of Milton and she of Dover, NH. Rev. Lewis Howard performed the ceremony. She was born in Dover, NH, December 29, 1828, daughter of Israel and Eunice (Twombly) Hanson.

Twombly, JM - 1856Eunice (Burrows) Twombly died of consumption in Milton, March 2, 1859, aged fifty-nine years, nine months, and twenty-four days.

James M. Twombly, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included [Mary] Abba Twombly, aged twenty-five years (b. NH), and John E. Twombly, a farmer, aged twenty-three years (b. NH). James M. Twombly had real estate valued at $6,000 and personal estate valued at $2,000. His household appeared between those of Ira S. Knox, a shoemaker, aged thirty years (b. NH), and Lewis N. Berry, a shoe manufacturer, aged thirty-six years (b. NH). (The households of son-in-law D.P. Warren and son E.H. Twombly appeared on the same page).

D.P. Warren, a shoe manufacturer, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Irene B. Warren, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Edgar B. Warren, aged eight years (b. NH), and Eunice E. Warren, aged three years (b. NH). D.P. Warren had real estate valued at $4,000 and personal estate valued at $7,000. His household appeared between those of E.R. Lord, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), and James W. Nutter, a shoemaker, aged thirty-one years (b. NH). (The households of father-in-law James M. Twombly and brother-in-law E.H. Twombly appeared on the same page).

E.H. Twombly, a merchant, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton (Milton P.O.) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Lucinda K. Twombly, aged thirty-one years (b. NH), Isabel Twombly, aged four years (b. NH), and Susan A. Twombly, aged two years (b. NH), and, apparently, George A. Randall, aged ten years (b. NH), Charles E. Randall, aged nine years (b. NH), and E.F. Randall, aged six years (b. NH). E.H. Twombly had real estate valued at $3,500 and personal estate valued at $2,500. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Benjamin Randall, a farm laborer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and W. Laskey, a laborer, aged thirty years (b. NH). (The households of father James M. Twombly and brother-in-law D.P. Warren appeared on the same page).

Daughter Mary A. Twombly married, probably in Milton, circa 1860, John F. Hart. (See Milton Merchant John F. Hart (1829-1896)).

Son Ezra H. Twombly replaced James R. Palmer as Milton postmaster, April 12, 1861. (This was the same day that Fort Sumpter was attacked in Charleston harbor, which is generally regarded as the start of the Civil War).

James M. Twombly married (2nd), circa 1862-63, Lydia A. Perkins. She was born in Lancaster, NH, in 1829, daughter of John and Mary (Ela) Perkins.

Daughter Lillian Adelaide Twombly was born in Lebanon, ME, in 1864.

Son John E. Twombly married in Somersworth, NH, July 29, 1868, Lydia Ann “Annie” Waterhouse, he of Milton and she of Dover, NH. He was a merchant, aged thirty-two years, and she was a lady, aged twenty-eight years. Rev. O. Jasper performed the ceremony. She was born in Strafford, NH, January 4, 1843, daughter of Benjamin F. and Lydia M. (Tuttle) Waterhouse.

James Twombly, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lydia [(Perkins)] Twombly, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and Lillian A. Twombly, aged six years (b. ME). James Twombly had real estate valued at $300 and personal estate valued at $300. (Their entry had an error, by which James Twombly was enumerated as a member of the preceding household of Samuel Knox, a laborer, aged sixty-six years (b. ME), rather than as the head of his own household).

Betsy M. [(Roberts)] Meserve, keeping house, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included Daniel P. Warren, a grocer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), Irene Warren, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), Edgar B. Warren, attending school, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Ennie Warren, attending school, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Betsy M. Meserve had real estate valued at $3,500. She was the widow of Charles Y. Meserve (1815-1869). (See Milton Trader Hopley Meserve (1789-1875)).

Ezra H. Twombly, post-master, aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lucinda K. Twombly, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), Isabella Twombly, at home, aged fourteen years (b. NH), and Susan A. Twombly, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). Ezra H. Twombly had real estate valued at $3,500 and personal estate valued at $385. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of Hazen Duntley, a blacksmith, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), and Charles L. Lord, a shoe cutter, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME).

John F. Hart, works in shoe factory, aged forty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. Hart, keeping house, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), Delta A. Hart, at school, aged eight years (b. NH), Cisco W. Hart, at school, aged six years (b. NH), Paulina Hart, at school, aged four years (b. NH), and Dana B. Hart, aged two years (b. NH). John F. Hart had real estate valued at $750 and personal estate valued at $1,015. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Charles H. Pease, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), and Robert Mathes, a farm laborer, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH).

John E. Twombly, a retail grocer, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lydia A. [(Waterhouse)] Twombly, keeping house, aged thirty years (b. NH), Clarence E. Twombly, aged eleven months (b. NH), and Ora J. Downs, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH). John E. Twombly had personal estate valued at $2,335. Their household appeared in the enumeration between the households of James W. Nutter, works in shoe factory, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and George W. Peavey, a physician, aged thirty-one years (b. NH).

John E. Twombly’s store (and his brother’s post-office within it) burned to the ground on Christmas Eve, December 24, 1870. Postmaster Ezra H. Twombly would be succeeded in that office by Charles H. Looney, January 17, 1872.

James M. Twombly, a farmer, aged eighty-one years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lydia M. [(Perkins)] Twombly, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), and his daughter, Lillian A. Twombly, at home, aged fifteen years (b. ME).

Daniel P. Warren, a book agent, aged sixty years (b. NH), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Irena B. Warren, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his children, Edgar B. Warren, shoe business, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Eunie E. Warren, a music teacher, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and his boarder, Dyer Smith, at home, aged seventy-nine years (b. MA).

Ezra H. Twombly, a laborer, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucinda K. Twombly, keeping house, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and his children, Isabel N. Twombly, works in millinery store, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Annette S. Twombly, a schoolteacher, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). They resided on Portland Street.

John F. Hart, a merchant, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. Hart, keeps house, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), Delta C. Hart, works on shoes, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Cisco W. Hart, works on shoes, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Paulina E. Hart, at school, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Dana B. Hart, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Bridie B. Hart, aged four years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Hiram V.R. Edgerly, a carpenter, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), and Henry Downs, a farmer, aged sixty years (b. Canada).

John E. Twombly, a clerk in grocer’s store, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Lydia A. [(Waterhouse)] Twombly, keeping house, aged forty years (b. NH), Clarence E. Twombly, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), James F. Twombly, at school, aged nine years (b. NH), Mary F. Twombly, at school, aged six years (b. NH), Benjamin F. Twombly, aged two years (b. NH), and Edith G. Twombly, aged ten months (b. NH). They resided on Silver Street.

Son-in-law Daniel P. Warren died of heart disease in Winthrop, MA, June 7, 1881, aged sixty-seven years, two months, and twelve days.

Son Ezra H. Twombly died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Dover, N.H., December 13, 1883, aged fifty-four years. (This date, as reported in several newspapers, is at variance with NH vital records, which gave his death as having taken place a week later, December 19, 1883).

BY TELEGRAPH. Ezra H. Twombly, widely known as a prominent citizen, died at Dover, N.H., this morning in an appoplectic fit, aged 50 years (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), December 13, 1883).

Daughter Lillian A. Twombly married in Lebanon, NE, January 20, 1885, James Fred Goodrich, she of Lebanon, ME, and he of Moultonborough, NH. He was a millman, aged twenty-two years, and she was a housewife, aged twenty years. Rev. F.E. Briggs performed the ceremony. Goodrich was born in Somersworth, NH, circa 1863, son of James W. and Mary C. Goodrich.

Daughter Lillian A. (Twombly) Goodrich died in Lebanon, ME, August 20, 1885, aged twenty-one years, one month, and sixteen days.

James M. Twombly died in Lebanon, ME, October 25, 1885.

Son John E. Twombly died of a gastric tumor in Dover, NH, August 24, 1888, aged fifty-two years.

Daughter Mary A. (Twombly) Hart died of gastric fever in Milton, September 3, 1891, aged fifty-eight years.

Irena B. Warren appeared in the Somerville, MA, directory of 1892, as the widow of Daniel P. Warren, with her house at 2 Charles street. Edgar B. Warren appeared as a traveling salesman (134 Summer street, Boston), boarding at 2 Charles street. Eunice E. Warren appeared as a music teacher, boarding at 2 Charles street.

Daughter Irena B. (Twombly) Warren died of consumption of the bowels in Somerville, MA, May 30, 1894, aged sixty-seven years, nine months. She was the widow of Daniel P. Warren.

Son-in-law John F. Hart died in Milton, January 3, 1896, aged sixty-seven years.

Daughter-in-law Lucinda K. (Hanson) Twombly died of cardiac disease in Dover, NH, July 19, 1910, aged eighty-two years, six months, and twenty days.

Lydia A. (Perkins) Twombly died of pneumonia in Lebanon, ME, April 8, 1912, aged eighty-two years, seven months, and sixteen days, M.A.H. Hart signed the death certificate.

Daughter-in-law Lydia A. (Waterhouse) Twombly died in Roslindale, MA, July 16, 1916.

DEATHS. TWOMBLY. In Roslindale, July 16, Lydia A., widow of John E. Twombly. Funeral from her late residence, 205 Belgrade av, Roslindale, Tuesday, July 18, at 3 p.m. Burial at Dover, N.H. Dover, N.H., papers please copy (Boston Globe, July 17, 1916).


References:

Claremont Manufacturing Company. (1851). NH Register and Farmer’s Almanac. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rgEXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA159

Farmer, John & Lyon, G. Parker. (1833). NH Annual Register and US Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=25EBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA36

Find a Grave. (2011, February 26). Lilian A. Twombly Goodrich. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/66178944/lilian-a-goodrich

Find a Grave. (2022, April 5). Lydia M. Twombly. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/238539115/lydia-m-twombly

Find a Grave. (2020, September 6). Mary Abigail Twombly Hart. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215294814/mary-abigail-hart

Find a Grave. (2022, April 5). James Meserve Twombly. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/238539223/james-meserve-twombly

Find a Grave. (2022, April 6). Daniel P. Warren. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/238563886/daniel-p-warren

Find a Grave. (2022, April 6). Irene Twombly Warren. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/238563840/irene-warren

NH General Court. (1838). Journal of the House. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=vBhNAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA4

US Department of the Interior. (1851). Official Register of the United States: Containing a List of Officers and Employees in the Civil, Military, and Naval Service. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Vto9AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA26

US Department of the Interior. (1853). Official Register of the United States: Containing a List of Officers and Employees in the Civil, Military, and Naval Service. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Yu2Qu1QkBSAC&pg=RA1-PA30

US Department of State. (1831). Register of All Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=bedIAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA283

US Department of State. (1835). Register of All Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rKmtHouyrugC&pg=RA1-PA20

US Department of State. (1838). Register of All Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=cOhIAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA19

US Post Office Department. (1828). United States Official Postal Guide. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=KPsCAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA74

Milton’s Blue Bird Tea Room

By Muriel Bristol | September 18, 2022

Nellie B. Tasker was born in Milton, September 15, 1866, daughter of George W. and Lydia (Jones) Tasker.

Nellie B. Tasker married in Farmington, NH, September 24, 1890, Royal K. Webber, both of Milton. She was a shoe stitcher, aged twenty-four years, and he was a carpenter, aged thirty years. He was born in Shapleigh, ME, October 15, 1859, son of Greenleaf and Sarah C. (Grant) Webber.

Royal K. Webber, a house carpenter, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Nellie B. Webber, aged thirty-three years (b. NH). Royal K. Webber owned their house, free-and-clear.

MILTON. Mrs. R.K. Webber is suffering from a concussion of the spine, caused by a fall on some steps (Farmington News, April 22, 1904).

Nellie B. Webber was secretary of the Lewis W. Nute grange in Milton in 1906. Bard B. Plummer, Jr., was its grange master, and Ruth L. Fall was its lecturer. It had 54 members.

Royal K. Webber, a leather-board mill carpenter, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty years), Nellie B. Webber, aged forty-three years (b. NH). Royal K. Webber owned their house, free-and-clear.

Royal K. Webber, a house carpenter, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nellie B. Webber, aged fifty-three years (b. NH). Royal K. Webber owned their house on Lower Main Street, free-and-clear. (Milton directories of 1902 through 1917 sited their house on South Main Street, opposite Charles Street).

In 1921 a woman named “Bettina” asked the readers of the Boston Globe’s Household Column for advice on establishing a tearoom in a rural mountain community. She had replies from “Mrs. Restmore,” who had maintained such a shop for fifteen years,” and “1921 Bride,” who gave information on the menu and prices at her favorite tearoom.

How I Conducted a Tea Room For 15 Years. Dear Bettina – Perhaps I can help you in your ideas for a tea room. First thing I want to suggest is an appropriate name. This means much in a business way, as you naturally want it to become “famous,” so give it a name easy to remember and suggestive of its surroundings. If you do not care to spend much for furnishings and as you say it’s in the mountains why not make your tables and chairs of birch wood, of maple or even pine. Any one who is handy with a hammer can gather the younger limbs of trees and with a few boards for the tops of tables and seats for chairs, can do much to furnish a rustic little tea room, naming it after the wood you use in furnishing it, such as “Cedarmere,” “The Birch wood Tea Room,” or “Pine Top Tea Room,” or if you prefer things plainer. I would suggest buying just common kitchen chairs and tables and painting them your favorite colors. Now for what to serve. I find in my experience home-cooked food is always best so try to do your own cooking, rather than buying things, as I know some do. I have run a tea room for last 15 years, off and on, making good in a location and selling when some one wanted to buy, and this has always been my one best drawing card, to serve the best food at popular prices and be cordial as you can to all who honor you with their trade, for it means more customers and money in your pocket. I wish you could see my tea room. I just love it, for I planned, and had it built by my own ideas. Later on I will send you different ways I serve my food, sandwiches, etc., and if I can help you in any other way let me know. – Mrs. Restmore (Boston Globe, March 10, 1921).

Dear Bettina – I saw your request, and just had to tell you about a cute little tea room we were in one day last Summer when on a trip. It was finished in blue, rather a bright shade, and they served sandwiches, such as cheese and nut, olive and cheese, ham, jam, marmalade, and tea, coffee and milk. They also had banana and walnut salad which had the banana sliced lengthwise with walnuts and mayonnaise and lettuce leaves. They charged 15 and 20 cents for the sandwiches and drinks were 10 cents. The salad was 30 cents. They also carried tonic and ice cream, and cigars and tobacco. It was very cute and they had just as simple things as they possibly could. Any further questions regarding this tea room will be gladly answered. A 1921 Bride (Boston Globe, March 10, 1921).

In response to a question regarding licensing such an establishment, “Mrs. Restmore” replied:

Tea Room Lunches. Dear E.E. – It all depends on the locality whether you have to get a license to conduct a tea room. I should not open one if I were you until I went to see the Selectmen of the town. I have a friend who started one, only to be told she could open week-days, but not Sundays. That was her busiest day, so she considered it best not to go further. This is a list of what I serve: Sandwiches – Date butter sandwich, 15 cents; chopped egg sandwich, 25 cents; chopped egg and lettuce, 20 cents; chopped ham and egg, 25 cents; chopped roast beef, 15 cents; hot roast beef sandwich, 25 cents; chopped chicken, 25 cents; hot chicken sandwich, 35 cents. Drinks – Pot tea, 4 people, 25 cents; cocoa, cup, 10 cents; coffee, 10 cents. – Mrs. Restmore (Boston Globe, May 3, 1921).

(A silver dime being worth presently about $2.00 to $2.50, these sandwiches would now be priced at between $3.00 and $8.25, depending on their contents and temperature; cocoa and coffee at $2.00 to $2.50 per cup, and a four-person pot of tea at $5.00 to $6.25).

In 1925, an anonymous “Tea Room Chef” sought recipes – “not too hard to make” – from the subscribers of the Boston Globe’s cookery column. They should be suitable for a tearoom. Here follow some of the dessert recipe suggestions offered by cooks from all over New England.

Rice Pudding. One package dates, washed, stoned and cut fine; 2 tablespoons dry rice, 1 quart milk, salt. Put in double boiler and cook three hours. Stir often at first. Serve with cream or hard sauce if wanted. Extra nice, but it is very good without either. – Last and Least (Boston Globe, November 4, 1925).

Chocolate Rolls. Dear Sisters and Tea Room Chef – Should you care for something different and very delicious just try Chocolate Roll (small amount), 2 egg yolks, 2 heaping teaspoons sugar, 2 heaping teaspoons cocoa, 2 egg whites and vanilla. Beat the egg yokes and sugar together until well creamed. Add the cocoa and vanilla. Lastly add the stiffly beaten egg whites. Spread in a shallow pan and bake about 30 minutes. When cool enough, spread with sweetened whipped cream, roll as you would a jelly roll, cover the whole with remainder of cream and put in ice chest till ready to serve. Won’t last long, too good, but try it and report to Grandma’s Pal. (Boston Globe, January 4, 1926).

Peanut Butter Squares. Tea Room Chef – Would like to have you try these peanut butter squares and report: Two eggs, 1 cup sugar. 1 cup peanut butter, 1 tablespoon butter, pastry. Mix eggs and sugar together, then add peanut butter and butter. Cook mixture over hot water until thick. Then allow to cool. Put teaspoons on squares of pastry, fold corners toward center and bake in a hot oven, temperature 425 degrees. This recipe makes 2½ dozen small squares. – Dippity Fig (Boston Globe, January 8, 1926).

Magic Cream Puffs for Tea Room Chef. One cup boiling water poured over ½ cup of butter or oleo; put on stove and boil, add 1 cup sifted flour, beat it in 5 minutes, keeping kettle on stove. When cool, add 3 eggs, one at a time and beat well after adding each one, then add a little soda size of a pea; beat again for a few seconds and put on greased cookie tin, teaspoonful at a time. This makes 14 and never fails. Bake in rather hot over 30 minutes, filling when cold with whipped cream or cooked filling. – London Girl (Boston Globe, January 21, 1926).

The “Tea Room Chef” reported later that she had achieved success sufficient to make her consider furnishing an upstairs room to accommodate overnight guests.

Nellie B. Webber established her own tearoom before 1927. If situated in her home, it would seem to have been situated on South Main Street, opposite Charles Street. Charles Street forms an arc that touches or meets up with Main Street twice. The likely location would seem to have been on South Main Street (i.e., the southern stretch of Main Street) – now White Mountain Highway – at its intersection with the southern end of Charles Street, i.e., opposite the current Emma Ramsey Center. This would have been a good location to attract automobile tourists passing to and from points north. (See also Milton and Ye Ragged Robin Tea Shop, which was situated on the same throughway, but further north at Plummer’s Ridge).

Nellie B. Webber appeared in the Milton directories of 1927 and 1930, as proprietor of the Blue Bird Tea Room. (Her house was on Main street).

Royal K. Webber died of oedema of the lungs in Milton, July 16, 1928, aged sixty-eight years, nine months, and one day. (He had resided there for forty-four years).

Nellie V. Weber, a tea room hostess, aged forty-six [sixty-three] years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. She owned her house in Milton’s “Rural district,” which was valued at $5,000. She had a radio set.

PERSONALS. Mrs. Royal K. Webber and brother have taken an apartment at the El Cortez apartments for the winter (Orlando Evening Star (Orlando, FL), November 9, 1930).

Nellie B. Webber, a widow, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed an Orlando, FL, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. She rented her apartment at 107 East Robinson Avenue, for $30 per month. She had resided in Milton, NH, in 1935.

Nellie B. Webber, a widow, aged eighty-three years (b. NH), headed an Orlando, FL, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. She had an apartment at 330 Livingston Avenue.

Nellie B. (Tasker) Webber died in Orlando, FL, May 7, 1955.

Obituaries. MRS. NELLIE B. WEBBER. Mrs. Nellie B. Webber, a native of Milton, N.H., died Saturday in a local hospital. She is survived by a brother, Dana Tasker, Ossipee, N.H. The body will be shipped to Union, N.H., for services and burial by Fairchild Funeral Home (Orlando Sentinel (Orlando, FL), [Monday,] May 9, 1955).


See also Milton and Ye Ragged Robin Tea Shop


References:

Find a Grave. (2020, October 25). Nellie B. Tasker Webber. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/217677162/nellie-b-webber

Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1910-1962

By Muriel Bristol | September 1, 2022


Continued from Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1855-1909


At this point we have exhausted the Mitchell-Cony minister list and are left now to compile our own list.

The Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist ministers described from this period were: James W. Williams, George B. Southwick, Edwin P. Moulton, Harvey E. Whitcomb, Carl R. Bartle, Howard M. Starratt, Frank H. Snell, James W. Currie, H. Leroy Patterson, Joseph B. Bubar, Loring P. Wilkins, and Buell W. Maxfield.

James W. Williams – 1909-1913

James W. Williams was born in Providence, RI, August 23, 1859, son of James F. and Phoebe (Wilmarth) Williams.

James F. Williams, a grocer, aged forty-seven years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-five years), Phebe A. Williams, aged forty-seven years (b. RI), and his children, James W. Williams, a student, aged twenty years (b. RI), and Charles A. Williams, a clerk in store, aged eighteen years. They resided in a two-family residence at 54 Dexter Street; Albert F. Williams, a grocer, aged thirty-seven years (b. RI), headed the other household.

James W. Williams appeared in the Providence, RI, directory of 1882, as a clerk at 16 Canal street, boarding at 54 Dexter street. (His father, James F. Williams, a grocer at 16 Canal street, with his house at 54 Dexter street).

James W. Williams married in Providence, RI, March 5, 1886, Flora B. (Tillinghast) Williams. She was born in Providence, RI, March 25, 1862, daughter of John G. and Mary E. (Barrett) Tillinghast.

James F. Williams, a grocer, aged sixty-five years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-five years), Phoebe A. Williams, aged sixty-seven years (b. RI), his son, James W. Williams, a minister, aged thirty-nine years (b. RI), his grandson, Roger Williams, aged seven years (b. RI), his boarder, Cora Fuller, aged twenty-three years (b. CT). James F. Williams owned their house at 98 Dexter Street, with a mortgage. They shared their two-family residence with the household of Charles A. Williams, a grocery clerk, aged thirty-seven years (b. RI). Phoebe A. Williams was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living.

James W. Williams appeared in the Providence, RI, directory of 1901, as a minsiter, boarding at 98 Dexter street. (His father, James F. Williams, a grocer, had his house at 98 Dexter street).

YORK FREE BAPTIST CONFERENCE. The two days’ session of the York county conference of the Free Baptist churches opened in Hollis Wednesday, Rev. John B. Jordan of Saco, president of the conference presiding. The opening sermon was preached by Rev. James W. Williams of Hollis. The devotional service Wednesday afternoon was led by Rev. W.H. Trafton and was followed by an address by B.L. Shah on “A Word from India.” Mrs. S.C.G. Avery made an address and was followed by Miss L.A. DeMerritte of Ocean Park who took for her subject “Our Juniors.” Rev. John B. Jordon of Saco preached Wednesday evening. The closing session of the convention was held Thursday afternoon (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), June 2, 1904).

Williams, Rev. James W.J.W. Williams (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1909, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

James W. Williams, a clergyman, aged fifty years (b. RI), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Rachel E. Williams, aged forty years (b. RI), his step-children, Ruth S. Richards, aged seventeen (b. RI), and Mervyn E. Richards, aged fifteen years (b. RI), and his children, Phoebe W. Williams, aged seven years (b. PA), and Paul A. Williams, aged six years (b. PA), and Philip W. Williams, aged five years (b. ME). James W. Williams rented their house. Rachel E. Williams was the mother of six children, of whom six were still living.

Jas. W. Williams appeared in the Milton directory of 1912, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister. J.W. Williams (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1913, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

Former Maine Woman Centenarian. Milton Mill, N.H., May 9. – “I am not a bit tired, but I am afraid some of the rest of you are.” These were the words of Mrs. Augusta H. Dore to her granddaughters after she had received the congratulations of 300 of her friends and neighbors at a reception at her home in Milton Mills Tuesday in honor of her 100th birthday. The children of the neighborhood public school to the number of 80 marched to her home early in the day to greet her bearing 100 pinks. A shower of letters and cards from all parts of the country was received. Mrs. Dore was the recipient also of three birthday cakes, which with other refreshments, she served to her guests. Late in the afternoon she enjoyed an auto ride and at the close of the day’s observance her pastor, Rev. James W. Williams of the Free Baptist church, spoke words of congratulations and offered prayer. Mrs. Dore was born in Acton, Me., about two miles from her present home, being a near neighbor of Ralph Farnum, the last survivor of the Battle of Bunker Hill. Her maiden name was Fix [Fox]. Seventy-five years ago she married Eliphlet Dore and removed to her present home, close to the State line between Maine and New Hampshire. Her husband died 30 years ago, since which time her only child, James F., cared for her until his death five months ago. A granddaughter has since resided at the home place. Mrs. Dore has each summer done work out of doors in her garden and has been active in the work of the home. All her faculties are acute and she gives but little evidence of her advanced years. For more than 80 years she has been a member of the Free Baptist church in Milton Mills (Kennebec Journal (Augusta, ME), May 14, 1913).

Augusta [(Fox)] Dore died of heart failure in Milton Mills, April 2, 1914, aged one hundred years, ten months, and twenty-seven days. She was the daughter of James and Sally (Thompson) Fox, and widow of Eliphalet P. Dore (1808-1868).

In July 1913, Rev. James W. Williams accepted a call to become pastor at Jackson, NH.

Notes from the Field. Rev. J. Williams, pastor for five years of the Baptist Church, Milton Mills, N.H., has resigned to accept the pastorate of the Jackson Baptist Church (Boston Evening Transcript, July 19, 1913).

[Class of] 1882. James W. Williams, Rev., L.L. B., 82; Clergyman; Supt. Schools, Jackson, N.H. (Columbia, 1916).

James W. Williams died in an accidental railway collision in North Conway, NH, January 5, 1917, aged fifty-seven years, four months, and thirteen days. (See also Milton in the News – 1912).

PASTOR KILLED AS SLEIGH IS HIT BY TRAIN. NORTH CONWAY, N.H., Dec. 4 – (Special to the Express-Advertiser) – Rev. J.W. Williams, 55, was killed instantly at 2.45 and his son Carl, aged 12, was terribly injured when the sleigh in which they were riding was demolished and the horse killed, being struck by a Boston & Maine Mountain Division train, which was backing up from Intervale. The boy was taken to the Memorial Hospital and his life is despaired of as he is badly hurt about the head, bones were broken, and it is believed that he is injured internally. Mr. Williams had preached in Jackson several years and is survived his widow and three children (Portland Evening Express (Portland, ME), January 5, 1917).

The Providence Journal says: Mr. Williams’ wife and daughter are in Providence visiting Mr. Williams brother. Rev. Mr. Williams was lineal descendant of Roger Williams and had been pastor of the Free Baptist church in Jackson three years. Rev. James W. Williams was well known in this city because of his visits here in recent years as well as through his residence here about 20 years ago when he practiced law in this city. Mrs. Williams was visiting at the home of her husband’s brother, Charles A. Williams of 98 Dexter street, with her daughter and they left late last night for the scene of the tragedy. Rev. Mr. Williams’ older son Roger attended the local schools and was graduated from Brown University in the class of 1914. He is a chemist and has made his home here with his uncle on Dexter street. Rev. Mr. Williams, after leaving Providence, went to New Hampshire and had several churches, finally locating in Jackson (Fall River Globe (Fall River, MA), January 6, 1917).

Roger Williams suffered the loss of his father, Rev. James W. Williams, and his 11-year-old brother, Philip W., in a grade crossing accident at North Conway, N.H., January 6. The two were in a sleigh and were struck by a train during a blinding snow-storm (Brown Alumni Monthly, February 1917).

George E. Tillinghast, a widower, aged eighty-three years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Flora B. William, a widow, aged fifty-six years (b. RI), and his granddaughter, Hope T. William, a real estate stenographer, aged thirty years (b. RI). George E. Tillinghast rented their house at 31 Almy street.

Flora B. Williams, widow of James W. Williams, appeared in the Providence, RI, directory of 1922, as residing at 31 Almy street.

John G. Tillinghast, aged ninety-two years (b. RI), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his daughter, Flora B. Williams, a widow, aged sixty-four years (b. RI), and his granddaughter, Hope T. Williams, a real estate stenographer, aged forty years (b. RI). John G. Tillinghast rented their house at 329 New York Avenue, for $40 per month. They had a radio set.

Flora Williams, a widow, aged seventy-eight years (b. RI), was one of four patients at a convalescent home at 173 Porter Street in Providence, RI, at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census.

Flora B. (Tillinghast) Williams died in Providence, RI, May 12, 1947.

George B. Southwick – 1914-1917

George Barnet Southwick was born in Humphrey, NY, March 22, 1863, son of Barnet and Clara A. (Chapman) Southwick.

George B. Southwick graduated from the Cobb Divinity School at Bates College with its Class of 1890.

Class of 1890. George Barnett Southwick. b. 22 Mar 1863, Humphrey, N.Y. Son of Barnet and Clara A. (Chapman) Southwick. Pastor, E. Warsaw, N.Y., 1890-92; Cherry Creek, N.Y., 1892-94; Kingfield, Me., 1894-01; Littleton, N.H., 1901-03; Franconia, N.H., 1903-06; Dale, N.Y., 1906-12; Madison, Me., 1912-14; Acton, Me., and Milton Mills, N.H., 1914. Res. Milton Mills, N.H. (Bates College, 1915).

WYOMING. Rev. George Southwick has been tendered and accepted a call as pastor of the Free Will Baptist Church at East Warsaw for the ensuing year (Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY), March 12, 1890).

George B. Southwick married (1st), circa 1891, Ella Louisa Cook. She was born in Thetford, VT, March 2, 1865, daughter of James A. and Elizabeth H. (Stevens) Cook.

Ella L. (Cook) Southwick died of typhoid fever in Kingfield, ME, October 28, 1898, aged thirty-three years, seven months, and six days.

George B. Southwick, a clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. NY), headed a Kingfield, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his children, Marion Southwick, aged seven years (b. NY), and Louis E. Southwick, aged two years (b. ME), and his mother, Clara A. [(Chapman)] Southwick, a widow, aged fifty-four years (b. NY).

George B. Southwick married (2nd) in Cherry Creek, NY, January 15, 1901, Flora Louise Weaver. She was born in NY, in 1871, daughter of Andrew J. and Cynthia (Akeley) Weaver.

George B. Southwick, a clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. NY), headed a Middlebury, NY, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of nine years), Flora L. Southwick, aged thirty-nine years (b. NY), and his children, Marion Southwick, aged seventeen years (b. NY), Lois A.E. Southwick, aged twelve years (b. ME), and Ruth A. Southwick, aged four years (b. NH). George B. Southwick rented their house. Flora L. Southwick was the mother of two children, of whom one was still living.

Skowhegan, Me., Pastor Leaving. SKOWHEGAN, Me. Dec. 23. – Rev. George B. Southwick has resigned his pastorate of the Madison Free Baptist Church, to take effect Jan. 1, having accepted a pastorate in Milton, N.H. He has been pastor of the Madison Church for about three years, and under his leadership the church edifice has been extensively remodeled and cleared from debt. Mr. Southwick came to Madison from Dale, N.Y. He was a member of the class of 1890 of Cobb Divinity School of Bates College (Boston Globe, December 24, 1913).

MADISON. Rev. and Mrs. G.B. Southwick left town Saturday morning for Milton Mills, N.H., where Mr. Southwick has accepted a call to the Free Baptist church in that place. Mr. Southwick has been pastor of the Free Baptist church in this place. Their many friends here deeply regret their departure (Waterville Morning Sentinel (Waterville, ME), January 6, 1914).

G.B. Southwick (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Registers of 1914 and 1916, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

Geo. B. Southwick appeared in the Milton directory of 1917, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister.

SUTTON. There will be services at the church May 6, when Rev. Mr. Southwick of Milton Mills, N.H., will preach as a candidate (Vermont Union-Journal (Lyndonville, VT), April 25, 1917).

George B. Southwick, a Baptist Church clergyman, aged fifty-six years (b. NY), headed an Epsom, NH, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Flora W. Southwick, aged forty-eight years (b. NY), and his daughter, Ruth A. Southwick, aged fourteen years (b. NH). George B. Southwick rented their house on the Turnpike.

George B. Southwick died in Lewiston, ME, December 29, 1923, aged sixty years, nine months.

OBITUARY. George B. Southwick. The death of Rev. George B. Southwick at his home, 36 College street, Lewiston, on Saturday evening comes as a great shock to his associates for he died very suddenly. Altho in Lewiston only a few years, coming here from Epsom, N.H., he had many friends. He conducted the services at the Sabatis and South Monmouth churches each Sunday and thru the week worked as a carpenter being considered efficient in his trade. Mr. Southwick was born in Humphrey N.Y., on March 22, 1863. He graduated from the Cobb Divinity School, Bates College in 1890. He first had the pastorate of the church at East Warsaw, N.Y., and has held many other important ones since that time. He leaves other than his wife: three daughters, a brother of Salamanca, Penn., and a sister in New York (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), January 2, 1924).

Flora [(Weaver)] Southwick, a homemaker, aged fifty-nine years (b. NY), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Ruth Southwick, a high school teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), her boarders, Marjorie Goodwin, a high school teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), and Doris Clifford, a high school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), and her lodgers Frank H. Tuttle, a fibre mill laborer, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), and Frank S. Tuttle, a fibre mill laborer, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Flora Southwick rented their house on South Main Street, for $25 per month. They had a radio set.

Cherry Creek. Mrs. Flora Weaver Southwick of Townsend, Mass., arrived Saturday night to visit relatives in this vicinity. Mrs. Southwick was formerly Flora Weaver, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Weaver of Maple Hill (Dunkirk Daily Observer (Dunkirk, NY), July 20, 1937).

Franklin Morrison, wet machine, leatherboard co., aged thirty years (b. NH), headed a Townsend, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ruth [(Southwick)] Morrison, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Flora [(Weaver)] Southwick, aged sixty-nine years (b. NY). Franklin Morrison rented their house, for $16 per month.

Franklin E. Morrison, a school janitor, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Townsend, MA, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Ruth S. [(Southwick)] Morrison, a teacher, aged forty-four years (b. NH), and his mother-in-law, Flora W. [(Weaver)] Southwick, aged seventy-nine years (b. NY). They resided at 196 Brookline Street.

Daughter Ruth (Southwick) Morrison died in Franconia, NH, February 1, 1962, aged sixty-six years.

Madison News Brevities. Woman Dies. Mrs. Ruth Southwick Morrison, 66, died February 6 at Franconia, N.H. Her father was the Rev. George B. Southwick, a former pastor of the Madison Baptist Church. She is survived by her husband, Franklin Morrison; her mother, Mrs. Flora Southwick, 90; two sisters, Mrs. Lois Tilton of Deerfield, N.H., and Mrs. Marion Bryant of Farmington [ME] (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), February 23, 1962). 

Flora L. Southwick died in Cherry Creek, NY, October 18, 1964, aged ninety-three years.

Madison Brevities. Word has been received of the death of Mrs. Flora Southwick. Her husband, the late Rev. George Southwick, was a pastor at one time of the United Baptist Church in Madison [ME] and his daughter is Mrs. Marion Bryant of Farmington [ME] (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), November 4, 1964).

Edwin P. Moulton – 1917-1921

Edwin P. Moulton was born in Corinth, VT, October 11, 1848, son of Eli and Louisa (Moulton) Moulton.

MOULTON. Edwin P. Moulton, son of Eli, b. in Corinth, Vt., Oct. 11, 1848, m. in 1872, Mary Ella Foss. He was educated in the common schools, Laconia Academy, New Hampton Institution, and Green Mountain (Vt.) Seminary. He pursued a private course of theological study, and was ordained a Free Baptist minister in L. [Laconia], June 7, 1874. He has been located in the ministry as follows L. [Laconia], May 1874, to Feb. 1876; Alton, Feb. 1876, to Dec. 1879; Rochester, Dec. 1879, to May 1885; Pittsfield, May 1885, to Nov. 1888; Somerville Mass., Nov. 1888, to 1898; and now [1905] at Nashua. Delegate to General Conference, Marion, Ohio, 1886, and Lowell, 1892. Supt. of Schools, Alton, two years I.O.O.F. Two ch. d. in infancy (Jackson, 1905). 

Edwin P. Moulton married in Gilford, NH, August 22, 1872, Mary E. Foss, he of Laconia, NH, and she of Tilton, NH. He was a clergyman, aged twenty-three years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. A.D. Smith performed the ceremony. She was born in Sanbornton, NH, circa 1852, son of Loran and Mary Ann (Mason) Foss.

Rev. Edwin P. Moulton, a clergyman, aged thirty-one years (b. VT), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. his household included his wife, Mary E. [(Foss)] Moulton, keeping house, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), his daughter, Gracie Moulton, aged three months (b. NH (March)), and his mother, Loisa Moulton, a widow, aged seventy years (b. VT). They resided on Myrtle Street.

Rev. Edwin P. Moulton appeared in the Somerville, MA, directories of 1890-91, and 1892, as pastor of the Broadway F.B. church, with his house at 12 Lincoln street.

Edwin P. Moulton, a M. Epis. Church pastor, aged fifty-one years (b. VT), headed a Nashua, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-seven years), Mary E. [(Foss)] Moulton, aged forty-seven years (b. NH). Edwin P. Moulton rented their house at 2 Spring Street. Mary E. Moulton was the mother of two children, of whom none were still living.

TIVERTON. Rev. Edwin P. Moulton of the Stone church, Tiverton, has accepted a call to the Welsh Avenue Free Baptist church, Brockton, Mass., and will commence his labors there the first Sunday in April (Fall River Globe (Fall River, MA), January 24, 1903).

Edwin P. Moulton of Brockton, MA, received a NH commission, August 8, 1907, to perform marriages in other states, i.e., to perform them in New Hampshire.

Moulton, Edwin P. - 1905Edward P. Moulton, a Free Baptist Church minister, aged sixty-one years (b. VT), headed a Kittery, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-seven years), Mary E. [(Foss)] Moulton, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). He did not rent their house on Foyes Lane. (Perhaps it was a parsonage). Mary E. Moulton was the mother of two children, of whom none were still living.

Edwin P. Moulton of Acton, ME, received a NH commission, September 17, 1917, to perform marriages in other states, i.e., to perform them in New Hampshire.

Edwin P. Moulton appeared in the Portsmouth, NH, directory of 1912, as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church, with his house at 163 Melbourne street.

S.P. Moulton (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1918, 1920. and 1921, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

Edwin P. Moulton, a church pastor, aged seventy-one years (b. VT), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary E. [(Foss)] Moulton, aged sixty-seven years (b. VT). Edwin P. Moulton rented their farm on the Lebanon Road.

Mary E. (Foss) Moulton died of chronic parenchymatous nephritis at 112 Central Street in Farmington, NH, July 7, 1929, aged seventy-six years, eleven months, and twenty-seven days. She had resided in Farmington, NH, for seven years, i.e., since circa 1921-22, with her having resided previously in Waterboro, ME.

Fred A. Giles, a lumber & boxes mill man, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Farmington, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Emma I. Giles, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), and his boarder, Rev. Edward P. Moulton, a widower, aged ninety-one [eighty-one] years (b. VT). Fred A. Giles owned their house at 45 Glen Street, which was valued at $2,500. They did not have a radio set.

LOCAL. Rev. Edwin P. Moulton who has been in very ill health at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Giles for several months, sustained a slight shock last Sunday from which he appears to be slowly rallying (Farmington News, March 6, 1931).

Edwin P. Moulton died of cardio-renal vascular disease on Glen Street in Farmington, NH, March 11, 1931, aged eighty-two years, five months. He had resided in Farmington, NH, for eight years, i.e., since circa 1922-23, with his having resided previously in Waterboro, ME.

IN MEMORIAM. Rev. Edwin P. Moulton. Death came to reward the patient and faithful life of Rev. Edwin Preston Moulton, which closed, after a long period of suffering at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Giles of Glen street, on Wednesday evening of last week. Many months of steadily falling health shattered the great physique and subdued the reason of one of the most energetic clergymen who has risen in the Baptist denomination of New England in a long time. The deceased attained his 82nd birthday on the eleventh day of last October and until the death of his wife about a year and a half ago he was regarded as one of the most remarkable men and ministers in New Hampshire. He was a native of Vermont, the last survivor in a family of three children who inherited indomitable courage and brilliancy from a line age of pioneer ancestry. At the age of 23 years, he entered the ministry, and it may be truly said of this man that God ordained him for his calling. With wonderful contour He endowed him with a superb voice that inspired choirs and thrilled congregations. He taught the Gospel in small hamlets and in large cities he consecrated his life and his resources to the work of his Master and most richly did he deserve the blessed benediction “Well done, thou good and faithful servant.” Among the greatest monuments of his career was a ten years pastorate of the First Baptist church in Somerville, Mass., the founding of the True Memorial church in Rochester, and the enlargement of the church in Pittsfield. While these pillars are among the tangible things that will ever point to achievement in the hearts of men and women, he set up greater altars, for he was an evangel of recognized worth. In the denomination he was a member of the Ocean Park Baptist association for over fifty years and was heard at every summer convention of this body until 1930. For many years he was a member of Suncook Lodge, No. 10, I.O.O.F., of Pittsfield. He was pastor of the Farmington Baptist church for two years and subsequently removed to Milton Mills, and after to Waterboro, Maine, from whence he returned to Farmington and having purchased a home on Central street sought retirement but he was privileged to enjoy only a short time before the death of Mrs. Moulton. Shortly afterward he went to live with Mr. and Mrs. Giles and by these good people he was cared for most tenderly until the end. Funeral services were held at the Baptist church Saturday afternoon at 1.30, with Rev. Albert Kenyon, pastor of the Baptist church at Arlington, R.I., and president of the Ocean Park Baptist association, officiating. In the work of the Baptist denomination in New England for many years Rev. Kenyon was closely associated with the deceased both as a clergyman and a personal friend. Rev. Kenyon was assisted by the present pastor of the church, Rev. Emery L. Wallace, and Rev. Chester Doe of Northwood. Following is a list of the flowers, Spray mixed pinks, Suncook Lodge, No. 10, I.O.O.F.; spray pinks, Farmington Baptist church; spray roses and pinks, True Memorial church of Rochester; spray mixed pinks, Mrs. Foss, Mrs. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Bald, Laconia; spray jonquils and pinks, Miss Alice M. Chase and Miss Alice M. Hoyt, Portsmouth; spray Jonquils and pinks, Alonzo S. Brooks; spray mixed pinks, Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Giles and Miss Pearl Giles (Farmington News, March 20, 1931).

CARD of THANKS. We wish to acknowledge the many kind attentions that so assisted us during the illness of Rev. E.P. Moulton and to express our heartfelt thanks and appreciation to all neighbors and friends whose comforting expressions of sympathy sustain us in this hour of affliction. Especially do we wish to acknowledge the beautiful floral offerings, including the Farmington Baptist church, the True Memorial church of Rochester and Suncook Lodge, I.O.O.F., of Pittsfield, also those who furnished cars for conveyance, and the members of Woodbine Lodge, I.O.O.F., who served as bearers at the funeral. Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Giles (Farmington News, March 20, 1931).

H.E. Whitcomb – 1921-1924

Harvey Edwin Whitcomb was born in St. Johnsbury, VT, July 9, 1865, son of Truman and Ella (Kittredge) Whitcomb.

Harvey E. Whitcomb married in Cambridge, VT, October 31, 1891, Alice L. Eaton, he of Cambridge, VT, and she of Hyde Park, VT. He was a carpenter, aged twenty-five years, and she was aged twenty-two years. Rev. Perrin B. Fisk performed the ceremony. She was born in Warren, VT, circa 1871, daughter of Melville and Lucy (Wilson) Eaton.

Morrisville. Harvey E. Whitcomb of Cambridge and Miss Alice Eton of Hyde Park were married by Rev. P.B. Fisk at his residence last Saturday evening (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), November 5, 1891).

Morrisville Liquor Agency Again. Two more prosecutions have followed false representations in buying liquor at the town agency. In both these cases the agent used all due caution, but was lied to. Harvey E. Whitcomb, a young man who never drinks himself, bought liquor there, claiming it for sickness in his family, but in reality bought it to furnish another party who wanted it and used it for other than medicinal purposes. Whitcomb was prosecuted and his fine and cost amounted to $24.98, on two counts for misrepresentation at the agency and furnishing which was paid. The second case was a more dramatic one in its results. One Edward Shiner, said to be a resident of Jericho, put up a bluff of being sick, bought some liquor and proceeded to get outside with it. When an attempt was made to take him he fought the crowd, and made a desperate stand for some time before he submitted, was handcuffed, tied with ropes and laid on his back in an express wagon to be taken to the county jail in Hyde Park. It took six or eight good men to do the job. He was fined $31.22 on two accounts; procuring liquor at the agency on false representation and a plain drunk. He was not taken for resisting an officer, as it had been expected be might be (St. Johnsbury Republican (St. Johnsbury, VT), March 30, 1898).

Whitcom & Eaton Patent - 1898Harvey E. Whitcomb and Melville B. Eaton, of Morrisville, VT, filed for a U.S. patent on their acetylene gas generator, December 9, 1898. (Patent No. 649,560, Serial No. 698,793) (U.S. Patent Office, 1900).

Harvey E. Whitcomb, a carpenter, aged thirty-four years (b. VT), headed a Morristown (“Morrisville P.O.”), VT, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Alice E. Whitcomb, aged thirty years (b. VT), and his children, Lucy E. Whitcomb, at school, aged seven years (b. VT), and Grace H. Whitcomb, at school, aged five years (b. VT). Harvey E. Whitcomb owned their house on Cherry Street, with a mortgage. Alice E. Whitcomb was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Harvey E. Whitcomb, a house and barn contractor, aged forty-four years (b. VT), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Alice E. Whitcomb, aged forty years (b. VT), and his children, Lucy E. Whitcomb, aged seventeen years (b. VT), and Grace H. Whitcomb, aged fifteen years (b. VT). Harvey E. Whitcomb rented their house at 62 Highland Avenue. Alice E. Whitcomb was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Harvey E. Whitcomb, an Ordnance Dept. auditor, aged fifty-four years (b. Canada (American citizen)), headed a Laurel, MD, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice E. Whitcomb, aged fifty years (b. VT), and his daughter, Lucy E. Whitcomb, a field director for Services, aged twenty-six years (b. MA). Harvey E. Whitcomb rented their house on Washington Avenue.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. THE NEW PASTOR AT MILTON MILLS, Rev. H.E. Whitcomb, recently baptized seven. This event has given a new impetus to the church life here (The Baptist, August 13, 1921).

H.E. Whitcomb appeared in the Milton directory of 1922, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister.

REV. MR. WHITCOMB GOES TO HYDE PARK CHURCH. STOUGHTON, June 14. Rev. Harvey E. Whitcomb of 1335 Central st. has received a unanimous call to the First Baptist Church of Hyde Park to become associate pastor of that church. The call was the result of a meeting of the church last Friday Evening and was accepted by Rev. Mr. Whitcomb on receiving the news of the action of the meeting. He entered upon his duties Sunday morning. The pastor is Rev. Chellia Velle Smith, of whom Mr. Whitcomb is a great admirer. Rev. Mr. Whitcomb for the most part will work with the young people of the parish and with the brotherhood, which has a membership. Rev. Mr. Whitcomb has lived in Stoughton the past three years, has supplied the pulpit in Hyde Park, has talked to the brotherhood on several occasions, and has preached in the various Protestant churches of Stoughton and other places in this section. He will continue to live in Stoughton (Boston Globe, June 14, 1926).

Harvey Whitcomb, a Baptist clergyman, aged sixty-four years (b. VT), headed a Stoughton, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Alice E. Whitcomb, aged sixty years (b. VT), his daughter, Lucy Macdonald, a tea room proprietor, aged thirty-seven years (b. VT), and his lodger, John T. Macdonald, a gas station proprietor, aged thirty-five years (b. MA). Harvey Whitcomb owned their household on Central Street, which was valued at $8,500. They owned a radio set.

JEFFERSONVILLE. Mrs. M.S. Hawley left Sunday for a three weeks’ visit with her brother, the Rev. H.E. Whitcomb at Stoughton, Mass., and with her sisters at Manchester and Haverhill, N.H. (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), August 7, 1939).

FORMER MORRISVILLE RESIDENTS CELEBRATE 58th WEDDING ANNIVERSARY. The Rev. and Mrs. Harvey E. Whitcomb, former residents of Morrisville for many years, celebrated their 58th wedding anniversary on Monday, Oct. 31. Mr. and Mrs. Whitcomb were married by the Rev. Perrin B. Fisk on Oct. 31, 1891. Mrs. Whitcomb was Alice L. Eaton, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. M.B. Eaton. They have two daughters, Mrs. Lucy E. Macdonald and Mrs. Grace H. Bacon; four granddaughters and one grandson; also seven great-grandchildren. While living in Morrisville, Mr. Whitcomb followed the contracting and building trade, building two houses on Cherry avenue and many other buildings in the village and town, also in Johnson and Cambridge. In 1895 he designed and built the Wheelock house, which is now the Copley Hospital. He received part of his high schooling at Peoples Academy and the Morrisville graded school, and his training for the ministry in Maryland. In World War I he was a government auditor of building construction. While in this work he served as supply pastor of a Baptist Church in Savage, Md., and later of one in Washington Heights, D.C. He received his training for the ministry in Maryland, and was ordained in 1921. He then went to Milton Mills, N.H., where he resigned after four years to go to Stoughton, Mass., where he served the church in North Stoughton for eight years, resigning because of ill health and failing eyesight. He was 84 years old last July (Morrisville News & Citizen (Morrisville, VT), November 3, 1949).

Harvey E. Whitcomb died in Stoughton, MA, October 30, 1950.

HARVEY E. WHITCOMB DIES IN STOUGHTON, MASS. A message was received by Ben E. Eaton of Morrisville Monday night announcing the death of his brother-in-law, Harvey E. Whitcomb, of Stoughton, Mass. Mr. Whitcomb was born in Cambridge, July 9, 1864. He married Alice Eaton of Hyde Park Oct. 31, 1891. He is survived in his immediate family by two daughters, Mrs. Lucy McDonald and Mrs. Grace Bacon, and also by several grandchildren. The deceased was an architect and builder and built several houses in Morrisville, one being the summer home of Mr. Wheelock of Dorchester, Mass., which building is the Copley Hospital, and several houses on Cherry street. Mr. Whitcomb died in Stoughton on Oct. 30 at 5:30 p.m., and the funeral was held at Lowes Funeral Home Thursday at 2 :00 p.m. (Morrisville News & Citizen (Morrisville, VT), November 2, 1950).

Carl R. Bartle – 1925-1928

Carle Raymond Bartle was born in Preston, NY, June 23, 1902, son of Chester U. and Julia E. (Eelles) Bartle.

BAPTIST CHURCH NOTES. This Friday C.R. Bartle will be ordained to the gospel ministry in the Baptist church at Milton Mills. Our pastor and Deacons Carter and Giles will represent this church at the ordaining council, and other members are expected to attend the public meeting in the evening (Farmington News, November 26, 1925).

Harry E. Wentworth ran the Acton & Milton Mills Freewill Baptist Church Sunday School in 1925.

MIDDLETON. Memorial exercises were held Sunday afternoon, May 30, in Grange hall at Union, in charge of the Union Woman’s club and Reunion Grange. A very fine program was given by the school children of Middleton and Union, under the direction of their teachers. An interesting address was given by Rev. Carl Bartle of Milton Mills, also very pleasing remarks were given by the president of the Woman’s club, Mrs. Arthur Moulton, and the master of Reunion Grange, Winburn Dudley. We were honored and proud to have with us one of our Grand Army men, George Bickford, and one of our American Legion boys, Winburn Dudley. After the exercises, the children were carried in autos to the two cemeteries, where the graves were decorated. Nearer My God to Thee and Taps were played by B.W. Mooney, past master of Reunion Grange. We missed the faces of those who have passed to the Great Beyond and were sorry Edward Hamlin was not with us – another of our Grand Army men who was not able to come to the hall. Let us not forget this day and each year let us set aside a time to follow out these exercises (Farmington News, June 4, 1926).

PASTOR IN MILTON MILLS ACCEPTS WHITMAN CALL. WHITMAN, Sept. 2 – Rev. Carl R. Bartle of Milton Mills, N.H., today accepted the call recently extended him by the First Baptist Church here and will assume his pastoral duties the last of the month. Rev. Mr. Bartle is a graduate of the Gordon Bible School of the class of 1924 and received the degree of bachelor of theology. He returned the next year for graduate work. He was for a time pastor of the Woodville Chapel of Wakefield and the Hill Memorial Church of Allston. He has been pastor for the past three years at the Milton Mills Free Baptist Church at Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, September 3, 1928).

Carl R. Bartle married in Farmington, NH, September 25, 1928, Dora E. Austin, he of Milton Mills and she of Farmington, NH. He was a clergyman, aged twenty-six years, and she was at home, aged thirty-two years. Rev. Arthur Jefferies performed the ceremony. She was born in Somerset, MA, January 1, 1896, daughter of Ulysses E. and Mary L. (Fogg) Austin.

Carl R. Bartle, a Baptist minister, aged twenty-seven years (b. NY), headed a Whitman, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of one year), Dora E. Bartle, aged thirty-three years (b. MA). Carl R. Bartle rented their house at 670 Washington Street, for $30 per month. They had a radio set.

WEST MILTON. Rev. and Mrs. Carl Bartle spent the past week with the latter’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Austin (Farmington News, May 2, 1930).

Carl R. Bartle, a religious clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. NY), headed a Whitman, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Dora E. Bartle, aged forty-three years (b. MA). Carl R. Bartle owned their house at 670 Washington Street, which was valued at $5,000.

Carl R. Bartle, aged forty-seven years (b. NY), a church clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. NY), headed a Winthrop, MA, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Dora Bartle, aged fifty-three years (b. MA). They resided at 68 Hermon Street.

MILTON. The 125th anniversary of the dedication of the church building of the Acton-Milton Mills Baptist Church, Milton Mills, N.H., will be observed with special recognition services on Sunday, November 14th. Rev. Carl Bartle, of Bradford, New Hampshire, will be the guest speaker at the 11 a.m. morning worship service. The Reverend Mr. Bartle, a former pastor, was ordained by the Church 40 years ago. He pastored in Milton Mills from 1925 through 1928. A public reception will follow the morning service. Interesting historical items will be on display at this time, including early pictures of the church and an old “paid-pew-holder” arrangement. At the 7 p.m. evening service a tape recording given by Pastor Emeritus Buell Maxfield will describe the early history of the Church. The church as a body was founded in 1781, and it is the second free will Baptist church to be established in America. The present church building was dedicated in 1840 (Farmington News, May 10, 1965).

Carl R. Bartle died in Bradford, NH, January 1, 1974. Dora E. (Austin) Bartle died in Concord, NH, April 29, 1979.

Rev. Howard M. Starratt – 1928-30

Howard Manuel Starratt was born in Everett, MA, March 22, 1900, son of Charles and Elizabeth (Case) Starratt.

Howard M. Starratt married in Couer d’Alene, ID, December 22, 1923, Mabel A. Bishop, both of Spokane, WA. Mrs. George Marvin and Eliza Thompson witnessed the ceremony, which was performed by Baptist minister Rev. Fred H. Thompson of Coeur d’Alene. She was born in Clarksburg, MA, February 25, 1901, daughter of Frank E. and Minnie D. (Sanford) Bishop.

POWNAL. Howard M. Starratt, pastor of the Baptist church for a little more than a year, has left for Boston where he will resume his theological studies at Gordon college and serve as pastor of the church at Milton Mills, N.H. Mrs. Starratt will remain about ten days at the home of her parents in Clarksburg before going to the new home which is on the border line between New Hampshire and Maine. Last Friday evening the Christian Endeavor Society tendered them a reception at Rightholme and presented a Sterling silver cream ladle. Saturday afternoon the Pownal center people entertained them at the town hall and presented a gift of money. The Ladies’ Auxiliary of the church in this village gave a check as a parting gift, following the morning worship yesterday, Dr. W.A. Davison of Burlington, Vt., is taking steps toward securing a new pastor for the local church (North Adams Transcript, November 20, 1928).

Pownal. H.M. Starratt, late of this place, now pastor at Milton Mills, N.H., and a student at Gordon college of Theology and Missions writes of attending the recent Gypsy Smith gospel meetings. These were held in Boston Garden, an auditorium seating 20,000 people and hundreds were turned away for lack of room. The evangelist’s spiritual message has moved Boston he writes. Mrs. Starratt writes of a recent visit to a lung specialist in Boston, who after an X-ray examination pronounced her well on the road recovery but cautioned against overexertion for some time to come. course of treatment she has for the past year and a half bids fair to make her entirely well in time. Work in the church at Milton is very encouraging. About 185 persons attended the Easter morning service and about the same number witnessed a pageant in the evening. An illustrated lecture on the Holy Land was given on Monday by Dr. A.D. Kempton of Baptist church, Cambridge, under whom Mr. Starratt worked before coming to Pownal. Both wish to be remembered to all local friends and offer a hearty welcome to any that will visit them at Milton Mills (North Adams, April 12, 1929).

Howard M. Starratt, a Baptist clergyman, aged thirty years (b. MA), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Mabel A. Starratt, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA). Howard M. Starratt rented their house. They had a radio set.

POWNAL Has New Pastorate. Rev. Howard M. Starratt who has been at Milton Mills, N.H., since leaving here two years ago has resigned there to accept the pastorate of the First Baptist church at LaFayette, Indiana, and will begin his duties at once. The church has a membership of three hundred. Mr. Starratt was accompanied on the trip by his brother, Charles, formerly of North Adams. Mrs. Starratt is staying a few weeks at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F.E. Bishop of Clarksburg before going to her new home (North Adams Transcript, October 31, 1930).

Montpelier Pastor Called To Sanford. SANFORD, Dec. 19 (Special) – The Rev. Howard M. Starrett, pastor of the First Baptist Church in Montpelier, Vt., was extended a call to succeed the Rev. Ellory G. Dakin of the Sanford Baptist Church at a church meeting Wednesday evening. The Rev. Mr. Starrett is a native ot Everett, Mass., and has served in churches in Milton Mills, N.H., and Lafayette Ind. The Rev. Mr. Daktn resigned to accept a call to a church pn New Britain, Conn. (PortlandEvening Express (Portland, ME), December 19, 1935).

Rev. Howard M. Starratt, a church minister, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Sanford, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mabel A. Starratt, a church worker, aged thirty-nine years (b. MA), his daughter, Nancy E. Starratt, aged five years (b. IN), and his lodger, Ethel Walker, aged fifty-five years (b. NH). They resided at 1 Kimball Street. They had resided in Montpelier, VT, in 1935, except their lodger, who had resided then in the “same place,” i.e., Sanford, ME.

Rev. Howard M. Starratt died in Clarksburg, MA, November 10, 1965, aged sixty-five years.

Rev. H.M. Starratt Stricken at Drury. The Rev. Howard M. Starratt of River Rd., Clarksburg, was stricken ill this morning at Drury High School where he is member of the English department faculty. Mr. Starratt, who serves as pastor of the Blackinton Union Church, went to the high school office shortly before 10 a.m., saying he was ill and was leaving for home. He then became very ill and Dr. Maurice G. Spitzer answered an emergency call to the school and ordered Mr. Starratt taken to the hospital in the Mohawk ambulance (North Adams Transcript, November 10, 1965).

Area Obituaries. Rev. HOWARD M. STARRATT. CLARKSBURG, Mass. The Rev. Howard Manuel Starratt, 65, of River Road, pastor of the Blackinton Union Church of North Adams and Hancock Baptist Church, who served his first pastorate at the Pownal Baptist Church, died Wednesday at North Adams Hospital. Mr. Starratt had been stricken Wednesday morning at Drury High School in North Adams, where he was a member of the English department faculty. Death was attributed to a stroke. Mr. Starratt, whose wife, the former Mabel, Bishop of Clarksburg, is an ordained minister and teacher, was born in Everett, son of the late Charles and Elizabeth (Case) Starratt. He was graduated from Mt. Hermon School and received the bachelor of theology degree from Gordon College. He held his M.A. degree from the University of New Hampshire and did graduate study toward his doctorate at Columbia, Boston University and the University of Vermont. His pastorates besides Vermont had included Maine, New Hampshire and Indiana. He was Protestant chaplain at the Monroe Forestry Camp, and had served as chaplain to the Vermont Senate. He was named a teacher at the Berlin, N.Y. Central School in 1955, and in 1956, was appointed to the Lanesboro School. He became a member of Drury faculty in 1957 and had served as pastor of the Blackinton church since 1959. Survivors besides his wife are two daughters, Mrs. Angelo E. Lorenzo of Buffalo, N.Y., and Miss Ruth Starratt of Amherst; three brothers, John H. of Cambridge, Charles F. of Mattapan and George H. Starratt of New York City; four sisters, Mrs. Ethel Smedberg of Spokane, Wash.; Mrs. Marion Browne of Cambridge, Miss Helen Starratt of Swampscott and Mrs. Florence Stone of Lynn; three grandchildren. The funeral will be held at the Blackinton Union Church Saturday at 2 p.m. Calling hours at the Simmons Funeral Home in North Adams are from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. today (North Adams Transcript, November 12, 1965). 

Mabel A. (Bishop) Starratt died in Pownal, VT, September 7, 1995.

Frank H. Snell – 1931-1937

Frank H. Snell was born in Fall River, MA, April 3, 1910, son of Lysander F. and Maude B. (Rodda) Snell.

Lysander Snell, a house carpenter, aged forty-four years (b. RI), headed a Tiverton, RI, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Maude B. Snell, aged thirty-nine years (b. England), and his children, Frank H. Snell, aged twenty years (b. RI), Arthur C. Snell, aged eighteen years (b. RI), Dorothy Snell, aged fourteen years (b. RI), Ruth E. Snell, aged twelve years (b. RI), and Marion L. Snell, aged three years (b. RI).

Snell, Rev Frank HFRANK H. SNELL ORDAINED AT MILTON MILLS CHURCH. MILTON MILLS, N.H., June 16 – The ordination of Frank Herbert Snell, pastor of the Baptist Church, to the Christian ministry took place this evening at the local Baptist Church. The ordination sermon was given by Rev. Dr. Nathan R. Wood, president of Gordon College. Rev. Dr. Edwin H. Byington of Needham, Mass., gave the charge to the candidate. The invocation was by Rev. H. Franklin Parker of Chichester, N.H., and the Scripture lesson by Rev. Clarence Sanger of Strafford, N.H. The ordination prayer was offered by Rev. George Kneeland, Lebanon, Me. The welcome to the Christian ministry was tendered by Rev. Dennis S. Jenks of Manchester, secretary of the State Convention. Rev G.S. Cambell of Rochester gave the charge to the church. Organ music was furnished by Mr. Fred E. Gale and vocal selections were by Miss Hazel Grant. Rev. Mr. Snell, who has been a student of Gordon College, has been acting as preacher since last Fall at the local church. He will continue in service as settled minister (Boston Globe, June 17, 1931).

Frank H. Snell married September 12, 1931, Doris M. Hapgood, he of Acton, ME, and she of Whitefield, NH. She was born in Lynn, MA, June 23, 1906, daughter of Roy G. and Florence B. (Kelley) Hapgood.

N.H. PASTOR LENDS HAND TO CUPID IN MAINE MAN’S WEDDING. Rochester, N.H., Feb 25 – (AP) – The part Rev. Vernon Byron played to assist Cupid became known tonight. Gerald White of South Lebanon, Me., and Miss Harriett Frost of East Rochester wanted Mr. Byron, pastor of the local Baptist church, to marry them several nights ago. Miss Frost attends his church. When the bridal party arrived at the parsonage, Mr. Byron said he couldn’t marry them because White’s license was issued in Maine. So the party drove to Milton Mills, N.H., ten miles away, where Mr. Byron’s friend, Rev. Frank Snell, is pastor of the Baptist church. The church is in Strafford county, N.H., but the parsonage is in Acton, York County, Me., and there Mr. Byron performed the ceremony (Lewiston Daily Sun (Lewiston, ME), February 26, 1936).

(The reverse must have been the case. The marriage must have taken place at the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church, which was in Acton, ME, while its parsonage was in Milton Mills, NH, which would have had the same legal difficulty with the Maine marriage license).

WHITEFIELD. Mrs. Frank Snell and daughter Joan of Milton Mills were here last week to visit her relatives (Kennebec Journal (Augusta, ME), October 19, 1937).

Frank H. Snell was pastor of the Green Street Baptist church in Melrose, MA, between December 1, 1937, and February 20, 1949.

Frank H. Snell, a church minister, aged thirty years (b. MA), headed a Melrose, MA, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Doris H. Snell, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), his daughter, Joan M. Snell, aged six years (b. NH), his mother-in-law, Florence Hapgood, retired, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), and his grandfather-in-law, Coleman Kelley, retired, aged sixty-nine years (b. NH). They resided at 14 Farwell Avenue. All had resided in Acton, ME, in 1935, excepting Florence Hapgood, who had resided then in Whitefield, NH.

Frank H. Snell, a Baptist Church minister, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Cranston, RI, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Doris H. Snell, aged forty-three years (b. MA), his children, Joan M. Snell, aged sixteen years (b. NH), and Carolyn M. Snell, aged six years (b. MA), and his mother-in-law, Florence B. Reynalds, a private family practical nurse, aged sixty-one years (b. NH). They resided at 44 Philmont Avenue. (Florence B. Reynalds had a marital status of “Separated”).

Frank H. Snell died in Coventry, RI, June 22, 1978. Doris M. (Hapgood) Snell died in Cranston, RI, November 14, 1998.

James W. Currie – 1938-1941

James Whitfield Currier was born in St. Johnsbury, New Brunswick, Canada, June 15, 1906, son of Charles and Ida M. (Camp) Currie.

Charles Currie, a hospital painter, aged fifty-seven years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed a Malden, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-nine years), Ida M. Currie, aged fifty-nine years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and his children, Nanna Currie, aged twenty-six years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and James W. Currie, a bank clerk, aged twenty-three years (b. Canada (Eng.)). Charles Currie owned their house at 51 Cherry Street, which was valued at $6,000. They did not have a radio set. They had all immigrated into the U.S. in 1921 (Charles Currie was a “permanent alien”).

BRIGHTON. The Summer schedule at Hill Memorial Baptist Church, North Harvard st., will begin Sunday. During the season the evening service at the church will be omitted. James W. Currie, a senior at Gordon College, will conduct the services (Boston Globe, June 26, 1935).

Rev. James Currie, pastor of the Baptist Church at Milton Mills, NH, was an usher at the wedding of Rev. Leland Maxfield, July 21, 1938 (Boston Globe, July 21, 1938).

J. Whitfield Currie, a Protestant minister, aged thirty-three years (b. Canada (Eng.)), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his father, Charles W. Currie, a house painter, aged seventy-seven years (b. Canada (Eng.)), and [his father’s] wife, i.e., his mother, Ida M. Currie, aged sixty-nine years (b. Canada (Eng.)). J. Whitfield Currie rented their house “near Milton Mills, New Hampshire,” for $10 per month. They had all resided in Malden, MA, in 1935; and they were all aliens, i.e., immigrants.

ROCHESTER, N.H. James W. Currie, who has been pastor of the Baptist Church at Milton Mills, was ordained to the ministry Friday night at the church (Potland Evening Express (Portland, ME), June 14, 1941).

James W. Currie married in Quincy, MA, in 1942, Edith Charlotta Victoria Serberg, both of Quincy, MA. She was born in Quincy, MA, July 16, 1912, daughter of Victor E. and Edith E.L. (Svenson) Serberg. (Edith C.V. Serberg was a niece of Milton’s Ruth H. (((Svenson) Anderson) Iovine) Dawson and Ingeborg V. “Ivy” (Svenson) Townsend).

James W. Currie was not the head of a Milton household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. His name was scratched out in favor of his wife, with the notation “Should not be listed – Chaplain in U.S. Army.” His wife, Edith C. Currie, aged thirty-six years (b. MA), headed instead their Milton household, which included his children, Charlotte V. Currie, aged seven years (b. MA), and Elizabeth V. Currie, aged one year (b. NH). They resided in the fifth house on the left on Main Street. (Whether that was Milton Main Street or Milton Mills Main Street was not clear).

ACTON. Next Sunday the Rev. James W. Currie of Swampscott, Mass., will be the guest speaker (Biddeford Journal Tribune, Biddeford, ME), August 17, 1967).

ACTON. The Rev. James W. Currie of Swampscott, Mass., former pastor of the Acton-Milton Mills Baptist Church, was the guest speaker at the church Sunday (Biddeford Journal Tribune, Biddeford, ME), August 24, 1967).

Edith C.V. (Serberg) Currie died in Volusia, FL, December 17, 1981, aged sixty-eight years. James W. Currie died in Boston, MA, April 14, 1984.

DEATHS. CURRIE – In Boston, formerly of Fla., April 14, James W. Currie, husband of the late Edith C.V. (Serverg) Currie, father of Charlotte V. Hartwell of Glendora, Cal. and Elisabeth V. Borgioli of Melrose, also survived by 4 grandchildren. Memorial Service at the Robinson Funeral Home, 809 Main St., MELROSE, Tuesday. April 17 at 10 o’clock. Relatives and friends invited. Gifts in his memory may be made to the American Lung Assn., 263 Summer St., Boston (Boston Globe, April 17, 1984).

H. Leroy Patterson – 1941-1943

Harold Leroy “Leroy” Patterson was born in Altoona, PA, April 2, 1918, son of George W. and Virginia (Frontz) Patterson.

Patterson, H. Leroy - 1940Harold Leroy Patterson of 30 Evans Way, Boston, MA, registered for the WW II military draft in Boston, MA, October 16, 1940. He was a student at Gordon College of Theology (30 Evans Way, Boston, MA), aged twenty-two years. His next of kin was his father, George W. Patterson of Juniata, PA. He was described as being 5′ 10″ tall, 190 pounds, with blue eyes, blond hair, and a light complexion.

H. Leroy Patterson married in Detroit, MI, September 13, 1941, Inez Genevieve Peterson, he of Juniata, PA, and she of Detroit, MI. Rev. Warner E. Cole performed the ceremony. She was born in MI, circa 1919. daughter of Otto and Teckla (Engmar) Peterson.

Maids Wear Fall Shades for Wedding. Inez Peterson Speaks vows at Church Service. DEXTER BOULEVARD BAPTIST CHURCH was the setting for the marriage on Saturday, Sept 13, of Inez Peterson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Peterson, of Rosedale Park, to Leroy Patterson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Patterson, of Altoona, Pa. The bride wore a high-necked, white silk Jersey gown with long bishop sleeves. Tiny covered buttons marked the back of the gown from the neckline to below the fitted waist. An extremely full skirt flowed into a fan-shaped train, and she wore a floor-length veil held in place by a Juliet cap. The bride’s bouquet was of white roses and stephanotis centered by an orchid. Her attendants were her sister, Ella Peterson, maid of honor, and two bridesmaids, Astrid Drage and Marguerite Vine. THE MAID OF HONOR wore a quaint gown of bronze taffeta fashioned with a velvet midrift. Her flowers were roses, baby mums and dahlias in yellow and bronze. The bridesmaid’s gowns were replicas in green, and they carried yellow and bronze baby mums and asters. The three wore sweetheart bonnets of velvet to match the midrift trim on their dresses. Don Patterson, of Wheaton College, brother of the bridegroom, was the best man. The ushers were Jim MacDonald, of Chicago, and Ralph Patterson, also a brother of the bridegroom. Immediately following the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of the bride’s parents. After a brief honeymoon In the East, the couple will live in Boston, Mass. (Detroit Free Press, September 21, 1941).

Rev. Leroy Patterson was pastor of the [Acton &] Milton Mills church as early as December  1941.

To Hold Roll Call at New Monmouth. … The [New Monmouth, NJ, Baptist] church now has four men who have gone out from the church to become ministers. They are Rev. John Wubbenhorst, who is pastor of Seneca Falls Baptist church, Seneca Falls, New York; Rev. Samuel Haddon Johnston, pastor of North Haven Baptist church, North Haven, Maine; Rev. Carey Johnston, pastor of Glendale Baptist church, Everett, Massachusetts, and Rev. Leroy Patterson, pastor of Milton Mills Baptist church, Milton Mills, New Hampshire (Daily Register (Red Bank, NJ), January 8, 1942).

Baptist Group Meets This Week. SANFORD, May 2 (Special) – The 26th annual meeting of the North York United Baptist Association will be held at the First Baptist Church at Springvale Tuesday. Taking part in the morning service, opening at 9:30, will be Thurber R. Weller of West Lebanon, the Rev. Lawrence N. Selfridge, the Rev. John S. Pendleton of Waterville, the Rev. Thomas Brindley and Leroy Patterson of Milton Mills. The Rev. Lester R. Norton of Waterboro will lead the afternoon praise service and there will be election of officers and a women’s hour in charge of Mrs. Mary Moody. The evening service at 7 o’clock will be in charge of young people. Taking part will be Miss Norma Hanscom, Miss Caroline Greenwood, Horace Emmons, the Rev. James B. Ranger, and the Rev. Mr. Selfridge (Portland Evening Express, May 3, 1943).

Rev. Leroy (Inez) Patterson appeared in the Attleboro, MA, directory of 1944, as pastor of the Grace Baptist church, with his house at 33 Benefit street.

CHURCH BRIEFS. Three chaplains from Fort Oglethorpe’s chaplain’s school, Lt. Joseph Hodges of Massachusetts, Christian and Missionary Alliance; Lt. H. LeRoy Patterson of Michigan, Northern Baptist; and Lt. George E. Lang, Christian and Missionary Alliance, will speak at the 7 p.m. service tomorrow evening at the Grace Methodist Church in Avondale (Dodson at Wilson). This special service will honor the men on the honor roll of the church and those from the church who gave their lives for their country. Relatives of the men are asked by the pastor, the Rev. A.G. McCoig, to be present (Chattanooga Daily News (Chattanooga, TN), October 6, 1945).

Rev. H. LeRoy (Inez G.) Patterson appeared in the Saginaw, MI, directory of 1948, as pastor of the Congress Avenue Baptist Church, with his house at 1752 W. Michigan Avenue.

Harold L. Patterson, a minister, aged thirty-two years (b. PA), headed a Saginaw, MI, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Inez G. Patterson, aged thirty years (b. MI), his children, Patricia L. Patterson, aged seven years (b. NH), and Linda R. Patterson, aged four years (b. MI), and Dale Patterson, aged three months (b. MI). They resided at 1752 Michigan Avenue.

Patterson, Rev. H.L. - 1950Flying Ex-Chaplain Speaking as Pietsch’s Ministry Ends. A former outstanding athlete who entered the chaplaincy upon completion of his seminary training and who frequently flies an airplane to distant Youth-for-Christ speaking engagements will speak here Sunday at the Grace church, as a candidate for the pastorate. He is Rev. H. Leroy (Roy) Patterson of the Congress Avenue Bible church of Saginaw, Mich., and president of the Saginaw Valley Youth-for-Christ organization. At the 11 a.m. service here, he will speak on the theme: The Foundation of the Church.” At the 7:30 p.m. service, his topic will be “The Cross and the World.” The services will also conclude the year’s ministry of Rev. Paul J. Pietsch, Jr., who, with his family, plans to sail toward the end of March for Evangelical Alliance mission work in Portugal. He plans to spend the months of January and February on a speaking tour. Mr. Patterson, the pulpit candidate, is a native of Altoona, Pa., and a graduate of Wheaton (Ill.) college. He won all-state and all-wrestling honors during his student days and received his theological degree at Gordon Divinity school, Boston. Upon graduation, he served as a wartime Army chaplain in the European theater, and while in Germany helped organize the first Youth-for-Christ rallies among service men in Nurmberg and other cities (Pomona Progress Bulletin (Pomona, CA), December 30, 1950).

Rev. H. LeRoy (Inez G.) Patterson appeared in the Lansing, MI, directory of 1951, as pastor of the Inter-City Tabernacle church, with his house at 807 Jerome street.

Joseph B. Bubar – 1944-1946

Joseph Bedell Bubar was born Weston, ME, August 27, 1919, son of Benjamin C. and Mary L. (Heal) Bubar.

Benjamin C. Bubar, a church clergyman, aged sixty-two years (b. ME), headed a Weston, ME, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary L. Bubar, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), his children, Benjamin C. Bubar, Jr., a printer (own business), aged twenty-two years (b. ME), Joseph B. Bubar, a clergyman, aged twenty years (b. ME), Rachel C. Bubar, aged seventeen years (b. ME), John H. Bubar, aged fourteen years (b. ME), David N. Bubar, aged twelve years (b. ME), Paul L. Bubar, aged seven years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Anna C. Heal, aged seventy-two years (b. ME). Benjamin C. Bubar owned their farm, which was valued at $4,000. They had all resided in the “Same House” in 1935.

New York Girl Engaged To Wed Linneus Man. Miss Ruth Hughey To Be Bride of Joseph B. Bubar. NEW YORK, Feb. 8. – Rev. and Mrs. Philip C. Hughey of New York City have announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Ruth Ella Hughey, to Joseph Bedell Bubar, son of Rev. and Mrs. Benjamin C. Bubar of Linneus, Maine. Miss Hughey is a graduate of Teaneck High school in New Jersey and is a student at Wheaton college in Illinois, where she is majoring in music. Her father, the Rev. Phillip C. Hughey, a native of Portland, is pastor of the Wadsworth Avenue Baptist church. He is president of the Evangelical Ministers Association of Greater New York. Mr. Bubar, after graduating from Danforth High school, was assistant pastor of the Aroostook Larger Parish for two years. He is a sophomore at Colby college, Waterville and is student pastor of the Baptist churches in North Vassalboro, Winslow, and Smithfield. His father, Rev. B.C. Bubar is pastor of the Baptist church in Linnaeus and a well-known evangelist. Mr. Bubar’s brother, Benjamin C. Bubar, Jr., is a member of the Maine State Legislature and is pastor of the Hainsville Baptist church (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), February 9, 1942).

Joseph B. Bubar married in New York, NY, September 5, 1942, Ruth Hughey, he of North Vassalboro, ME. She was born in Waterboro, ME, in February 1923, daughter of Phillip C. and Grace D. (Walsh) Hughey.

Bubar, Joseph B. - 1944Joseph B. Bubar To Be Ordained Tuesday Night. With his father, his father-in-law, his wife, brother and wife’s mother having parts in the services Rev. Joseph B. Bubar, pastor of the Baptist church in North Vassalboro, will be ordained to the Baptist ministry at the Church in North Vassalboro Tuesday night at 7.30. The public has been invited to attend the ceremony. Taking part will be the candidate’s brother, Rev. Benjamin C. Bubar, Jr., of Hodgdon, who will offer the invocation. Mrs. Bubar’s father, Rev. Philip C. Hughey, pastor of the Wadsworth Avenue Baptist church New York City, will preach the ordination sermon. Rev. Benjamin C. Bubar of the Allagash larger parish will deliver the charge to the candidate, while Mrs. Bubar and her mother, Mrs. Hughey, will assist in the music. Others who will assist in the ordination are Rev. A.W. Brown of Norridgewock; Rev. Paul Scruton, Hartland; Rev. Sterling Heliner, Pittsfield; Rev. George Hammond, Fairfield; Rev. Howard A. Welch, Madison; and Rev. Waldo Putnam and Rev. Herbert L. Newman of Waterville. Rev. Joseph B. Bubar is a native of Danforth, where he graduated from the high school. He was graduated from Colby college in the class of 1944 last month. He has served as assistant pastor of the Danforth larger parish, which comprises 11 towns, for two years. For the past four years he has been pastor of the church in North Vassalboro, also serving in the churches in East Winslow and Smithfield. He will leave his work in Maine next month to enter Gordon seminary in Boston for further study, meanwhile serving as pastor of the church in Milton Mills, N.H., where he will make his home. His wife was the former Miss Ruth Hughey of New York City (Morning Sentinel (Waterville, ME), June 19, 1944).

Joseph B. Bubar died in Chicago, IL, June 27, 1976.

Obituaries. BUBAR. Rev. Joseph B. Bubar of Muskego, Wisc., formerly of Addison, beloved husband of Ruth, nee Hughey; loving father of Joseph (Charlotte), Philip (Lisa) and Mary (David) Davis; dear brother of Rev. Benjamin C., Rev. John, Rev. David N. and Rev. Paul and Mrs. Henry Kelly; three grandsons. Funeral services Thursday July 1 at 2 p.m. at the Addison Bible Church, 325 S. Addison Rd, Addison, Ill. Visitation on Wednesday from 4 to 10 p.m. at The Villa Park Funeral Home, 305 S. Princeton Ave. (a block west of Ardmore Ave.), Villa Park. Lying in state at the Church Thursday from 1 p.m. till time of service. He was pastor of the Calvary Evangelical Free Church of Muskego, Wisc., and the former General Director of Christian Service Brigade. In lieu of flowers memorials appreciated to the Calvary E.F.C. of the Christian Service Brigade. Interment Elm Lawn. 834-6656 (Chicago Tribune, June 30, 1976).

Ruth (Hughey) Bubar died April 8, 2015, aged ninety-two years.

Loring P. Wilkins – 1946-48

Loring Peabody Wilkins was born in Beverly, MA, October 18, 1923, son of Melville O. and Beatrice T. (Dodge) Wilkins.

GORHAM NEWS. The Rev. Loring Wilkins, Milton Mills, N.H., will preach at the Eight Corners and South Gorham Baptist Churches Sunday morning, as a candidate for the pastorates (Portland Evening Express (Portland, ME), October 14, 1948).

Loring P. Wilkins married, September 2, 1945, Thelma Arlene Bentley. She was born in Manchester, ME, July 13, 1919, daughter of Ellsworth B. and Alice G. (Flewelling) Bentley.

Ellsworth B. Bentley, a chicken farmer, aged fifty-three years (b. MA), headed a Plymouth, MA, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Alice S. Bentley, aged fifty years (b. ME), his daughter, Thelma B. Wilkins, aged thirty years (b. ME), his son-in-law, Loring P. Wilkins, a student minister, aged twenty-six years (b. MA), his grandchild, Tyler B. Wilkins, aged two years (b. NH), and his hired hand, Francis B. Marsh, a farm laborer, aged nineteen years (b. MA). Ellsworth B. Bentley owned their farm on Bartlett Road.

Wilkins, Loring P - 1954Rev. Loring Wilkins Begins Pastorate In Middlebury Sunday. MIDDLEBURY, June 2. The Rev. Loring P. Wilkins begins his pastorate at the Middlebury Memorial Baptist Church Sunday, June 6. Mr. Wilkins attended Moody Bible Institute of Chicago for a year, and then transferred to Gordon College of Theology and Missions in Boston. After graduation there in 1946 he served as pastor for two and a half years in Acton, Maine, before returning to Gordon Divinity School, from which he was graduated in 1952. He has since been pastor of the First United Church of Swampscott, Massachusetts. Mrs. Wilkins is also a graduate of Gordon College, Boston. They have three children: Tyler, age 7, Arthur, 3, and Sharon, 2 (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), June 3, 1954).

New St. Albans Baptist Church Pastor Named. ST. ALBANS – A native of Beverly. Mass., will become the new pastor of the First Baptist Church here Sept. 1. He is the Rev. Loring P. Wilkins, who will succeed the Rev. Alfred Scott. Mr. Wilkins has served as pastor of the Acton and Milton Mills Baptist Churches in Acton, Maine, the First United Church, Baptist Disciples, of Swampscott, Mass., the Memorial Baptist Church of Middlebury and the Community Baptist Church of Panton. He is a trustee of the Vermont Baptist State Convention and president of the Vermont Baptist Historical Society. Mr. Wilkins is married to the former Thelma Bentley of Manomet, Mass., and they have three children – two sons, Tyler and Arthur, and one daughter, Sharon. He was commissioned a chaplain in the Navy Reserve with the rank of Lieutenant, junior grade, in 1936, and is on duty status with the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Reserve training program at Burlington (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), June 21, 1958).

Thelma (Bentley) Wilkins died in Hatfield, PA, January 9, 2008. Loring P. Wilkins died in Lansdale, PA, May 16, 2008.

Rev. Loring P. Wilkins Navy chaplain, 84. The Rev. Loring P. Wilkins, 84, a retired Navy chaplain and Baptist minister, died of complications of diabetes May 16 at Elm Terrace Gardens, a retirement community in Lansdale, where he had lived for more than 20 years. Mr. Wilkins grew up in Worcester, Mass. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Gordon College in Wenham, Mass., where he met Rev. Loring his future wife, Thelma Bentley. After graduating from Gordon Theological Seminary, he was a minister in Baptist churches in Maine, Vermont and Massachusetts. In 1956, he began an 8½-year stint in the Navy, serving as a chaplain on bases in California, Hawaii, Thailand, Guam and South Carolina. He was the first chaplain to be assigned to a submarine, said his daughter, Sharon Barone, and in 1967 he served aboard the USS Benjamin Franklin on a two-month tour in the Pacific. He continued to remain in the Naval Reserve until retiring as a lieutenant commander in 1974. Following his active military duty, Mr. Wilkins was chaplain at Christ’s Home for Children and Christ’s Home Retirement Community in Warminster for 12 years. He then served as the first chaplain at Elm Terrace Gardens for several years. A talented photographer, he chronicled his travels with the Navy and his vacations, his daughter said. He loved dogs, she said, especially Boston terriers. Mr. Wilkins’ wife of 63 years died in January. In addition to his daughter, he is survived by sons Tyler and Art; nine grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. A funeral will be at 10 a.m. Monday at Elm Terrace Gardens, 660 N. Broad St., Lansdale. Friends may call at 9:30 a.m. Burial will be in Christ’s Home Cemetery, Warminster (Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA), May 23, 2008).

Buell W. Maxfield – 1949-62

Buell Wade Maxfield was born in Monkton, VT, March 30, 1897, son of Newton J. and Flora I. (Tomlinson) Maxfield.

Buell W. Maxfield married (1st) in Starksboro, VT, June 26, 1917, Beulah Sherman, he of Starksboro, VT. He was a student, aged twenty years, and she was aged twenty years. Rev. J.S. Braker performed the ceremony. She was born in Burlington, VT, June 26 [or 29] 1896, daughter of Herbert and Hattie H. (Greeve) Sherman.

Beulah (Sherman) Maxfield died of scarlet fever in Boston, MA, February 22, 1920.

OBITUARY. Mrs. Buell W. Maxfield. Mrs. Beulah (Sherman) Maxfield, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Sherman, died in Boston yesterday morning of scarlet fever. Besides her husband, she is survived by one son, Keigwin, an infant daughter and her parents. Mrs. Maxfield was born in this city June 29, 1896 and attended the graded and Burlington high schools. In June, 1917, she married Buell Wade Maxfield, of Starksboro, and has since made her home in Boston. The sudden death of Mrs. Maxfield comes as a shock to her wide circle of friends and acquaintances here (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), February 24, 1920).

Buell W. Maxfield married (2nd) at the Hill Grove Baptist Church in Salisbury, New Brunswick, Canada, September 1, 1920, Bertha Margaret Holmes, he of Winchendon, MA, and she of Hill Grove, New Brunswick, Canada. He was a widower, aged twenty-three years, and she was a spinster, aged thirty-three years. Both were Baptists and both could read and write. Rev. Milton Addison performed the ceremony. She was born in Hill Grove, New Brunswick, Canada, daughter of Charles R. and Phoebe (MacMonagle) Holmes.

Rev. Buell W. Maxfield (Bertha H.) appeared in the Worcester, MA, directory of 1927, as pastor of the Dewey St. Baptist Church, with his house at 162 May street.

Rev. Buell W. Maxfield appeared in the Boston, MA, directory of 1928, as pastor of the Bethany Baptist Church in Roxbury, with his house at 57 Melville avenue in Dorchester. (Roxbury and Dorchester being parts or wards of Boston, MA).

Buell W. Maxfield, a church minister, aged thirty-three years (b. VT), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of ten years), Bertha H. Maxfield, aged forty-three [thirty-three] years (b. Canada), and his children, Keigwin B. Maxfield, aged eleven years (b. VT), and Atta B. Maxfield, aged ten years (b. MA). Buell W. Maxfield rented their house at 25 Woodville Street, for $50 per month. They had a radio set.

Rev. Buell W. Maxfield (Bertha H.) appeared in the Dover, NH, directories of 1933, 1935, 1936, and 1938, as pastor of the Dover Baptist Church, with his house at 14 Richmond street.

Buell Maxfield, a Baptist minister, aged forty-three years (b. VT), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Bertha H. Maxfield, aged fifty-one years (b. Canada), and his children, Keigwin Maxfield, aged twenty-one years (b. VT), and Alta B. Maxfield, aged twenty years (b. MA).

Rev. Buell W. Maxfield (Bertha H.) appeared in the Dover, NH, directories of 1941, and 1943, as pastor of the Dover Baptist Church, with his house at 14 Richmond street.

Rev. Buell W. Maxfield (Bertha H.), Th. B.B.D., appeared in the Manchester, NH, directory of 1947, as pastor of the First Baptist Church, with his house at 39 Auburn street (Tel. 1876).

Buell W. Maxfield, pastor of the Acton & Milton Mills Baptist church, aged fifty-three years (b. VT), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Seventeenth (1950) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Bertha H. Maxfield, aged sixty-three years (b. New Brunswick, Canada), and his lodger, Alice A. King, a telephone operator for NET&T, aged thirty-six years (b. NH). His enumeration line had the additional information that he had lived in Concord, NH, ten years earlier, and that he had worked fifty-two hours in the previous week.

Rev. Buell W. Maxfield was a guest at the ordination of Charles Shelley at the Nute Chapel on Monday, August 1, 1950. (See Milton’s Nute Chapel Ministers of 1922-53).

Rev. Buell W. Maxfield gave the benediction at Milton’s sesquicentennial celebration on Sunday, August 10, 1952. (See Milton in the News – 1952).

In the following Summer 1953 schedule one may note with interest that those substituting for Rev. Maxfield were a sequence of his predecessor ministers, Rev. Wilkins, Rev. Bubar, and Rev. Snell.

South Acton, By Mrs. Irl R. Hurd. Acton-Milton Mills Baptist Church. Rev. Buell W. Maxfield, Pastor. Milton Mills, New Hampshire. Welcome To All Faiths. 11 a.m., Sunday. Aug 2, Evangelist Roy Egar will conduct the worship service. He currently is holding tent meetings in Center Ossipee, Route 16. Other guest speakers for next month will be: Aug. 9, the Rev. Loring Wilkins; Aug. 10 Rev. Joseph Bubar; Aug. 23, Rev. Frank Snell; Aug. 30, Rev. Roy Bohanan. Friday, July 31, at 10 a.m., there will be an all-day sewing meeting at the home of Abbie Anderson. Each member is asked to bring a favorite dish for lunch, either salad or dessert. Coffee will be furnished by the hostess. The Rev. Buell W. Maxfield, pastor, will spend his vacation next month at his old home in Pittsfield, N.H. (Journal Tribune (Biddeford, ME), July 30, 1953).

Rev. Buell W. Maxfield officiated at the funeral of Nute High School Principal Walter J. Foster, on Sunday, June 23, 1957. (See Nute High School Principals, 1923-57).

Acton. BY MRS IRL HURD. Baptist Church. The Rev Buell Maxfield spoke on “Religious Gate Crashers” at the Sunday morning worship service in the Acton-Milton Mills Baptist Church. His resignation as pastor of the church was accepted at a special business meeting of the church at noon. A meeting of the Dorcas Society is planned today at 1:30 pm at the home of Mrs. Helen Wentworth. A blind auction is planned. The weekly church prayer meeting will be held with Mrs. Alice Reynolds tonight at 7:30 o’clock (Sanford Tribune (Sanford, ME), March 15, 1962).

Buell W. Maxfield died of an acute coronary occlusion in his home on South Road in Pittsfield, NH, March 30, 1969, aged seventy-two years.

Deaths and Funerals. REV. BUELL W. MAXFIELD. PITTSFIELD, N.H. – The Rev. Buell Wade Maxfield, 72, of Pittsfield, N.H., died unexpectedly at his home Sunday morning. He was born March 30, 1897, in Starksboro, Vt., the son of Newton John and Flora (Tomlinson) Maxfield. The Rev. Mr. Maxfield was a retired Baptist minister after serving pastorates in Worcester, Winchendon, and Roxbury, Mass.; Dover, and Milton Mills, N.H. He was first married to Beulah Sherman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Sherman of Burlington, Vt. Later he married Bertha Holmes who survives him. He is also survived by a son, Keigwin of Knoxville. Tenn., a daughter. Mrs. Alta Gibbs of South Schroon, NY.; three grandsons, Kenneth Maxfield, Robert and Russell Gibbs; and three nieces, Mrs. Beatrice Marshall and Mrs. Marjorie Bennett of New Haven and Mrs. Alice Lewis of Davenport, Iowa. Burial will be in Starksboro at a later date (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), April 3, 1969).

Bertha (Holmes) Maxfield died at Concord Hospital, in Concord, NH, October 17, 1969, aged eighty-two years.

Deaths and Funerals. BERTHA H. MAXFIELD. PITTSFIELD – Mrs. Bertha H. Maxfield, 82, of South Road died at Concord Hospital Friday after a long illness. A native of Petitcodiac, N.B., she had lived here seven years. She was the widow of the Rev. Buell W. Maxfield. She was a member of the Acton-Milton Mills Baptist Church. She had attended Gordon College. She leaves a son, Keigwin B. Maxfield of Ooltemwail, Tenn.; a daughter, Mrs. Alta B. Gibbs of St. Petersburg, Fla. and Schroon Lakes, N.Y.; three grandsons, Robert Gibbs, USN, Russell Gibbs of St. Petersburg and Kenneth Maxfield of Ooltemwail; two brothers, Cecil and Floyd Holmes of Petitcodiac; a sister, Mrs. Robert Colpitts of Petitcodiac; nieces and nephews. Services will be conducted at the Acton-Milton Mills Baptist Church Tuesday at 10 a.m. by Rev. Galen Robertson. Burial will be in Green Mountain Cemetery, Starksboro, VT, at 4 p.m. Rev. William Bosch will officiate. There will be no calling hours. It has been requested flowers be omitted and suggested contributions be made to the Buell W. Maxfield Memorial Fund, Alumni Office, Gordon College, Wenham, Mass. Hussey and Wiren Funeral Chapel, Concord, is in charge of arrangements (Concord Monitor (Concord, NH), October 20, 1969).


References:

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Burgess, Gideon A., & Ward, John T. (1889). Free Baptist CyclopaediaHistorical and Biographical: The Rise of the Freewill Baptist Connection and of Those General and Open Communion Baptists Which, Merging Together, Form One People, Their Doctrines, Polity, Publications, Schools and Missions, with Brief Biographies of Ministers and Others Identified with the Growth and Strength of the Denomination. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=3GXiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA617

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Find a Grave. (2012, January 13). Carl Raymond Bartle. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/83377452/carl-raymond-bartle

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Find a Grave. (2018, March 9). Rev. Edwin P. Moulton. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/187894714/edwin-p-moulton

Find a Grave. (2020, April 8). Rev. Frank H. Snell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/208834428/frank-h-snell

Find a Grave. (2006, September 3). Rev. George B. Southwick. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/15595953/george-b-southwick

Find a Grave. (2015, September 5). Rev. Howard Manuel Starratt. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/151883874/howard-manuel-starratt

Find a Grave. (2016, September 12). Rev. Loring Peabody Wilkins. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/169375776/loring-peabody-wilkins

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Milton Trader Hopley Meserve (1789-1875)

By Muriel Bristol | September 4, 2022

Hopley Meserve was born in Milton, March 31, 1789, son of Stephen and Abigail (Yeaton) Meserve.

(The known children of Stephen and Abigail (Yeaton) Meserve were: Comfort Meserve (1772–1802), Polly Meserve (1778–1801), Abigail Meserve (1780–1860), Betsey Meserve (c1782–), John Meserve (1785–1871), Stephen Meserve (1787–1850), Hopley T. Meserve (1789–1875), and Samuel Meserve (1791–)).

Father Stephen Meserve died in Rochester, NH, circa 1794. Mother Abigail (Yeaton) Meserve died in Rochester, NH, circa 1801.

Hopley Meserve married (1st) in Milton, March 4, 1810, Joanna Twombly. She was born in Milton, June 13, 1789, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Burrows) Twombly.

(The known children of Hopley and Joanna (Twombly) Meserve were: Stephen M.Y. Meserve (1811–1876), Hopley T. Meserve (1813–1889), Charles Y. Meserve (1815–1869), Louisa F. Meserve (1818–1901), Henry H. Meserve (1820–1827), Mary I. Meserve (1824-1849), and John S. Meserve (1827–1897)).

Hopley Meservy headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-25 years [himself], one female aged 16-25 years [Joanna (Twombly) Meserve], one female aged 10-15 years, and one female aged 45-plus years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ephraim Prummer [Plummer] and Daniel Hayes.

Son Stephen M.Y. Meserve was born in Milton, February 26, 1811. Son Hopley T. Meserve was born in Milton, May 11, 1813. Son Charles Y. Meserve was born in Milton, February 2, 1815.

Daughter Louisa F. Meserve was born in Milton, February 14, 1818.

The Milton selectmen of 1818 were Jas. Roberts, W.S. Nutter, and Hopley Meserve.

The Milton selectmen of 1819-20 were Hanson Hayes, H. Meserve, and John Remick, Jr.

Son Henry H. Meserve was born in Milton in 1820.

Hopley Meserve was among the seventy-nine Milton inhabitants that petitioned NH Governor Samuel Bell (1770-1850) and his Executive Council, April 3, 1820, seeking appointment of James Roberts as a Milton justice-of-the-peace.

Hopley Meserve was among some eighty-eight Milton men that filed a militia company division petition intended for the November 1820 session of the NH legislature. Captain Jeremy Nute signed this proposal, as did former company officers Elijah Horn, Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, future company officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes. A division of the company would have obviated the need or desire to divide the town in order to divide the company. (See Milton Militia Division Petitions – November 1820).

The Milton selectmen of 1821 and 1822 were Jas. Roberts, H. Hayes, and H. Meserve. The Milton selectmen of 1823 were H. Hayes, H. Meserve, and Jos. Plumer.

Hopley Meserve was among the twenty-three Milton inhabitants that requested appointment of Gilman Jewett of Milton Mills as Milton coroner, June 12, 1823. (See Milton Seeks a Coroner – June 1823).

The Milton selectmen of 1824 were H. Hayes, H. Meserve, and I.H. Wentworth.

Daughter Mary I. Meserve was born in Milton, June 21, 1824.

Hopley Meserve Signature - 1816Hopley Meserve was one of five inhabitants residing “in the neighborhood of Farmington & Rochester or Chestnut hills so-called” that petitioned in 1825, seeking appointment of Job Varney of Farmington, NH, as a Farmington justice-of-the-peace, in lieu of James Davis, Esq., who had removed from town. Fellow Milton selectman Hanson Hayes was one of an additional five petitioners that subscribed on the reverse side.

The Milton selectmen of 1827 were Jas. Hayes, Jr., Thos. Chapman, and H. Meserve.

Son John S. Meserve was born in Milton, May 25, 1827. Son Henry H. Meserve died in Milton, November 13, 1827.

The Milton selectmen of 1829 were W.B. Wiggin, H. Meserve, and J.M. Twombly.

Hopley Meservy headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Joanna (Twombly) Meserve], three males aged 15-19 years [Stephen M.Y. Meserve, Hopley T. Meserve, and Charles Y. Meserve], one female aged 10-14 years [Louisa Meserve], one female aged 5-9 years [Mary I. Meserve], and one female aged under-5 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Moses Nute and Mary Wingate.

The Milton selectmen of 1831 were J.M. Twombly, Thos. Chapman, and H. Meserve.

The Milton selectmen of 1833 were J.M. Twombly, W.S. Nutter, and H. Meserve.

Rep. Nathaniel Rogers of Wolfeborough, NH, presented a petition for Hopley Meserve and others to the NH House in June 1834. The petitioners sought to incorporate a stagecoach company.

TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1834. Mr. Rogers of Wolfeborough, presented the petition of Hopley Meserve and others, for the incorporation of a stage company. Ordered, That it be referred to the committee on incorporations.

On Tuesday, July 1, 1834, Rep. John H. Smith of Rochester, NH, submitted the committee’s report. It was voted that the stagecoach petition be held over for the next legislative session.

Mr. Smith from the same committee, to whom was referred the petition of Hopley Meserve and others, made a report. Whereupon, Resolved, That the further consideration of this petition be postponed to the next session of the Legislature. 

Daughter Louisa F. Meserve married (1st) in Milton, October 27, 1834, David M. Davis, both of Milton. Rev. Jacob Davis of Barnstead, NH, performed the ceremony.

Son Hopley T. Meserve married (1st), circa 1835, Almira Lydston. She was born in Litchfield, ME, circa 1814, daughter of John and Abigail (Cole) Lydston.

Son Charles Y. Meserve married in Wolfeboro, NH, July 10, 1836, Elizabeth March “Betsy” Roberts. She was born in Middleton, NH, December 3, 1813, daughter of John and Polly (Davis) Roberts.

Son Stephen M.Y. Meserve married in Rochester, NH, December 31, 1837, Mary Jane Stackpole, he of Rochester, NH, and she of Dover, NH. She was born in Portsmouth, NH, in 1820, daughter of Otis and Dorcas (Lord) Stackpole.

Son Charles Y. Meserve acquired a Rochester, NH, hotel in 1838 and he and his brother, Stephen M.Y. Meserve, ran it until it was sold to another party in 1843.

Lowell Kenney came from Salem, Mass., and opened “Kenney’s Tavern” in 1824. Charles Y. Meserve bought it in 1838, and at a supper which he gave to his friends on the occasion the Hon. J.H. Woodman proposed the name “Langdon House,” by which it was afterwards known. His brother Stephen Meserve followed him, and in 1843 Capt. Ephraim Richardson bought it, and conducted the business on strictly temperance principles for seventeen years. He leased the place for three years, and then in 1863 sold it to Mr. Dodge. The Wallaces soon after bought it, and the place is occupied by their business. The “Langdon House” did a large business before the time of railroads, frequently putting up from seventy-five to one hundred yoke of cattle, besides twenty to thirty horses in a single night. It was for some years “the head-quarters during the sessions of court, of the judges, lawyers, and leading men.” The regimental muster was held for many years on the parade back of this hotel (McDuffee, 1892).

Son Hopley T. Meserve removed to Charlestown, MA, at some time before 1840. Over time his parents and most of his siblings would follow him there.

Hoply Meserve headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Joanna (Twombly) Meserve], one female 15-19 years [Mary I. Meserve], one male 10-14 years [John S. Meserve], one female 80-89 years. Two members of his household were engaged in Agriculture. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Joseph Goodwin and Sarah Matthews [or Mathes].

Stephen M.Y. Meserve headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 20-29 years, one male aged 15-19 years, one female aged 15-19 years, and one female aged under-5 years. Two members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

H.T. Meserve headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 20-29 years, one male aged under-5 years, and one female aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in Commerce.

David M. Davis headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Louisa F. (Meserve) Davis], one female aged 5-9 years [Caroline Davis], and one male aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in Commerce.

Charles Y. Meserve of Rochester, NH, was Lt. Colonel of the 39th Regiment of NH Militia in 1842.

39th Regiment – Colonel Jeremiah Roberts Farmington; Lt. Colonel Charles Y. Meserve, Rochester; Major Enoch W. Chase, Rochester; Adjutant James H. Edgerly, Rochester; Quartermaster George N. Eastman, Farmington (Farmer & Lyon, 1842). 

Son Hopley T. Meserve appeared in the Charlestown, MA, directory of 1842, as a trader in West India goods at 5 Elm Street, with his house at the same address.

Hopley Messerve appeared in the Charlestown, MA, directory of 1845, as a trader on Bartlett street, at its corner with School street. His son, Hopley T. Messerve, appeared also as a trader on Bartlett street, at its corner with Green street.

Son-in-law David M. Davis of Rochester, NH, made his last will, November 27, 1845. He bequeathed all his household furniture of every description to his wife, Loiza Davis. She was to receive also all the rest and residue of his estate, while she remained his widow, for the purpose of bringing up his children, Caroline M. Davis, Cynthia J. Davis, and John H. Davis. Should she still be a widow when they reached their majority, she would share out the estate with them, i.e., she would receive a share, but should she remarry, she would share out the estate among the children only. David M. Davis signed his will with an “X.” James C. Cole, Henry Walker, Jr., and Stephen M. Mathes signed as witnesses. His will was proved at a Strafford County Probate court held in Rochester, NH, February 3, 1846 (Strafford County Probate, 60:222).

Hopley Meserve appeared in the Charlestown, MA, directory of 1848, as a trader on Bartlett street, at its corner with Green street, with his house at the same address. His son, Hopley T. Meserve, appeared also as a stabler on B. Hill, i.e., Bunker Hill, opposite Green street, with his house at the corner of Green and B. Hill streets. Another son, Charles Y. Meserve, appeared as having his house at the corner of Green and Bartlett streets.

Daughter Louisa F. (Meserve) Davis married (2nd), April 29, 1849, Stephen M. Mathes. He was born in Milton, April 3, 1797, son of Robert and Polly (Meserve) Mathes. (He had been married three times before. They were cousins, both being grandchildren of Stephen and Abigail (Yeaton) Meserve).

Daughter Mary I. Meserve died of consumption in Charlestown, MA, May 11, 1849, aged twenty-four years, ten months, and twenty days.

Hopley Meserve received payment of $75.70 from the Charlestown, MA, almshouse for delivery of milk in 1849. H.T. Meserve received $44.70 and John S. Meserve received $2.32, both also for milk delivered to the almshouse (Charlestown, MA, 1846).

Son John S. Meserve married (1st) in Charlestown, MA, May 9, 1850, Ruth M. Brooks, both of Charlestown, MA. He was a trader, aged twenty-two years, and she was aged twenty-two years. Rev. Joseph Banfield performed the ceremony. She was born in Thetford, VT, in 1828, daughter of Charles and Mary (Bruce) Brooks.

Hopley Meserve, W.I. [West India] goods, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Joanna Meserve, aged sixty-one years (b. NH), John S. Meserve, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Ruth M. [(Brooks)] Meserve, aged twenty-two years (b. VT), Amanda C. Brooks, aged eighteen years (b. VT), and Joseph H. Brooks, a clerk, aged nineteen years (b. VT).

Stephen M.Y. Meserve, a manufacturer, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. [(Stackpole)] Meserve, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Sarah J. Meserve, aged ten years (b. NH), Walter S. Meserve, aged five years (b. NH), and Mary J. Meserve, aged four months (b. NH).

Hoply T. Meserve, none [no occupation], aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Almira [(Lydston)] Meserve, aged thirty-six years (b. ME), John L. Meserve, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Almira Meserve, aged eleven years (b. MA), Georgeanna Meserve, aged seven years (b. MA), Charles H. Meserve, aged four years (b. MA), and Mary Butler, aged twenty years (b. NH). Hoply T. Meserve had real estate valued at $7,000.

Charles Y. Meserve, a baker, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Betsey M. [(Roberts)] Meserve, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), and Ellen J. Meserve, aged seven years (b. NH). They shared a two-family residence with the household of Lyman Brown, a teamster, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH).

Stephen M. Mathes, a merchant, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Louisa [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), Mandana Mathes, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Stephen Mathes, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Clara W. Mathes, aged two years (b. NH), Caroline Davis, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Cynthia Davis, aged eleven years (b. NH), and John Davis, aged seven years (b. NH). Stephen M. Mathes had real estate valued at $3,000.

Son-in-law Stephen M. Mathes‘ shop goods sustained considerable damage in a large fire at Rochester. NH, in August 1851.

LARGE FIRE AT ROCHESTER, N.H. We learn by an extra from the office of the Great Falls Sketcher that a fire occurred in Rochester, N.H., on the 20th inst., which destroyed property to the amount of $15,000. It commenced in the stable of Jonathan T. Dodge, adjoining the Rochester Hotel, and destroyed the hotel, stable, and out-buildings, with their contents; the house occupied by Lorenzo D. Day, and some of his furniture; a shop occupied by Mr. Day as a marble manufactory; a blacksmith’s shop owned by Joseph Richardson, and occupied by Mr. Dicy; the barn and out-buildings, also a portion of the house of Benjamin Barker, Esq., and a horse and two carriages belonging to D.J. Parsons. The estimated losses are as follows; Mr. Dodge, $10,000, insured $3,000; Mr. Day, $700, no insurance; Mr. Barker, $2500, insured $1,800. Considerable damage was sustained by Messrs. Jones & Co., and S.M. Mathes & Co., in the removal of their stock of goods, but they were well insured. The fire was set by one Ezekiel Tebbets, about 19 years of age, who admitted his guilt, and has been lodged in Dover jail for trial (Boston Evening Transcript, August 22, 1851).

Hopley Meserve appeared in the Charlestown, MA, directory of 1852, as proprietor of H. Meserve & Son (John S.), purveyor of W.I. [West India] goods, at Barlett street, at its corner with Green street, and his house at Bunkerhill street, at is corner with Elm street. Hopley T. Meserve had his house at Elm street court. Charles Y. Meserve was a dry goods merchant, with his house at 7 Elm street. John S. Meserve (H. Meserve & Son) had his house on Bunkerhill street, at its corner with Elm street.

Joanna (Twombly) Meserve died of consumption on Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown, MA, February 22, 1852, aged sixty-two years, eight (and one-third) months.

Hopley Meserve married (2nd) in Charlestown, MA, December 19, 1852, Sally P. (Mooney) Smith, both of Charlestown, MA. He was a trader, aged sixty-three years, and she was aged fifty-three years. (She was the widow of James Smith). Rev. H.E. Hempstead performed the ceremony. She was born in Sandwich, NH, circa 1799, daughter of Benjamin and Polly P. (Graves) Mooney.

H. Meserve and John S. Meserve were among the one hundred seventy-three citizens and non-resident taxpayers of Charlestown, MA, that petitioned, April 13, 1853, for an altering, widening and extension of Monument Avenue to Main Street. The street in question bounded the recently completed Bunker Hill Monument, which had been under construction between 1823 and 1843 (Charlestown, MA, 1854).

Hapeley Meserve, a grocer, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Sarah P. [((Mooney) Smith)] Meserve, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), Charles W. Smith, a clerk, aged seventeen years (b. NH), Nelson Jaquith, a carpenter, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), William Freece, a trader, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), William H. Brown, and apprentice, aged twenty years (b. NH), and Amelia Boynton, aged nineteen years (b. NH).

Haply T. Meserve, a baker, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Almira [(Lydston)] Meserve, aged forty-one years (b. ME), John L. Meserve, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Almira Meserve, aged sixteen years (b. MA), Georgeanna Meserve, aged twelve years (b. MA), Charles H. Meserve, aged nine years (b. MA), and Julia Kelly, aged twenty-three years (b. Ireland).

Charles Y. Meserve, a trader, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Betsey M. [(Roberts)] Meserve, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and Amanda Dodge, aged twenty-eight years (b. VT).

John S. Meserve, a trader, aged twelve [twenty-eight] years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Ruth M. [(Brooks)] Meserve, aged twenty-seven years (b. VT), Adda M. Meserve, aged four years (b. MA), and Mary Meserve, aged two months (b. MA).

Hopley Meserve appeared in the Charlestown, MA, directory of 1856, as proprietor of H. Meserve & Son (John S.), grocers at 167 Bunkerhill street, with his house at 165 Bunkerhill street. Hopley T. Meserve appeared as a broker (in Boston), with his house at Lincoln place. Charles Y. Meserve was a dry goods merchant, with his house at 72 School street. John S. Meserve (H. Meserve & Son) had his house on 61 Pearl street.

MARRIED. In Charlestown, 2d inst., by Rev. Mr. Miner, Mr. John H. Blodgett to Miss Almira Meserve (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), March 8, 1856).

Daughter-in-law Ruth M. (Brooks) Meserve died of consumption at 58 Elm Street in Charlestown, MA, January 2, 1857, aged twenty-eight years, seven months, and nineteen days.

Son-in-law Stephen M. Mathes died in Rochester, NH, May 13, 1857, aged sixty years, one month.

Son John S. Meserve married (2nd) in Boston, MA, April 7, 1858, Pamelia E. Boynton, both of Charlestown, MA. He was a trader, aged thirty-one years, and she was aged twenty-three years. Rev. S. Streeter performed the ceremony. She was born in Meredith, NH, circa 1834, daughter of David and Mary C. Boynton. (She had resided – as Amelia Boynton – in the household of Hopley Meserve in 1855).

Hopley Meserve, a grocer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census, His household included Sarah P. Meserve, aged sixty-one years (b. NH). Hopley Meserve had real estate valued at $3,000.

Stephen M.Y. Meserve, an overseer in factory, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Rochester “Farmington P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. [(Stackpole)] Meserve, aged forty-three years (b. ME), Sarah J. Meserve, aged twenty years (b. NH), Walter L. Meserve, aged fourteen years (b. NH), Mary F. Meserve, aged ten years (b. NH), Ida V. Meserve, aged eight years (b. NH), Augustus Tucker, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), Cora Tucker, aged one year (b. NH). Stephen M.Y. Meserve had real estate valued at $1,000 and person estate valued at $200.

Hoply T. Meserve, a money broker, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Almira [(Lydston)] Meserve, aged forty-six years (b. ME), Chas. H. Meserve, aged fourteen years (b. MA), and Sarah A. Smith, aged twenty-three years (b. MA). Hoply T. Meserve had real estate valued at $6,000.

Chas Y. Meserve, a clerk, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Betsey M. [(Roberts)] Meserve, aged forty-six years (b. NH). They shared a two-family residence with the household of Bernard Grogan, a blacksmith, aged thirty-eight years (b. NY).

Louisia F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Farmington P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Her household included George F. Mathes, aged four years (b. NH). Louisia F. Mathes had real estate valued at $666 and personal estate valued at $500.

John S. Meserve, a trader, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Pamelia [(Boynton)] Meserve, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Addie M. Meserve, aged eight years (b. MA), Frank W. Meserve, aged one year (b. MA), and Clementina A. Boynton, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). John S. Meserve had personal estate valued at $1,000.

Hopley Meserve likely knew the last veteran of the 1775 Battle of Bunker Hill, Ralph Farnham of Acton, ME, and Milton Mills, NH, who was fêted at Charlestown, MA, in October 1860.

Hopley Meserve, a grocer, aged seventy-six years (b. Milton, NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA State Census. His household included Sarah P. [((Mooney) Smith)] Meserve, aged sixty-six years (b. Sandwich, NH).

Hapely T. Messerve, aged fifty-two years (b. Milton, NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA State Census. His household included Almira [(Lydston)] Messerve, aged fifty-one years (b. Litchfield, ME), Charles H. Messerve, a milkman, aged nineteen years (b. Charlestown, MA), and Sophia Leeder, a servant, aged nineteen years (b. England).

C.Y. Messerve, a broker, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA State Census. His household included Betsey [(Roberts)] Messerve, aged fifty years (b. NH), C.H. Pierce, a merchant, aged thirty-four years (b. Otisfield, ME), and Josephine Pierce, a teacher, aged thirty years (b. Livermore, ME).

John S. Messerve, a grocer, aged thirty-seven years (b. Milton, NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA State Census. His household included Amelia [(Boynton)] Messerve, aged thirty-two years (b. Holderness, NH), Addie M. Messerve, aged fourteen years (b. Charlestown, MA), and Frank W. Messerve, aged six years (b. Charlestown, MA).

Charles Y. Meserve sued John S. Andrews in a store rental contract dispute in or after May 1865.

Contract. The declaration alleged that the parties agreed that the plaintiffs should permit the defendant to use and occupy their shop in Boston, and should render certain services to him in his business, and in consideration thereof he should pay them rent, and for repairs and furniture, and also a quarter of the net profits of the business’ that the plaintiffs faithfully performed their part of the agreement, and there were net profits resulting from the business; but that the defendant refused to pay the plaintiffs anything (MA Supreme Judicial Court, 1872).

Charles Y. Meserve of Charlestown, MA, made his last will, April 27, 1869. He bequeathed Maine land to his beloved wife, Betsy M. Meserve. This included a one hundred eighty-acre township lot (#138) in Wellington, Piscataquis County, ME; and two lots in Philips, Franklin County, ME. He bequeathed to her also his interest in the Col. Marston red store in Philips, ME. Finally, he bequeathed to her all the rest and residue of his estate, including his horse, carriage, household furniture, carpets, bedding, books, pictures, wearing apparel, etc. N.D. Wetmore, Charles P. Brooks, and Amanda Dodge signed as witnesses (Franklin County Probate, 31:326).

Son Charles Y. Meserve died of consumption at 35 Russell Street in Charlestown, MA, May 8, 1869, aged fifty-four years, three months, and six days. He was a merchant.

Hopley Messerve of Charlestown, MA, made his last will, April 9, 1870. He bequeathed his bible and walking cane to his son, Stephen M.Y. Messerve. He bequeathed $1 to his son, Hopley T. Messerve. He bequeathed a silver spoon marked “Y” to Betsy M. Messerve, widow of his son, Charles Y. Messerve. He bequeathed a silver spoon marked “J.M.” to Louisa F. Matthews [Mathes]. He bequeathed a French Crown [coin] to John S. Messerve. He bequeathed the rest and residue of his estate to his executor, after the decease of his beloved wife, Sarah P. Messerve, who was to have the interest on it during her life. He appointed Oliver H.P. Smith of Charlestown, MA, as his executor. Leonard Spinney, Merrill A. Green, and William C. Smith signed as witnesses (Suffolk County Probate, 483:65).

Theophilus F. Bennett, a teamster, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan M. [(Smith)] Bennett, keeping house, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), James S. Bennett, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), Theste S. [(Carey)] Bennett, at home, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), Sarah M. Bennett, at home, aged nineteen years (b. MA), Hopley T. Meserve, retired, aged eighty-five years (b. NH), and Sarah [((Mooney) Smith)] Meserve, aged seventy years (b. NH). Theophilia F. Bennett had real estate valued at $9,000 and personal estate valued at $4,000.

Stephen Messerve, work for shoe mfty., aged fifty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Rochester (“Gonic P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary J. [(Stackpole)] Messerve, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), Sarah J. [(Messerve)] Parcker, aged thirty years (b. NH), Walter S. Messerve, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), M. Isable Messerve, aged nineteen years (b. NH), Ida V. Messerve, aged seventeen years (b. NH), and Estta Parcker, aged eight years (b. NH). Stephen Messerve had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $300.

Betsy M. [(Roberts)] Meserve, keeping house, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included Daniel P. Warren, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), Irene Warren, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), Edgar B. Warren, attending school, aged eighteen years (b. NH), and Ennie Warren, attending school, aged thirteen years (b. NH). Betsy M. Meserve had real estate valued at $3,000.

John S. Meserve, a grocer, aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Permelia E. [(Boynton)] Meserve, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. NH), Addie M. Meserve, a dressmaker, aged nineteen years (b. MA), Frank W. Meserve, at school, aged eleven years (b. MA), and Grace E. Meserve, aged two years (b. MA). John S. Meserve had real estate valued at $8,000 and personal estate valued at $2,500.

Daughter-in-law Almira (Lydston) Meserve died of cancer at 1 Lincoln Place in Charlestown, MA, September 18, 1871, aged fifty-seven years, six months, and fourteen days.

DIED. 18th inst., Almira, wife of H.T. Meserve, 57 yrs. 6 mos. (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), September 30, 1871).

Hopley Meserve appeared in the Charlestown, MA, directory of 1872, as a grocer at 62 Elm street, with his house at 63 Elm street. His son, Hopley T. Meserve was employed at 83 Sudbury street, Boston, MA, with his house at 1 Lincoln place. Mrs. Charles Y. Meserve ahd her house at 35 Russell street. John S. Meserve was a grocer at 211 Bunker Hill street, with his house at 209 Bunker Hill street.

SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT. FOR SUFFOLK COUNTY BEFORE JUDGE ENDICOTT. New juries were empanelled, Charles H. Doten being chosen foreman of the first jury, and Hopley T. Meserve of the second. No cases were ready for trial and the court adjourned until 9 o’clock, this morning (Boston Globe, May 21, 1874).

TO BE LET. TO LET – In Charlestown, 2, 4, 5 or 6 rooms, convenient for housekeeping. Apply to H.T. MESERVE, 27 Elm St., upstairs, room 5 (Boston Globe, May 30, 1874).

Voters in Charlestown, in Middlesex County, MA, chose to accept annexation by the neighboring city of Boston, in Suffolk County, MA, in October 1873. The independent city government of Charlestown shut down in 1874.

Hopley T. Meserve died of pneumonia at his home at 63 Elm Street, Boston, MA, December 21, 1875, aged eighty-six years, nine months, and twenty-one years.

DEATHS. At Charlestown, Dec 21, Hapley Meserve, 86 (Boston Post, December 24, 1875; New England Farmer (Boston, MA), January 1, 1876).

COMMONWEALTH of MASSACHUSETTS, SUFFOLK, SS. PROBATE COURT. To the Heirs-at-Law, Next of Kin, and all other persons interested in the Estate of HOPLEY MESERVE, late of Boston, in said County, deceased. Greeting: Whereas, a certain Instrument purporting to be the last will and testament of said deceased has been presented to said Court, for probate, by OLIVER H.P. SMITH, of said Boston, who prays that letters testamentary may be issued to him, the executor therein named; you are hereby cited to appear at a Probate Court to be held at Boston, in said County of Suffolk, on MONDAY, the seventeenth day of January, A.D. 1876, at ten o’clock in the forenoon, to show cause, if any you have, against the same. And said petitioner is hereby directed to give public notice thereof, by publishing this citation once a week, for three successive weeks, in the newspaper called the Boston Post, printed at said Boston, the last publication to be two days, at least, before said Court. Witness, ISAAC AMES, Esquire, Judge of said Court, this twenty-seventh day of December, in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five. P.R. GUINEY, Register. d28 lt&M2w (Boston Globe, January 3, 1876).

Son Stephen M.Y. Meserve died in Rochester, NH, in 1876, aged sixty-four years.

Son Hopley T. Meserve headed a petition to the Boston Board of Aldermen, in May 1876, seeking crosswalks from Elm Street to Lincoln Place in Charlestown.

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen. May 22, 1876. Hopley T. Meserve, et al., for crosswalks from Elm street to Lincoln place, Charlestown.

Son Hopley T. Meserve married (2nd) in Boston, MA, September 16, 1877, Lydia (Thomas) Ellis, both of Boston, MA. He was a gentleman, aged sixty-four years, and she was aged sixty-four years. (She was the widow of Freeman Ellis (1801-1872)). W.T. Stowe performed the ceremony. She was born in [Hanson] Pembroke, MA, February 17, 1813, daughter of Shadrach and Lydia (Keene) Thomas.

MARRIAGES. MESERVE-ELLIS. – In Charlestown District, 16th inst., by the Rev. William T. Stowe, Mr. Hopley T. Meserve to Mrs. Lydia Ellis (Boston Globe, September 20, 1877).

Delinquent taxpayers in Boston, MA, were noticed to bring their accounts up to date in 1878. Separate properties of John S. Meserve and Betsy M. (Roberts) Meserve were mentioned as being abutters.

SUPPLEMENT. CITY COLLECTOR’S NOTICE. The list of estates in Wards 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22, to be sold for taxes August 30, 1878, will be found in the Boston Daily Advertiser and Daily Evening Traveller of this date; those of Wards 23, 24 and 25 to be sold August 31, 1878 in the Boston Morning Globe and Boston Evening Transcript.
The owners and occupants of the following described parcels of real estate, situated in the City of Boston, in the County of Suffolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the public, are hereby notified that the Taxes thereon severally assessed for the years hereinafter specified, according to the list committed to me as Collector of Taxes for said city by the Assessors of Taxes, remain unpaid, and that said parcels of real estate will be offered at public auction for sale at the office of McCLELLAN & KNIGHTS, Room No. 10, Old State House, in said city of Boston, on THURSDAY, August 29, 1878, at 9 o’clock A.M., for the payment of said taxes, together with the costs and charges thereon, unless the same shall be previously discharged. …
WARD THREE. Samuel L. Fillebrown—House and about 1300 feet of land, numbered 79 Elm street, formerly Charlestown, between estates of John S. Meserve and George P. Sanborn, tax for 1877, $34.06
WARD FOUR. Sewell D. Tibbetts— House and about 1069 feet of laud, numbered 37 Russell street, formerly Charlestown, between an estate of Betsey M. Meserve and another estate of said Tibbetts, tax for 1877. $45.85 (Boston Post, August 5, 1878).

Mary J. [(Stackpole)] Meserve, keeping house, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Walter S. Meserve, at home, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), her daughters, Ida V. Meserve, at home, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Sarah J. Tucker, works in woolen mill, aged forty years (b. NH), and her granddaughter, Etta Tucker (b. NH), at home, aged seventeen years, her son-in-law, Asa G. Rosenburg, a music teacher, aged forty-two years (b. NY), and her daughter, Bell M. Rosenburg, at home, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). She shared a two-family dwelling with the household of Martha F. Stevens, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Both Mary J. Meserve and Sarah J. Tucker were widows.

Hoply T. Meserve, a retired broker, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lydia [((Thomas) Ellis)] Meserve, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. MA). They resided at 27 School Street.

Betsey M. [(Roberts)] Meserve, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Fedeal Census. Her household included Amanda Dodge, a seamstress, aged fifty years (b. VT).

Loisa F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, at home, aged sixty-four years (b. NH), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. She shared a two-family residence on Wakefield Street with the household of Caroline E. Barker, keeping house, aged forty-seven years (b. NH).

John S. Messerve, hardware store, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Charlestown, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Fedeal Census. His household included his wife, Amelia [(Boynton)] Messerve, keeping house, aged forty-six years (b. NH), and his children, Addie M. Messerve, a telephone agent, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), Frank W. Messerve, an overseer in workshop, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), and Grace E. Messerve, at home, aged twelve years (b. MA). They resided at 209 Bunker Hill Street.

Probate Court for Suffolk County. In the Probate Court today, before Judge McKim, the wills of Lewis Stockbridge, Ann Davis, Emily Hall, Sarah Dreyer, William H. Gorman, Maria T. Sullivan, Mellish I. Motte and Mary Minot were probated. Letters of administration were taken out on the estates of John O’Brien, Samuel Pratt, Hogan Basford, Hopley Meserve, John Cassidy, Abraham Belcker, Patrick Gaffey, Ellen Kelley. Ruth C. Lyman and John Preston (Boston Globe, March 13, 1882).

… When Company C Cavalry, the old Prescott Light Guard of Charlestown, was disbanded, they had a lot of property which was sold, and each retiring officer received a present, Mr. J.S. Meserve of the company received an elegant clock. Today at the dinner of Company F Cavalry he was present, and presented the clock to the company in a neat speech, to which Captain Fletcher responded in an appropriate manner. The clock is circular in form, surmounted by a gilt eagle, with a row of stars around it and two crossed sabres beneath with the inscription bearing the words, “Presented by J.S. Meserve of Company C to Company F, Massachusetts Cavalry.” It will be placed in the armory of the company at Westford (September 16, 1882).

MARRIAGES. MESERVE-WADSWORTH – At Saxonville, 2d inst., by Rev. F.P. Sutherland of Natick, Frank W. Meserve of Charlestown to Alice B. Wadsworth of Saxonville (Boston Evening Transcript, September 5, 1885).

Carpentry and machine tools were advertised for sale from the address of Betsy M. (Roberts) Meserve, widow of son John S. Meserve.

FOR SALE. 2 second-hand foot-power lathes. With chucks and tools; 4-set die plates, and taps, 5 guns, 1 spyglass, chest carpenter’s tools. Apply to MESERVE, 77 Elm st., Charlestown, 3t* d28 (Boston Globe, December 28, 1886).

Daughter-in-law Lydia (Thomas) Meserve died of acute lung congestion at 27 Elm Street in Boston, MA, September 6, 1887, aged seventy-four years, six months, and twenty-three days.

DEATHS. MESERVE – At Charlestown, 6th inst., Lydia, wife of H.T. Meserve, 74 yrs., 6 mos. (Boston Evening Transcript, September 7, 1887).

Son Hopley T. Meserve died of paralysis in his home at 27 Elm Street in Boston, MA, August 19, 1889, aged seventy-six years, three months.

DEATHS. MESERVE – At Charlestown, 16th [19th] inst., Hopley T. Meserve, 77th year (Boston Evening Transcript, August 20, 1889).

COMMONWAELTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. – SUFFOLK, ss. -PROBATE COURT. To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and all other persons interested in the estate of HOPLEY T. MESERVE, late of Boston, in said county, deceased. Greeting: Whereas, a certain instrument purporting to be the last will and testament of said deceased has been presented to said court for probate by GEORGE H. PENDERGAST of said Boston, who prays that letters testamentary may be issued to him, the executor therein named, without giving a surety or sureties on his official bond; You are hereby cited to appear at a Probate Court to be held at Boston, in said county of Suffolk, on Monday, the twenty-third day of September, A.D. 1881, at ten o’clock in the forenoon, to show cause, if any you have, against the same. And said petitioner is hereby directed to give public notice thereof by publishing this citation once a week for three successive weeks, in the newspaper called the Boston Post, printed at at said Boston, the last publication to be two days, at least, before said court. Witness, John W. McKim, Esquire, Judge of said court, this fourth day of September, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine. ELIJAH GEORGE, Register (Boston Post, September 6, 1889).

CHARLESTOWN HOME FOR AGED MEN AND COUPLES. Incorporated 1889 to receive a bequest of real estate valued at $10,000 from Hopley T. Meserve (died 1889), to maintain a Home for aged Protestant couples of American birth and a Home for aged Protestant men of American birth, to be located in Charlestown. The Home cannot be opened until it has received considerable gifts. Treasurer, Nelson Bartlett, 54 Monument ave. (Old Corner Bookstore, 1891).

Machine and other tools were advertised for sale again from the address of Betsy M. (Roberts) Meserve, widow of son John S. Meserve.

MACHINERY. FOR SALE. Foot lathe, 42-in. bed, 2-in. swing, universal chuck and small tools; also 2 small universal chucks, lot taps and dyes, milling tools, hand planer, etc. Apply MESERVE, 77½ Elm st., Charlestown. 2t* f26 (Boston Globe, February 27, 1890).

Sarah P. ((Mooney) Smith) Meserve died of peritonitis at 63 Elm Street in Charlestown, MA, January 29, 1897, aged ninety-seven years, seven months, and thirteen days.

CHARLESTOWN. Last Monday Mrs. Sarah P. Meserve, 97, widow of Hoply Meserve, fell down in her home on Green st. and injured her hip. Although the physicians did all possible toward her recovery she died last night (Boston Globe, January 30, 1897).

The Winchester Home for Aged Women, in Charlestown, has just added to its holdings on Elm st. there, by the purchase from the owner of the valuable parcel adjoining the home, numbered 25 to 27 Elm st. The grantor was the estate of Hopley T. Meserve. There is a large brick house on the corner of Lincoln pl., standing on about 2940 square feet of land, the whole taxed for $9o00. Of this amount the land is taxed for $3700. The price paid is private, but was away above the total taxed value (Boston Globe, December 17, 1899).

Daughter-in-law Pamelia E. (Boynton) Meserve died in Boston, MA, February 8, 1900.

DEATHS. MESERVE – At Charlestown, Feb. 8, Pannella E. Meserve (Boston Evening Transcript, February 9, 1900).

Probate Notices. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the subscribers have been duly appointed administrator of the estate of PAMELIA ESTHER MESERVE, late of Boston, in the County of Suffolk, deceased, intestate, and have taken upon themselves that trust by giving bonds, as the law directs. All persons having demands upon the estate of said deceased are required to exhibit the same, and all persons indebted to said estate are called upon to make payment to F.W. MESERVE, GRACE MESERVE, administrators, 209 Bunker Hill street, Boston. March 8, 1900. mh 6.18.20: (Boston Evening Transcript, March 6, 1900).

Daughter-in-law Betsy M. (Roberts) Meserve died of an enlarged heart in Boston, MA, April 11, 1900, aged eighty-six years, four months, and two days.

Daughter-in-law Mary J. [(Stackpole)] Meserve, a widow, aged eighty-two years (b. ME), headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Ida Meserve, aged forty-four years (b. NH). Mary J. Meserve owned their house, free-and-clear. She was the mother of four children, of whom two were still living.

George F. Mathes, local agent of the B&M R.R., aged forty-four years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-three years), Fannie A. Mathes, aged forty-five years (b. NH), his son, Charles A. Mathes, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and his mother, Louise F. [((Meserve) Davis)] Mathes, a widow, aged eighty-two years (b. NH). George F. Mathes rented their house at 24 Sixth Street. Fannie A. Mathes was the mother of one child, of whom one was still living; Louise F. Mathes was the mother of four children, of whom two were still living.

Louisa F. Mathes died of senility at 24 Sixth Street in Dover, NH, December 7, 1901, aged eighty-three years, ten months, and twenty-three days. She had resided in Dover, NH, for four years, i.e., since circa 1896-97. Her previous residence had been Rochester, NH.

Daughter-in-law Mary J. (Stackpole) Meserve died of gastritis on R.R. Avenue in Rochester, NH, April 7, 1903, aged eighty-three years. She had resided in Rochester, NH, for fifty-six years, i.e., since 1846-47, with her previous residence having been Portsmouth, NH. D.L. Stokes, M.D., signed the death certificate.


References:

Biographical Review. (1897). Biographical Review: Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Strafford and Belknap Countries, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=C2sjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA129

Boston City Council. (1876). Proceedings of the Boston City Council. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ux4tAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA310

Charlestown, MA, (1846). State, Town and County Tax, in the Town of Charlestown, for the Year 1846. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=M4PjAAAAMAAJ

Charlestown, MA. (1854). Report: Relative to Monument Avenue. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=HjfwmtDSD34C&pg=RA5-PA16

Farmer, John & Lyon, G. Parker. (1842). NH Annual Register, and United States Calendar. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=IIYBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA81

Find a Grave. (2020, September 7). Stephen Meserve Mathes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/215330464/stephen-meserve-mathes

Find a Grave. (2013, August 2). Henry H. Meserve. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114785867/henry-meserve

Find a Grave. (2013, August 2). Hopley Meserve. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/114785277/hopley-meserve

Find a Grave. (2022, May 25). John S. Meserve. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/240023136/john-s-meserve

Find a Grave. (2015, November 15). Mary Meserve. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/155039615/mary-meserve

Find a Grave. (2015, November 15). S.M.Y. Meserve. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/155040497/s.-m.y.-meserve

McDuffee, Franklin. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, from 1722 to 1890. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=rL0yAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA489

MA Judicial Supreme Court. (1872). Massachusetts Reports: Decisions of the Supreme Judicial Court. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=QIo3AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA360

Old Corner Bookstore. (1891). A Directory of the Charitable and Beneficent Organizations of Boston. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=PYcXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA41

Schermerhorn, Stackpole E. (1913). History of the town of Durham, New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation) with Genealogical Notes. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ovfvAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA288

Wentworth, John. (1878). Wentworth Genealogy: English and American. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=KR8aAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA489

Wikipedia. (2022, July 3). Bunker Hill Monument. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunker_Hill_Monument

Wikipedia. (2022, June 25). Charlestown, Boston. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlestown,_Boston

Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1855-1909

By Muriel Bristol | August 28, 2022


Continued from Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854


FIRST FREE BAPTIST CHURCH. The First Free Baptist Church was reorganized by Rev. Gershom Lord, in 1802, and consisted of eight members. Samuel Runnells and Bart. Miller were first deacons, and Elder Lord was clerk. Rev. Gershom Lord was the first preacher, and was succeeded by Humphrey Goodwin, who was ordained in 1807, and continued to preach until his removal to Hollis in 1814. Elder David Blaisdell supplied from 1815 to 1830. A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840. Theodore Stevens became pastor in 1834, left in 1836, returned in 1839, and was succeeded, in 1843, by Elder J. Fullerby; Horace Stanton, in 1847; and subsequently by Z. Jordan, Wm. Hurlin, Seth Perkins, Aaron Ayer, Dexter Waterman, James Potter; Rev. Mr. McLain, in 1872; Hosea Quimby, 1875; and at Mr. Quimby’s death, in October 1878, by Rev. B.F. Sherwood, who remained until about 1880, when Rev. H.P. Mansur came. He remained until about 1885. The following have been pastors since that time: Revs. G.A. Anderson, 1887; C.E. Hurd, 1888-93; E.W. Fernald, 1894-7; R.W. Churchill, 1898- (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

The Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist ministers described from this period were: Seth W. Perkins, William Hurlin, Aaron Ayer, Samuel Jones, Edward A. Stockman, David Boyd, Dexter Waterman, James S. Potter, Alexander S. McLean, Hosea Quinby, Benjamin A. Sherwood, Hiram P. Mansur, Clifford M. Anderson, Charles E. Hurd, Ebenezer N. Fernald, and Edgar W. Churchill.

Seth Perkins – 1855-56

Seth Warren Perkins was born in ME, August 26, 1810, son of Seth and Nancy (Warren) Perkins.

Seth W. Perkins married in Belgrade, ME, June 11, 1830, Clarinda C. Damren. She was born in Belgrade, ME, May 9, 1816, daughter of Joshua B. and Theodate D. (Marchant) Damren. (Theodate: a Greek-Latin compound meaning “God Giveth Thee”).

Seth W. Perkins headed a Gardiner, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], two females aged 20-29 years [Clarinda C. (Damren) Perkins], one female aged 15-19 years, and one female aged 5-9 years.

Seth W. Perkins and Elias Hutchins were Free-Will Baptist ministers in Dover, NH, in 1846.

Seth W. Perkins, a Baptist clergyman, aged forty years (b. ME), headed a Kittery, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Clarinda Perkins, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and Ellen Perkins, aged ten years (b. ME).

Seth W. Perkins appeared in the Maine Register of 1852, as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church at Kittery, ME.

Rev. Seth Perkins was minister in Candia, NH, from 1852 to 1855.

Rev. Seth Perkins was performing marriages in Acton, ME, as early as May 1855. Seth W. Perkins appeared in the Maine Registers of 1856, and 1857, as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church at Acton, ME.

Clergymen. YORK COUNTY. Perkins, Seth W., [F.B.], Acton (ME Register, 1856).

Seth W. Perkins, an F.W. Baptist clergyman, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Corinth, VT, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Clarinda C. Perkins, aged forty-two years (b. ME), Ellen A. Perkins, aged twenty years (b. ME), and Eugene J. Perkins, aged eight years (b. ME). Seth W. Perkins had real estate valued at $300.

Revivals in Vermont. Seth W. Perkins writes the Morning Star: “The Lord is reviving his work within the limits of the first F.W. Baptist church in Corinth, Vt. Three new converts spoke in the prayer-meeting last eve, and numbers of others are seeking Christ. To God be all the praise” (Vermont Christian Messenger (Montpelier, VT), December 1, 1860).

Seth W. Perkins appeared in the NH Register of 1866, as an F. Bap. minister in Sutton, NH.

About the year 1866 he settled in South Wheelock, Vt., and remained three years; then he was pastor of the Eaton and Newport church, Province of Quebec, three years (Burgess & Ward, 1889).

Seth W. Perkins, an F.W. Baptist minister of the gospel, aged sixty years (b. U.S.), headed a Newport, Quebec, Canada, household at the time of the Canadian Census of 1871. His household included [his wife,] Clorinda C. Perkins, aged fifty-three years (b. U.S.), A. Ellen Perkins, aged thirty years (b. U.S.), Eugene J. Perkins, aged nineteen years (b. U.S.), and Winona Perkins, aged nine years (b. U.S.).

After this he was pastor one year in each of the following places in Maine: Canton, Wilton, Weld, New Sharon, South Montville and New Gloucester (Burgess & Ward, 1889).

MARRIAGES. Canton – July 28th by Rev. Seth W. Perkins, Mr. Chas. H. Berry of Hartford and Miss Abbie F. Robinson of Sumner (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), August 1, 1873).

Seth W. Perkins appeared in the Maine Registers of 1874-75, as pastor of the Baptist church at Canton, ME.

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. A correspondent (M) writes: Rev. Seth W. Perkins who has been preaching with the churches at Wilton and Weld for two years past, and been highly esteemed as a minister of the gospel, has accepted a call to the pastorate of the churches in New Sharon and Mercer and has commenced his labors there (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), March 17, 1875).

Seth W. Perkins appeared in the Augusta, ME, directory of 1876, as pastor of the Brunswick Street Freewill Baptist Church, boarding at William Whitney’s Oak. (William Whitney appeared a cooper on Oak street, at its corner with Water street, with his house at the same address).

Seth W. Perkins of Gardiner, ME, filed for divorce from Clarinda C. Perkins of Canton, ME, in Kennebec County, ME, in October 1876.

STATE ITEMS. There were twenty-eight divorces decreed at the recent term of court in Kennebec county. One case was that of Seth W. Perkins of Gardiner, divorce from Clarinda C Perkins of Canton. Cause, alienation in affection, covering a period of four years, manifesting a strong dislike, culminating in actual hatred of him, so that she refused to offer him to remain in the same house, and he had to leave for the “sake of keeping peace in the family.” The libellant is a minister of the Gospel, and has not been able to live with his wife for more than three years (Portland Eastern Argus (Portland, ME), February 16, 1877).

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. Rev. Seth W. Perkins has accepted a call to the pastorate of the South Montville church and has already entered upon the discharge of his duties in that place (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), March 22, 1877).

Religious Intelligence. Rev. Seth W. Perkins of Montville has received and accepted a call to the pastorate of the Free Baptist church at New Gloucester and entered upon its duties (Daily Eastern Argus (Portland, ME), November 10, 1877).

Seth W. Perkins married (2nd), circa 1878, Eleanor (Waite) Waite. She was born in Dixfield, ME, circa 1820, daughter of Isaac and Sally (Goodwin) Waite. (Her first husband, Chandler D. Waite, had died in 1867).

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. Our correspondent writes: Rev. Seth Perkins will close his second year with the Free Baptist church in New Gloucester on the 12th of October. He has spent two pleasant years in the community and leaves many kind friends in the town and surrounding society. Any church, community or society wishing to correspond in view of future services aro invited to do so by directing to him at North Gray, Maine (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), August 27, 1879).

Seth W. Perkins, a minister, aged sixty-nine years (b. ME), headed a New Gloucester, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Eleanor Perkins, aged forty-seven years (b. ME).

Clarinda Perkins, keeping house, aged sixty-four years (b. ME), headed a Lyndon, VT, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Winnie Perkins, a teacher, aged eighteen years (b. ME), and her boarders, Frank Dunklee, teaching school, aged twenty years (b. VT), and Loran Prescott, a clerk in railroad office, aged forty-five years (b. VT). (Clarinda Perkins was described as a widow, anticipating her [ex-] husband’s death in the following year).

Seth W. Perkins died in Hollis, ME, June 14, 1881, aged seventy years.

MINISTERIAL OBITUARY RECORD. REV. SETH W. PERKINS died in Hollis, Me., June 13 1881, aged 70. [Vol. 56, No. 25] (Free Will Baptist Register, 1882). 

Elenor ((Waite) Waite) Perkins died of senile debility in Livermore Falls, VT, December 23, 1904, aged eighty-four years.

Ex-wife Clarinda C. (Damren) Perkins died of pneumonia in Lyndon, VT, January 23, 1907, aged ninety years, eight months, and fourteen days.

Mrs. Clara Perkins. Mrs. Clara Perkins died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ellen Prescott, last week Wednesday, Jan. 23. Clara Clark Damren was born in Belgrade, Me., on May 9, 1816. She was the last surviving member of sixteen children and her family belonged to a hardy, long lived race. Although Mrs. Perkins died at an advanced age, being 91 years, 6 months and 14 days old, yet she was a wonderfully well-preserved woman, appearing many years younger than she really was, and had not only retained her physical health, but her mental faculties as well. She was a great reader and her eye-sight was so good that she did very fine needle work up to the very time of her last illness. She was taken ill on January 12th, with a heart trouble which had been about her for several years and pneumonia did not develop until the 18th. Although an intense sufferer during this last illness, she showed great fortitude and patience. On June 11, 1830, she was married to Seth Warren Perkins, of Anson, Me. Mr. Perkins was a Free Baptist minister, preaching in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Canada. He was at one time located in Sheffield, Vt. Three children, all of whom are now living, were born to them. They are: Mrs. Ellen A. Prescott, of Lyndonville, Mrs. Fred Harvey, of Sandy Hill, N.Y., and Eugene Per-kins, of Brooklyn, N.Y. Mrs. Fred Harvey and her husband are well-known in this vicinity. Mr. Harvey was a native of Lyndon Center, where they lived until a few years ago. The son, Eugene Perkins, was at one time employed in the railroad office at this place. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Perkins decided to make her home at Lyndon Center and moved there 29 years ago last November. She resided there until eight years ago when she came to live with her daughter, Mrs. George Prescott, at the time of Mr. Prescott’s death. Mrs. Perkins was greatly beloved by her children and to them she had been a model mother. She was a woman of the old school, her interests being wrapped up in her home. She was a model housekeeper, a woman of strong character, excellent judgement and decided ideas of right and wrong. Her warm sympathies and lively interests in old and young and her pleasant manner attracted a large circle of warm friends. Funeral services were held at the house on Friday, Jan. 25th at 10 A.M. Rev. W.H. Lyster assisted by Rev. J.W. Burgin and Rev. E.G. French were the officiating clergymen. A great many beautiful flowers from young and old friends bore silent testimony to the esteem in which she was held (Vermont Union-Journal (Lyndonville, VT), January 30, 1907).

Wm. Hurlin – 1856-1858

See Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854 for details of this second pastorate of Rev. William Hurlin (1814-1905), as well as of his life in general.

Aaron Ayer – 1859

Aaron Ayer was born in Buxton, ME, April 3, 1802, son of Timothy Jr. and Hannah (Merrill) Ayer.

Aaron Ayer married in Lyman, ME, May 19, 1840, Mary Olive Cleaves. She was born in Windsor, ME, August 7, 1810, daughter of Joseph and Hannah (Hanson) Cleaves.

In April 1844, Rev. Aaron Ayer began a successful pastorate of two years. During this time the church took decided action in relation to temperance, in the following votes: “Dec. 5, 1844. Voted not to receive any person as a church member who shall make use of distilled liquors or wines as a beverage. Also Resolved that it is improper for church members to make use of Cider as a beverage” (McDuffee, 1892).

Rev. Aaron Ayer was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Joseph Fullonton, Zachariah Jordan, Theodore Stevens, Jr., and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Aaron Ayer, a Freewill Baptist, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Woolwich, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary O. Ayer, aged forty years (b. ME), George W. Ayer, aged five years (b. ME), and Daniel Ayer, aged three years (b. ME).

FREE WILL BAPTIST CLERGY. Ayer, A., Acton, Me. (Clark & Meeker, 1860).

John S. Rowe, a farmer, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Deerfield, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Delia Rowe, aged forty-six years (b. NH), Aaron Ayer, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), Mary O. Ayer, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), Mary E. Rowe, a T. [teacher] of schools, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), John L. Rowe, aged ten years (b. NH), and Anson B. Rowe, aged three years (b. NH). John S. Rowe had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $450. Aaron Ayer had personal estate valued at $2,200.

Rev. Aaron Ayer was a bold, solid and powerful preacher; a man that never feared the face of clay and was never afraid to advocate what he believed to be right in the face of the most strenuous opposition, but in the plenitude of his intellectual and physical powers he became demented, losing the equilibrium of his mind and was ever afterwards semi-insane. However, like many in his condition, his wit was as keen as ever and the sarcastic language employed by him was original and beyond imitation. His repartee was caustic and irresistible and many a person who thought they could play fast and loose with him because of his dementia had found out their mistake and sneaked away like an exhausted gamecock. He retired to a farm and discontinued professional work; and also declined every invitation (with one or two exceptions) to attend religious services (Portland Telegram (Portland, ME), October 19, 1913).

Aaron Ayer, a farmer, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Naples, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary O. Ayer, keeping house, aged sixty years (b. ME), and Aaron E. Ayer, at school, aged nineteen years (b. ME). Aaron Ayer had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $800.

Aaron Ayer died in Naples, ME, October 8, 1876.

Mary O. Ayer appeared in the Portland, ME, directories of 1883, 1884, 1885, and 1886, as the widow of Aaron Ayer, with her house on Woodford street, Woodfords. Mary O. Ayer appeared in the Portland, ME, directories of 1887, and 1888, as the widow of Aaron Ayer, with her house at 11 Congress place.

Mary O. (Cleaves) Ayer died of old age in Naples, ME, November 3, 1894, aged eighty-five years, three months.

Samuel Jones – 1859

Ministerial Removals and Settlements. Jones, Samuel. [Whence:] Elizabethtown, N.Y. [Where:] Milton Mills, N.H. (Baptist Family Magazine, 1859).

Edward A. Stockman – 1860-6?

Edward Ainsley Stockman was born in Poland, ME, February 3, 1821, son of Robert and Thankful Davis) Stockman.

Rev. Edward A. Stockton married in Standish, ME, October 25, 1847, Elizabeth Ann Thomas, he of Limington, ME, and she of Standish, ME. Rev. Andrew Hobson performed the ceremony. She was born in Maine, in 1829, daughter of Stephen and Dorothy M. “Dolly” (Parker) Thomas.

Edward A. Stockman, a Methodist clergyman, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Worthington, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Elizabeth A. Stockman, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), and Lucy A. Stockman, aged one year (b. MA). (Another Methodist clergyman, James Wright, aged forty-nine years (b. England), headed another household on the same page).

Rev. Edward A. Stockman was an ardent abolitionist and associate of the leaders of the anti-slavery movement. He was a personal friend of William Lloyd Garrison, editor of The Liberator abolitionist newspaper. He was said to have maintained an “underground railroad” station at all of his ante-bellum residences. (See also Milton and Abolitionism).

REV. E.A. STOCKMAN, an Agent of the Mass. Anti-Slavery Society, will lecture as follows: West Cummington, Sunday, April 24. Plainfield, Monday, [April] 25. Ashfield, Tuesday and Wednesday, [April] 26 and 27. Hawley, Thursday, [April] 28 (Liberator (Boston, MA), April 22, 1853).

MR. STOCKMAN IN CHESHIRE. That eloquent and fearless friend of the friendless, Rev. E.A. Stockman of Cummington, addressed our citizens, on the slavery issue, in its moral and political aspects, on the first three evenings of this week, at the Universalist Church. The house was well filled through the course; and the most profound attention given. Those who have had the pleasure of hearing Mr. S. on this topic need not be told that a marked sensation was produced by the lectures in this hunkerish community. A company of anti-slavery singers from Mr. Stockman’s choir in Cummington were present at the last lecture, and added greatly to the interest of the occasion by a variety of appropriate songs – Northampton Courier (Liberator (Boston, MA), October 28, 1853).

(Dictionaries define being a “hunker” or being “hunkerish” as being old-fashioned and conservative).

Stephen Thomas, a farmer, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), headed a Standish, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Dorothy Thomas, aged fifty-eight years (b. ME), Orlando Thomas, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Edward A. Stockman, a medicine agent, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), Elizabeth A. Stockman, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and  Lucy A. Stockman, aged eleven years (b. MA). Stephen Thomas had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $200.

Rev. Edward A. Stockman did not appear in the Mitchell-Cony list of ministers, However, in his own later 1890 book, Rev. Edward A. Stockman mentioned briefly his pastorate of the Acton-Milton Mills Freewill Baptist Church, and especially his interactions with the Farnham family.

Quite many years ago the author of this little volume was pastor of the F. Baptist church at Milton Mills, N.H. At an extreme quarter of the parish stood the Farnham homestead. The dwelling, a plain farm-house, was then occupied by John Farnham [(1797-1884)] and his wife Fanny [(1802-1891)]. They were most excellent Christian people, greatly beloved. Ralph Farnham [(1756-1860)], father of John, was a revolutionary soldier and had spent most of his days on that homestead, an excellent citizen, a devoted Christian. He was converted to God by witnessing the phenomenon called the “dark day” which occurred on the 19th of May 1780, and which, to his latest hour, he was accustomed to describe in very glowing and impressive language. He lived to a remarkably old age. On his one hundred and fourth birthday, he was carried to Boston, Mass., where he was received, and for some days entertained, with much eclat, as the oldest living soldier of the Revolution (Stockman, 1890).

Ralph Farnham died in December 1860, so this account would seem to fix Rev. Stockman’s time at the Acton-Milton Mills Freewill Baptist church as having started while Farnham still lived and having run for some undefined duration before Rev. Boyd’s pastorate began in May 1864.

LOCAL AND STATE ITEMS. Rev. E.A. Stockman, agent of F.W.B. Home Mission Society, will lecture at the Freewill Baptist Church to-morrow evening, at 7 o’clock, on the Freedmen. Mr. S. has been among the Freedmen, and his lecture will be of interest to those who may attend (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), August 25, 1866).

Edward A. Stockman of Wells, ME, was an original incorporator of Storer College, September 5, 1867, having purchased one of the nine $100 initial shares.

The undersigned agree to become a corporation by the name of the “Storer College,” for the purpose of establishing and maintaining an institution of learning, embracing a normal school, an academy and a college, for teaching all classes of persons, without distinction of color all the branches of useful information usually taught in similar institutions; and for the purpose of receiving, holding, managing and applying funds, moneys and property, to an amount not exceeding nine hundred thousand dollars, devised, bequeathed or granted in aid thereof; which corporation shall keep its principal office or place of business at Harper’s Ferry, in the county of Jefferson, and State of West Virginia, and is to expire on the thirty-first day of December, in the year nineteen hundred and sixty-seven … (WV Legislature, 1868). 

Edwd. A. Stockman, a clergyman, aged forty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Pittsfield, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Ann E. Stockman, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. ME), Lucy A. Stockman, a school teacher, aged twenty-one years (b. ME [SIC]), and Lilian M. Stockman, aged two years (b. ME). Edwd. A. Stockman had personal estate valued at $800.

New Hampshire Local News. Strafford County. The Rev. E.A. Stockman, recently pastor of the Charles-street Church, Dover, has withdrawn from the Free Baptist denomination and joined what is known as the Evangelical Adventists (Vermont Journal (Bellows Falls, VT), June 21, 1873).

THE SUBURBS. CHELSEA. Pulpit News. A protracted meeting will he held, during the week, in the Heard Street Adventist Chapel, commencing tomorrow evening. Among the preachers announced to be present is Elder E.A. Stockman, formerly a Baptist clergyman in Dover, N.H. (Boston Globe, January 12, 1874).

New Bedford. At Pope’s Island yesterday morning three candidates were baptized by Rev. James H. Lee, pastor of the Salem Baptist church, North Sixth st. At the same place, at noon, four candidates were baptized by Elder E.A. Stockman, who is temporarily filling the pulpit of the Christian Advent church on Kempton street (Fall River Daily News (Fall River, MA), May 5, 1879).

Edw. A. Stockman, a clergyman, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Chelsea, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elizabeth A. Stockman, keeping house, aged fifty years (b. ME), and his children, Lucy A. Stockman, at home, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Lillian M. Stockman, at school, aged twelve years (b. ME [SIC]). They were one of four families residing at 87 Orange Street.

Vernon. Elder E.A. Stockman of Boston, editor of the World’s Crises, will preach, at the chapel in Vernon July 16, 10:30 A.M., and 1:30 P.M. (Vermont Phoenix (Brattleboro, VT), July 14, 1882).

Church Dedication. The dedication of the Emerald Street Advent Church took place last evening. Elder E.A. Stockman pronounced the invocation. J. Hemenway read from the Scriptures, and was followed by a dedicatory prayer by Elder D. T. Taylor. H.H. Tucker, the pastor, then preached the dedicatory sermon, taking for his text: “The true principles of the interpretation of signs.” Voluntary talks were made by Elders Boutelle and Goodrich (Boston Globe, May 13, 1887).

Edward A. Stockman, a preacher, aged seventy-nine years (b. ME), headed a Chelsea, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-four years), Elizibeth N. Stockman, aged seventy years (b. ME), and his servant, Annie McCool, a servant, aged twenty-three years (b. Canada (Eng.)). They were one of two families renting at 87 Orange Street. Elizabeth N. Stockman was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Edward A. Stockman died of marasmus [severe malnutrition] in Chelsea, MA, February 1, 1901, aged seventy-nine years, eleven months, and twenty-seven days.

The Rev E.A. Stockman Dead. BOSTON, Feb. 2. The Rev. Edward A. Stockman, editor of The World’s Crisis, died at his home in Chelsea Friday night. He was eighty years old and one of the leaders of the Christian Advent denomination in the United States. He established Storer College. After preaching as a Free Will Baptist for years, Mr. Stockman became an Adventist, and in addition to preaching was in 1883 chosen assistant editor of The World’s Crisis. In 1885 he was made editor in chief and held that place until three years ago (NY Times (New York, NY), June 3, 1901).

Elizabeth A. (Thomas) Stockman died of marasmus [severe malnutrition] in Chelsea, MA, June 5, 1901, aged seventy-two years, eight months, and eighteen days.

Mrs. Elisabeth A. Stockman. Mrs. Elizabeth A. Stockman, widow of Rev. E.A. Stockman, who was at the time of his death last February, editor of The Worlds Crisis, died at her home, 108 W. Orange street, Chelsea, last night, after a long illness. Mrs. Stockman was born in Standish, Me., seventy-two years ago. She had lived in Chelsea about twenty-eight years, and had a large number of friends there. The deceased was interested in the work of the Advent Christian Church of Chelsea, of which she was a member. The only near relatives who survive her are two daughters, Mrs. P.T. Edwards and Miss Lucy A. Stockman. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2.30 o’clock at her late home. Rev. George Haines, pastor of the Advent Christian Church, will officiate. He will be assisted by Rev. F.L. Piper of Malden, who will offer prayer, and Rev. Roger Sherman of Salem, who will lead the scriptures. A quartet will sing (Boston Evening Transcript, June 6, 1901).

Rev. David Boyd – 1864-1865

David Boyd was born in South Berwick, ME, March 2, 1836, son of Charles and Harriet (Davis) Boyd.

Boyd, Rev. David, brother of Rev. James Boyd, was born at South Berwick, Me., Mar. 2, 1836. He was converted in 1851, licensed in 1858, and ordained May 12, 1861. Rev. A. Lovejoy and others serving on the council. His pastorates have been at Exeter, Acton, and Rockland, Me., Pawtucket, R.I., and Oneonta, N.Y. He has baptized about 200 converts, served as delegate at the General Conference, and has occupied a prominent position in temperance work, especially in connection with the I.O.G.T. He married Olive Gray in 1856, has four children, and is at present Superintendent for the American Bible Society with headquarters at Oneonta, N.Y. (Burgess & Ward, 1889).

David Boyd married, in 1856, Olive Gray. She was born in South Berwick, ME, January 20, 1834, daughter of Charles and Sylvina (Thurrell) Gray.

Rev. O.A. True has accepted the call of the F.W. Baptist Church in West Lebanon to become their pastor and Rev. David Boyd has assumed the pastoral care of the F.W. Baptist Church at Milton Mills (Acton) (Daily Eastern Argus (Portland, ME), May 26, 1864).

David Boyd appeared in the New England business directory of 1865, as the Acton, ME, Free-Will Baptist minister.

Rev. David Boyd of the Rockland, ME, Free-Will Baptist Yearly Meeting was sent as a delegate to a Congregational ministerial convention in June 1868.

DELEGATES FROM CORRESPONDING BODIES. Rev. David Boyd of Rockland Free Will Baptist Yearly Meeting (General Conference, 1868). 

David Boyd, a clergyman, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Rockland, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Olive Boyd, keeping house, aged thirty-six years (b. ME), and his children, William A. Boyd, at school, aged twelve years (b. ME), Vesta E. Boyd, at school, aged eleven years (b. ME), Flora Boyd, at school, aged four years (b. ME), and David C. Boyd, at home, aged three years (b. ME). David Boyd had personal estate valued at $700.

Religious News. BAPTIST. Rev. David Boyd, pastor of the Free Baptist Church, Rockland, Maine, has resigned his pastorate, in order to accept the position of State lecturer offered him by the Good Templars of the State (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), June 3, 1871).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. The Rev. David Boyd of Maine, having accepted a call to the Free Baptist church of Pawtucket, was installed as pastor on Monday evening last. The sermon was preached by Rev. A.H. Heath, formerly of Auburn in this State (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), October 12, 1872).

David Boyd, a clergyman, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Pawtucket, RI, household at the time of the RI State Census of 1875. His household included his wife, Olive Boyd, a house keeper, aged forty-one years (b. ME), and his children, William A. Boyd, a scholar, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Vestie E. Boyd, aged fifteen years (b. ME), Flora A. Boyd, aged nine years (b. ME), and David C. Boyd, a scholar, aged eight years (b. ME).

Rev. David Boyd appeared in the Pawtucket, RI, directories of 1875, and 1877, as pastor of the Second Free Baptist church, with his house at 87 Summit street.

A PASTOR UNDER A CLOUD. Serious Charges Against a Pawtucket Clergyman. Suspicious Familiarity With the Organist and Conspiracy to Break Up the Society Alleged Against Him. Special Despatch to The Boston Globe. Pawtucket, R.I., April 18. A council of clergymen to consider the troubles in the Free Baptist Church of this place has been in session in the vestry of the church. It was not called to try the pastor for any offence, nor any member of the church, but to listen to the statement of such facts as the official members of the church should present and give such advice as circumstances warranted. The clerk read the proceedings of the late church meeting at which letters of dismissal were said to have been granted to about forty members of the church, including the pastor thereof, the Rev. David Boyd. Afterwards regular charges against the pastor were presented. The first three relate to an alleged improper intimacy between the pastor and the organist, which was followed up and persisted in even when he was admonished of the improprieties by the Trustees of the church. The fourth and fifth charges assert that the pastor opposed all efforts to harmonize existing troubles and difficulties in the church, and to having an Advisory Council called to consider them, he is charged, sixthly, with leading a movement to permanently divide the church. It is also claimed that all the present troubles in the church come from what is brought against the pastor in the first charges. Nothing criminal has yet been charged upon the minister, but several suspicious acts have been noticed which gave occasion to much scandal. The Council, after rehearsing the charges, etc., gave the following decision: “We, therefore, advise you, members of the First Free Baptist Church, entirely to ignore the organization claiming to be the Second Free Baptist Church, and proceed at once to prefer such charges against the Rev. David Boyd as in your judgment the case requires.” Mr. Boyd protested against the action of tlie Council as hasty and unjust, and declared his intention to appeal to the community for justice. He claimed that the Council had exceeded its jurisdiction, and that he had not been informed of the charges be preferred against him till he saw them in the Providence papers (Boston Globe, April 20, 1877).

MORE INDIGNATION MEETINGS. Newport, Me., Dec 30. – The Republicans held a large indignation meeting last night, presided over by the Rev. David Boyd. Several earnest speeches were made by prominent Republicans and resolutions severely condemning the action of the governor and council were adopted (Rutland Weekly Herald & Globe (Rutland, VT), January 1, 1880).

David Boyd, a clergyman, aged forty-four years (b. ME), headed a Newport, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Olive Boyd, keeping house, aged forty-six years (b. ME), and his children, Vesta E. Boyd, at home, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), Flora A. Boyd, at home, aged fourteen years (b. ME), David C. Boyd, at home, aged thirteen years (b. ME). They resided on Pleasant Street.

David Boyd died of apoplexy in East Newport, ME, March 7, 1900, aged sixty-four years, and five days. He had resided there for twenty-two years, i.e., since circa 1877-78.

ASHLAND. It is with regret that the people of this section learn of the death of Rev. David Boyd of Newport, Me., who was pastor of the Free Baptist church at Presque Isle several years and was well known here (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), March 19, 1900).

Olive Boyd, a farmer, aged seventy-six years (b. ME), headed a Newport, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Flora A. Boyd, a public school teacher, aged forty-four years (b. ME), and David C. Boyd, a farm laborer, aged forty-three years (b. ME). Olive Boyd owned their farm, free-and-clear. She was the mother of five children, of whom four were still living.

Olive (Gray) Boyd died of old age in Newport, ME, March 5, 1919, aged eighty-five years, one month, and fifteen days. She had resided there for forty-one years, i.e., since circa 1877-78.

Hiatus – 1865-1870

There appears to have been a hiatus in this sequence of ministers in the immediate post-war period that fell between the pastorates of David Boyd and Dexter Waterman. There might have been one or more pastorates not yet traced or perhaps there was a run of short-term “supply” pastors

Dexter Waterman – 1870-1872

Ebenezer Dexter “Dexter” Waterman was born in Litchfield, ME, January 30, 1807, son of Sylvanus and Abigail (Jackson) Waterman.

Ebenezer D. Waterman married (1st) in Bristol, ME, June 2, 1834, Mahala Wentworth, he of Boothbay, ME, and she of Bristol, ME. She was born in Bristol, ME, January 29, 1806, daughter of James and Susan (Williams) Wentworth.

Dexter Waterman headed a Phillips, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years, one female aged 30-39 years, one male aged 5-9 years, and one female aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in the Learned Professions.

Rev. Dexter Waterman was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Joseph Fullonton, Zachariah Jordan, and Theodore Stevens, Jr., signed also.

Dexter Waterman, an F.B. preacher, aged forty-three years (b. ME), headed a Unity, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mahala Waterman, aged forty-four years (b. ME), Granville Waterman, a student, aged fifteen years (b. ME), and Achsa H. Waterman, aged twelve years (b. ME). Dexter Waterman had real estate valued at $800.

The First Free-Will Baptist Church of Farmington, NH, organized itself in 1854, with Rev. Dexter Waterman as its pastor.

FREE BAPTIST CHURCH. The first Free Baptist Church was organized in 1854, with the Rev Dexter Waterman as pastor. Meetings were held in the meetinghouse on Peavey Hill, where the Congregationalists worshipped. During the pastorate of Mr. Waterman the church membership increased to thirty-two. He resigned in 1856, and was succeeded by Rev. J.M.L. Babcock, who remained until 1858 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Mahala (Wentworth) Waterman died of pneumonia in Farmington, NH, April 16, 1856, aged fifty-one years.

Dexter Waterman married (2nd) in Unity, ME, January 11, 1859, Mary Ann (Rich) Roberts. She was born in Jackson, ME, July 24, 1815, daughter of Joseph and Judith A. Roberts. (She was the widow of Hamlin M. Roberts of Jackson, ME).

Dexter Waterman, a Baptist clergyman, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), headed a Charleston (“West Charleston P.O.”), VT, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary Waterman, aged forty-five years (b. ME), and Cassius Waterman, aged fifteen years (b. ME). Dexter Waterman had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $500.

Correction. Mr. Editor: In your paper of August 17th, we notice an item stating that “The Freewill Baptists of New Hampshire have just held their yearly meeting at Sandwich. The denomination is mostly confined to that state, where it has 75 ministers, and 10,000 church members.” The writer then gives statistics of the Baptists in Kentucky, and Methodists in England, placing us in an unfavorable contrast with them. That the writer intended to misrepresent us we will not say, but that article is calculated to give the readers of your paper a very unfavorable and incorrect idea of the Baptist denomination. We therefore request you to do is the justice to publish the following statistics and facts. Not having the returns for the present year, we give the statistics officially reported for 1859. The denomination had its rise in New Hampshire. No. [Number] members in N.H. in 1859, 9,928; Ordained ministers in N.H., 184. So far from being “mostly confined to that state,” we have in Maine, 15,045 church members, Rhode Island, 3,293 [church members], New York, 9,701 [church members]. And churches, quarterly meetings, and yearly meetings, in nearly every free state and in Canada. Our uncompromising opposition to American slavery caused the conferences of North and South Carolina, of about 2090 members, to refuse to associate with us about twenty-five years ago.  We might have had a large portion of the “eighty thousand Baptists of Kentucky,” if in general conference about twenty years ago, we had endorsed slavery by receiving and ordaining D. Homely of Kentucky, who attended the general conference of Conneant, Ohio, for that purpose.  We have flourishing institutions of learning of the highest grade (below a college,) in Maine, New Hampshire, and New York, a college in Michigan, and several other seminaries in New England and the west. We have also a theological school at New Hampton, N.H. In these institutions we have invested in lands, buildings, and permanent funds, between $300,000 and 400,000. The Morning Star, a paper published by the denomination, has a circulation of about eleven or twelve thousand copies. DEXTER WATERMAN, H.C. HENDERSON. August 25, 1860 (Orleans Independent Standard (Irasburgh, VT), August 31, 1860).

Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared in the Bates College directories of 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, and 1868, as a member of the [Maine State Seminary] Corporation. Rev. Hosea Quinby, A.M., appeared also in the same lists. (Rev. Quinby was a D.D., i.e., a Doctor of Divinity, in 1867 and 1868, rather than an A.M., i.e., a Master of Arts, as he had been earlier).

Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared also in the Bates College directories of 1868, 1869, and 1870, as a member of the Maine State Seminary Board of Trustees.

Dexter Watterman, a clergyman, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed an Acton (“South Acton, P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. Watterman, keeping house, aged fifty-five years (b. ME).

D. Waterman appeared in the Milton directory of 1871, as the Milton Mills Free Baptist minister.

Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared also in the Bates College directories of 1871, 1873, 1874, 1876, 1878, and 1879, as a member of the Maine State Seminary Board of Trustees.

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Rev. Dexter Waterman will enter upon his pastoral charge in Phillips the second Sabbath in March (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), March 9, 1872).

Sunday in the Churches. Religious services, under the charge of City Missionary Tarbox, was held on the park Sabbath afternoon. Interesting remarks were made by Rev. Dexter Waterman of Wilton. His theme was the prodigal son. There was a large assembly present (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), July 17, 1876).

Mary A. ((Rich) Roberts) Waterman died in Wilton, ME, October 8, 1877, aged sixty-two years, two months, and fifteen days.

Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared also in the Bates College directories of 1881, 1882, 1883, and 1885, as a member of the Maine State Seminary Board of Trustees. (The list of 1882 gave him a residence of Laconia, NH, and the lists of 1883, and 1885 gave him a residence of Dover, NH).

Dexter Waterman died of heart failure in Littleton, NH, February 8, 1890, aged eighty-three years, and twenty-five days.

Rev. Dexter Waterman, pastor of the Freewill Baptist church at Carroll, who died at Littleton recently of heart failure, at one time held a pastorate at West Charleston, Vt. He was one of the founders of its Education society, has been a member of the Board of Corporators of its printing establishment for more than 40 years, and a trustee of Bates college from its foundation. He has been well known to the guests of the Twin Mountain House during the last three years, as his church was nearer than any other to the hotel. (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), February 15, 1890).

GRANBY. Rev. Dexter Waterman died at Littleton, N.H., the 8th inst. Rev. Mr. Waterman was the last pastor of the Free Baptist Church in Carroll, N.H., having closed his labors there only a few weeks ago (Essex County Herald (Island Pond, VT), February 28, 1890).

James Potter – 1873-1874

James Soule Potter was born in Kenduskeag, ME, in 1823, son of David and Nancy (Soule) Potter.

James S. Potter married Laura J. Grant. She was born in Winterport, ME, August 1, 1832, daughter of Hezekiah and Margaret A. (Scribner) Grant.

James S. Potter, a clergyman, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Corinth, ME, at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Laura J. Potter, aged seventeen years (b. ME).

J.S. Potter. an F.W. Baptist clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Bridgton, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Laura J. Potter, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), Anna R. Potter, aged eight years (b. ME), Charles F. Potter, aged four years (b. ME), and [her sister,] A.M. Grant, aged sixteen years (b. ME). J.S. Potter had personal estate valued at $400.

James S. Potter appeared in the Maine Business directory of 1869, as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church in Raymond, ME.

James Potter, a clergyman, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Scarboro, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Laura J. Potter, aged thirty-eight years (b. ME), Annie E. Potter, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Charles F. Potter, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and James A. Potter, aged four years (b. ME).

James S. Potter appeared in the Maine Business directory of 1871, as pastor of the Free-Will Baptist church in Raymond, ME.

J.S. Potter appeared in the Milton directories of 1873, and 1874, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister. (Rev. Ebenezer N. Fernald served as a Milton supply pastor in September 1874 (See below)).

Religious. NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. Rev. J.S. Potter, who has been laboring with the church in Lyman for the past three years, has accepted an invitation to continue his pastorate. He is now assisted by the neighboring ministers in holding a series of meetings with some encouragement (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), February 22, 1879).

James S. Potter, a farmer & preacher, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Lyman, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Laura J. Potter, keeping house, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), his son, James A. Potter, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Annie C. Strout, house work, aged sixty-six years (b. ME).

James S. Potter died of uremia in Lyman, ME, July 17, 1897, aged seventy-four years, eleven months, and twenty days.

DEATHS. POTTER – In Lyman, July 17, Rev. James S. Potter, aged 74 years, 11 months, 20 days (Portland Evening Express, July 23, 1897).

Laura J. (Grant) Potter died in Lyman, ME, December 31, 1920, aged eighty-eight years.

LYMAN’S OLDEST WOMAN, 89, HAS PASSED AWAY. LYMAN, Jan. 4. – The funeral of Mrs. Laura G. Potter, wife of James Potter, the oldest woman in town, who died Friday in her 89th year, was held at her home here yesterday afternoon. The body was taken to Alfred for burial (Portland Evening Express, January 4, 1921).

Rev. Mr. McLain – 1875-76

Alexander Stewart McLean was born on Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada, November 1, 1843.

Alexander S. McLean, a clergyman, aged twenty-seven years (b. PEI), headed a Gray, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Julia McLean, aged twenty years (b. PEI). Alexander S. McLean has personal estate valued at $500.

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. The Star says that Rev. A.S. McLean lately of the Acton and Milton Mills F.B. church has accepted a call to the Charlestown, Mass., church and entered upon his duties last Sunday (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), October 15, 1875).

One might suppose these locations to have been reversed in error, i.e., he accepted a call to leave Charlestown, MA, and go to Acton & Milton Mills F.B. Church. A.S. Maclean appeared in the Milton directories of 1875, 1876, and 1877, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister.

When Rev. A.S. McLean left his pastorate at the Acton & Milton Mills Baptist church he went next to Boston, MA,

MARRIED. In this [Boston, MA] city, May 1, by Rev. A.S. McLean, Mr. James M. Milk to Miss M. Justina Shedd (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), May 12, 1877).

First Baptist Church in Hingham – Mr. Sankey Expected, But Does Not Preach –  The Rev. A.S. McLean Delivers an Eloquent Sermon. It was expected that the “singing evangelist,” Mr. Ira D. Sankey, would take a prominent part in the morning service at the First Baptist Church in Hingham yesterday. But Mr. Sankey was unable to come, having, it is supposed, been called away to attend the dedication of the monument to P.P. Bliss in Rome, Pa. The evangelist is, however, sojourning at the cottage of Franklin W. Smith, Esq., in Cohasset for the summer, and will doubtless soon be heard in Hingham. In his absence yesterday the pastor of the Baptist Church, the Rev. A.S. McLean, preached an earnest and forcible sermon, taking as his text Matthew, xi., 30: “For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” The speaker showed at the outset the peculiar force of these words to those who had been educated under the dominion of the secularized theocracy of Judaism in its latter days. But the text was also proved to be full of meaning to followers of Christ in this age. It sets forth, on the one hand, the fact that there is a Christian yoke and a Christian burden, and on the other, that strength is given to bear these. Restraint and self-denial are often enforced in the New Testament as duties, and the Christian life is represented as a warfare. Christianity does not remove every yoke and burden, but makes the one easy and gives strength to bear the other. While the yoke of sin is heavy and its burden grievous and there is no hope for the future, the Christian finds strength for all his temptations, nobility of character from self-denial, and is assured of attaining a glorious reward at the last (Boston Globe, July 16, 1877).

HINGHAM. The Rev. A.S. McLean will preach the sermon at the service of the Baptist Church. and the Rev. E.C. Hood will conduct the union service in the Congregational Church, Fast Day (Boston Globe, April 10, 1878).

New England Items. The Rev. A.S. McLean has been presented with a pair of gold-lined silver goblets by the Old Colony Lodge of Free Masons in recognition of the services he has rendered the Hingham Lodge (Boston Globe, July 20, 1878).

Alexander S. McLean married, perhaps in Canada, circa 1878-79, Julia S. Skilling. She was born in Kempt, Nova Scotia, Canada, in January 1850, daughter of Capt. John E. and Phebe D. (Card) Skilling.

Alexander McLean, a Free Baptist clergyman, aged thirty-eight years (b. PEI), headed a Kempt, Nova Scotia, Canada, household at the time of the Canadian Census of 1881. His household included his wife, Julia McLean, aged thirty-three years (b. Nova Scotia), and his son, Stewart McLean, aged eleven months (b. Nova Scotia).

Alexander Lean, aged forty-two [forty-eight] years, headed a Summerville, Nova Scotia, Canada, household at the time of the Canadian Census of 1891. His household included his wife, Julia Lean, aged thirty-eight [forty-three] years (b. Nova Scotia), and his son, Stewart Lean, aged twelve years (b. Nova Scotia).

Alexander McLane, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. Canada), headed a Milford, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-two years), Julia McLane, aged fifty years (b. Canada), and his children, Stewart McLane, a teamster, aged twenty-one years (b. ME), and Phoebe McLane, aged five years (b. MA). Alexander McLane rented their farm on Silver Hill Street. He had become a naturalized citizen in 1868. Julia S. Mclean was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Alexander S. Mclean, a railroad gate tender, aged sixty-six years (b. Canada), headed a Winthrop, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-two years), Julia S. Mclean, aged sixty years (b. ME), and his daughter, Phebe Mclean, aged fifteen years (b. MA). Alexander S. Mclean rented their house at 35 Siren Street. He had become a naturalized citizen in 1868. Julia S. Mclean was the mother of two children, of whom two were still living.

Alexander S. McLean died in Medfield, MA, February 16, 1916.

Julia McLean, a lodging house keeper, aged sixty years (b. ME [SIC]), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Ernestine McLean, aged twenty-five years (b. MA). Julia McLean rented their house at 31 Bowdoin Street. There were twenty-three lodgers.

Julia (Skilling) McLean died in Warren, MA, in 1925.

Hosea Quimby – 1876-1878

Hosea Quinby was born in Sandwich, NH, August 25, 1804, son of Moses and Doreathea (Atkins) Quinby. (His surname of Quinby was often misspelt as Quimby).

Hosea Quimby, D.D., Free Baptist, son of Moses and Dolly (Atkins) Quimby was born Aug 25, 1804. Preparatory studies at New Hampton Institution and Wolfborough Academy, 1824-8; Tutor, New Hampton, 1828-9. Graduated at Colby University, 1832, the first of his denomination, preaching during his entire course. Ordained Sandwich, June 2, 1833. Principal, Parsonsfield (Me.), Academy, 1832-9, and Smithville (R.I.) Seminary, 1840-51, meanwhile preaching at Greenwich for a time. Pastor, Meredith, June 20, 1839-40, and Jan. 18, 1855-7; Pittsfield, Feb. 28, 1857-61. Pastor and principal of Academy, Lebanon, Me., 1861-4; Lake Village, now Lakeport, 1861-7, retiring from teaching, 1864. Without charge, Concord, 1868-71, meanwhile chaplain of New Hampshire State Prison, July 1869-71. Pastor, Nottingham, Oct 1872-4; Pittsfield, Jan. 9, 1875-6; and Milton Mills, 1876-8. Delegate and secretary, First General Conference, Tunbridge, Vt., Oct. 11, 1827. Delegate to the General Conference, Lowell, Mass., 1859, and Fairport, N.Y., Oct, 1877. Is said to have done the work of two men for 30 years. Died, Milton Mills, Oct. 11, 1878. Married Dorothea Burleigh of Sandwich, May 10, 1828. She died Concord about 1870. Publications: 1. Review of Butler’s Letters. 2. Treatise on the Faith and Usages of the Free Baptist Denomination. 3. Prison Chaplaincy and Experiences, 1873. 4. Christian Baptism (Carter, 1906).

Hosea Quinby married in Sandwich, NH, May 10, 1828, Miss Dolly Burley, both of Sandwich, NH. Dorothea Burleigh was born in Sandwich, NH, in 1806, daughter of Josiah and Rosamond Burleigh.

Hosea Quimby headed a Waterville, ME, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Dolly (Burley) Quinby].

Hosea Quimby headed a Meredith, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 30-39 years [Dolly (Burley) Quinby], one female aged 20-29 years, one male aged 5-9 years, and one male aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in Agriculture.

Hosea Quinby, president of seminary, aged forty-five years (b. NH), headed a residence hall in Scituate, RI, at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Dorothea Quinby, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Josiah S. Quinby, a student, aged seventeen years (b. ME), Hosea M. Quinby, aged ten years (b. NH), and Caroline J. Quinby, aged six years (b. RI). The residence hall house also four teachers and fifty-three students.

Rev. Hosea Quimby, principal of the Smithville [RI] Seminary invited Anti-slavery activist Alonzo J. Grover to speak before the student body in September 1852.

In this dilemma, Rev. Hosea Quimby, Principal of the Smithville Seminary, a flourishing institution, situated short distance from the village, proposed that I should speak in the Seminary Hall to the students, who could attend without going out of doors. Of course, I gladly accepted the invitation, and at the hour of meeting, about a hundred students, and a few of the villagers, assembled in the hall, and listened apparently not without interest for upwards of two hours. I endeavored to show the relation of the North to slavery, giving as full an account as I could, in the time, of the action of the Federal Government in its behalf, from the striking out of the clause deprecatory of slavery in the Declaration of Independence, as originally presented by Jefferson, down to the adoption of the late Baltimore platforms. I presume this was a chapter in American history not found in the text books of the institution, and probably not the most familiar to my audience; but no one expressed any doubts in regard to its authenticity (Liberator (Boston, MA), September 10, 1852).

Hosea Quinby, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), headed a Pittsfield, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Dorothy Quinby, aged fifty-four years (b. NH), Stillman J. Quinby, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Hosea M. Quinby, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Caroline Quinby, aged sixteen years (b. RI). Hosea Quinby had personal estate valued at $1,000.

Rev. Mr. Stevens, of Biddeford, has resigned the charge of the Free Baptist Church, and his resignation has been accepted. The society has extended an invitation to Rev. Hosea Quimby of Lebanon, to become their pastor (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), August 8, 1863).

Rev. Hosea Quinby, A.M. appeared in the Bates College directories of 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, and 1868, as a member of the [Maine State Seminary] Corporation. (Rev. Quinby was a D.D., i.e., a Doctor of Divinity, in 1867 and 1868, rather than an A.M., i.e., a Master of Arts, as he had been earlier). Rev. Dexter Waterman appeared also in the same lists.

A Funny Story. A few years ago, there was sent to Rumford, or the circuit in which the said town was, a Rev. Mr. Quinby. While there he was called upon to go about two miles to perform the marriage ceremony. It proved to be a very rainy and muddy time, but on such an occasion as this it would not do to disappoint the parties, so he hitched up his team, and in due time met his appointment, for which he received the sum of one dollar and fifty cents; but, on the next day, what was his surprise when the bridegroom came and requested him to return the sum of twenty-five cents, as he had paid him that much more than the law demanded of him to pay for such services – OWT (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), April 30, 1872).

Hosea Quimby appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1870, as chaplain of the NH State Prison, with his house at 19 Monroe street.

Hosea Quimby, a clergyman, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Dorathea B. Quimby, keeping house, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), and Carrie J. Quimby, at home, aged twenty-four years (b. RI). Hosea Quimby had personal estate valued at $400; and Carrie J. Quimby had personal estate valued at $200.

Hosea Quimby appeared in the Concord, NH, directory of 1872, as a clergyman, with his house at 164 State street.

MARRIAGES. MISCELLANEOUS. In Concord, N.H., June 25th, by Rev. Hosea Quimby, C.L. French, M.D., of Glover, Vt., and Nellie Burleigh of Concord, N.H. (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), July 6, 1872).

Dorothea (Burleigh) Quinby died in Concord, NH, in 1872.

RELIGIOUS NEWS. BAPTIST. Rev. Hosea Quinby entered upon the pastorate of the Pittsfield, N.H., church last Sabbath (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), December 26, 1874).

Elder Hosea Quinby, D.D., died in Milton Mills, October 11, 1878.

DIED. In Milton Mills, N.H., Oct. 11, Rev. Hosea Quinby, D.D., 74 yrs. (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), October 19, 1878).

Rev. Benjmain A. Sherwood – 1878-1879

Benajmin Atherton Sherwood was born in Kings, New Brunswick, Canada, August 7, 1843, son of George R. and Elizabeth “Betsy” (Colpitts) Sherwood.

Benjamin A. Sherwood married (1st) in New Brunswick, Canada, December 16, 1865, Lucy Anna Estey. She was born in York, New Brunswick, Canada, in 1845, daughter of George and Ammia “Ann” (Burtt) Estey. She died in Narrows, New Brunswick, Canada, August 22, 1868.

Benjamin A. Sherwood married (2nd), in November 1870, Ann DeWolfe. She was born in Harvey, New Brunswick, Canada, in 1843, daughter of Henry and Delilah (Copp) DeWolfe.

Benjamin A. Sherwood married (3rd), in 1874, Elizabeth Mary Murray. She was born in Providence, RI, in December 1846, daughter of George and Harriet J. (McKenzie) Murray.

NEWS OF THE CHURCHES. The Star says that Rev. B.A. Sherwood has accepted a call from the F.B. church in Richmond, Me., and commenced his labors on Sunday, Oct. 3 (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), October 15, 1875).

Sutton. The Rev B.A. Sherwood of Milton Mills, N.H., occupied the desk Sunday forenoon as a candidate for the pastorate of the church. We learn the committee intend to secure his services as soon as possible if the people will sign liberally and raise his salary. The church has been without a pastor and regular preaching since Mr. Atwood ceased his labors last March (St. Johnsbury Caledonian (St. Johnsbury, VT), October 24, 1879).

Sutton. Rev. B. A. Sherwood has moved his family, and commenced his labors with the church here as pastor, last Sabbath. We are glad to have a settled minister again after being without one nearly eight months. The people volunteered and drew his goods from the depot, helped set them up, and carried in provisions and set him up in housekeeping in good shape (St. Johnsbury Caledonian (St. Johnsbury, VT), November 28, 1879).

B.A. Sherwood, aged thirty-six years (b. NH), headed a Sutton, VT, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lizzie [(Murray)] Sherwood, aged thirty-three years, and his children, Fred Sherwood, aged six years, George Sherwood, aged four years, and Nellie Sherwood, aged two years.

Daughter Nellie M. Sherwood died of scarlatina in Manchester, NH, May 15, 1882, aged three years, eleven months, and five days. (She had been born in Rochester, NH).

Sutton. It is with sincere regret that we learn of the death of Rev. Mr. Sherwood’s little daughter, Nellie. She died May 15th of scarlet fever; she was a lovely child of four years, and during Mr. Sherwood’s pastorate here was every one’s pet (Orleans County Monitor (Barton, VT), May 29, 1882).

MAINE MEN & WOMEN. Rev. B.A. Sherwood of Georgetown, Me., has received a unanimous call from the Free Baptist church of Farnumsville, [Grafton,] Mass., reports the Springvale Advocate (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), February 6, 1888).

Son Fred H. Sherwood died in Johnston, RI, in August 1894, aged nineteen years.

Sutton. The friends of Rev. B.A. Sherwood, a former pastor here, will be sorry to learn of the death of their son Fred recently in Rhode Island, after a long sickness (Sr. Johnsbury Caledonian (St. Johnsbury, VT), August 30, 1894).

Benjamin A. Sherwood, a clergyman, aged fifty-six years (b. Canada), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-six years), Elizabeth M. [(Murray)] Sherwood, aged fifty-three years (b. Canada [SIC]), George H. Sherwood, a teacher in Brown University, aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Ralph A. Sherwood, a student in Brown University, aged nineteen years (b. Vermont), Grace M. Sherwood, aged sixteen years (b. ME), and Howard G. Sherwood, aged twelve years (b. ME). Benjamin A. Sherwood owned their house at 324 Laurel Hill Avenue. He was a naturalized citizen, having immigrated in 1871. Elizabeth M. Sherwood was the mother of six children, of whom four were still living. She immigrated in 1872.

Benjamin Sherwood, own income, aged sixty-six years (b. Canada), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of thirty-eight years), Elizabeth [(Murray)] Sherwood, aged sixty-three years (b. Canada), and his daughter, Grace Sherwood, a State House assistant librarian, aged twenty-five years (b. ME). Benjamin A. Sherwood owned their house at 324 Laurel Hill Avenue, free-and-clear. Elizabeth Sherwood was the mother of six children, of whom four were still living.

Benjamin A. Sherwood, a Baptist clergyman, aged seventy-six years (b. Canada), headed a Providence, RI, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Elizabeth M. [(Murray)] Sherwood, aged seventy-three years (b. Canada), and his daughter, Grace M. Sherwood, a State House reference librarian, aged thirty-five years (b. ME). Benjamin A. Sherwood owned their house at 324 Laurel Hill Avenue, free-and-clear.

George H. Sherwood, retired, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), headed a New York, NY, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-eight years), Alverda B. Sherwood, aged fifty-five years (b. RI), and his mother, Elizabeth M. Sherwood, aged eighty-three years (b. NJ [SIC]). George H. Sherwood rented their apartment at 1 West 85th Street, for $200 per month. They had a radio set. Meanwhile, Benjamin A. Sherwood, aged eighty-five years (b. Canada (Eng.)), was one of ninety-two patients at the Butler Hospital, in Providence, RI, at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census.

Benjamin A. Sherwood died in Providence, RI, October 26, 1930, aged eighty-seven years.

Bates Graduate Dies. Providence, R.I., Oct. 26. – (AP) – The Rev. Benjamin Atherton Sherwood, veteran Free Baptist clergyman, died here today after a long illness, in his 88th year. A native of New Brunswick, the Rev. Sherwood graduated from Cobb Divinity School, Bates College, in 1875. During his active career he held pastorates in every state of New England. He was a frequent contributor to religious periodicals. Survivors include his wife, a daughter, Grace M. Sherwood of Providence; and four sons, Dr. George H. Sherwood, New York City; Rev. Ralph Sherwood, Salem, Mass.; Charles B. Sherwood, Boston; and Howard G. Sherwood, McCleary, Washington (Morning Sentinel, October 27, 1930; Portland Press Herald (Portland, ME), October 27, 1930).

Elizabeth M. (Murray) Sherwood died in New York, NY, May 15, 1933, aged eighty-six years.

Obituary. Mrs. Elizabeth Mary Murray Sherwood, 86, contributor of articles to women’s magazines, The Youths’ Companion and religious publications, died at the home of her son, Dr. George H. Sherwood, director of the American Museum of Natural History, in New York (Elmira Star-Gazette (Elmira, NY), May 16, 1933).

Rev. Hiram P. Mansur -1879-1885

Hiram Pierce Mansur was born in Monroe, ME, July 6, 1825, son of James and Polly (Pierce) Mansur.

Father James Mansur published an “emancipation” of his son, Hiram Mansur, in July 1840, after the son’s fifteenth birthday.

NOTICE. THIS certifies that I have given to my son Hiram Mansur, a minor, his time, that henceforth he may set and trade for himself. Hereafter I shall not claim any of his earnings nor pay any debts of his contracting. JAMES MANSUR. Witnesses, ELIJAH BATCHELDER, THOMAS MARDEN (Republican Ledger (Belfast, ME), July 9, 1840).

Hiram P. Mansur was admitted to membership in the Mount Vernon Congregational Church in Boston, MA, March 3, 1850. He had formerly attended the First Freewill Baptist Church of Prospect, ME (Mt. Vernon Congregational Church, 1852).

Ward Litchfield, a mason, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included L. Litchfield, aged ten years (b. MA), H. Mason, aged sixty-six years (b. MA), Hiram Manson [Mansur], a carpenter, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), S.N. Fellows, a mason, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), Wm. H. Hebard, a merchant, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Mrs. Hebard, aged thirty years (b. NH).

Hiram P. Mansur married in Boston, MA, March 30, 1851, Nancy W. Hutchins, both of Boston, ME. He was a carpenter, aged twenty-six years, and she was aged twenty-one years. Rev. A.L. Stone performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, March 29, 1828, daughter of Joseph H. and Elizabeth “Betsy” (Wiggin) Hutchins.

Hiram P. Manser, a carpenter, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Nancy W. [(Hutchins)] Manser, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), Herbert S. Manser, aged two years (b. MA), and Walter H. Manser, aged one year (b. MA). They shared a two-family residence with the household of James A. Newcomb, a trader, aged twenty-seven years (b. RI).

Hiram P. Mansur, a farmer, aged thirty-five years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield (“Horne’s Mills P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Nancy W. [(Hutchins)] Mansur, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Herbert S. Mansur, aged seven years (b. MA), and Walter H. Mansur, aged five years (b. MA). Hiram P. Mansur had real estate valued at $1,600 and personal estate valued at $500.

Hiram P. Mansur was ordained at the Wakefield, NH, Second Free-Will Baptist church, October 30, 1862.

Hiram P. Mansur, a minister, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH) registered for the Civil War military draft in Wakefield, NH, in May or June 1863.

Hiram P. Mansur and Joshua A. Stetson appeared in the Maine Political Manual of 1867, as the Wakefield, NH, F. Bap. ministers. Hiram P. Mansur (Milton Mills) and Joshua A. Stetson (Union) appeared in the Maine Political Manual of 1869, as the Wakefield, NH, F. Bap. ministers.

Hiram Manser, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield (“Milton Mills P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Nancy W. [(Hutchins)] Manser, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. NH), Herbert S. Manser, a farm laborer, aged seventeen years (b. MA), Walter H. Manser, a farm laborer, aged fifteen years (b. MA), Hiram W. Manser, at home, aged six years (b. NH), and Joseph H. Manser, at home, aged four years (b. NH). Hiram Manser had real estate valued at $1,500 and personal estate valued at $957.

MARRIAGES. In So. Wakefield, Nov. 26, by H.P. Mansur, John G. McCullkins and Nellie A. Atkins, both of Gt. Falls (Farmington News, December 5, 1879).

Elder Joseph Spinney, pastor of the Wakefield, NH, Second Free-Will Baptist church, and twenty-two of his congregants converted to Adventism, and left the church.

After that the [Wakefield] church had as pastors Elder Cummins Parris, Elder John Chick, and Hiram P. Mansur, who was ordained October 30, 1862, and served quite a number of years (their last pastor); after that he served for some years as pastor of the Acton Free Baptist Church, Milton Mills, one of the five Free churches [founded] in that first year of Benjamin Randall’s ministry, 1780. His son, Herbert Mansur, is a recent graduate of Bates College and Theological School, Lewiston, Maine (Merrill, 1889).

H.P. Mansur appeared in the Milton directories 0f 1880, 1881, 1882, and 1884, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister. Hiram P. Mansur (P.O., Milton Mills, N.H.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1882, as pastor of the Acton, ME, F. Bapt. church.

Hiram P. Mansur, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. ME), headed a Wakefield, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Nancy W. [(Hutchins)] Mansur, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), and his sons, Hiram W. Mansur, at home, aged sixteen years (b. NH), Joseph C. Mansur, at home, aged fourteen years (b. NH), his daughter-in-law, Lizzie L. Mansur, at home, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Maude E. Mansur, aged four years (b. NH).

Hiram P. Mansur (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1885, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

ACTON. Mrs. Ambrose Sanborn died of pneumonia April 18th. She has been a great sufferer for many years. Rev. H.P. Mansur preached the sermon (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME, April 20, 1892).

Hiram P. Mansur died of heart neuralgia in Wakefield, NH, June 22, 1892, aged sixty-six years, eleven months, and sixteen days. He was a clergyman. W.E. Pillsbury, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Nancy W. (Hutchins) Mansur died of heart disease at 633 Central Avenue in Dover, NH, December 27, 1900, aged seventy-two years, eight months, and twenty-eight days. (She had resided in Dover, NH, for only six weeks, with her previous residence in Wakefield, NH).

Rev. C.M. Anderson – 1887

Clifford M. Anderson was born in Hopewell, New Brunswick, Canada, December 20, 1847, son of Owen and Mary Ann Anderson.

Clifford M. Anderson married at the Broadway Methodist Episcopal Church in Chelsea, MA, June 15, 1875, [Mrs.] Francelia Medora (Clogston) Cook, he of Chelsea, MA, and she of Boston, MA. He was an oil dealer, aged twenty-eight years, and she was aged twenty-nine years. Methodist Rev. L.B. Bates performed the ceremony. She was born in Burke, VT, June 22, 1843, daughter of Abner P. and Rachel (Gould) Clogston. (She had married previously in Boston, MA, August 14, 1862, Charles H. Cook, he of Boston, MA, and she of South Strafford, VT. He died in Boston, MA, July 16, 1872, aged thirty-one years).

But they would separate not long after their marriage, and certainly before 1880, by which point they had a single child, Charles L.B. Anderson.

Page H. Mack, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. VT), headed a Lebanon, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Hannah A. [(Clogston)] Mack, keeping house, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), his boarder, Mary P. Gould, without, i.e., without occupation, aged seventy-two years (b, NH), his sister-in-law, Francelia Anderson, without, aged thirty-six years (b. VT), and his nephew-in-law, Charles L.B. Anderson, aged four years (b. NH).

LEXINGTON. Mr. Alfred B. Nichols, of the Cambridge Theological School, is to preach at the Episcopal Chapel this morning. Mr. Winford L. Rollins will preach May 4 and Rev. C.M. Anderson of Arlington on May 11 (Boston Globe, April 27, 1884).

Rev. C.M. Anderson held the pastorate of the First Baptist church at Kittery Point, Kittery. ME, between 1884 and 1887 (Mitchell, 1906).

KITTERY. Rev. C.M. Anderson, formerly of Manchester, N.H. has begun his labors with the Free Baptist church in Kittery to which he received a call three weeks ago (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), December 10, 1884).

C.M. Anderson appeared in the Milton directory of 1887, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister.

MAINE EVENTS. ACTON. Under the labors of Rev. C.M. Anderson the church is enjoying a revival interest reports the Morning Star (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), June 11, 1887).

KITTERY, ME. The funeral services over the remains of Richard Graham were held at the Baptist church at Kittery Point at 2 o’clock Friday afternoon and conducted by the pastor, Rev. W.H. Hall, assisted by Rev. C.M. Anderson of Newburyport, Mass., a former pastor, and Rev. F.K. Amazeen, pastor of the First Christian church. The body was placed in the receiving tomb (Portsmouth Herald, February 5, 1898).

Fransila M. [((Clogston) Cook)] Anderson, a seamstress, aged fifty-four years (b. VT), headed a Newburyport, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Charles L. Anderson, a student, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and her boarders, Elizabeth A. Bartlett, a seamstress, aged seventy years (b. MA), and Olivier S. Turner, aged sixty-four years (b. ME). Fransila M Anderson rented their house at 43 Fair Street. She had been married for twenty-five years, and had had one child, of whom one was still living.

Clifford M. Anderson of Hanover, NH, divorced his wife, Francelia M. [((Clogston) Cook)] Anderson, for abandonment in Grafton County Superior Court, October 19, 1903. (To judge from the Federal Census records, they had not lived together for over twenty years).

Francelia M. ((Clogston) Cook) Anderson died of acute broncho-pneumonia in Fairlee, VT, December 29, 1922, aged seventy-nine years, six months, and seven days.

LOCAL. Mr. and Mrs. John V. Kimball have sold their home on Bunker street to Rev. Clifford Anderson, a retired clergyman of Fremont. While Mr. Anderson will not occupy his purchase as a home and has rented the premises to Mr. and Mrs. Kimball, he will make occasional visits to Farmington and cultivate an acquaintance, as he is desirous of forming associations with the town along the line of community welfare work in which he is active and much interested. He spends his winters in South America with his son who enjoys prominent connections with the field of civil engineering (Farmington News, July 29, 1927).

PERSONAL. Rev. Clifford Anderson of Fremont and Albert Bishop of Reed’s Ferry have been guests of Mr. and Mrs. O.C. Baxter the past week (Farmington News, August 19, 1927)

Clifford M. Anderson died of colon cancer in Fremont, NH, January 29, 1929, aged eighty-six years, eleven days. He was a retired preacher, who had resided in Fremont, NH, for two years.

Rev. C.E. Hurd – 1888-1890

Charles Edwin Hurd was born in Gilmanton, NH, May 1, 1838, son of Caleb and Judith C. (Allen) Hurd.

Charles E. Hurd married in Gilmanton, NH, February 25, 1859, Anna Augusta Drake, both of Gilmanton, NH. He was aged twenty years and she was aged seventeen years. Thomas Keniston performed the ceremony.

Charles E. Hurd, a shoemaker, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), headed a Gilmanton (“Gilmanton Iron Works P.O.”), NH, at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Anna A. Hurd, aged eighteen years (b. NH). Charles E. Hurd had real estate valued at $350 and personal estate valued at $150.

Charles Edwin Hurd, Free Baptist, son of Caleb and Judith C. (Allen) Hurd was born May 1, 1838. Soldier in the Civil War, 1861-5. Moved to Dover, 1871. Preached his first sermon Manchester. Itinerating, 1878-80. Ordained, 1880. Pastor, Loudon, 1880-5. State evangelist, May to Aug 1885. Pastor, North Tunbridge, Vt., 1885-8; Acton, Me., and Milton Mills, 1888-90; Limerick, Me., 1890-2; Cape Elizabeth, Me., 1892-6; Contoocook, 1896-8. Without charge, Concord, 1898-1900 (Carter, 1906).

Charles E. Hurd, works for shoe factory, aged forty-two [thirty-two] years (b. NH), headed a Gilmanton (“Gilmanton Iron Works P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Anna A. Hurd, keeping house, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), Frank D. Hurd, attending to school, aged ten years (b. NH), Flora B. Hurd, aged eight years (b. NH), Henry W. Chamberlin, works for shoe factory, aged twenty years (b. NH), Millet W. Merrow, works for shoe factory, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), and Electa Merrow, aged sixteen years (b. NH). Charles E. Hurd had real estate valued at $80 and person estate valued at $575. They shared a two-family residence with Levi Ayers, a farmer, aged eighty-one years (b. NH).

Charles E. Hurd, a minister, aged forty-two years, headed a Rye, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna A. Hurd, keeping house, aged thirty-seven years, his children, Frank D. Hurd, molder in factory, aged nineteen years, Florabel [(Hurd)] Page, aged eighteen years, Charles A. Hurd, at school, aged nine years, and his son-in-law, James B. Page, a shoemaker, aged twenty-three years.

Tunbridge. The Baptist society have secured the services of Rev. C.E. Hurd of Concord, N.H. (Vermont Watchman and State Journal (Montpelier, VT), October 28, 1885).

Tunbridge. Rev. C.E. Hurd gave his comrades of Whitney Post a brief but very interesting account of his four years’ service in the 4th New Hampshire regiment (Rural Vermonter (Montpelier, VT), July 16, 1886).

Rev. Charles E. Hurd left Tunbridge, VT, in or after March 1888, to take up the pastorate of the Milton Mills Baptist Church.

Tunbridge. Rev. Mr. Hurd of the Baptist church will move to New Hampshire soon (Vermont Watchman & State Journal (Montpelier, VT), March 7, 1888).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Rev. C.E. Hurd of North Tunbridge has accepted a call to the Free Baptist church at Milton Mills, N.H. (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), April 9, 1888).

C.E. Hurd (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1888, as the Acton F. Bap. minister. C.E. Hurd appeared in the Milton directory of 1889, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister. C.E. Hurd (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1891, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

Tunbridge Tid-Bits. Rev. C.E. Hurd and family, of Milton Falls [Mills], N.H., are visiting in town (Argus & Patriot (Montpelier, VT), August 19, 1889).

Charles E. Hurd appeared in the remaining Veterans Schedule of the Eleventh (1890) Federal Census. He resided in Limerick, ME. He had served three years, ten months, and ten days (September 13, 1861 through August 23, 1865) in Company D of the 4th NH Volunteer Infantry Regiment.

RELIGIOUS SUMMARY. Rev. C.E. Hurd has resigned the pastorate of the Free Baptist church at Limerick (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), March 2, 1892).

Sunday Service Notice. Rev. C.E. Hurd of Cape Elizabeth will preach at the Free Baptist church opposite the public library tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. (Portland Evening Express (Portland, ME), July 30, 1892).

LOCALS. Rev. Charles E. Hurd and wife of Cape Elizabeth, Me., were guests of E.H. Crosby and wife last week (Farmington News, August 11, 1893).

SUNDAY SERVICES. So. Portland F.B. Church. Rev. C.E. Hurd, pastor. Services 2 p.m. Rev. G.H. Adalian of the Orient will preach. All are welcome (Portland Daily Press (Portland, ME), June 1, 1895).

MAINE TOWNS. CAPE ELIZABETH. Cape Elizabeth, October 19. – The many friends of Rev. C.E. Hurd, formerly pastor of the Baptist church at this place, will be pleased to learn that he has a nice pastorate, and is very pleasantly situated at Contoocook, N.H. His son Clarence, formerly a member of South Portland High school, is attending Henniker High school, where Osman C. Evans, formerly of Knightviile, is principal (Portland Daily Press (Portland, ME), October 20, 1896).

MINISTER’S MISTAKE In The Accounts of His Ward HAD TO BE SETTLED IN COURT. Much Surprise Caused in Religious Circles By Decision. He Paid Her $6.50 as The Amount Remaining From Her Father’s Estate But Must Now Pay $1,164. Concord, N.H., June 17. Chief Justice Blodgett’s decision in the case against Rev. Charles E. Hurd, a retired minister of this city, has caused something of a sensation, especially in church circles. The court decides that Miss Fannie Drake is entitled to recover from Mr. Hurd the sum of $1,164, instead of $6.50, which he tendered to her in full payment of a legacy. About 13 years ago the adopted father of Fannie Drake died at Chichester. He left to her in his will $1,500. She was then about nine years of age. The Rev. Mr. Hurd was appointed guardian of the child. He took her to his home, where she remained and grew up as a member of his family, until she reached the age of 15. Since then she has been working in different families and places. She was, however, in the habit of returning to the home of Mr. Hurd, during her vacations, and looked upon his dwelling as her home. Miss Drake reached her majority in February, 1898. In March, 1898, Mr. Hurd filed in the probate court his account as her guardian. He charged himself with the $1,500 and $600 for interest. He credited himself with something like $1,700 for her board and charged incidentals that amounted in all $2,093.50. After he had filed his account in the probate court he wrote to Miss Drake, who was then living in Andover, Mass., informing her that at the death of Mr. Drake she was willed the sum of $1,500 and that he was appointed her guardian. In the letter he told her that he had filed the account, and that after her expenses, such as board, clothes and spending money, for instance, had been paid that there still remained in her favor the sum of $6.50. That same letter contained the information, however, that Mr. Drake wanted to will the money to Mrs. Hurd. Miss Drake secured counsel, the matter was looked into and the minister was asked to make an appearance at the April term of the supreme court that was held in this city. The court proceedings were held, and it is now said that at the hearing the Rev. Mr. Hurd admitted that there had been errors in the accounts, but that they were there only through mistake. Mr. Hurd has preached in various sections of this State and in Maine. He is not now doing any active church work. The decision was rendered some days ago, but has just become known (Montpelier Evening Argus (Montpelier, VT), June 17, 1899)

Charles E. Hurd, a clergyman, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Concord, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-one years), Annie A. Hurd, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), and his son, Clarence E. Hurd, a telegraph operator, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Charles E. Hurd rented their portion of a two-family residence at 144 Rumford Street; its owner was Henry H. Proctor, a R.R. car inspector, aged forty-eight years (b. VT). Annie A. Hurd was the mother of five children, of whom four were still living.

Annie A. (Drake) Hurd died in Windsor, VT, May 20, 1908, aged sixty-four years.

WINDSOR CHIT CHAT. Mrs. A.A. Hurd died, Thursday of last week, at the home on West State street of her son, C.E. Hurd, after a comparatively brief illness, although she had been in poor health for some time. She was the wife of Rev. C.E. Hurd, and was 64 years of age. After a prayer at the house, her body was taken to Gilmanton Iron Works, N.H., her former home, here burial was had, after funeral services held in the church. The deceased had made her home in Windsor since last November, and is survived by her husband, three sons and a daughter (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), May 30, 1908).

Son Charles A. “Austin” Hurd died of Bright’s disease in Claremont, NH, October 29, 1909, aged thirty-nine years, four months.

WINDSOR PARAGRAPHS. Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Hurd, accompanied by Rev. C.E. Hurd, attended the funeral services of the son and brother Austin, in Claremont on Monday of this week. The deceased leaves a wife and six children (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), November 5, 1909).

Clarence A. Hurd, a machine shop bookkeeper, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Windsor, VT, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of seven years), Amy E. Hurd, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Charles E. Hurd, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), Clarence C. Seaver, a machine shop bookkeeper, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Florence E. Willard, a private family servant, aged twenty-four years (b. VT). Clarence A. Hurd rented their house at 12 North Main Street. Florence E. Willard was the mother of four children, of whom three were still living.

Charles E. Hurd died in Windsor, VT, January 26, 1911, aged seventy-four years.

REV. C.E. HURD DEAD. Veteran of the Civil War Entered Shoe Business Before Becoming Minister at Windsor, Vt. WINDSOR, Vt., Jan. 27 – Rev. Charles E. Hurd, aged 74, died yesterday at the home of his son, Clarence E. Hurd. He was born in Gilmanton, N.H., and there married Anna A. Drake. At the outbreak of the civil war he enlisted in Co D, 4th N.H. volunteers, for three years, then reenlisted and served until the close of the war. His regiment was called the Bloody Fourth. He was in many hard battles. After the close of the war he engaged in the shoe business, and later studied for the ministry, being ordained by the Free Will Baptist denomination. He held pastorates at Loudon, N.H., Tunbridge, Vt., Acton, Me., South Portland, Me., and Contoocook, N.H., retiring at the latter place from the ministry and coming to Windsor, where his wife died on May 20, 1908. He is survived by two sons, Frank D. of Concord, N.H., and Clarence K. of Windsor; also two brothers, Henry L. and James A. of Gilmanton, N.H. (Boston Globe, January 27, 1911).

Rev. Ebenezer N. Fernald – 1890-1897

Ebenezer N. Fernald was born in Lebanon, Maine, March 10, 1833, son of Joseph and Polly (Nichols) Fernald.

Ebenezer N. Fernald, a student, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), resided in an Amherst College dormitory residence, in Amherst, MA, at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census.

Class of 1862. EBENEZER NICHOLS FERNALD, the son of Joseph and Polly (Nichols) Fernald was born in Lebanon, Maine, March 10, 1833, and was fitted for college at New Hampton Literary and Biblical Institute, N.H. The first year after graduation he was teacher of Latin and Greek in the State Seminary at Lewiston, Me., one term, and the remainder of the year instructor in the English department, Williston Seminary. From 1863 to 1865 he was principal of Rockford High School, Ill. This position he resigned to take charge of educational work among the Freedmen, at Chattanooga, Tenn., under the auspices of the North-Western Freedmen’s aid commission. After accomplishing this work in a most satisfactory manner, he entered Andover Theological Seminary, and graduated there in 1869. He was ordained, Nov. 12, 1869, at Winthrop, Mass., and was pastor of the Free-will Baptist church there one year; from 1870 to 1874 he was pastor of the church in Auburn, Me.; from 1874 to 1885 he was financial secretary and treasurer of the Free-will Baptist home and foreign missionary societies, and the education society of the same denomination, with his residence at Lewiston, Me. From 1885 to 1890 he treasurer and publisher of the Free Baptist printing establishment in Boston, and resided in that city. From 1878 he was a trustee of Stover College, an institution for freedmen at Harper’s Ferry, W. Va. In October,1890, he became pastor of the Free Baptist church at Milton Mills, N.H., and continued in that relation until the failure of his health compelled his resignation in November, 1897. He died of tuberculosis of the liver at Milton Mills, N.H., Jan. 15, 1898.
“Mr. Fernald was a strong preacher a profound thinker, with a clear, terse, and impressive diction, with large sympathies as well as intense convictions, ruling a great heart that drew to him friends, and held them as with hooks of steel. Mr. Fernald’s good-nature, ready wit, and capacity for ardent friendship made him a delightful social companion; and these qualities joined with keen insight, practical judgment, and great interest in the prosperity of the churches made the visits of the financial secretary a godsend to many a perplexed pastor and discouraged church. The common sense of his finely prepared and stirring addresses and the eloquence he gave to figures in his annual reports are still remembered. Their influence will long abide. Its effects are seen in the system inaugurated by him for collecting benevolent funds, and now found indispensable. Mr. Fernald was catholic in his sympathies, but not indiscriminate. He was no bigot, but his devotion was enthusiastic for the cause he served, for his own division of the church militant, and the doctrines he believed.” – The Morning Star, Boston, Mass.
Mr. Fernald was married, Dec. 27, 1863, to Anna B., daughter of David Tuxbury of Saco, Me., who, with two of their five children, survives him (Amherst College, 1883).

Ebenezer N. Fernald married December 27, 1863, Anna B. Tuxbury. She was born in Saco, ME, August 12, 1839, daughter of Col. David and Lucinda (Hill) Tuxbury.

The 61st anniversary of the Andover Theological Seminary occurred last week. Diplomas were awarded to the following graduates from Maine, viz. James Brand of Saco, Ebenezer Nichols Fernald of West Lebanon, George Harris, Jr., Columbia Falls, George Thomas Packard of Brunswick (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), July 28, 1869).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. BAPTIST. Mr. Ebenezer N. Fernald, of the senior class at Andover, was licensed on the 9th at Lawrence, by the Freewill Baptist Association (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), February 6, 1869).

Colby University – Programme for the Commencement Week. The 61st anniversary of the Andover Theological Seminary occurred last week. Diplomas were awarded to the following graduates from Maine, viz. James Brand of Saco, Ebenezer Nichols Fernald of West Lebanon, George Harris, Jr., Columbia Falls, George Thomas Packard of Brunswick (Bangor Daily Whig & Courier (Bangor, ME), July 28, 1869).

Eben. N. Fernald, a clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Winthrop (“East Boston P.O.”), MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Anna T. [(Tuxbury)] Fernald, keeping house, aged thirty years (b. ME), and Agnes Carney, at school, aged fifteen years (b. MA).

Rev. Ebenezer N. Fernald took up a pastorate at the Court Street Free Baptist Church in Auburn, ME, in October 1870.

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Rev. E.N. Fernald pastor of the Court street Free Baptist church, Auburn, is dangerously ill at his father’s house in Lebanon, N.H., whither he had gone to spend his vacation (Bangor Daily Week & Courier (Bangor, ME), August 3, 1872).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. There was a very interesting and impressive baptismal service on Sunday morning at Little Androscoggin. Nine persons were baptized in the river by Rev. E.N. Fernald of Court street Free Baptist church in Lewiston [Auburn] (Bangor Daily Week & Courier (Bangor, ME), June 28, 1873).

Court Street Free Baptist Church. … Rev. E.N. Fernald commenced a pastorate of three years in October, 1870. October, 1873, in consequence of an injury on the cars, he resigned. He raised $3,300 to pay the debt of the society and added 34 to the church (Merrill, 1891).

While recovering from his 1872 illness and his 1873 accident, Rev. Ebenezer Fernald presaged his later pastorate (1890-1897) at the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church by preaching there as a “supply,” i.e., temporary or substitute, pastor.

City and County. The Morning Star learns that Rev. E.N. Fernald, formerly of Auburn, is getting some relief from the difficulties with his eyes, which have afflicted him. He is at present supplying the Free Baptist church at Milton, N.H. (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), September 1, 1874).

Eben. N. Fernald, a clergyman, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Lewiston, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Anna T. [(Tuxbury)] Fernald, keeping house, aged forty years (b. ME), and his children, Annie S. Fernald, aged six years (b. ME), and Horace W. Fernald, aged two years (b. ME).

To Let. To Rent. – About September 1st, a tenement at 243 College Street, occupied for several years by Rev. E.N. Fernald. J.F. BOOTHBY. aug13tf (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), August 20, 1885).

OUR NEIGHBORS AND FRIENDS. Gossip About Lewiston and Auburn and Other People. Rev. I.D. Stewart, agent of the Morning Star corporation, which paper is the Free Will Baptist national organ, has resigned. He will be succeeded by Rev. E.N. Fernald of Lewiston, treasurer of the Free Will Baptist Home and Foreign Missions and Education Society. The office of the Star is to be removed to Shawmut avenue, Boston, next week, where a new building has just been built for it (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), August 26, 1885).

Rev. E.N. Fernald gave the funeral sermon in the Free Baptist church at Milton Mills, NH, for medical resident William C. Buck, on Tuesday, May 2, 1893. Buck’s fellow medical students were his pallbearers (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), May 4, 1893). Buck was a son of Jeremiah C. and Eunice C. (Swasey) Buck (and grandson of Reuben and Alice (Jacquith) Buck).

Eben. Fernald appeared in the Milton directories of 1894, and 1898, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister.

Ebenezer N. Fernald died of tuberculosis of the liver at Acton, ME, January 15, 1898, aged sixty-four years, ten months, and three days. Charles W. Gross, M.D., signed the death certificate.

Anna T. [(Tuxbury)] Fernald, a widow, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a North Tonawonda, NY, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included her children, Annie S. Fernald, a music teacher, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), and Horace W. Fernald, a traveling salesman, aged twenty-two years (b. ME). Anna T. Fernald rented their house at 191 Vandervourth Street. She was the mother of five children, of whom two were still living.

Horace W. Fernald, a wholesale iron co. manager, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), headed a Newton, MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Anadine H. [(Hoyt)] Fernald, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), his children, Leland H. Fernald, aged seven years (b. NY), Florice E. Fernald, aged three years (b. MA), Margaret L. Fernald, aged one year (b. MA), and Alison T. Fernald, weeks old (b. MA), his mother, Anna T. [(Tuxbury)] Fernald, aged seventy years (b. ME), Claudia F. Hoyt, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), and Delia Gerage, aged thirty years (b. Ireland). Horace W. Fernald rented their house at 347 Cabot Street. Anadine H. Frenald was the mother of four children, of whom four were still living. Anna T. Fernald was the mother of five children, of whom two were still living.

Anna B. (Tuxbury) Fernald, died in Bedford, MA, October 22, 1915.

Deaths. MRS. ANNA TUXBURY FERNALD. Anna Tuxbury Fernald, daughter of and Lucinda (Hill) Tuxbury, was born in Saco, Me. on Aug. 12, 1839. At twelve years of age she was converted and was a member of the Baptist church in Saco until after her graduation from New Hampton Institute. In 1863 she married Ebenezer N. Fernald of Lebanon, Me., and went to Rockford, Ill., where they taught for a year. In 1864 they became interested in the call for teachers for the Freedmen and were the first to report for duty at Chattanooga, Tenn. While in this work her husband received his call to the Christian ministry in the Free Baptist denomination where later he became a leader doubly efficient because of the constant loyalty and help of his wife. As minister’s wife she was intensely interested in both foreign and home missions, and India, China and America can all testify to the work of her heart and hands. She was the mother of three daughters, and two sons, of whom one daughter, Mrs. Annie F. Wentworth of Haven, Ct., and one son, Horace W. Fernald of Bedford, Mass., are living. She is survived by eight grandchildren. Some years after the death of her husband she and her children joined the Congregational denomination and at the time of her death she was a non-member of the Central Congregational Church of Newtonville, Mass. Since 1902 she lived with her son and was called home Oct. 22, 1915. Throughout her entire life was remarkable for her deep piety and Christian faith. Hers was a life of prayer, praise and service and her good works will continue to follow after her. H.W.F. (Congregationalist & Christian World, November 18, 1915). 

Rev. R.W. [E.W.] Churchill – 1898-1909

Edgar W. Churchill was born in Shapleigh, ME, December 15, 1858, son of Nathaniel and Abigail W. (Stevens) Churchill. (His elder brother, Roger W. Churchill, i.e., “R.W. Churchill” would also become a minister, although not at the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Church).

Abbie W. [(Stevens)] Churchill, keeping house, aged sixty years (b. ME), headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her sons, Roger W. Churchill, a lawyer, aged thirty-two years (b. ME), and Edgar W. Churchill, a farmer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME). Abbie W. Churchill was a divorcée.

Edgar W. Churchill graduated from the Cobb Divinity School at Bates College with its Class of 1892.

Class of 1892. Edgar Whiting Churchill, b. 15 Dec., 1858, Shapleigh, Me. Son of Nathaniel and Abbie (Stevens) Churchill. Pastor, Free Baptist Ch., Oakland, Me., 1893-95; Richmond, Me., 1895-99; Milton Mills, N.H., 1899-10; Bridgewater, Me., 1910-13; Milo, Me., 1913- (Bates College,1915).

Edgar W. Churchill married in Belmont, NH, June 14, 1892, Amy Weymouth Cushing, he of Oakland, ME, and she of Belmont, NH. He was a clergyman, aged thirty-three years, and she was a teacher, aged twenty-three years. Rev. J.B. Davis performed the ceremony. She was born in Cambridge, MA, July 7, 1868, daughter of Thomas R. and Arminda (Weymouth) Cushing.

Fairfield. Rev. E.W. Churchill preached his farewell sermon at the Free Baptist church Sunday and will move to Richmood sometime during the present week. Tbe people of the church regret very much to lose the work of Rev. Mr. Churchill, as he is a man who works continually for the best interests of the society and this community, and their best wishes go with him to his new field (Kennebec Journal (Augusta, ME), April 4, 1894).

Religious Summary. The Free Will Baptist church at Acton have given Rev. Edgar W. Churchill a call to become their pastor (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), January 19, 1898).

R.W. [E.W.] Churchill (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1899, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

Edgar W. Churchill, a clergyman, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed an Acton, ME, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eight years), Amy W. Churchill, aged thirty-one years (b. ME), and his daughter, Dorothy M. Churchill, aged three years (b. ME). Edgar M. Churchill rented their house. Amy W. Churchill was the mother of one child, if whom one was still living.

E.W. Churchill appeared in the Milton directories of 1901, 1904, 1905-06, and 1909, as the Milton Mills Baptist minister. R.W. [E.W.] Churchill (Milton Mills P.O.) appeared in the Maine Register of 1907, as the Acton F. Bap. minister.

Rev. Edward W. Churchill gave a sermon at the annual Maine Free Baptist Association on Thursday, September 27, 1906.

FREE BAPTISTS LAST SESSIONS. Closing Events in an Interesting and Profitable Annual Meeting. … At 11 o’clock Rev. E.W. Churchill of Milton Falls [Mills], N.H., delivered an able, scholarly and interesting sermon, taking his text from Ephesians, 3:19 – “And to know the love of Christ which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with the fullness of God” (Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), September 28, 1906).

Edgar W. Churchill, a Free Baptist Church pastor, aged fifty-one years (b. ME), headed a Bridgewater, ME, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of eighteen years), Amy W. Churchill, aged forty-one years (b. MA), and his daughter, Dorothy M. Churchill, aged thirteen years (b. ME). Edgar M. Churchill rented their house. Amy W. Churchill was the mother of one child, if whom one was still living.

Edgar W. Churchill, a United Baptist clergyman, aged sixty-one years (b. ME), headed a Phillips, ME, household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Amy W. Churchill, aged fifty-one years (b. MA), his daughter, Dorothy M. Churchill, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and his mother-in-law, Arminda Cushing, aged seventy-eight years (b. NH). Edgar M. Churchill rented their house on Sawyer Street.

MAINE. Rev. E.W. CHURCHILL of Phillips has accepted a call to the Free Baptist Church, Rochester, N.H. WT (The Baptist, November 27, 1920).

MAINE. REV. J.K. MILLER, Convention missionary pastor, has completed a successful series of meetings with the Rochester Church, Rev. E.W. Churchill, pastor. Mr. Miller now has engagements for evangelical work with churches at Milton Mills, Milton. and Rumney, which will require his attention until the middle of May (The Baptist, April 15, 1922).

Edgar W. Churchill died of valvular disease at Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NH, October 23, 1929, aged seventy years, ten months, and eight days. He had resided for in Rochester, NH, for nine years, i.e., since circa 1920, with his previous residence having been Phillips, ME.

REV. E.W. CHURCHILL DIES AT AGE OF 70. Had Held Several Pastorates In Northern New England. ROCHESTER, N.H., Oct 24 (AP). Rev. Edgar W. Churchill, 70, former pastor of True Memorial church here, died today after an illness of several months. He was graduated from Bates college in 1892 and was ordained the same year at Oakland, Me. Rev. Churchill held pastorates in Oakland, Fairfield, Richmond, Bridgewater, Marlow, Phillips, all in Maine, and in Milton Mills, N.H. He was secretary-treasurer of the Ministers association of Maine for 20 years, president of the Rochester Ministers association and past president of the New Durham Association of Baptist churches. A widow and daughter, Miss Dorothy M. Churchill of Shrewsbury, Mass., survive (Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, VT), October 25, 1929).

Amy Churchill, a widow, aged sixty-one years (b. MA), headed a Nashua, NH, household at the time of the Fifteenth (1930) Federal Census. Her household included her sister, Charlotte A. Cushing, a public-school teacher, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH). Amy Churchill rented their house at 5 Mt. Pleasant Street, for $35 per month. They had a radio set.

Amy W. Churchill, a widow, aged seventy-one years (b. MA), headed a Laconia, NH, household at the time of the Sixteenth (1940) Federal Census. her household included her lodger, Laura H. Williams, aged seventy years (b. ME). Amy W. Churchill rented their house at 124A Church Street, for $30 per month.

Amy W. (Cushing) Churchill died of broncho-pneumonia in the Laconia Hospital in Laconia, NH, October 8, 1941, aged seventy-three years, three months, and one day. Earl J. Grey, M.D., signed the death certificate. (Daughter Dorothy Churchill of Shrewsbury, MA, supplied the personal information).


Continued in Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1910-1962


References:

Amherst College. (1883). Obituary Record of Graduates. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=adqNz395hywC&pg=RA2-PA199

Burgess, Gideon A., & Ward, John T. (1889). Free Baptist CyclopaediaHistorical and Biographical: The Rise of the Freewill Baptist Connection and of Those General and Open Communion Baptists Which, Merging Together, Form One People, Their Doctrines, Polity, Publications, Schools and Missions, with Brief Biographies of Ministers and Others Identified with the Growth and Strength of the Denomination. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3GXiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA617

Carter, Nathan F. (1906). Native Ministry of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3KUeAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA714

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Milton Millwright Charles C. Hayes (1822-1893)

By Muriel Bristol | August 21, 2022

Charles Chesley Hayes was born in Milton, September 1, 1822, son of James Jr. and Apphia “Effie” (Card) Hayes.

(His parents had been married in Milton, January 28, 1817, by Levi Jones, justice-of-the-peace. NH Gov. William Plumer commissioned his father, James Hayes, Jr., as a lieutenant of the Seventh Company, Second Regiment of NH Militia, July 17, 1818. He was promoted to captain of the Sixth Company, Thirty-Ninth Regiment of NH Militia, September 4, 1822).

James Hayes headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [James Hayes], one female aged 50-59 years [Apphia (Card) Hayes], one male aged 15-19 years [Charles C. Hayes], one female aged 15-19 years [Sarah C. Hayes], and one male aged 10-14 years [Cyrus A. Hayes]. Three members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

Father James Hayes died in Milton, February 18, 1845, aged fifty-four years.

The Milton selectmen of 1849 were Jos. Mathes, C.C. Hayes, and Jos. Cook. Those of 1850 were Jos. Mathes, C.C. Hayes, and Asa M. Durrell.

Sister Mary J. Hayes died in Milton, April 6, 1850, aged seventeen years, eight months. Brother Cyrus A. Hayes died in Milton, April 24, 1850, aged twenty-one years, seven months.

Apphia Hayes, aged sixty-four years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Charles Hayes, a farmer, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), and Sally Hayes, aged nineteen years (b. NH). Charles Hayes had real estate valued at $900. Her household appeared in the enumeration between those of Comfort Laskey, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), and David M. Corson, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH).

Charles C. Hayes and John E. Goodwin received five-year appointments as Milton justice-of-the-peace, July 5, 1850.

Sister-in-law Mary E. Spinney died in Milton, September 8, 1850, aged twenty-one years, eleven months, and fifteen days.

Charles C. Hayes married in Somersworth, NH, November 26, 1851, Abigail Paul “Abby” Spinney, he of Milton and she of Somersworth, NH. Richard Russell, a Somersworth justice-of-the-peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Wakefield, NH, November 3, 1826, daughter of Parker F. and Mary E. (Dearborn) Spinney.

Son Eugene Augustine Hayes was born in Milton, November 24, 1854.

Charles C. Hayes was the Milton town moderator for fourteen years from about 1855. He was preceded in that office by Charles A. Varney (1834-1893), and succeeded by Charles Jones (Scales, 1914).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 26, 1855.

Son Eugene A. Hayes died in Milton, January 17, 1856, aged thirteen months, twenty-three days.

Our treasure is in heaven. – Eugene A. Hayes epitaph

Mother-in-law Mary E. (Dearborn) Spinney died in Milton, February 10, 1856, aged fifty years.

C.C. Hayes of Milton filed a report with the NH Board of Education, March 29, 1856. He was a member of Milton’s superintending school committee, who made forty-eight visits to local schools during the 1855-56 academic year, and had been paid $28.50 (NH Board of Education).

MILTON. The Committee are of opinion that we have far too many districts in town for the best interest of our schools. We believe that if the number of districts was reduced one third or one half even, that the benefit derived from our money would be increased in the same proportion. Many object to this reduction of districts because the children having farther to walk, will be unable to attend the schools regularly. We believe this to be no argument, from the fact that we find the per cent of absentees in our villages much larger than it is in the more sparsely settled districts; and that those scholars who live remote from the school-house are much the most punctual in their attendance at school. In many of our schools the past year, there has been a manifest want of good wholesome discipline; very many teachers who are well qualified in other respects are wholly incompetent to govern a school in a proper manner. Those teachers only should be employed who are thorough disciplinarians. We would call your attention to the importance of parents manifesting a greater interest in our schools. It is a duty devolving upon every parent to see that his children attend school regularly, that they are there in season, and that they conform to the reasonable regulations of the school. It is the duty of every parent to show both teacher and scholars by his frequent presence in the school-room, that he is deeply interested in the welfare of the school. Every parent should visit each term of the school at least twice. This would encourage the scholars in their efforts for improvement and stimulate the teacher to greater exertions in their behalf. – Charles C. Hayes, Committee (NH Board of Education, 1856).

Dr. Charles F. Elliott (1804-1876) of Somersworth, NH, who was Strafford County Commissioner of [Common] Schools, made his own report on Milton’s district or common schools.

MILTON – The schools in this town are improving. A new school-house for two schools has been erected at the Ponds within the last year, which does credit to the citizens of that village. At the Mills – the Branch – are houses and schools worthy [of] notice. If the school districts suffer no further division they will be fortunate (NH Board of Education, 1856).

C.C. Hayes of Milton filed a report with the NH Board of Education, March 25, 1857. He was a member of Milton’s superintending school committee, who made thirty-nine visits to local schools during the 1856-57 academic year, and had been paid $32.97 (NH Board of Education).

The Milton selectmen of 1857 were D. Wallingford, Jr., C.C. Hayes, and S.S. Wakeham.

Daughter Abbie Louisa Hayes was born in Milton, September 5, 1857.

The Milton selectmen of 1859 were C.C. Hayes, J.F. Hart, and C.H. Goodwin.

Daughter Mary Elizabeth Hayes was born in Milton, May 5, 1859.

Charles C. Hayes received a reappointment as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, June 19, 1860.

Chas. C. Hayes, a farmer, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Abba P. Hayes, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Abba L. Hayes, aged three years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, aged one year (b. NH). Chas. C. Hayes had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $300. His household immediately preceded in the enumeration that of [his mother,] Aphie Hayes, aged seventy-two years (b. NH). Her household included Sarah C. Hayes, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). Aphie Hayes had personal estate valued at $300.

Milton - 1871 (Detail) - Hayes, CC
Milton in 1871 (Detail). The “C.C. Hayes” farm off what is now Applebee Road, near its junction with Plummer’s Ridge Road (NH Route 125).

Charles C. Hayes, a millwright, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Abbie P. Hayes, keeping house, aged forty-three years (b. NH), Abbie L. Hayes, at school, aged twelve years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH). Chas. C. Hayes had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $250. He shared a two-family residence with the household of Apphia Hayes, keeping house, aged eighty-two years (b. NH). Their households appeared in the enumeration between those of Parker Spinney, aged sixty-five years (b. ME), and John P. Nute, a farmer, aged forty-four years (b. NH).

Milton sent Charles C. Hayes to Concord, NH, as its NH State Representative for the 1874-75 biennium. (Milton’s state representatives of 1874-75 were Charles Hayes (1822-1893) and George E. Simes (1832-1914)).

Father-in-law Parker F. Spinney died in Milton, August 1, 1874, aged seventy years, eleven months, and fifteen days.

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year appointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, July 2, 1875.

Mother [Apphia] “Effie”(Card) Hayes died of a brain hemorrhage in Milton, October 4, 1878, aged ninety-two years, twenty-three days.

The Milton selectmen of 1878-79 were Chas. C. Hayes, Asa A. Fox, and M.V.B. Cook. (They appeared belatedly as such in the Milton business directory of 1880).

C.C. Hayes appeared in the Milton business directories of 1880, 1881, 1882, 1884, 1887, and 1889, as a justice-of-the-peace).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, June 24, 1880.

Charles C. Hayes, a farmer & sets water wheels, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Abbie T. Hayes, keeping house, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), Abbie L. Hayes, at home, aged twenty-two years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, at home, aged twenty-one years (b. NH). His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Jonas S. Laskey, a farmer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and Geo. W. Fellows, connected with the press, aged forty years (b. NH).

(A young Ira W. Jones (1854-1946) appeared in this same 1880 census as being engaged in setting water wheels. Might they have been working together? (See Milton’s Hydraulic Engineer: I.W. Jones)).

Charles C. Hayes compiled a Milton historical sketch, including lists of its public officials, which was included in D. Hamilton Hurd’s History of Rockingham and Strafford Counties, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, as published in 1882. (Much of his information was reprinted in John Scales’ History of Strafford County, New Hampshire, and Representative Citizens, when it was published in 1914). (See for example Milton’s NH State Representatives – 1803-1902).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, May 26, 1885.

The Milton selectmen of 1888 were J.H. Avery, Chas. Hayes, and C.C. Hayes. (They appeared belatedly as such in the Milton business directory of 1889).

The Milton selectmen of 1889 were C.C. Hayes, Chas. Hayes, and C.A. Jones.

Milton sent Charles C. Hayes as a its delegate to the NH Constitutional Convention of January 1889. His mileage was calculated to be 176 miles. He was assigned to the Committee on the Bill of Rights and Executive Department.

The delegates of the Constitutional Convention assembled in the hall of the House of Representatives on Wednesday, January 2, 1889, at 11 o’clock A.M., and were called to order by John W. Morse of Bradford (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889). 

On Tuesday, January 8, 1889, delegate Hayes presented a petition from the Union Law and Order League of Wakefield, Brookfield, Milton, and Middleton. (Daniel S. Burley of the Burley & Usher Shoe Company was the leader of this league. New Hampshire was then operating under what was called “semi-prohibition” (see Milton Under “Semi-Prohibition” – 1855-02)).

Mr. Hayes of Milton presented a memorial of the Union Law and Order League, of Wakefield, Brookfield, Milton, and Middleton, praying for the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution prohibiting the manufacture or sale of all malt or distilled liquors. The memorial was laid on the table pending the appointment of the special committee to consider petitions on the same subject (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889).

On Wednesday, January 9, 1889, delegate Hayes reported his committee’s majority opinion that it would be inexpedient to pass an amendment limiting the terms of police court justices. The convention agreed with his committee.

Mr. Hayes, from the Committee on Bill of Rights and Executive Department, to which was referred the proposed amendment limiting the term of office of justices of police courts to a period of five years, reported the following resolution: Resolved, That it is inexpedient to adopt such amendment. The report was accepted and the resolution adopted (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889).

On Thursday, January 10, 1889, delegate Hayes proposed that a select committee be appointed to consider the question of female suffrage. (There was no female suffrage at this time, nor would there be for another thirty-one years).

Mr. Hayes of Milton offered the following resolution: Resolved, That a select committee of ten, one from each county, be appointed by the chair to take into consideration the subject of the suffrage of women. The resolution was adopted, and the president announced the following gentlemen as said committee: Messrs. [Charles C.] Hayes of Milton, [George F.] Merriam of Greenville, [Aaron L.] Mellows of Newmarket, [Oran E.] Randall of Chesterfield, [Frank M.] Beckford of Laconia, [Granville J.] Marshall of Unity, [Charles W.] Gray of Jackson, [Hazen D.] Smith of Plymouth, [Charles] Danforth of Concord, [Daniel E.] Cummings of Colebrook.

On Friday, January 11, 1889, Delegate Hayes’ proposed amendment regarding religious freedom was one of three similar proposals considered by the convention.

Mr. [Samuel D.] Felker of Rochester: I introduced the resolution to strike out the word “Protestant” from article 6 of our Bill of Rights. I did it, in the first instance, because I believed that the word “Protestant” is distasteful to a certain class of our citizens. They are entitled to as much consideration as we are. Suppose the word “Catholic” instead of “Protestant” was there, would it not be just as distasteful to us? I do not care which form the resolution takes; the one proposed by the gentleman from Hanover (Mr. [Edward R.] Ruggles) or the one proposed by the gentleman from Milton (Mr. Hayes). I am for religious freedom, even if it is a matter of sentiment, for sentiments are sometimes very dear to us. I have as much veneration for the works of the fathers as the gentleman from Dover (Mr. [James] Thurston). If he will look in the old Bill of Rights of Massachusetts, he will see somewhat similar language, which was thoroughly revised in 1833; but it would do no harm, if it were satisfactory to our Methodist brethren, to retain the old form stripped of its objectionable features. Ours is the last State in the Union that retains any such article in its Bill of Rights, and it seems to me that it should be changed so as to give everybody equality in matters of religion (NH Constitutional Convention, 1889).

After some debate an amendment proposed by the delegate from Hanover (Mr. Ruggles) was adopted and that amended alteration to the NH Bill of Rights was passed by the convention.

(NH constitutional conventions was the mechanism for constitutional change for many years. In more recent years, constitutional amendments have originated in the NH legislature rather than in a convention of delegates).

Charles C. Hayes received a five-year reappointment as a Strafford County justice-of-the-peace, May 21, 1890. He would not live to complete this final term.

C.C. Hayes appeared in the Milton business directory of 1892, as a justice-of-the-peace).

Charles C. Hayes died of Bright’s disease (and a carbuncle) in Milton, February 10, 1893, aged seventy years, five months, and ten days. Charles W. Gross, M.D., of Milton Mills signed the death certificate.

MILTON. The death of Mr. Charles Hayes which occurred last Friday removes from our midst one who will long be missed in public life as well as by many warm personal friends. He was an active, earnest and efficient member of the school board, a skilled surveyor, one of the trustees of the Nute High school and much respected by every one. He was connected with the Masonic fraternity and stood high in their circles. The funeral took place Tuesday, the school closing in memory of his labors with and for its interests, and teachers and pupils attended. Rev. Frank Haley officiated (Farmington News, February 17, 1893).

UNION. The late Charles C. Hayes, whose death was mentioned by your Milton correspondent last week, was a charter member of the above lodge and in the years 1875 and 1876 filled the master chair in the most acceptable manner. The lodge was instituted in June 1857, and of the thirteen persons who have been elected to the office of Worthy Master, Brother Hayes was the first to be “called from labor to reward.”
Farewell, dear brother, farewell; Thou has gone with Christ to dwell. Though we shall greet thee here no more, Yet we shall meet on the other shore (Farmington News, February 24, 1893).

Sister Sarah C. Hayes, a housekeeper in Haverhill, MA, died of a strangulated hernia in Milton, September 6, 1896, aged sixty-six years, two months, and nine days.

Brother-in-law Nathaniel D. Spinney died in Milton, April 7, 1900, aged sixty-five years.

Abby P. Hayes, aged seventy-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton (“Milton P.O.”) household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. Her household included Abby L. Hayes, aged forty-two years (b. NH), and Mary L. Hayes, aged forty-one years (b. NH). She owned their farm, free-and-clear. She was the mother of three children, of whom two were still living.

Brother Benjamin F. Hayes died of a strangulated hernia in Milton, October 8, 1902, aged eighty-five years, six months, and fifteen days. James J. Buckley, M.D., of Milton, signed the death certificate.

Daughter Mary E. Hayes died of a bowel obstruction, appendicitis, and ovaritis in Milton, March 3, 1904, aged forty-four years, nine months, and twenty-eight days. Charles W. Gross, M.D., of Milton Mills, signed the death certificate.

Abbie P. Hayes, a farmer, aged eighty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Abbie L. Hayes, aged fifty-two years (b. NH). Abbie P. Hayes owned their farm, free-and-clear. She was the mother of four children, of whom one was still living.

Abigail P. (Spinney) Hayes died of acute indigestion (followed by heart disease) in Milton, NH, April 10, 1913, aged eighty-six years, five months, and seven days. H.E. Anderson, M.D., of Milton Mills, signed the death certificate.

Abbie L. Hayes, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Fourteenth (1920) Federal Census. Abbie L. Hayes owned her farm, free-and-clear.

Daughter Abbie L. Hayes died of Addison’s disease on Branch Road in Milton, June 17, 1927, aged sixty-nine years, nine months, and twelve days. H.E. Anderson, M.D., of Milton Mills, signed the death certificate.


References:

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Abbie Louisa Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130390001/abbie-louisa-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Abigail Paul “Abbie” Spinney Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130388134/abigail-paul-hayes

Find a Grave. (2012, October 7). Benjamin F. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/98444912/benjamin-f-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Charles Chesley Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130387666/charles-chesley-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Cyrus Augustus Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130383936/cyrus-augustus-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Eugene Augustine Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130389206/eugene-augustine-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Cpt. James Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336842/james-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Mary A. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237337115/mary-adaline-hayes

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Mary D. Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336998/mary-d-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130389688/mary-elizabeth-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Mary Jane Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130383602/mary-jane-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Sarah Card Hayes. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130384568/sarah-card-hayes

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Mary E. Dearborn Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130405538/mary-e-spinney

Find a Grave. (2022, March 7). Mary E. Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/237336379/mary-e-spinney

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Nathaniel D. Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130382579/nathaniel-d-spinney

Find a Grave. (2014, May 26). Parker Foster Spinney. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130406637/parker-foster-spinney

NH Board of Education. (1856). Annual Report Upon the Common Schools of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qYQ-AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA3-PR60

NH Constitutional Convention. (1889). Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the State of New Hampshire, January, 1889. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Vw0MAAAAMAAJ

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA508

Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854

By Muriel Bristol | August 14, 2022

FIRST FREE BAPTIST CHURCH. The First Free Baptist Church was reorganized by Rev. Gershom Lord, in 1802, and consisted of eight members. Samuel Runnells and Bart. Miller were first deacons, and Elder Lord was clerk. Rev. Gershom Lord was the first preacher, and was succeeded by Humphrey Goodwin, who was ordained in 1807, and continued to preach until his removal to Hollis in 1814. Elder David Blaisdell supplied from 1815 to 1830. A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the [Acton] town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840. Theodore Stevens became pastor in 1834, left in 1836, returned in 1839, and was succeeded, in 1843, by Elder J. Fullerby; Horace Stanton, in 1847; and subsequently by Z. Jordan, Wm. Hurlin, Seth Perkins, Aaron Ayer, Dexter Waterman, James Potter; Rev. Mr. McLain, in 1872; Hosea Quimby, 1875; and at Mr. Quimby’s death, in October 1878, by Rev. B.F. Sherwood, who remained until about 1880, when Rev. H.P. Mansur came. He remained until about 1885. The following have been pastors since that time: Revs. G.A. Anderson, 1887; C.E. Hurd, 1888-93; E.W. Fernald, 1894-7; R.W. Churchill, 1898- (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

The Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist ministers described from this period were: Gershom Lord, Humphrey Goodwin, David Blaisdell, Theodore Stevens, Joseph F. Fullonton, Horace Stanton, Zachariah Jordan, Benjamin F. Hubbard, and William Hurlin (his first and second pastorates).

Rev. Gershom Lord – 1802-07

Gershom Lord was born in Lebanon, ME, January 18, 1752, son of Elder Ebenezer and Martha (Emery) Lord.

Gershom Lord, son of Elder Ebenezer Lord, was born in 1752, and died in 1817, in Lebanon; he married Esther Hanson (Cutter, 1926).

Gershom Lord married in Dover, NH, September 30, 1776, Esther Hanson, both of Dover, NH. Rev. Jeremy Belknap performed the ceremony. (Rev. Jeremy Belknap, D.D, was pastor of Dover’s First (Congregational) Church). She was born circa 1757.

Gershom Lord was one of some hundred inhabitants of Dover, NH, and vicinity that petitioned, August 30, 1786, for a lottery to finance refurbishing the bridge at the [Dover] Falls (Hammond, 1882).

State of New Hampshire } AN ACT TO ENABLE GERSHOM LORD TO FILE A COMPLAINT AT THE NEXT SUPERIOR COURT OF JUDICATURE FOR THE COUNTY OF STRAFFORD
[Passed February 7, 1788. Not found in Original Acts; recorded Acts, vol. 5, p. 403].
Whereas Gershom Lord of Dover in the County of Strafford and said State, Potter, hath Petitioned the General Court setting forth that at the inferior Court common pleas holden at Dover in and for said County on the third Tuesday of November AD., 1786, he recovered Judgment against Jona Simonds of said Dover, sadler, for the sum of thirty-six pounds and one penny debt or damage and one pound six shillings and ten pence cost of Suit; from which Judgment the said Simonds appealed to the then next Superior Court of Judicature but failed to enter his said appeal; And that the said Gershom Lord, prevented by sickness, did not file a complaint as the Law directs by means of which the said Lord hath lost the benefit of the said Judgment. Wherefore he prayed that he might be empowered to file a complaint at the next Superior Court for said County if the said Simonds should not then enter his said appeal. Which appearing reasonable.
Therefore be it enacted by the Senate and house of Representatives in General Court convened that the said Gershom Lord be and he hereby is empowered to file a complaint for affirmation of the said Judgment with Interest and cost at the next Superior Court of Judicature to be holden at said Dover in and for said County of Strafford on the third Tuesday of April AD .,1788, if the said Jonathan Simonds should not then enter and prosecute his said appeal as the law in other cases directs which he is hereby enabled to do. And the said Superior Court of Judicature are hereby authourized to take cognizance thereof and render Judgment thereon in the same manner as in other cases of appeal to the said Court (Metcalf, 1916).

Gershom Lord headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], one female [Esther (Hanson) Lord], three males aged under-16 years.

Lord, Rev. Gershom, brother of Rev.’s Tosier and Daniel, was ordained along with John Blaisdell by a council from the New Durham Q.M. convened with the Lebanon church, Me., Nov. 21, 1799. “He appeared to be a serious young man; he had an extraordinary gift in speaking, and was much admired by many.” But a lawsuit between him and the clergyman of the place having been decided against him, he soon moved to eastern Maine (Burgess, 1889).

A council from the New Durham Quarterly Meeting, N.H., convened with the Lebanon church, November 21st [1799], and ordained John BLAISDELL and GERSHOM LORD (Steward, 1862). 

Gershom Lord of Lebanon, ME, was “accepted” at the monthly meeting of the Dover Friends, i.e., Quakers, in 1801. A distinction was made between those “received” and those “accepted” (Tibbetts, 1909). As Rev. Lord was and remained a Free-Will Baptist, one might suppose that new or relocating Friends were “received,” while visiting attendees, such as a Baptist minister, were “accepted.”

Gershom Lord headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 45-plus years [Esther (Hanson) Lord], two females aged 16-25 years [Mary Lord and Esther Lord], two females aged 10-15 years [Abigail Lord and Hannah Lord], and one male aged under-10 years [Gershom Lord, Jr.].

Gershom Lord died in Lebanon, ME, March 5, 1817, aged sixty-five years, one month. Esther (Hanson) Lord died in Lebanon, ME, March 30, 1840.

Humphrey Goodwin – 1807-1814

Humphrey Goodwin was born in Hollis, ME, in January 1774, son of Timothy and Mehitable Goodwin.

Humphrey Goodwin married in Biddeford, ME, circa 1795, Hannah Long. She was born in Andover, MA, October 1, 1778, daughter of Josiah and Mary “Molly” (Carlton) Long.

Humphrey Goodwin headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census, His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 10-15 years, and two males aged under-10 years [Timothy Goodwin].

Goodwin, Humphrey - 1802Humphrey Goodwin signed the Rochester Division petition of May 28, 1802. (See Rochester Division Petition – May 1802).

Humphrey Goodwin was ordained in 1807.

Eldr Humpy Goodwin headed a Shapleigh, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 10-15 years [Timothy Goodwin], three males aged under-10 years [Benjamin L. Goodwin, John R. Goodwin, and Josiah L. Goodwin], and two females aged under-10 years [Hannah Goodwin and Harriet Goodwin].

The first Freewill Baptist Church was organized in 1810, in Rodolphus Young’s house, on “Grammar Street.” There were fourteen (or fifteen) members, one of whom, William Tripp, became a Methodist minister, and died in Ripley, Maine. Humphrey Goodwin, who had been ordained as an elder, three years before, became their pastor. There are no records of this church, but there are strong evidences of its organization, possibly as a branch of the Freewill Baptist Church of Shapleigh (Acton). Its existence was not long continued, probably because when Elder Goodwin removed to Hollis from Acton, in 1814, he left them destitute of a leader, and was unable to return at stated intervals (Emery, 1901).

The First Free-Will Baptist Society of Hollis was formed at a meeting held March 21, 1815. John Smith, son Elisha Smith, was chosen Moderator; Benjamin Warren, Clerk; and Elder Humphrey Goodwin, Daniel Smith (3d), and Nathaniel Kimball, Committee to attend to the legal requirements. Elder Humphrey Goodwin was chosen. There were 22 members including Canell Tarbox, James Smith, Joseph Linscott, Amos Mason, Moses Goodwin, Nathaniel Kimball, and others (Clayton, 1880).

FREEWILL BAPTIST [OF HOLLIS]. First society formed March 21, 1815, with 22 members. House of Worship erected 1834-5. Elder Humphrey Goodwin pastor until 1838. Succeeding pastors, Revs. Lewis T. Witham, Perkins Smith, Edwin Brown and others (Mitchell, et al., 1905). 

Humphrey Goodwin headed a Hollis, NH, household at the time of the Fourth (1820) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 26-44 years, one male aged 16-25 years [Josiah L. Goodwin], one male aged 10-15 years [Timoty Goodwin], one female aged 10-15 years, and one male aged under-10 years. Three members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

Son Rev. Josiah L. Goodwin, son of Elder Humphrey and Hannah Goodwin of Hollis, ME, died in Rochester, MA, September 4, 1828, “in the first year of his ministry.”

Humphrey Goodwin headed a Hollis, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Hannah (Long) Goodwin], one male aged 20-29 years, two females aged 20-29 years, one male aged 10-14 years, and three females aged under-5 years.

Elder Humphrey Goodwin died in Hollis, NH, October 3, 1837, aged sixty-three years, ten months. Hannah (Long) Goodwin died in Hollis, NH, December 1, 1846.

Elder David Blaisdell – 1815-1833

David Blaisdell was born in Lebanon, ME, July 28, 1777, son of Ephraim and Hannah (Burrows) Blaisdell.

David Blaisdell married in Lebanon, ME, March 22, 1799, Sarah “Sally” Blaisdell. She was born in Lebanon, ME, January 29, 1782, daughter of Rev. John and Abigail (LeGro) Blaisdell.

David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-25 years [himself], one female aged 16-25 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell] and one male aged under-10 years.

Dean David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], one male aged 10-15 years, three males aged under-10 years, and one female aged under-10 years.

In 1815, when a powerful revival occurred in Lebanon and Acton, “Elder David Blaisdell was invited into Sanford from the place, and many were there converted, and a branch of the Lebanon church was there constituted.” Elder Blaisdell and his brother, Edward, came as evangelists and held meetings in a school-house. According to Rev. C.E. Blake, the brothers Blaisdell came into town in 1817, and organized a branch church of fifteen members. A certificate filed with the town clerk, on September 3, 1817, on behalf of persons desirous of avoiding payment of the legal ministerial tax for the support of a Congregational minister, shows that on that date. Francis Pugsley, Elias Littlefield, Solomon Littlefield, and Theodore Emery (clerk), of Sanford, Benjamin Webber and Edward Standley, of Shapleigh, and James Ridley and John Beedle of Alfred, were members “of the religious society in sd town of Sanford called by the name of the first freewill Baptist Church and Society in sd town of Sanford” (Emery, 1901).

ACTON. … The first Free-will Baptist church was formed in 1801, by Gershom Lord, – its first preacher. In 1818, a house of worship was erected in the west part of the town, near Milton Mills near where their house of worship now stands. A second society, called the Union Society of Acton, was formed in 1840, and a house built the same year at the south part of the town (Varney, 1881). 

A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Elder Davis Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fourth (1820) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], one male aged 16-25 years, one male aged 10-15 years, one female aged 10-15 years, two males aged under-10 years, and one female aged under-10 years.

Elder David Blaisdell ministered to the church from 1829 to 1833; at first one-fourth of the time, and later, one-eighth. During his ministry, meetings were held at the house of Elias Littlefield, and a school-house at Springvale (Emery, 1901).

David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 50-59 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], two males aged 15-19 years, on female aged 15-19 years, one female aged 10-14 years, and two males aged 5-9 years.

David Blaisdell headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], one female aged 60-69 years [Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell], one female aged 20-29 years, two males aged 15-19 years, and one male aged 5-9 years. Two members of his household were engaged in Agriculture.

Religious Intelligence. Milton Mills, N.H. A number has been hopefully converted to God and are rejoicing in his love (Free-Will Baptist Quarterly Magazine, March 1841).

Rev. David Blaisdell died in Lebanon, ME, July 25, 1842, aged sixty-five years, eleven months, and twenty-eight years.

Moses E. Varney, a carpenter, aged forty years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sarah [(Blaisdell)] Varney, aged forty years (b. ME), Sarah M. Varney, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Isaac Varney (b. ME), aged eleven years (b. ME), George Varney, aged three years (b. ME), Mary Varney, aged five months (b. ME), and Sarah [(Blaisdell)] Blaisdell, aged eighty years (b. ME). Moses E. Varney had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $350.

Sarah (Blaisdell) Blaisdell died in Lebanon, ME, September 3, 1868.

Theodore Stevens – 1834-1836, 1839-1843

Theodore Stevens was born in Limington, Me., October 11, 1812, son of Theodore and Mary (Boyd) Stevens.

Rev. Theodore Stevens died at his home in Saco, Me., Oct. 21, 1880. He was a younger brother of Rev’s James and John Stevens, and was born in Limington, Me., Oct. 11, 1812. He was converted at the age of nineteen, and began to preach when about twenty-one years of age, and in 1835 was ordained in Limington. He first settled in Lebanon, and preached half of the time in Acton, where he married Miss Susan Brackett, who survived him. In 1838 he moved to Great Falls, N.H., but returned to Acton in one year. After three years he settled in Springvale, Me., and was there four years, when he moved to his native town. He never entirely recovered from the arduous toil of these years. In 1847-48 he made a strenuous effort to restore the Saco church to new life. He returned home and for years he could neither preach nor labor. When strength began to return, he supplied at Limerick, Hollis and other places and preached a year and a half at Springvale, when he was forced to retire again. After three years on a farm in Somersworth, N.H., his health improved so that in 1860 he became pastor of the North Berwick church, Maine. After preaching in Lebanon six years he moved to Saco, where he lived the rest is life. During this time, he supplied at Carver’s Harbor a season, two years at Doughty’s Falls, two years at Cape Elizabeth, during which time their house of worship was repaired, and two years at Kennebunk Port. He was a member of the executive committee of the Foreign Mission Society from 1857 to his resignation in 1875, and a member board of corporators of the Printing Establishment from 1847 till his death. With unswerving integrity and a fearless fidelity to convictions he united a tender heart and deep concern for the welfare of men (Burgess & Ward, 1889).

REVIVAL INTELLIGENCE. We design in each number to give a summary of revival intelligence, ordinations, dedication of meeting houses, & c. The following summary embraces the four months ending Aug 31, 1839. … Br. Theodore Stevens of Acton, Me., has baptized 28 in a recent revival in the church in that place (Freewill Baptist Quarterly Magazine, June 1839).

The Baptists of Milton Mills donated $9.00 and those of Acton, ME, donated $4.75 for missionary work in May-June 1839 (Baptist Missionary Magazine, July 1839).

Religious Intelligence. Milton Mills, N.H. A number has been hopefully converted to God and are rejoicing in his love (Freewill Baptist Connection, 1839). 

A house of worship was built in 1818, in the west part of the town near Milton Mills, and replaced by a new one on the same ground, in 1840 (Mitchell-Cony, 1908).

Theodore Stevens headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 20-29 years, one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged under-5 years, and one female aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in the Learned Professions. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Ebenezer Osgood and James Berry.

Rev. Theodore Stevens was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Joseph Fullonton, Zachariah Jordan, and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Theodore Stevens, Junr, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Limington, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Susan B. [(Brackett)] Stevens, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Mary A. Stevens, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Jacob B. Stevens, aged eleven years (b. ME), Benjamin F. Stevens, aged ten years (b. ME), Theodore Stevens, 3d, aged eight years (b. ME), Newell F. Stevens, aged eight years (b. ME), Eunice V. Stevens, aged seven years (b. ME), Milton H. Stevens, aged four years (b. ME), and John Q.A. Stevens, aged two years (b. ME). They shared a two-family residence with the household of his father, Theodore Stevens, a farmer, aged seventy-seven years (b. ME). (It was the elder Theodore Stevens that owned the farm, which was valued at $1,300).

Theodore Stevens was the pastor at the Free-Will Baptist church at Doughty’s Falls in [North] Berwick, ME, in the years 1858-60 (Clayton, 1880).

Rev. Theodore Stevens of North Berwick, ME, offered a prayer at the funeral of Rev. Elizas Hutchins of Dover, NH, in September 1859. He was also one of the eight ministers that served as pallbearers (FWB Printing Estab., 1860).

Theodore Stevens, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Somersworth, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Census. His household included Susan E. [(Brackett)] Stevens, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), Eunice B. Stevens, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Milton H. Stevens, aged fifteen years (b. ME), John Q. Stevens, aged twelve years (b. ME), Samuel R. Stevens, aged nine years (b. ME), Susan C. Stevens, aged seven years (b. ME), Charles E. Stevens, aged six years (b. ME), Arabella Stevens, aged four years (b. ME), and Hannah F. Stevens, aged one year (b. NH). Theodore Stevens had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $450.

Theodore Stevens was the first pastor at the new Free-Will Baptist church building at Beech Ridge in [North] Berwick, ME, in 1860 (Clayton, 1880).

Thedore Stevens, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Susan [(Brackett)] Stevens, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. ME), Mary A. [(Stevens)] Hasty, aged thirty-three years (b. ME), Newell T. Stevens, a farm laborer, aged twenty years (b. ME), Clara Stevens, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Charles Stevens, at school, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Belle Stevens, at school, aged fourteen years (b. ME), Fanny Stevens, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), Frank L. Hasty, at school, aged nine years (b. ME), and James E. Hasty, aged four years (b. ME). Thedore Stevens had real estate valued at $3,250 and personal estate valued at $700.

Theodore Stevens was the pastor at the Free-Will Baptist church at Doughty’s Falls in [North] Berwick, ME, in the years 1871-72 (Clayton, 1880).

Thedore Stevens, a Free Baptist minister, aged sixty-eight years (b. ME), headed a Saco, ME, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Susan [(Brackett)] Stevens, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and his children, Chas. Stevens, a farmer, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), and Fanny Stevens, a printer, aged twenty-one years (b. ME). His household was on Ferry Road.

Rev. Theodore Stevens died at his home in Saco, Me., October 21, 1880, aged sixty-eight years.

MAINE PERSONAL AND POLITICAL. Elder Theodore Stevens of Saco was taken with apoplexy on the train from Boston to Saco Monday. He is improving (Lewiston Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME), October 21, 1880).

MINISTERIAL OBITUARY RECORD. REV. THEODORE STEVENS died in Saco, Me., Oct. 21, 1880, aged 68 (FW Baptist Register, 1882). 

Susan (Brackett) Stevens died in Saco, ME, August 13, 1898.

Elder J. Fullerby [Fullonton]- 1843-1847

Joseph F. Fullonton was born in Raymond, NH, January 31, 1808, son of Deacon Jeremiah H. and Hannah (Dudley) Fullonton.

Joseph Fullonton married in North Hampton, February 26, 1835, Abigail Dow Robinson. She was born in North Hampton, April 9, 1813.

Sources identify him – Joseph Fullonton – as having been the acting pastor of the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church between 1843 and 1847. (The “J. Fullerby” of the Mitchell-Cony directory was some sort of transcription error). While he was the pastor there, he wrote a History of Acton, Maine, which was published in 1847.

Joseph Fullonton, Free Baptist, son of Dea. Jeremiah and Hannah (Dudley) Fullonton, was born Jan. 31, 1808. Preparatory studies at Pembroke and Hampton Academies, and Deerfield Parade High School. Licensed to preach by the New Durham Quarterly Meeting, at Barrington, May 21, 1834. Ordained pastor Danville, Feb. 16, 1837-43. Acting pastor, Acton, Me., 1843-7. Left the ministry on account of failing voice. Editor, The Granite Pillar, a temperance paper, Exeter, 1843-5; Myrtle, a Sunday School paper, Dover, 1847 54. Farmer, Raymond, occasionally supplying there and at Danville, 1847-80. Clerk of the Rockingham Quarterly Meeting 33 years. Died, Raymond, Oct. 27, 1880. Married Abigail D. Robinson of New Hampton, 1834. Publications – (1) History of Acton Me, 1847. (2) History of Raymond, 1875 (Carter, 1906).

Rev. Fullonton summarized his own career in his History of Raymond, N.H., thus:

It has been seen that the author of this History [of Raymond, N.H.,] came up in this church. An Autobiography is not to be written, but a few items may be put down. The Psalmist said, “I am as a wonder unto many.” We are a wonder to none but ourselves. Thirsting for knowledge, an Academy was attended part of three terms. Engaged in teaching; poorly qualified; studied and taught, taught and studied, carrying books on the road into fields and to bed to study. Talked with the learned for improvement, studied the trees, plants, flowers, winds, clouds and stars. Continued thus, teaching and studying much for 25 years. Engaged in the ministry; no chance for Theological training in the denomination of our choice then, so studied as best we could. Ordained at Danville, Feb. 16, 1837, continued there six years, then held a pastorate in Acton, Me., four years. Lost all voice for public speaking, and came here in Jan. 1847 (Fullonton, 1875).

Fullonton, Rev. Joseph - CarterRev. Joseph Fullonton was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Zachariah Jordan, Theodore Stevens, and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Joseph Fullington, a Free Will Baptist clergyman, aged forty-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Abagail Fullington, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), Susan Fullington, aged fifteen years (b. ME), and Sarah Fullington, aged twelve years (b. ME).

Rev. Joseph Fullonton succeeded Rev. Tobias Foss the pastorate of the Free-Will Baptist church in Raymond, NH, in or around September 1853.

Mr. Foss left in September 1853. Rev. Joseph [Fullonton] succeeded as stated supply and continued nineteen years. In 1858 good revival brought an addition of twelve. Rev. John Fullonton, T. Robie, and Rev. Mr. Fullenten became ministers while members of this church and later J. Woodbury Scribner (Hazlett). 

Joseph Fullonton, an F.W.B. preacher, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Abigail Fullonton, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), and Sarah A. Fullonton, aged twenty-two years (b. NH). Joseph Fullonton had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $1,000.

Rev. Joseph Fullonton of Raymond, NH, published a paper or sermon entitled Government of God in July 1862 (FWB Printing Establishment, 1862).

Joseph Fullerton, a clergyman, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond (“West Epping P.O.”), NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Abigail Fullerton, keeping house, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), Sarah A. Fullerton, a school teacher, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and Charles Healey, a farm laborer, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). Joseph Fullonton had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $2,000.

John [i.e., Joseph] Fullonton, a retired minister, aged seventy-two years (b. NH), headed a Raymond, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Abbigale Fullonton, keeping house, aged sixty-seven years (b. NH), Cyrus M. Roberts, works on railroad, aged forty-one years (b. NH), [Roberts’ wife,] Sarah A. [(Fullonton)] Roberts, keeping house, aged forty-one years (b. NH), and [Roberts’ son,] Frank F. Roberts, aged five years (b. NH).

Joseph F. Fullonton died of septicemia in Raymond, NH, October 27, 1880, aged seventy-two years. True M. Gould, M.D., signed the death certificate.

MINISTERIAL OBITUARY RECORD. REV. JOSEPH FULLONTON died in Raymond, N.H., Oct. 27, 1880, aged 72 (FW Baptist Register, 1882).

Abigail D. (Robinson) Fullonton died of bronchitis in Raymond, NH, April 25, 1892, aged seventy-five years, and sixteen days. A.W. Mitchell signed the death certificate.

Horace Stanton – 1847

[Horace Stanton appears in both this Mitchell-Cony list of Acton-Milton Mills ministers and – perhaps in error – in another: Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1843-50].

Horace Stanton was born in Lebanon, ME, August 27, 1818, son of James and Sabra (Wentworth) Stanton.

The Farmington, NH, Baptist Elders voted to ordain Brother Horace Stanton [in August 1846].

Tuesday, Aug. 25 — This morning between day and Sunrise we heard and felt the Shock of an Earthquake while at Elder [Edward] Blasdell’s, the only one I have been sensible of hearing for many years. It seemed to pass from South to North, and to be mostly to the west of us. We have since learned it was verry heavey in the central part of New-Hampshire and continued Some two minutes. Went to the New-Durham Q.M. [Quarterly Meeting] at LeGrow’s Corner. I was chosen moderator of the conferance, which will detain me from my journey longer than I intended. We passed through our business rapidly, and in the Elders conferance voted to ordain Br. Horace Stanton (NEHGS, 1998).

Rev. Horace Stanton died in Lebanon, ME, January 28, 1847.

Z. Jordan – 1848-49

Zachariah Jordan was born in Raymond, ME, July 2, 1787, son of Samuel and Sarah (Jackson) Jordan.

It is said of Rev. Zachariah Jordan, the second pastor [of the Second Free Baptist Church of Raymond, ME], that he made a preaching tour of ten weeks, speaking nearly every day, and as a reward for his labor received besides his board, a cotton handkerchief and the munificent sum of twelve and one-half cents. He was born July 2, 1787, was ordained June 10, 1818, and died at Limerick, Me., May 27, 1864, being nearly 87 [77] years of age (Portland Press Herald, November 13, 1894).

The West Falmouth [ME] Church dates from May 6, 1829 when a group met at the Poplar Ridge schoolhouse and termed the church organization. Elders Zachariah Jordan and Hubbard Chandler were present, the former delivering the sermon. Meetings were held in homes and school-houses until through the efforts of Elder Charles Bean the present church building was erected and dedicated. The Rev J.M. Lowdon, a Portland minister preached, the dedication sermon (Portland Evening Express, October 6, 1939).

Zachariah Jordan married (1st) in New Gloucester, ME, May 20, 1832, Esther Merrill, he of Raymond, ME, and she of New Gloucester, ME. Esther (Merrill) Jordan died of cholera morbus in South Berwick, ME, July 3, 1838, aged forty-three years.

Zachariah Jordan married (2nd), April 22, 1840, Sabrina Page. She was born in Parsonsfield, ME, in 1811, daughter of Dudley and Elizabeth (Weeks) Page.

Zachariah Jordan headed a Parsonsfield, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 50-59 years [himself], and one female aged 20-29 years [Sabrina (Page) Jordan]. One member of his household was engaged in the Learned Professions.

Rev. Zachariah Jordan was one of many Free-Will Baptist ministers that signed an anti-slavery declaration in 1848. It was published in the Morning Star and [Boston] Liberator newspapers (Liberator, March 24, 1848). Revs. Aaron Ayer, Joseph Fullonton, Theodore Stevens, Jr., and Dexter Waterman signed also.

Zachariah Jordon, a trader, aged sixty-three years (b. ME), headed a Biddeford, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sabrina P. Jordon, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), Merill P. Jordon, aged seven years (b. ME), and John Knox, aged twenty years (b. ME). Zachariah Jordon had real estate valued at $900.

Zachariah Jordan, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged seventy-one years (b. ME), headed a Limerick, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Sabrina Jordan, aged forty-seven years (b. ME), Merrill R. Jordan, a clerk in store, aged seventeen years (b. ME).

Sabrina (Page) Jordan died in Limerick, ME, April 5, 1864, aged fifty-two years. Zachariah Jordan died in Limerick, ME, May 27, 1864, aged seventy-six years.

Benjamin F. Hubbard – 1850-1851?

The Mitchell-Cony list of Acton & Milton Mills Baptist Ministers has a gap between the pastorate of Rev. Zachariah Jordan, which concluded in 1849, and the first pastorate of Rev. William Hurlin, which did not begin until December 1852. However, a Baptist clergyman named Benjamin F. Hubbard, appeared in the Seventh (1850) Federal Census as residing in Milton Mills during that time. (The Acton-Milton Mills parsonage was situated in Milton Mills). He might possibly have been the Baptist minister whose pastorate should perhaps bridge the gap.

Benjamin F. Hubbard was born in Maine, circa 1821.

Rev. B.F. Hubbard was pastor at Sanford, ME, in at least the years 1847-49. Visiting Rev. John Peacock remembered Hubbard and his ordination there:

During these three years that I labored with them, I attended several meetings out of the place. One was at Mount Hope in Sanford, which was considerably blessed to that little church and to several of the impenitent. It continued nearly two weeks in February, 1847. Here the Rev. B.F. HUBBARD was laboring, and was ordained pastor of the church, March 31, 1847. I was called by the council to preach on the occasion (Peacock, 1851).

A discussion was to take place between the Rev. E.H. Lake (Universalist,) and Rev. B.F. Hubbard (Baptist,) at Sanford, Me., last Friday. Question: “Do the Scriptures teach the doctrine of endless punishment, or the final holiness and happiness of all mankind?” (Portland Press Herald (Portland, ME), February 19, 1849).

Benjamin Hubbard, a Baptist clergyman, aged thirty years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Betsy F. Hubbard, aged thirty-four years (b. ME). They were enumerated on the same page as Gilman Jewett, postmaster [of Milton Mills], aged seventy-three years (b. NH).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard succeeded Rev. William H. Copeland as pastor of the Baptist church in Sanford, ME, in 1851-52.

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. Rev. B.F. Hubbard, of Milton, N.H., has become pastor of the First Baptist church, Sanford, Me. (Bigelow, 1851).

Rev. William H. Copeland began to labor among the people in the summer of 1848 and continued his service until the spring of 1850. He was followed the next year by Rev. B.F. Hubbard who preached one year. Rev. Thomas Jameson supplied the pulpit two years (Emery, 1901).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard of Lebanon, ME, was clerk of the Free-Will Baptist York Association in 1852. Its post office address, i.e., his post office address, was Sanford, ME (Burrows, 1852).

Frederic A. Wood married in Lebanon, ME, January 19, 1853, Miss Ruth Libby. Rev. B.F. Hubbard performed the ceremony.

Rev. B.F. Hubbard was clerk of the Free-Will Baptist York Association in 1857. Its post office address, i.e., his post office address, was Lebanon, ME. The York Association comprised thirteen churches, nine ministers, had baptized fourteen converts, making for a total of eight hundred seventy-four congregants (American Baptist Publication Society, 1857).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard was clerk of the Free-Will Baptist York Association in 1860. Its post office address, i.e., his post office address, was Lebanon, ME (Clark & Meeker, 1860).

Benjamin F. Hubbard, Baptist clergy, aged thirty-seven years (b. ME), headed a North Berwick, ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Elisabeth Hubbard, aged forty-one years (b. ME). He had real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $150.

Rev. B.F. Hubbard and Rev. James Ferguson were employed as supply preachers by the Baptist church in Springvale, ME, for a time beginning in the summer of 1862.

In August, 1861, W.T. Emerson, a licentiate of the Baptist Church, Saco, accepted a call to preach one year, and in October was ordained to the ministry. The following summer he asked for his dismission, and enlisted in the army. Rev. B.F. Hubbard and Rev. James Ferguson, of Alfred, were his successors in the pulpit supply (Emery, 1901).

Benjamin F. Hubbard, a minister, aged forty-one years (b. ME) registered for the Civil War military draft in Shapleigh, ME, in May or June 1863. He was assessed $1 in US Excise Tax for his carriage in Shapleigh, ME, in May 1865.

Benjamin F. Hubbard appeared in the NH Business Directory of 1868, as proprietor of a Milton Mills country store. (The other Milton Mills country store proprietors were Asa Fox & Son, Bray U. Simes, and John U. Simes).

Rev. B.F. Hubbard died, probably in Milton, September 10, 1870, aged forty-eight years, one month, and twenty-nine years.

Elizabeth Hubbard, keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. ME), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census.

Wm. Hurlin – 1853-1854 and 1856-1858

William Hurlin, Jr., was born in Bethnal Green, London, England, 1814, son of William and Elizabeth (Evans) Hurlin.

William Hurlin married in St. Matthew’s Church, Bethnal Green, London, England, December 25, 1836, Harriet Brown, both of St. Matthew’s Parish. George Parnet and Ann Berkell signed as witnesses.

Rev. William Hurlin was born in London, Eng., July 31, 1814. From his early childhood he was a great reader of history, biography, natural history, voyages and travels, science, religious magazines, etc. He was converted in early life and preached his first sermon in March, 1835, and for five years was a gratuitous lay preacher in London and vicinity. In April, 1840, he became a London city missionary and continued until May 31, 1849. Then on account of ill health he came to this country with his wife and five children, and was pastor of Baptist churches in New England until October, 1878, when he was elected secretary of the New Hampshire Baptist Convention and held that office until October, 1900, twenty-two years. He still preaches occasionally. He married, December 25, 1836, Miss. Harriet Brown, who died December 30, 1905, having commenced the seventieth year of married life. For many years he has resided in Antrim, N.H. – Editor (Granite State Magazine, 1906).

William Hurlin immigrated to New York, NY, arriving there, August 3, 1849. He took up a pastorate in Danville, VT.

William Harlen, an F.W.B. clergyman, aged thirty-six years (b. England), headed a Danville, VT, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Harlen, aged thirty-two years (b. England), Harriet Harlen, aged twelve years (b. England), Elisabeth Harlen, aged ten years (b. England), Wm. Harlen, aged seven years (b. England), Sarah Harlen, aged three years (b. England), and John M. Harlen, aged two years (b. England).

Rev. Hurlin left Danville, VT, in 1851, and held next a pastorate in Alton, NH, until December 1852.

Rev. William Hurlin was pastor of the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church from January 1853 to October 1854. After which he took up a pastorate in Amesbury, MA.

Wm. Hurlin, an F.B. clergyman, aged forty years (b. England), headed an Amesbury, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Harriet Hurlin, aged thirty-seven years (b. England), Harriet Hurlin, aged seventeen years (b. England), Elisabeth Hurlin, aged fifteen years (b. England), Wm. Hurlin, Jr., aged twelve years (b. England), Sarah Hurlin, aged eight years (b. England), John M. Hurlin, aged seven years (b. England), Sophia E. Hurlin, aged four years (b. VT), and Martha A. Hurlin, aged two years (b. ME).

Rev. William Hurlin immigrated in 1849, and held initially pastorates in Danville, VT; and Alton, NH, before his first pastorate at the Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist church (See Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1802-1854). After that he was pastor at Amesbury, MA, before returning to Acton, ME.

Religious Intelligence. Rev. W.H. Hurlin, late of Amesbury, Mass., has accepted the pastorate of the Baptist church in South Acton, Me., where he enters at once on his labors (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), March 15, 1856).

William Hurlin filed a declaration seeking naturalization in Alfred, ME, April 23, 1857. He stated that he had traveled from London, England, arriving in New York, NY, August 3, 1849,

and thence went to reside in Danville in Vermont, where he resided till July, 1851. Thence removed to Alton in N.H. and continued till December 1852, thence to Acton in Maine till Oct. 1854, thence to Amesbury, Mass., residing there till March 1856, and in that month removed again to Acton, & in June 1858 removed to Sumner in our county of Oxford.

William Hurlin of Lewiston, ME, became a naturalized U.S. citizen, in an Androscoggin County court, in Auburn, ME, in September 1859. (He had been born in London, England, in 1814). Orin B. Cheney and G.H. Ricker, both of Lewiston, ME, vouched for him.

William Hurlin, a Cal. Bpst. clergyman, aged forty-five years (b. England), headed a Sumner (“Sumner P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Harriet [(Brown)] Hurlin, aged forty-two years (b. England), Harriet Hurlin, a common school teacher, aged twenty years (b. England), Elizabeth Hurlin, aged nineteen years (b. England), William Hurlin, aged seventeen years (b. England), Sarah Hurlin, aged thirteen years (b. England), John M. Hurlin, aged twelve years (b. England), Sophia E. Hurlin, aged nine years (b. ME), Martha A. Hurlin, aged seven years (b. ME), Albert H. Hurlin, aged three years (b. ME), Charles S. Hurlin, aged two years (b. ME), and Clara M. Hurlin, aged eleven months (b. ME). William Hurlin had real estate valued at $200 and personal estate valued at $750.

William Hurlin, a farmer, aged fifty-six years (b. England), headed an Antrim, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Hurlin, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. England), Henry Hurlin, at home, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Clara Hurlin, at home, aged eleven years (b. NH). William Hurlin had personal estate valued at $1,200.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. Rev. William Hurlin of Antrim has accepted a call from the Baptist Church in Plaistow, and commences his labors there on the first of March (Boston Globe, February 19, 1873).

William Hurlin, a clergyman, aged sixty-five years (b. England), headed an Antrim, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Harriet Hurlin, keeping house, aged sixty-two years (b. England), Henry A. Hurlin, a bookkeeper, aged twenty-three years (b. ME), and Clara M. Hurlin, a schoolteacher, aged twenty years (b. ME).

Recalling a Happy Event. Contoocook, N.H., December 25. Rev. William Harlin and wife of Antrim celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage today. Rev. Mr. Harlin is a native of London, England (Boston Globe, December 26, 1886).

Rev. William Hurlin expressed his opinion that the British and American exhibitors at World’s Columbian Exposition, which was planned to be held in Chicago, IL, in 1893, should close their doors on Sundays.

RELIGIOUS MATTERS. Events and Opinions. The Rev. William Hurlin, writing in the Sunday School Times on International Expositions, notes that of the seven already held, the three in English speaking capitals (two in London, one in Philadelphia) were closed on Sunday, while in a fourth, that in Paris in 1889, the American and English exhibitors closed their departments on the Sabbath day. “With the above facts,” says the writer, “in view, what will the European peoples say of us if the exposition is opened on the Lord’s Day? Should not Christians bring all the influence they have to bear on this question, until it is settled rightly! And should they not declare, and adhere to the declaration, that they will have nothing at all to do with this Exposition unless it is closed on the Lord’s Day?” (Hartford Courant (Hartford, VT), April 2, 1892)

Hurlin, Rev. WilliamWilliam Hurlin, a clergyman, aged eighty-five years (b. England), headed an Antrim, NH, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of sixty-three years), Harriet [(Brown)] Harlin, aged eighty-two years (b. England). William Hurlin rented their dwelling from their son-in-law, Bennett S. Buckminster, aged seventy-five years (b. NH). (He was married to Lizzie H. [(Hurlin)] Buckminster. Harriet Hurlin was the mother of twelve children, of whom seven were still living.

Harriet (Brown) Hurlin died of pulmonary oedema in Antrim, NH, December 30, 1905, aged eighty-seven years, six months.

CHURCH AND CLERGY. The oldest minister in New Hampshire is Rev. William Hurlin of Antrim, who in his ninety-second year is still preaching the gospel. He preached his first sermon seventy-two years ago (Springfield Reporter (Springfield, VT), August 23, 1907).

William Hurlin died of cardiac failure on North Main Street in Antrim, NH, June 28, 1910, aged ninety-five years, ten months, and twenty-eight days. He had resided in Antrim, NH, for forty-four years.

BUSINESS HOUSES CLOSE. Funeral of Rev. William Hurlin Held at the Baptist Church In Antrim, N.H. ANTRIM, N.H., July 2. – The funeral of Rev William Hurlin was held yesterday at the Baptist church, of which in former years he was a pastor for seven years. Rev C.L. White of New York city, secretary of the American Baptist home mission society, made an address and the Rev O.C. Sargent of Concord, N.H., secretary of the New Hampshire Baptist state convention, delivered the sermon. Rev J.H. Nichols of Derry, N.H., spoke. Rev Oren E. Kendall, pastor of the Baptist church, assisted. The business houses throughout the town were closed and the curtains were drawn during the service, as a token of respect for the memory of the venerable clergyman. Floral tributes were many. Interment was at Maplewood cemetery (Boston Globe, July 2, 1910).


Continued in Acton & Milton Mills Free-Will Baptist Ministers, 1855-1909


References:

American Baptist Publication Society. (1857). The American Baptist Almanac for the Year of Our Lord 1857. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Dcw7AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA5-PA41

Amherst College. (1883). Obituary Record of Graduates. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=adqNz395hywC&pg=RA2-PA199

Bates College. (1915). General Catalogue of Bates College and Cobb Divinity School, 1863-1915. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=VsBBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA222

Bigelow, John R. (1851). Baptist Memorial and Monthly Record. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=9QARAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA208

Burgess, Gideon A., & Ward, John T. (1889). Free Baptist CyclopaediaHistorical and Biographical: The Rise of the Freewill Baptist Connection and of Those General and Open Communion Baptists Which, Merging Together, Form One People, Their Doctrines, Polity, Publications, Schools and Missions, with Brief Biographies of Ministers and Others Identified with the Growth and Strength of the Denomination. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3GXiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA617

Burrows. (1852). American Baptist Register for 1852. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=RdgpAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA390

Carter, Nathan F. (1906). Native Ministry of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3KUeAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA714

Clark, W.R.C. & Meeker. (1860). American Christian Record. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=1oQPAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA412

Clayton, W. Woodford. (1880). History of York County, Maine: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=-e8gAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA362-IA7

Cochrane, W.R. (2001). Families of Antrim, New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mYIJRrJZDDUC&pg=PA550

Emery, Edwin. (1901). History of Sanford, Maine, 1661-1901. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=0nUUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA135

Find a Grave. (2018, May 26). Elder David Blaisdell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/190070565/david-blaisdell

Find a Grave. (2011, October 22). Josiah L. Goodwin. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/79093461/josiah-l-goodwin

Find a Grave. (2012, September 21). Rev. B.F. Hubbard. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/97520104/b-f-hubbard

Find a Grave. (2015, August 18). Rev. William Hurlin, Jr. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/150928693/william-hurlin

Find a Grave. (2015, October 19). Deacon Zachariah Jordan. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/153974774/zachariah-jordan

Freewill Baptist Connection. (1839). Freewill Baptist Quarterly Magazine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qg4aAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA271

FWB Printing Establishment. (1860). Freewill Baptist Quarterly. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=oRsRAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA105

FWB Printing Establishment. (1862). Freewill Baptist Quarterly. Retrieved from Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=JxsRAAAAIAAJ&pg=Pa325

Hammond. (1882). Provincial and State Papers: Town Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mdtKAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA544

Hazlett, Charles A. (1915). History of Rockingham County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=amojAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA641

Lasher, George W. (1899). Ministerial Directory of the Baptist Churches in the United States of America. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=f9gpAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA377

Metcalf, Henry H. (1916). Laws of New Hampshire: First Constitutional Period, 1784-1792. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=iKkwAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA298

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Mitchell, Daggett, Goodyear, Bassett and Russell. (1905). The Town Register of Alfred, Lyman, Dayton, Hollis and Waterbro, 1905. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3UQHjbsouQ4C&pg=PA219

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Milton Taverner Elijah Horne (1764-1839)

By Muriel Bristol | August 7, 2022

Elijah Horne was born in Rochester, NH, May 4, 1764, son of Peter and Mercy (Wentworth) Horne.

(The known children of Peter and Mercy (Wentworth) Horne were: Daniel Wentworth Horn (1761–1843), Moses Horne (1762–1800), Elijah Horne (1764–1839), Rebecca Horne (1766–1800), Peter Horne (1768–1815), Edmund Horne (1769–1843), Jacob Horne (1771–1858), Rachel Horne (1773–1852), Abra Horn (1775–1862), and Richard Horne (1777–1854)).

Horn, Peter, Signature - 1762Father Peter Horn was one of the one hundred and one Rochester, NH, inhabitants that petitioned, February 8, 1762, for Rochester to be represented in the NH Provincial Legislature. Barnabas Palmer, John Plumer, and [Elijah Horn’s future father-in-law] Ichabod Corson were also among those that signed the petition.

The house he [Lewis B. Twombly] occupied, which is now owned by his son, is one of the oldest in Milton, and was originally the property of Lieutenant Elijah Horn. In an upper room, which was then unfinished, were held the first town meetings of Milton; and for some years it was customary for the people of the North-east Parish to hold religious services here on Sundays. Here old Parson Hasy, of Lebanon, and Parson Haven, of Newbury Plains, delivered eloquent discourses on the Word and taught the way to salvation. The children of the settlers and the early converts were baptized in this room (Biographical Review, 1897).

Father Peter Horn was among the one hundred ninety-eight men who signed the revolutionary Association Test in Rochester, NH, June 1, 1776.

WE, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our Lives and Fortunes, with ARMS, oppose the Hostile Proceedings of the British Fleets, and Armies, against the United American COLONIES (Batchellor, 1910).

Twenty-two Rochester men “refused” to sign. Another twenty-two Rochester Friends, i.e., “Quakers,” did not “choose” to sign, i.e., they were conscientious objectors.

Sister Rebecca Horne married in Rochester, NH, October 20, 1783, John Wentworth. He was born in Milton, April 14, 1762, son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Hodgdon) Wentworth.

Elijah Horn married in Rochester, NH, October 7, 1784, Anna Corson, both of Rochester, NH. Rev. Joseph Haven performed the ceremony (NEHGS, 1907). She was born circa 1765, daughter of Ichabod and Abigail (Roberts) Corson. (Ichabod Corson had been on Rochester’s Committee of Correspondence in 1775, and its military recruiting committee in 1778-79).

[The known children of Elijah and Ann (Corson) Horn were: Abigail R. Horne (1785–1834), Mercy Wentworth Horne (1788–1862), Charlotte Horne (1790–1809), James H. Horne (1793-1877), Anna Horn (1796–1838), Rachel Horne (1799–1840), Ichabod C. Horne (1801–1829), Elijah Horne, [Jr.] (1805–1842), and Daniel Wentworth Horne (1809–1876)].

Peter Horn was one of three hundred ten Rochester inhabitants that petitioned the NH legislature, August 30, 1785, seeking repeal of an act requiring milled boards to be square-edged and an inch thick (and other lumber in proportion). Those inhabitants described themselves then as being “largely Concerned in Lumber.” They sought also repeal of an act forbidding transport of lumber to the British West Indies, and seeking the issuance of a new paper money (Hammond, 1884). (See Rochester Lumber Remonstrance – August 1785).

Elijah Horn was doubtless the first blacksmith [at Milton], but was soon followed by Isaac Worster at the [Milton Three] Ponds, and later by Solomon Land and Joseph Rines at Milton Mills (Scales, 1914).

Lt Elijah Horne - 1770
Lt. Elijah Horne House, “c1770” (Photo: Google Maps).

Daughter Abigail R. Horne was born in Milton, March 24, 1785.

Elijah Horn signed the Rochester lumber remonstrance of August 1785. (See Rochester Lumber Remonstrance – August 1785).

Sister Rachel Horne married in Rochester, i.e., Farmington, NH, September 14, 1786, Richard Randlett. He was born in Rochester, i.e., Farmington, NH, August 16, 1764, son of Jacob and Abigail (Plummer) Randlett.

Daughter Mercy Wentworth Horne was born in Milton, July 20, 1788. (She was a namesake for her paternal grandmother, Mercy (Wentworth) Horne).

Elijah Horne headed a Rochester, NH, household at the time of the First (1790) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 16-plus years [himself], three females [Anna (Corson) Horne, Abigail R. Horne and Mercy Wentworth Horne], and one male aged under-16 years [James H. Horne]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Enoch Hayes and Gilbert Pirkins.

Daughter Charlotte Horne was born in Milton, December 18, 1790. Son James Howe Horne was born in Milton, June 18, 1793. (He was likely a namesake for Dr. James Howe (1755-1807) of Rochester, NH).

Father Peter Horn died in Farmington, NH, May 26, 1795. Sister Abra Horn married in Rochester, NH, October 11, 1795, Joseph Corson. He was born in Rochester, NH, December 11, 1772, son of Ichabod [Jr.] and Mary (Allen) Corson.

Daughter Anna Horn was born in Milton, April 18, 1796. Anna Horn, daughter of Elijah Horn, was baptized by Rev. Joseph Haven in Rochester, NH, June 30, 1796. Samuel, Peter, and Abigail Wallingford, children of David Wallingford, were baptized at that same time (Tibbetts, 1910). (The Wallingford children were cousins of Anna Horn, as their respective mothers were sisters).

Rachel Horn, daughter of Elijah Horn, was born in Milton, January 26, 1799. She baptized by Rev. Joseph Haven in Rochester, NH, April 27, 1800. (She was a namesake for her paternal aunt, Rachel (Horne) Randlett).

Brother Richard Horn married in Rochester, NH, May 9, 1799, Lucy Scates. She was born in Rochester, NH, circa 1778, daughter of Benjamin and Lydia Scates.

Sister Rebecca (Horne) Wentworth died in Milton, in 1800.

Lt. Elijah Horn (1764-1839), Capt. Samuel Nute, and Lt. Jotham Nute (1760-1835) were identified by their militia ranks in the Second (1800) Federal Census.

Lt. Elijah Horn headed a Northeast Parish, Rochester, NH, household at the time of the Second (1800) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 26-44 years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Anna (Corson) Horn], one female aged 10-15 years [Mercy W. Horn], three females aged under 10-years [Charlotte Horn, Anna Horn, and Rachel Horn], and one male aged under-10 years. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Moses Davis and Mark Miller. (See Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

Brother Moses Horn died in Farmington, NH, October 20, 1800.

Brother-in-law David Corson (1761-1843) sold land in Rochester, NH, i.e., in Milton that would be, to Ephraim Drew (c1760-1845) in November 1801. It adjoined land he had sold formerly to Elijah Horn, and was situated north of the pond, i.e., Meetinghouse Pond, and south of the Wakefield road, i.e., what is now NH Rte. 125.

David Corson, husbandman of Rochester, for $50 sold Ephraim Drew, cordwainer of Rochester, 12¼ acres in Rochester, 3rd Division, drawn to original right of John Trickey, et al., lying between that of Jonathan Dorr and land David sold Elijah Horn, joining on north side of pond and south side of road leading to Wakefield. The deed was witnessed by John Fish and Pelatiah Hanson; deed dated November 16, 1801, and recorded June 14, 1802 (Strafford County Deeds, 40:34, as abstracted by TAL Publications, 1991).

A “division” was a division of common land. Original settlers of – in this case Rochester – would generally receive an original house or farmstead lot from an original township grant. They would have also rights in any undivided common land. People who had such rights were termed “commoners.” Commoners might have a sort of parallel government of only those that had such rights, in which they might decide on issues related to their commonly owned land and its management, including any further divisions of it into separate privately owned parcels.

Those having common rights were allowed use of that common land. (From which practice the economic concept of the “Tragedy of the Commons” arises). If a division of that common land were to be made at any point, only commoners were entitled to a share or lot drawn at random from the land being divided. (There might be successive divisions over a period of years until the common land had all been dispersed). Their division rights were separable. It would be possible for one to sell one’s original house lot, while still retaining one’s division rights. It might be possible to sell one’s share in a first division, while retaining one’s rights in future divisions. In this case, Corson sold Third Division land to Drew (as he had earlier to Horn) that he had acquired from John Trickey, et al., who had original division rights.

Son Ichabod Corson Horne was born in Milton, November 18, 1801. (He was a namesake for his maternal grandfather, Ichabod Corson, who had died earlier in that same year).

Horn, Elijah - Signature - 1802Elijah Horn signed the Rochester division petition (or Milton separation petition) in what was then Rochester, NH, May 28, 1802, as did his brother Richard Horn (1777-1854), and brother-in-law Joseph Corson (1772-1852) (husband of sister Abra (Horn) Corson).

This meeting convened at the tavern of Lieut. Elijah Horne, August 30, 1802, only a short time after the charter, which gave Milton its independent existence, had been signed by Governor Gilman. This instrument had been granted at the June session of the legislature of New Hampshire at the petition and largely through the efforts of Capt. Beard Plumer, one of the representatives from Rochester, who, with others, felt that the time had come for Milton to sever the ties which bound her to the mother town.

The very first act of the original Milton selectmen was to license Elijah Horn’s tavern, August 30, 1802. The first annual town meeting was held March 14, 1803, purportedly in the tavern, and presumably the second annual town meeting was held there also in March 1804. The Milton town house was completed “on or before” October 3, 1804 (Scales, 1914). So, the third and subsequent annual town meetings presumably took place in the new structure.

State of New Hampshire. Strafford, ss: We, the Selectmen of Milton, do by these presents license to Elijah Horn to keep a public tavern at his house in Milton from this date under such Rules and Regulations as the law directs. Given under our hand at Milton, this 30th day of August 1802. William Palmer, John Fish, John Remick. Jr. } Selectmen.

James L. Twombly, the subject and source of the quoted biography, was born there in 1840. (The younger Twombly would serve in the Civil War (See Milton in the Veterans Schedule of 1890)).

The house he [Lewis B. Twombly] occupied, which is now owned by his son [James L. Twombly], is one of the oldest in Milton, and was originally the property of Lieutenant Elijah Horn. In an upper room, which was then unfinished, were held the first town meetings of Milton; and for some years it was customary for the people of the North-east Parish to hold religious services here on Sundays. Here old Parson Hasy, of Lebanon, and Parson Haven, of Newbury [Norway] Plains, delivered eloquent discourses on the Word, and taught the way to salvation. The children of the settlers and the early converts were baptized in this room (Biographical Review, 1897).

Plummer's Ridge - Detail - 1892
Milton in 1892 (Detail of Plummer’s Ridge). The farmhouse of “F. Jones” (Fred P. Jones, grandson of Levi Jones), now the NH Farm Museum, is indicated at the upper left, and the Milton Town House of 1803 is indicated at the lower right. Between them, but closer to the Town House, is indicated the house of “L.B. Twombly” (Lewis B. Twombly, father of James L. Twombly), the occupant from c1840 to 1892 of what had been originally the Elijah Horn Tavern. Just beyond it, on the righthand side when heading towards the Jones farmhouse, is a “Sch.” (the still extant District One Schoolhouse) just before what is now called Bolan Road. (There seems to be yet another schoolhouse a bit further on beyond Bolan Road).

Apart from its primary function as tavern, Northeast Parish church services had been held also in the unfinished upper room of the Horn Tavern, by Rev. Isaac Hasy (1742-1812) of neighboring Lebanon, ME, and Rev. Joseph Haven (1747-1825) of the Norway Plains in Rochester, NH. (Norway Plains Road lies opposite what is now the Lilac Mall).

Son Elijah Horne [Jr.], was born in Milton, September 15, 1805.

Son Daniel Wentworth Horne was born in Milton, May 29, 1809. He was a namesake for his paternal uncle, Daniel Wentworth Horne (1761-1843)). “Elijah & Daniel Wentworth, Sons of Elijah Horn of Milton,” were baptized by Rev, Joseph Haven, October 8, 1809.

Daughter Charlotte Horne died in Milton, November 2, 1809, aged eighteen years, ten months, and fifteen days (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Daughter Mercy W. Horne married November 23, 1809, John Nute, she of Milton and he of Dover, NH. He was born in Rochester, NH, November 26, 1787, son of Samuel and Phoebe (Pinkham) Nute.

Elijah Horne headed a Milton household at the time of the Third (1810) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 45-plus years [himself], one female aged 26-44 years [Anna (Corson) Horne], one male aged 16-25 years [James H. Horne], two females aged 16-25 years [Abigail R. Horne and Charlotte Horne], two females aged 10-15 years [Anna Horn and Rachel Horne], and three males aged under-10 years [Ichabod C. Horne, Elijah Horne, Jr., and Daniel Wentworth Horne]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Thomas Nutter and Gilbert Perkin.

Son James Howe Horne married in Milton, February 13, 1814, Huldah Roberts. She was born in Somersworth, NH, June 26, 1794, daughter of James and Martha (Goodwin) Roberts.

Elijah Horn and his father, Peter Horn, were among forty-two Milton inhabitants that petitioned for incorporation of a Milton Congregational society, in June 1814.

Elijah Horn and his son, James H. Horn, were among the seventy-nine Milton inhabitants that petitioned to have James Roberts appointed as a Milton justice-of-the-peace, April 3, 1820. (James Roberts (1783-1839) was Elijah Horn’s nephew, a son of his sister, Rebecca (Horn) Wentworth).

A dispute arose in 1820 regarding Milton’s militia company (of which Jones had formerly been the captain). Milton’s area encompasses 34.3 square miles. Those required to attend periodic company training – they being all males aged 18-45 years – found the long distances to be traveled to musters burdensome. They asked that their largish (140% of standard size) town-delineated militia company be split into two companies. When their regimental field officers refused them, they sought to accomplish their objective by circulating a petition seeking instead to simply divide the town into two parts.

Some one hundred twenty-seven Milton men filed a competing remonstrance petition opposing a division of the town. It was intended for the June 1820 session of the NH legislature. Company officers Jeremy Nute, James Hayes, Jr., and Norton Scates all signed this remonstrance, as did former company officers Elijah Horn, Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, and future officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes. Jones’ brother, Joshua Jones, subscribed also to this petition (One may note that none of Milton’s then selectmen signed this petition).

Some eighty-eight Milton men filed a militia company division petition intended for the November 1820 session of the NH legislature. Captain Jeremy Nute signed this proposal, as did former company officers Elijah Horn, Levi Jones and Jotham Nute, future company officers Theodore C. Lyman and Bidfield Hayes, and Milton selectman Hopley Meserve. A division of the company would have obviated the need or desire to divide the town in order to divide the company.

Daughter Anna Horne married in Boston, MA, February 20, 1822, Charles Flint. Rev. Sereno E. Dwight performed the ceremony (MA VRs; Columbian Centinel, February 23, 1822).

Daughter Rachel Horn married in Boston, MA, April 18, 1822, Emmanuel Chisholm. Rev. Hosea Ballou performed the ceremony.

 Elijah Horn married in Wakefield, NH, November 18, 1825, Nancy Durrell, he of Wakefield, BH, and she of Shapleigh, Me.

Mother Mercy (Wentworth) Horn died in Farmington, NH, before 1826.

Son Daniel W. Horne married (1st) in Milton, September 27, 1829, Sarah Ann Dore, both of Milton. Stephen M. Mathes, Justice-of-the-Peace, performed the ceremony. She was born in Lebanon, ME, in 1811, daughter of Daniel G. and Margaret “Peggy” (Clark) Dore.

Son Elijah Horn [Jr.] married in Dartmouth, MA, November 8, 1829, Delila Brownell Tripp, both of New Bedford, MA. She was born in Westport, MA, January 7, 1812, daughter of Howard and Thankful Tripp.

Son Ichabod C. Horne died in Lebanon, ME, December 13, 1829 (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Elijah Horne headed a Milton household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 60-69 years [himself], one female aged 60-69 years [Anna (Corson) Horne], one female aged 40-49 years [Abigail R. Horne], and one male aged 10-14 years. Just beneath him was the household of Jas [James H.] Horne. His household included one male aged 30-40 years [himself], one female aged 30-40 years [Huldah (Roberts) Horne], one male aged 10-14 years, one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged 5-9 years, and one female aged under-5 years. Their households appeared in the enumeration between those of Nahum Tasker and Matthias Nutter.

Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. Her household included one female aged 40-49 years [herself], one male aged 15-19 years [Isaac M. Nute], one male aged 10-14 years [Joseph Plummer Nute], and one male aged 5-9 years.

Emanuel Chishole headed a Boston, MA, household at the time of the Fifth (1830) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years [himself], two females aged 30-39 years [Rachel (Horne) Chisholm], one female aged 10-14 years, two males aged 5-9 years, two males aged under-5 years, and one female aged under-5 years.

Daughter Abigail R. Horne died in Lebanon, ME, August 9, 1834, aged forty-nine years, four months, and sixteen days (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Daughter Anna (Horne) Flint died in Lebanon, ME, March 16, 1838.

Elijah Horne died in Milton, NH, August 17, 1839, aged seventy-five years, three months, and thirteen years.

Daughter Rachel (Horne) Chisholm died in Lebanon, ME, in May 1840 (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. Her household included one female aged 40-49 years [herself], one male aged 20-29 years [Isaac M. Nute], one female aged 20-29 years [Mary A. (Jenkins) Nute], one male aged 10-14 years, one female aged under-5 years [Anne E. Nute], one male aged under-5 years [John H. Nute]. Two members of her household were engaged in Agriculture.

James H. Horn headed a Milton household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 40-49 years [himself], one female aged 40-49 years [Huldah (Roberts) Horne], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 20-29 years, two males aged 15-19 years, one female aged 10-14 years, one male aged under-5 years, and one female aged 70-79 years [Anna (Corson) Horn]. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of Matthias Nutter and Edward Ellis. (And three entries below that of Lewis B. Twombly).

Elijah Horn headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included two males aged 30-39 years [himself], one female aged 20-29 years [Delia (Tripp) Horne], one male aged 20-29 years, one female aged 5-9 years [Mary A. Horne], one male aged under-5 years. One member of his household was engaged in Commerce, and two members of his household were engaged in Navigation of the Ocean.

Daniel W. Horn headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Sixth (1840) Federal Census. His household included one male aged 30-39 years, one female aged 30-39 years, one male aged 15-19 years, two males aged 5-9 years, two males aged under-5 years, and one male aged 50-59 years, one female aged 50-59 years. Two members of his household were engaged in Manufacture and the Trades.

Son Elijah Horne [Jr.] died in New Bedford, MA, March 2, 1842. (He was the husband of Delilah B. Tripp) (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Son-in-law Charles Flint died in Boston, MA, June 25, 1847. Brother-in-law John Wentworth died in Milton, February 13, 1849.

Isaac M. Nute, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Jenkins)] Nute, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), Ann Elisa Nute, aged thirteen years (b. NH), John H. Nute, aged eleven years (b. NH), Sarah D. Nute, aged six years (b. NH), and Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute, aged sixty-five years (b. NH). Isaac M. Nute had real estate valued at $1,000.

James H. Horn, a farmer, aged fifty-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Huldah Horn, aged fifty-six years (b. NH), Anna Horn, aged eighty-four years (b. NH), Rachel Horn, aged twenty years (b. NH), Roxann Scates, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Thomas M. Cheswell, aged fourteen years (b. NH). James H. Horn had real estate valued at $1,000. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of William S. Ellis, a shoemaker, aged forty-four years (b. MA), and Benjamin Scates, a farmer, aged fifty-five years (b. NH).

Delilah B. Horne, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Her household included Mary Ann Horne, aged sixteen years (b. MA), Elijah H. Chisole, a sailor, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), Abby A. Chisole, aged nineteen years (b. MA), Thomas John, a rigger, aged fifty years (b. England), Panor B. Vaildell, a machinist, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and Cathrine Davis, aged thirty-six years (b. Gotenburg).

Daniel W. Horne, a farmer, aged forty-one years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Sarah A. Horne, aged thirty-nine years (b. ME), Elijah Horne, a blacksmith, aged nineteen years (b. ME), Henry Horne, a shoemaker, aged sixteen years (b. ME), James W. Horne, aged thirteen years (b. ME), George S. Horne, aged five years (b. ME), Daniel G. Dorr, a farmer, aged sixty-seven years (b. ME), and Margaret Dorr, aged sixty-five years (b. ME). Daniel W. Horne had real estate valued at $1,000.

Brother Richard Horne died in Milton, February 16, 1854.

Daughter-in-law Sarah A. (Dore) Horn died in Lebanon, ME, October 29, 1855, aged forty-four years, two months, and fourteen days.

Son Daniel W. Horn married (2nd) in Lebanon, ME, December 22, 1855, Rachel DeMerritt Berry. She was born in Strafford, NH, February 19, 1820, daughter of Nicholas and Hannah (Atkins) Berry.

Delilah B. Horne appeared in the New Bedford, MA, directory of 1856, as a widow, keeping a boarding house at 97½ Middle Street, at its corner with Purchase Street.

Anna (Corson) Horne died in Lebanon, ME, March 19, 1857.

Isaac M. Nute, a farmer, aged forty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Dover, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary A. [(Jenkins)] Nute, aged forty-two years (b. NH), John H. Nute, aged twenty years (b. NH), Sarah D. Nute, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Mary A. Nute, aged six years (b. NH), and Mercy W. [(Horne)] Nute, aged seventy years (b. NH). Isaac M. Nute had real estate valued at $3,000 and person estate valued at $550.

James H. Horne, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Huldah Horne, aged sixty-six years (b. NH), Charlotte A. Horne, aged forty years (b. NH), Rachel Horne, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Martha A. Horne, aged five years (b. NH), and Alfred D. Dore, a shoemaker, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). James H. Horne had real estate valued at $2,000 and person estate valued at $1,000.

Daniel W. Horn, a smith, aged fifty-one years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon (“West Lebanon P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Rachel D. Horn, aged forty-four years (b. NH), James W. Horn, aged sixteen years (b. ME), Sarah Horn, aged three years (b. ME), Mary A Horn, aged five months (b. ME), Daniel Dore, a laborer, aged seventy-six years (b. ME), Margaret Dore, aged seventy-one years (b. ME), Tamsund Bery, aged fifty years (b. NH). Daniel W. Horn had real estate valued at $2,000 and person estate valued at $500.

Daughter Mercy W. (Horne) Nute died in Lebanon, ME, November 16, 1862. (She was the wife of John Nute) (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Dehlia B. Horn, a boarding-housekeeper, aged fifty years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the MA Census of 1865. Her household included Mary A. Horn, a dressmaker, aged twenty-seven years (b. MA), Charles M. Tripp, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Lizzie Tripp, aged twenty-one years (b. RI), Sarah B. Brush, a clerk, aged twenty-two years (b. MA), and Martha A. Dagget, a clerk, aged twenty years (b. MA).

James H. Horne, a farmer, aged seventy-seven years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Huldah Horne, aged seventy-six years (b. NH), Charlotte A. Horne, aged fifty years (b. NH), and Martha A. Horne, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NH). James H. Horne had real estate valued at $2,000 and personal estate valued at $1,150.

Delilah B. Hall [Horn], keeping house, aged fifty-four years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Her household included Mary A. Hatt [Horn], a dressmaker, aged thirty years (b. MA), and Maria H. Francis, a dressmaker, aged twenty-four years (b. MA).

Daniel W. Horne, a farmer, aged seventy-one years (b. NH), headed a Lebanon (“Lebanon P.O.”), ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Rachel Horne, keeping house, aged fifty years (b. NH), Sewell S. Horne, works for shoe manfy., aged twenty-four years (b. ME), Sarah A. Horne, aged thirteen years (b. ME), Mary A. Horne, aged ten years (b. ME), and Tamson Bery, aged sixty years (b. NH).

Daughter-in-law Huldah (Roberts) Horne died of dropsy in Milton, March 25, 1871, aged seventy-six years, nine months.

Son Daniel W. Horne died in Lebanon, ME, March 7, 1876, aged sixty-six years, nine months. (He had been, in succession, the husband of Sarah Ann Horne and Rebecca D. Horne) (Private Records of Miss Sarah A. Horne, West Lebanon, ME).

Son James H. Horne died of old age in Milton, February 22, 1877, aged eighty-three years, nine months. He was a widowed farmer.

Charles H. Fuller, a cigar dealer, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a New Bedford, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sophronia Fuller, keeps house, aged forty-six years (b. MA), his niece, Lusina Hallett, at home, aged twenty years (b. MA), and his lodgers, Clara W. Thompson, at home, aged sixty-four years (b. MA), Delila B. Horn, aged sixty-eight years (b. NH), and her daughter, Mary A. Horn, at home, aged forty-two years (b. NH). They resided at 129 Purchase Street.

Daughter-in-law Delila B. (Tripp) Horne died of pneumonia in New Bedford, MA, February 16, 1892, aged eighty years. She was the widow of Elijah Horne.

Daughter-in-law Rachel D. (Berry) Horne died of chronic bronchitis in Lebanon, ME, March 23, 1895, aged seventy-five years, one year, and four months. Charles Blazo, M.D., of Rochester, NH, signed the death certificate.


References:

Batchellor, Albert S. (1910). Miscellaneous Revolutionary Documents of New Hampshire: Including the Association Test, the Pension Rolls, and Other Important Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MIhQAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA127

Find a Grave. (2016, May 26). Ichabod Corson. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/163301301/ichabod-corson

Find a Grave. (2020, November 10). Daniel W. Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/218383005/daniel-w-horne

Find a Grave. (2013, January 24). Edmund Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/104095651/edmund-horne

Find a Grave. (2015, March 16). Elijah Horne [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/143780583/elijah-horne

Find a Grave. (2022, February 3). Elijah Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/236457865/elijah-horne

Find a Grave. (2010, April 19). Jacob Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/51357448/jacob-horne

Find a Grave. (2010, February 20). Moses Horne. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/48404133/moses-horne

Find a Grave. (2014, December 6). Peter Horne [Jr.]. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/139643614/peter-horne

Mitchell-Cony. (1908). Town Register Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA91

NEHGS. (1907). First Congregational Church Records, Rochester, NH. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=MtM5AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA152

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=520

Tibbetts, Charles W. (1910). First Congregational Church Records, Rochester, NH. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=Z61bAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA28

Wikipedia. (2022, March 12). Tragedy of the Commons. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons

Rochester Lumber Remonstrance – August 1785

By Muriel Bristol | July 31, 2022

Three hundred and fifteen inhabitants of Rochester, NH, signed a remonstrance petition, August 30, 1785, intended for an October 1785 Concord, NH, session of the NH General Court.

Merriam-Webster’s dictionary defines a remonstrance as being

an earnest presentation of reasons for opposition or grievance, especially: a document formally stating such points.

The British surrender at Yorktown, VA, had marked the end of Revolutionary War land operations in October 1781, although the formal Treaty of Paris had not been signed until September 1783. Under the Articles of Confederation, the separate states had still considerable latitude over foreign relations, including tariffs, duties, regulations, etc., and the petitioners of August 1785 evidently found New Hampshire’s restrictions burdensome.

The petitioners presented themselves as being involved with the lumber industry and sought repeal of several recently enacted NH lumber laws and regulations, as well as restrictions and duties on overseas lumber sales, especially those destined for the British West Indies.

Less prudent was their proposed alternative that a fresh round of NH paper currency, or “Bills of Credit,” be issued. Merchants and lenders tended to lose under such a paper currency regime, while borrowers, including often farmers, tended to gain, as they could repay their nominal debts in depreciating inflationary currency. In the following year, the NH legislature would be literally besieged by an armed crowd demanding issuance of paper currency in the “Exeter Riot” or “Paper Money Riot” of September 1786 (for some details of which see Milton Justice William Palmer, Esq. (1757-1815)).

NH 40-Shilling Note -1775-82New Hampshire was at this time under “The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union,” which preceded the U.S. Constitution. Several years later, the U.S. Constitution would forbid issuance by the states of Bills of Credit.

Article I, Section 10, Clause 1 prohibits the states from issuing Bills of Credit. The prohibition of states issuing Bills of Credit came in direct response to how states managed their financial policy during the era of the Articles of Confederation. While all states in theory recognized the American Continental as their official currency, in reality, nearly every state issued its own Bills of credit, which further devalued the Continental and led to its eventual collapse as a currency (Wikipedia, 2022).

The salutation was directed initially to “His Excellency the President,” as New Hampshire’s Governor was then known. Paper was much more expensive then than it is now, so frugal Yankees might simply line out a mistake when changing course, rather than starting anew with a fresh piece of paper.

As for spelling, dictionaries were not commonly available. The first English one, with 3,000 of the more difficult words only, had been published in 1604, and Samuel Johnson’s famous two-volume English dictionary, regarded when completed as the definitive source, had been published in 1755, although the fully revised editions came only years later. These would have been quite expensive. Noah Webster’s initial “American” dictionary would be published in 1806, although his more comprehensive editions would not appear until 1828.

Contractions were (and are) regarded as a spoken usage rather than something that should be written out, especially in a formal document. Nevertheless, one may note the contraction “don’t” for “do not” rendered without its apostrophe as “dont” in the final paragraph.

Familiar names from what are now Milton and Farmington, NH, are present also in this remonstrance, as those towns were at this time the Northeast and Northwest parishes, respectively, of Rochester, NH. (See Northeast Parish in the First (1790) Federal Census and Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census).

State of New Hampshire, Strafford Ss. }

To His Excellency the President and the To the Honorable the Senate & House of Representatives, and General Assembly Convened at Concord on the 3d Wednesday in October 1785 ~

The Petition of us the Subscribers, free Holders and Inhabitants of the Town of Rochester, Humblely Sheweth, that we are largely Concerned in Lumber, and we understand your Excellency & Honours has passed some late acts at your last Session, verry hurtfull and Injurious to us and we believe to all Other Towns Concerned in the lumber way therefore and pray you would repeal the act that requires all boards to be Inch thick And Square Edgeed and Other lumber in propotion ~ And likewise to repeal the new acts prohibiting any Vessel Carrying Lumber [to] the Brittish Islands in the West Indies that can procure Brittish papers for that purpose ~

And to repeal the Other act with regard to the Duty Layed on tunnage on Ships or Vessells belonging to foreigners which Duty we Look Upon to be Equal to Shuting up our ports against them, but if your Excellency and Honours Dont see fit to grant the prayer of this Petition Wee would request a paper Currency on a Loan or in Such other way as your wisdom may Direct you to Support the Credit of Said Moneys, as in Duty bound we ever pray ~
Rochester, Augst 30th 1785

Pg. 2:

[Column 1:]

James Jennes, David Place, Abner Hodgdon, Ebenezer Place Junr, Ebenzr Place Senr, Moses Place, Amos Place, Joseph Thompson, Joseph Thompson Junr, Alexander Hodgdon, Eleazer Hodgdon, Joseph Pearl, Moses Hammet, John Hammet, Dimon Pearl, James Young, Joseph Clark, Tobias Ricker, Cornelius Jenness, Jonathan Place, Moses Waymoth, Thomas Drew, John Richson, James Dearing, Moses Varney, Jonathan Leighton, John Place, Jonathan Place, Thomas Varny, Elijah Varney, Reubin Heard, Benjami[n] Meder, Ephraim Ham, Eleazer Ham, James Ham, Isaac Brown,

[Column 2:]

George Place, Moses Roberts, Epharim Wentworth, William Wentworth, Wentworth Hayes, Daniel McNeal, Joshua Merrow, Josiah Folsom, Edward Rollins, John Goodwin, Benja Odiorne, Paul Harford, Daniel Watson, Jonathan Heard, Richard Hilton, Ebenezer Horn, Benjamin Rollins, Ebenezer Ricker, Joseph Dame, Peter Cushing, Eleazar Ham, Joshua Knight, John Place the 3d, Jonathan Wallingford, Stephen Lee, Benjamin Hoyt, John Randall, John Ham, Simon [Herd?], Paul Place, John Russet Place, James Jackson, Caleb Jackson,

[Column 3:]

Joshua Downing, Epharim Trickey, Paul Cook, Timothy Ricker, William Jones, Nathaniel Jones, Samuel Palmer, Robert M[—], James Wentworth, Thomas Plumer, John Glidden, Barnabas Palmer, Gersum downs, David Morrison, John Bickford, Daniel Calef, John Roberts, Ephraim Parker, Elazar Ham, Joseph Runels, James Rogers the third, William Huntress, Jona Norris, Josiah Wentworth, Samuel Richards, Timothy Robarts, Francis Meder, Daniel Brewster, Samuel Plummer, Moses goodwin, Zebulon dam, Richerd Perkins, Silas Dame,

Pg. 3:

[Column 1:]

Enoch Burnham, Lemuel Richardson, William McDuffee, John Richards, Jona Richard Jr, Jonathan Laighton, Joseph Knight, Daniel goodwin, nehemiah kimbel, Solomon Perkins, Bening Colbath, Geo: R. Downing, Ebenezer Varney, Joseph Bickford, Ebenezer Varney Ju, John Bickford, Samuel Varney, Moses Varney, John Rawlings, Anthony Rawlings, Joshua Rawlings, John Cloutman, Ebenr Twombly, Isaac Libby, George Snell Hayes, David Corson, John Bergon, Jonathan Twombly, Elijah Horn, Benjamin Copps, Richard Manson, William Hanson, Paul Copps, Beard Plumer, Enoch Hayes, Daniel Cook,

[Column 2:]

Nich Wentworth, David Horn, John Carr, Ebenezer Wentworth, Daniel Garland, Ephraim Twombly, Daniel Kimbal, John walker, John Hanson, Jeams Edley, Nathan Nock, Mark Miler, Joseph Chapan, John Wentworth, Elihu Wintworth, Samuel Jennes, Garsom Downs Jnr, Joseph Plumer, David Walanford, Moses hamblin, Ha[tevil] Knight, Joseph Roberts, Simon Torr, Timo Courson, James McDuffee, Robert Walker, David Langley, Ephraim Perkins Jr, Jonathan Richards, William Wingate, Benjamin Varney, James Chesley, John Place Jr,

[Column 3:]

Thomas Roberts, James Downs, William Palmer, Saml Nute, Isaac Wentworth, [—-] place, barnebas Palmer Junr, Richard Wentworth, Peter Horn, Moses Horn Junr, Joseph Walker, Tristram heard, Nathaniel Heard, Tristram Heard, Jas Adams, Samuel Austin, Jacob Elles, Samuel Wingate, Benja Wingate,  Elijah Tebbetts, John Trickey, Samuel Door, Silas Tebbets, Heard Roberts, David Tebbets, Joseph Tebbets, Ichabod Cossen, William Elles, David Wingate, Samuel Allen, Joshua Allen, Micah Allen, Samuel Downing, Stephen Furnald,

Pg. 4:

[Column 1:]

Benjamin Forse Junr, Josiah Main, Saml Furbur, Ephraim Kimbel, David Twombly, Daniel Page, Nathanel Garland, Benjamin Page, Moses Jennes, Joseph Drown, Richard Furbur Junr, Tobias Twombly Junr, John Knowles, Joseph Heard Junr, Thoms Virney, Aaron Downs, Ephram Down Junr, Wentworth Twombly, Moses Downs, Ebenezr Ricker Junr, Edmund Tebbets, Joseph Knight, Dudley Wentworth, Daniel Bruster, Stephen Wentworth Junr, Eleazer Coleman, James Coleman, James Rogers Junr, Moses Horn, Jeams Bery, John Bery, Willam Bery, David Hanson, John Tanner,

[Column 2:]

Abraham Cooke, Richd Walker, John Wentworth Jr, Hunking Colbath, Abraham Cooke Junr, Rueben Heard, Jacob Wallingford, Morris Alles, Thomas Peavey, Daniel Peavey, Anthony Peavey, David Watson, Edmund Wingate, Jonathan Merry, Benjamin Chase, Ezekiel Ricker, Nathnil Jonson, Richard Nutter Junr, Joseph Holmes, Jonathan Wentworth, Joseph Heard Junr, Enoch Hoyt, Ichabod Corson Junr, Thoms Pinkam, Jona Pinkham, John Rand, John Ham, John Stanton, Daniel Page Junr, Joseph Page, Valetine Rallins, David Jenness, Joseph Meader Jnr, Winthrop Nutter, William Whitehouse, Aaron Whitehouse, George Meader,

[Column 3:]

Pelatiah Cartlan, John Tucker, Jacob Hanson, Isaiah Jenkins, Joseph meder, Hatevil Laighton, Solomon Drown, John Drown, Joseph Tasker, natthel meedor, William Heard, Jonthan Meder, William hodgdon, Robert Evans, James Place, Paul Jennes, Samuel Robeson, Gorge Laighton, timothy Richson, Clem hays, Stephen harfot, John Davis, Joshua Corson, Dodavah Garlan Junr, Dodavah Garlan, Jonathan Elles, Joshua Elles, Richd Furber, Benja Furber, Robart tebets, Benjamin Wentworth, David Allard, Job Allard, James Runnels, Jona Bigford, James French, Edward Varney 3, Moses Varney Junr, Thoms Davise, James Twombley, John Palmer, Amos place.


See also Salmon Falls Sawmill Petition – 1797 and Milton Road Weight Petition – 1816


References:

Hammond, Isaac W. (1884). Provincial Papers. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=OFgSAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA342

NH Department of State. NH Government Petitions, 1700-1826: Box 20: June 12, 1785-Oct 21, 1785. Concord, NH

Wikipedia. (2022, July 5). Articles of Confederation. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_Confederation

Wikipedia. (2022, July 17). Bills of Credit. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bills_of_credit

Wikpedia. (2022, July 18). A Dictionary of the English Language. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Dictionary_of_the_English_Language

Wikipedia. (2022, April 26). Webster’s Dictionary. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webster%27s_Dictionary

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