Milton in 1859

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | May 21, 2018

A description of Milton as it appeared in an 1859 gazetteer:

MILTON, in the southeastern [SIC] part of Strafford County, is an irregularly-shaped town, containing 27,000 acres, and is forty miles from Concord. It formerly belonged to Rochester, from which it was set off and incorporated June 11, 1802. The settlers came principally from Dover, Madbury, Rochester, and towns in that vicinity, and were a hardy, industrious, and intelligent people, early manifesting an interest in religion and education. The Congregational church was organized September 8, 1815, under the labors of Rev. Curtis Coe, who continued to preach as long as he was able; but prior to his settlement they had occasional preaching. With the exception of Teneriffe Mountain, which runs along the east part, the surface is comparatively level, and the soil good for pasturage. This is an agricultural community, and stock is raised to some extent. Salmon Falls river runs along the whole eastern boundary, thirteen miles, while a branch of the same river crosses from the south part of Wakefield, uniting near the centre of the eastern boundary. Milton pond and Gould pond are the only bodies of water. There are three villages – Milton Three Ponds, South Milton, Goodwinville, and Milton Mills; two church edifices – Congregational and Christian; twelve school districts, and three post-offices – Milton, Milton Mills, and West Milton. The Milton Mills, with a capital of $50,000, have eighteen looms and 1,200 spindles, and manufacture woolen and cotton goods to the amount of $90,000. The boot and shoe industry is also prosecuted to a considerable extent, there being $480,000 invested. The Great Falls and Conway Railroad passes through Milton. Population, 1,629; valuation, $494,066.


Previous in sequence: Milton in 1857


References:

Coolidge, Austin J., and Mansfield, John B. (1859, April). A History and Description of New England, General and Local. Boston, MA: Austin J. Coolidge

Hot Water for Itchy Bug Bites

By Muriel Bristol | May 15, 2018

The itching caused by bug bites, as well as that caused by poison ivy and poison oak, may be relieved by the brief application of hot water.

Run the affected part under the hot water tap, or soak it in a bath of hot water, or apply a washcloth soaked in hot water. It should be as hot as you can stand it, but for just a few moments (about 5-10 seconds or so). (The water should be 120 to 130 degrees in temperature, which should not be damaging during such a brief exposure. (120 degrees is the mandated upper limit for modern water heaters)).

Obviously, when you can no longer stand it, withdraw the body part. DO NOT SCALD YOURSELF. This should not be used for open irritated wounds or more chronic skin diseases.

This should provide localized itch relief for 2-3 hours, at which point it could be repeated, if necessary.

This method is a folk remedy of long standing. It appeared in print in the 1961 textbook Dermatology: Diagnosis & Treatment. It is thought to work because itch and pain receptors are intertwined. Overloading them with hot water blocks the itch.


See also Black Flies Return


References:

Graedon, Joe. (2009, August 9). Hot Water for Itchy Bug Bites. Retrieved from https://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2009/08/01/hot-water-for-itchy-bug-bites/

Sulzberger, Dr. Marion B., et al. (1961). Dermatology: Diagnosis & Treatment. Chicago: Year Book Medical Publishers

Wolf, Lauren K. (2011). Itching to Know More about Itch. Retrieved from https://pubs.acs.org/cen/science/89/8927sci1.html

 

Black Flies Return

By Muriel Bristol | May 11, 2018

The very last vestiges of packed snow situated in shady spots disappeared by Mayday. The Spring warmth that dissipated the snow also brought out the black flies. They are typically a nuisance between about Mother’s Day and Father’s Day. I try to remember what my grandfather always said: we need the black flies, as they are food for the fish and birds.

According to a UNH Cooperative Extension fact sheet, New Hampshire is home to 40 species of black flies, of which only 4 or 5 are considered to be either annoying or “significant” human biters. Only the female bites and most species feed on birds or other animals.

Black flies breed in running water. Females lay their eggs on stream vegetation or the water surface. When the larvae hatch (as water temperatures reach the 40-to-50 degree range), they attach themselves to rocks, leaves, grass or other submerged objects. The larvae pupate underwater and emerging adults rise to the surface to fly in Spring or early Summer. They mate near their hatching site and female seeks a blood meal (you) before laying eggs to begin the cycle again.

Only two species of black flies in New Hampshire consistently and abundantly bite humans. These are Prosimulium mixtum and Simulium venustum. Simulium venustum, the so-called “white-stockinged” black fly emerges in early to mid-May in southern New Hampshire and remains a pest until the end of May. In the north, it emerges in late May to early June and can remain abundant until the end of June in some areas and even into July in higher mountain localities (UNH/CE, 2009).

Light clothing colors such as orange, yellow and light blue are less attractive to black flies than dark green, brown and red. They are drawn also to perfumes and aftershaves.

The same remedies used for mosquitoes work also on black flies, although less effectively. The Centers for Disease Control recommend DEET, Picaridin, IR3535, and Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus for use in repelling biting anthropods, including black flies.

Years ago, Ole Time Woodsman Fly Dope was considered quite an effective repellent (although it had a very strong smell) and it was widely available in sporting goods stores. Johnson’s Baby Oil was said to be effective also.

Black flies are active only during the day. They do not bite at night. Depending on weather, black flies tend to be more active at certain times of day. Activity peaks tend to occur around 9:00 to 11:00 AM and again from 4:00 to 7:00 in the late afternoon and early evening, or until the sun falls below the horizon. They tend to be most active on humid, cloudy days and just before storms. If possible, avoid activity during times when black flies are most active. Early morning, midday and late evenings are the best times to work outside (UNH/CE, 2009).

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension has been quoted as saying that

Generally black fly bites cause some itching and minor swelling from the first few bites of the season, following which an immunity develops, with subsequent reduced reactions.  Nonetheless, even individuals who have lived all their lives in black fly country and are exposed every season, can have greater effects if they get an unusually high number of bites on their first exposure of the season, or have some significant change in their physical condition or medical status.

Good luck.


See also Hot Water for Itchy Bug Bites


References:

Ole Time Woodsman. (n.d.). [Home Page] Retrieved from https://oletimewoodsman.com/

University of Maine Cooperative Extension. (2012). Insect Repellents [Fact Sheet]. Retrieved from https://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/ipddl/publications/5108e/

University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension. (2009, July 1). Black Flies [Fact Sheet]. Retrieved from https://extension.unh.edu/resource/black-flies-fact-sheet

Walmart. (2018). Coleman Mosquito Head Net. Retrieved from https://www.walmart.com/ip/Coleman-Mosquito-Head-Net/13848609

 

Milton’s NH Employment Security (NHES) Community Profile

By Muriel Bristol | April 30, 2018

New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) produced an update to its Milton statistics in its NH Community Profiles in December 2017. Most of its figures were updated to 2015.

It included US Census Bureau figures, which estimated Milton’s population at 4,606 inhabitants as of 2015. This would be an increase of 0.3% of the 4,592 inhabitants estimated in 2014. Milton’s net population had not increased significantly since the 2010 census, when it had 4,598 inhabitants.

224 (4.7%) of Milton’s 4,606 inhabitants were aged under 5 years of age, 883 (19.2%) were aged 5-19 years of age, 815 (17.7%) were aged 20-34, 1,223 (26.6%) were aged 34-54 years of age, 803 (17.4%) were aged 55-64 years of age, and 658 (14.3%) were aged 65 years of age or over. There were 2,294 males (49.8%) and 2,312 (50.2%) females. The median age was 43.1 years (an increase of 4.6% over the prior year).

Milton had 2,058 housing units in 2015. Single-Family Units, Detached or Attached accounted for 1,616 (78.5%) of them, Mobile Homes (and Other Housing Units) accounted for 242 (11.6%), 2-4 Unit Multi-family Structures, i.e., apartment buildings, accounted for 107 (5.2%), and 5-or-more Unit Multi-family Structures accounted for 93 (4.5%) housing units.

By computation, the average Milton housing unit sheltered 2.2 inhabitants.

Milton’s single largest employer by far was the Milton town government, whose 247 employees (132 Municipal Services and 115 Education) made up 11.3% of the 2,185 employed inhabitants. Next largest was Index Packaging with 157 employees, Eastern Boats with 38 employees, Iron Mountain with 20 employees, and ProLine with 13 employees.

Most of Milton’s Working Residents (87.5%) commuted to employment out of town. Most of them (78.2%) commuted to another NH community, while some (9.3%) commuted to employment out of state. The mean travel time was 31 minutes. Only 12.5% worked in Milton.

Some 124 inhabitants (5.4%) were unemployed in 2015. (This had declined to 73 inhabitants (3.1%) by 2016).

The Per Capita income was $33,495 in 2015 (an increase of 0.9% over the previous year). The Median Family income was $67,991 and the Median Household income was $60,000. Individuals below the poverty level were 8.8% of the population.

References:

New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES). (2017, December 5). New Hampshire Community Profiles. Retrieved from https://www.nhes.nh.gov/elmi/products/cp/

Milton in the Third (1810) Federal Census

by Muriel Bristol | April 23, 2018

Milton made its first appearance as its own town in the Third Federal Census (1810). (It had separated from Rochester in 1802). It had 1,005 residents on Monday, August 6, 1810: 477 males (47.5%) and 528 females (52.5%).

Milton had 163 households with an average 6.2 inhabitants per household. Only 6 households (3.7%) were headed by a female (5 of them were titled “Widow”).

The surnames represented as heads of household (all other inhabitants were identified as counts only by age and sex) were: Adams, Applebee, Amos, Berry, Brackett, Bragdon, Bunker, Burham, Cate, Chamberlain, Chapman, Chase, Colby, Cook, Copp, Courson, Couston, Dearborn, Dore, Downs, Drew, Ellis, Fisk, Foss, Garland, Gate, Gerrish, Goodwin, Grant, Hanson, Harford, Hartshorne, Hayes, Henderson, Hierd, Horne, How, Jenkins, Jennings, Jewett, Jones, Libby, Lord, Lyman, McDuffee, Matthews, Merry, Meservey, Miller, Moulton, Nute, Nutter, Palmer, Paul, Peavey, Perkin, Phifield, Pinkum, Plumer, Prumer, Remick, Ricker, Rines, Robers, Roberts, Scates, Smith, Stevens, Tibbetts, Tuttle, Twombly, Varna, Varner, Varney, Wakeham, Waker, Wallingford, Watson, Wentworth, Whitehouse, Whitham, Whittum, Willey, Wingate, Worcester, and Young.

326 of Milton’s inhabitants were aged under 10 years of age (161 males and 165 females), 153 were aged 10-15 years of age (66 males and 87 females), 206 were aged 16-25 (97 males and 109 females), 166 were aged 26-44 years of age (76 males and 90 females), and 153 were aged over 45 years of age (76 males and 77 females). All of these were “free white” inhabitants. Peter Gerrish was the only inhabitant in the “all other free persons” category.

Merrill’s Gazetteer of the State of New Hampshire (1817) described Milton seven years later as having “3 religious societies, 1 meeting house, 3 grain mills, 3 sawmills, 1 clothing mill, and 3 trading stores.”


Previous in sequence: Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census; next in sequence: Milton in the Fourth (1820) Federal Census


References:

Wikipedia. (2018, November 9). 1810 United States Census. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1810_United_States_Census