Local NH Liquor & Wine Outlet Stores Join Business Migration to Route 11

By S.D. Plissken | May 1, 2018

The NH Liquor & Wine Outlet stores at the Lilac Mall in Rochester and on Route 11 in Farmington have closed.

The NH Liquor Commission (NHLC) announced on March 2 that it would “… open a new, 20,000-square-foot New Hampshire Liquor & Wine Outlet on Tuesday in Rochester. The state-of-the-art, freestanding store, which is located within The Ridge Marketplace on Route 11 just off Exit 15 of the Spaulding Turnpike, features an enhanced shopping experience, more than 6,600 sizes and varieties of wines and spirits, and a strategic location providing exposure to more than 36,000 daily motorists. NHLC anticipates this new store generating $9.5 million in sales each year. This new, larger location will replace the existing Lilac Mall store on Route 125 in Rochester and the Route 11 site in Farmington.”

NH Liquor Commission Chairman Joseph Mollica said, “We are constantly evaluating our stores looking for opportunities to optimize our sales success, which last year reached an all-time record of nearly $700 million. This new store will serve our customers in Farmington, Rochester, and neighboring communities in Maine, as well as the traveling public.”

The new Ridge Marketplace location opened as planned on Tuesday, March 6. It is 5 miles from the former Farmington location and 3.4 miles from the former Lilac Mall location.

In related news, the NHLC closed the Dover and Somersworth outlets in favor of a larger new Somersworth outlet. The Portsmouth Circle outlet is being expanded in place.

New Hampshire is one of seventeen states that chose to create state-run monopolies when Prohibition was repealed in 1933. (The other choices being continued state-level prohibition and licensing private vendors).

NH Public Radio (NHPR) ran a short report of the history of NH liquor licensing on its Only In New Hampshire show in December 2017: You Asked, We Answered: Why Do All New Hampshire Bars Have To Sell Food? (11:28).

 

Milton’s NH Employment Security (NHES) Community Profile

By Muriel Bristol | April 30, 2018

New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES) produced an update to its Milton statistics in its NH Community Profiles in December 2017. Most of its figures were updated to 2015.

It included US Census Bureau figures, which estimated Milton’s population at 4,606 inhabitants as of 2015. This would be an increase of 0.3% of the 4,592 inhabitants estimated in 2014. Milton’s net population had not increased significantly since the 2010 census, when it had 4,598 inhabitants.

224 (4.7%) of Milton’s 4,606 inhabitants were aged under 5 years of age, 883 (19.2%) were aged 5-19 years of age, 815 (17.7%) were aged 20-34, 1,223 (26.6%) were aged 34-54 years of age, 803 (17.4%) were aged 55-64 years of age, and 658 (14.3%) were aged 65 years of age or over. There were 2,294 males (49.8%) and 2,312 (50.2%) females. The median age was 43.1 years (an increase of 4.6% over the prior year).

Milton had 2,058 housing units in 2015. Single-Family Units, Detached or Attached accounted for 1,616 (78.5%) of them, Mobile Homes (and Other Housing Units) accounted for 242 (11.6%), 2-4 Unit Multi-family Structures, i.e., apartment buildings, accounted for 107 (5.2%), and 5-or-more Unit Multi-family Structures accounted for 93 (4.5%) housing units.

By computation, the average Milton housing unit sheltered 2.2 inhabitants.

Milton’s single largest employer by far was the Milton town government, whose 247 employees (132 Municipal Services and 115 Education) made up 11.3% of the 2,185 employed inhabitants. Next largest was Index Packaging with 157 employees, Eastern Boats with 38 employees, Iron Mountain with 20 employees, and ProLine with 13 employees.

Most of Milton’s Working Residents (87.5%) commuted to employment out of town. Most of them (78.2%) commuted to another NH community, while some (9.3%) commuted to employment out of state. The mean travel time was 31 minutes. Only 12.5% worked in Milton.

Some 124 inhabitants (5.4%) were unemployed in 2015. (This had declined to 73 inhabitants (3.1%) by 2016).

The Per Capita income was $33,495 in 2015 (an increase of 0.9% over the previous year). The Median Family income was $67,991 and the Median Household income was $60,000. Individuals below the poverty level were 8.8% of the population.

References:

New Hampshire Employment Security (NHES). (2017, December 5). New Hampshire Community Profiles. Retrieved from https://www.nhes.nh.gov/elmi/products/cp/

Milton in the Third (1810) Federal Census

by Muriel Bristol | April 23, 2018

Milton made its first appearance as its own town in the Third Federal Census (1810). (It had separated from Rochester in 1802). It had 1,005 residents on Monday, August 6, 1810: 477 males (47.5%) and 528 females (52.5%).

Milton had 163 households with an average 6.2 inhabitants per household. Only 6 households (3.7%) were headed by a female (5 of them were titled “Widow”).

The surnames represented as heads of household (all other inhabitants were identified as counts only by age and sex) were: Adams, Applebee, Amos, Berry, Brackett, Bragdon, Bunker, Burham, Cate, Chamberlain, Chapman, Chase, Colby, Cook, Copp, Courson, Couston, Dearborn, Dore, Downs, Drew, Ellis, Fisk, Foss, Garland, Gate, Gerrish, Goodwin, Grant, Hanson, Harford, Hartshorne, Hayes, Henderson, Hierd, Horne, How, Jenkins, Jennings, Jewett, Jones, Libby, Lord, Lyman, McDuffee, Matthews, Merry, Meservey, Miller, Moulton, Nute, Nutter, Palmer, Paul, Peavey, Perkin, Phifield, Pinkum, Plumer, Prumer, Remick, Ricker, Rines, Robers, Roberts, Scates, Smith, Stevens, Tibbetts, Tuttle, Twombly, Varna, Varner, Varney, Wakeham, Waker, Wallingford, Watson, Wentworth, Whitehouse, Whitham, Whittum, Willey, Wingate, Worcester, and Young.

326 of Milton’s inhabitants were aged under 10 years of age (161 males and 165 females), 153 were aged 10-15 years of age (66 males and 87 females), 206 were aged 16-25 (97 males and 109 females), 166 were aged 26-44 years of age (76 males and 90 females), and 153 were aged over 45 years of age (76 males and 77 females). All of these were “free white” inhabitants. Peter Gerrish was the only inhabitant in the “all other free persons” category.

Merrill’s Gazetteer of the State of New Hampshire (1817) described Milton seven years later as having “3 religious societies, 1 meeting house, 3 grain mills, 3 sawmills, 1 clothing mill, and 3 trading stores.”


Previous in sequence: Northeast Parish in the Second (1800) Federal Census; next in sequence: Milton in the Fourth (1820) Federal Census


References:

Wikipedia. (2018, November 9). 1810 United States Census. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1810_United_States_Census

 

Milton Town Beach Has Its Own Government

By S.D. Plissken | Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Last February, a Milton resident missed the deadline for a petitioned warrant article that would have made access to the Milton Town Beach free to residents.

On Monday, April 2, 2018, Selectman Lucier questioned the purchase of a $12,000 tractor for that same Town Beach. He had been unable to find any authorization for its purchase in warrant articles or in the minutes of either the Board of Selectmen’s Meetings or the Recreation Commission. “Who signed it, who signed the check for it?,” he asked.

He got his answer in the Milton Board of Selectmen [BOS] Meeting of Monday, April 16, 2018.

The BOS have been trying to ascertain the status of its various town committees and commissions, be they active or defunct. Four are listed in the 2017 Town Report: the Conservation Commission, the Economic Development Committee, the Recreation Commission, and the Townhouse Stewardship Committee. Some residents have questioned whether any of them fulfill any legitimate governmental functions.

It emerged that the Recreation Commission was authorized by warrant article in 1948. Since then, it seems to have been reauthorized in 1977. It got a sibling Beach Committee or Commission in 1997 and the two were merged together in 1999. Or so it would seem from the rather spotty records.

The Recreation Director, Karen Brown, added that “the ’99 vote gave the Commission the right to oversee a revolving fund. The 2004 vote gave the Commission the full authority over the beach, the maintenance, all using the funds taken in, and that was elected and both passed, and that’s where the authority came from.” “And then in 2006, there was a vote to try to bring the authority back to the Board of Selectmen and that failed, leaving it as not an advisory committee, but as a committee overseeing and having full access to the money.”

And it would seem that the BOS has little to say about it – the Recreation Commission is its own beach government, established by the voters and authorized to collect its own revenue (sorry, no free beach access) and allocate that revenue just as they see fit (say, on tractors). One of the BOS sits on the Recreation Commission “ex officio” and the BOS fill vacancies to the Commission.

Unless the Recreation Commission is defunct. There seemed to be some doubt as to whether they have met often enough to remain an active commission.

But that remains to be seen…