Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1847-90

By Muriel Bristol | February 18. 2019

Continued from Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1827-46

According to Scales’ History of Strafford County, Milton’s Congregational pastor, Rev. Benjamin G. Willey,

… was succeeded by Revs. Edward F. Abbott, August 1846 to May 1848; James Doldt, May 1848 to January 1870; Frank Haley, February 1870 to April 1874; John N. Lowell, August 1874 to August 1875; Samuel W. Clarke, April 1876 to April 1877; John N. Jewett [SIC], 1877 to 1880; George Sterling, October 1881 to 1890 [SIC].

Scales’ list has several errors. The Rev. John N. Jewett entry was actually a second pastorate of Rev. John N. Lowell; and the Rev. George Sterling actually left in 1884, to be succeeded by a second pastorate of Rev. Frank Haley.

Edward F. Abbott – “August 1846 to May 1848″

Edward Farrington Abbott was born in Andover, MA, December 24, 1816, son of Zebediah and Sarah (Farrington) Abbott.

He married in NH, circa 1838, Charlotte Cushing. She was born in NH in 1818.

Rev. Edward F. Abbot, son of Dea. Zebadiah Abbot, studied theology at Gilmanton, N.H. [Class of 1840]; was ordained minister of church in Milton, N.H., 1846; at Dublin, N.H., 1855; at Ipswich, Mass., 1855 (Bailey, 1880).

Edward F. Abbott, a clergyman, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), headed a Loudon, NH, household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Charlotte Abbott, aged thirty-two years (b. NH), and Clarabel F. Abbott, aged two years (b. NH).

Edward F. Abbott, a clergyman, aged thirty-eight years (b. Andover, MA), headed an Andover, MA, household at the time of the First (1855) MA State Census. His household included Charlotte C. Abbott, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), and Clara S. Abbott, aged seven years (b. NH). They shared a two-family dwelling with the household of William Course, a bootmaker, aged forty-two years (b. Scotland).

Ichabod Crane, a farmer, aged seventy-six (b. NH), headed a Surry, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Clarissa A. Crane, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), and Edward F. Abbott, a Congregational clergyman, aged forty-four years (b. MA). Ichabod Crane had real estate valued at $800 and personal estate valued at $2,500; Clarissa A. Crane had personal estate valued at $100; and Edward F. Abbott had personal estate valued at $400.

[Abbott’s landlord happened to have the same name as Washington Irving’s fictional schoolmaster, who was pursued by a headless horseman in his 1820 short story The Legend of Sleepy Hollow].

Edward F. Abbott, a Con. clergyman, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), headed an Andover, MA, household at the time of the Second (1865) MA State Census. His household included Charlotte C. Abbott, aged forty-seven years (b. NH), and Clarabel S. Abbott, aged seventeen years (b. NH).

The Congregationalist and Recorder says: At the recent meeting of the Andover Association, held in Lowell, after due enquiry, and hearing statements and confession from Rev. Edward F. Abbott of Andover, a resolution was passed to the effect that the Association are satisfied as to his piety and soundness in the faith, and now recommend him as a Congregational minister in good and regular standing. It will be remembered that, on account of a change of his views on future punishment he withdrew himself for a time from our denomination (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), May 9, 1868).

William Tinker a tanner, aged forty-six years (b. MA), headed an Otis, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Emily C. Tinker, keeping house, aged forty-three years, Pearl S. Tinker, bookkeeping, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Emma L. Tinker, attending school, aged eleven years (b. MA), Bert S. Tinker, at home, aged two years (b. MA), Catherine Waters, attending school, aged fourteen years (b. Ireland), and Edward Abbot, a clergyman, aged fifty-three years (b. MA). William Tinker had real estate valued at $7,200 and personal estate valued at $4,000.

Charlotte (Cushing) Abbott died in Lebanon, ME, June 17, 1882. Edward F. Abbott died in Andover, MA, June 17, 1888. Daughter Clarabel S. Abbott died in Lebanon, ME, September 26, 1888.

James Doldt – “May 1848 to January 1870″

James Doldt was born in Groton, MA, September 30, 1809. He was probably a son of Frederick and Nancy (Pell) Doldt, and brother to Nancy Doldt (b. 1804), Mary Dolt (b. 1806), and Frederick Doldt, Jr. (b. 1807). In later records, his father was said to have been a native of Germany.

Rev. James Doldt married (1st), May 3, 1842, Eliza Etta Stevens, he of Effingham and she of Canterbury. She was born in Canterbury, NH, October 29, 1810, daughter of Edmund and Betsy (Shepard) Stevens.

James Doldt, a Con. clergyman, aged forty years (b. MA), headed a Milton household at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. His household included Eliza Doldt, aged thirty nine years (b. NH), Marietta L. Doldt, aged five years (b. NH), and Eliza A. Doldt, aged three years (b. NH). He had no valued real estate. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of James H. Twombly, a painter, aged fifty-three years, and Daniel Jenness, a carpenter, aged forty-four years.

Eliza E. (Stevens) Doldt died in Milton, NH, March 1, 1856. He married (2nd), February 16, 1858, Lucia Chandler. She was born in Concord, NH, June 14, 1816, daughter of Henry and Ruth (Abbott) Chandler.

James Doldt, a clergyman, aged forty-nine years (b. NH [SIC]), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Lavina Doldt, aged forty-four years (b. NH), Marietta P. Doldt, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Eliza A. Doldt, aged thirteen years (b. NH), James Kenison, a carpenter, aged twenty-six years, and Chales Jenkins, a shoemaker, aged eight years (b. NH). James Doldt had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $600. His household appeared in the enumeration between those of William W. Cook, a farmer, aged sixty-two years (b. NH), and Daniel Collins, a R.R. man, aged thirty years (b. Ireland).

James Doldt appeared as Milton’s Congregational minister in the Milton business directory of 1867-68. and 1869-70.

Rev. James  and Lucia C. Doldt went next to Canterbury, NH, in February 1870.

Religious Intelligence. NEW HAMPSHIRE. Rev. James Doldt of Milton,. is to supply the church in Canterbury one year, and will soon commence his labors there (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), December 11, 1869).

James Doldt, a clergyman, aged sixty years (b. MA), headed a Canterbury, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Lucia C. Doldt, keeping house, aged fifty-two years (b. NH). James Doldt had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $1,500.

Lyford’s History of the Town of Canterbury left this portrait of him:

Like his predecessors, Mr. Doldt was of the old school of preachers in the form of his sermons and the manner of his delivery. His pulpit utterances were less of a doctrinal nature than those of Mr. Moody. He emphasized the love of God more than his retributive justice. There was no mistaking that he was a clergyman, his dress and dignity at all times indicating his calling. His greeting, however, was kindly and his apparent reserve disappeared in conversation (Lyford, 1912).

James Doldt, a clergyman, aged seventy-one years (b. MA), headed a Canterbury, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lucia Doldt, keeping house, aged sixty-four years (b. NH).

State Religious News. New Hampshire. CANTERBURY. Rev. James Doldt, acting pastor of the church in this place for fifteen years, is sick with Bright’s disease and has resigned his charge. Services were conducted last Sabbath by the young men (Vermont Chronicle (Bellow’s Falls, VT), March 19, 1886).

New Hampshire. CANTERBURY. Rev. James Doldt, acting pastor of this place for fifteen years, has retired and has gone to Orange, N.J., to live with his daughter. He is quite feeble in health. Lucien C. Kimball of Andover, Mass., supplied last Sabbath and a call has been extended for a permanent supply (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), October 29, 1886).

NEW HAMPSHIRE NEWS. Rev. James Doldt of Canterbury died on Sunday at Orange, N.J., whither he went a few days ago for the benefit of his health. He was born in Groton, Mass., Sept. 30, 1809, was graduated from Gilmanton theological seminary in 1841, and was ordained to the Congregational ministry, Sept. 21, 1843. His first settlement was In Wolfboro, N.H., and afterwards he was in Effingham, Milton and Canterbury, where he was pastor of the Congregational church until his resignation a few weeks ago (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), [Saturday,] November 6, 1886).

James Doldt died in East Orange, NJ, October 31, 1886. Lucia (Chandler) Doldt died June 14, 1888.

Frank Haley – First Pastorate – “February 1870 to April 1874″

Frank Enoch Haley was born in Tuftonboro, NH, February 20, 1835, son of Enoch and Cynthia (Piper) Haley.

Haley, Frank, M.D., son of Deacon Enoch and Cynthia (Piper) Haley, was born in Tuftonboro, N.H., Feb. 20, 1835. Studied at the Wolfboro and Tuftonboro Academy 1850, 1852-54. Took course of medical lectures at Bowdoin College, 1856. Studied in Dartmouth Medical College, 1857-58, when he was graduated. Practiced medicine at Tamworth, N.H., 1858-59. Studied theology in Andover Seminary and was graduated in 1863. Ordained as pastor at Enfield, N.H., Oct. 7, 1863, dismissed May 1, 1866; Concord, Mass., installed Jan. 3, 1867, dismissed April 30, 1867. Was missionary of the A.M.A. at Macon, Ga., October 1867 to October 1868, as local superintendent of educational and religious work. Pastor at Boscawen, N.H., December 1868 to May 1869; Milton, N.H., February 1870 to April 1874, also practicing medicine there from February 1871. Was missionary under the A.M.A. at Macon, Ga. April 1874 to October 1874; Dover, N.H., Belknap Church, December 1874 to December 1875; Seabrook and Hampton Falls, N.H., December 1875 to June 1881; Boscawen, N.H., June 1881, installed Oct. 11, 1882, dismissed June 11, 1885; Milton, N.H., June 1885 to June 1891. Was trustee of the Nute High School and library, Milton, N.H. from 1889 till his death, and was librarian of the Nute library from 1891. Publications: Funeral Sermon of Mr. Dexter Harris, of Canaan, N.H., Concord, N.H., 1865, 19 pp. A Discourse delivered in the Congregational Church at Milton, N.H., at the funeral services of Dr. Stephen Drew, Lynn, Mass., 1872, 16 pp. A Discourse delivered at the funeral of Hon. Charles Jones, Milton, N.H., Dover, N.H., 1873, 16 pp. Married in Tuftonboro, N.H. Dec. 16, 1857, Rhoda Jane, daughter of James and Mary (Smith) Hayes, who died at Seabrook, N.H., Feb. 23, 1877. Two children, one living. Married at Milton, N.H., May 1, 1878, Sarah, daughter of Deacon Enoch W. and Orinda (Ayers) Plummer, who survives him. One child living. Died of Bright’s disease at Milton, N.H., March 28, 1904, aged 69 years, 1 month, 8 days (Congregational Publishing Society, 1905).

He married (1st) in Tuftonboro, NH, December 16, 1857, Jane Rhoda “Jennie” Hayes. She was born in Tuftonboro, October 1, 1839, daughter of James and Mary D. (Caverly) Hayes.

Candidates for the Ministry. Messrs. Frank Haley, M. L. Severance, Geo. Hardy, Alba L.P. Loomis, William W. Chapin, Lucius H. Higgins, Nathan B. Knapp, Samuel L. Bates, William S. Hazen, Roswell Harris, Jr., Theodore S. Pond, William A. Haselton, John Otis Barrows and M. Bradford Boardman, members of Andover Theological Seminary, were examined by the Derry and Manchester Association, at Manchester, N. H., on the 13th inst., and licensed to preach, the Gospel (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), January 20, 1863).

Frank Haley, a student, aged twenty-eight years (b. NH), married, registered for the Class I military draft in Andover, MA, in June 1863.

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Massachusetts. The orthodox Church in Concord has voted a call to Rev. Frank Haley, late of Enfield, N.H. The salary mentioned is $1400 (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), December 1, 1866).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Massachusetts. Rev. Frank Haley was installed over the Congregational church in Concord, on Thursday, Jan. 3d (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), January 19, 1867).

One may note that the Congregational church was still considered to be the “orthodox” church.

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. South and West. The Congregational Church at Macon, Ga., has received twenty members since April last. Rev. Frank Haley, pastor (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), November 7, 1868).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. New Hampshire. Rev. Frank Haley is engaged to preach at Boscawen for the current year (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), April 17, 1869).

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. New Hampshire. Rev. Frank Haley, who has been supplying the Congregational Church in Boscawen, since January, and had engaged for a year, has been obliged to suspend all ministerial labors by the failure of his health (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), September 1869).

Frank Haley, a clergyman, aged thirty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Jenny R. Haley, keeping house, aged thirty years (b. NH), Mary L. Haley, at home, aged eleven years (b. NH), and Agnes C. Haley, aged six years (b. NH). Frank Haley had personal estate valued at $300. His household appeared between those of Nancy J. Dixon, keeping house, aged forty-four years (b. ME), and John M. Hanson, a teamster, aged fifty years (b. ME).

Rev. Haley evidently considered relocating to Candia, NH, in 1871, but does not seem to have done so (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), January 14, 1871).

Frank Haley appeared as Milton’s Congregational minister in the Milton business directories of 1871, 1873, and 1874.

RELIGIOUS NEWS. Congregational. Rev. Frank Haley who has supplied the church in Milton. N.H., for the last four years, has removed to Macon, Georgia (Vermont Journal (Bellows Falls, VT), April 25, 1874).

Jane R. “Jennie” (Hayes) Haley died in Seabrook, NH, February 23, 1877. He married (2nd) in Seabrook, NH, May 1, 1878. Sarah Plummer. She was born in Milton, NH, June 17, 1848, daughter of Enoch W. and Orinda (Ayers) Plummer.

Ministers and Churches. New Hampshire. BOSCOWAN. Rev. Frank Haley was installed as pastor of the First Congregational church on the 11th. Eight churches were represented on the Council. The examination was very satisfactory. Sermon by Rev. George B. Spalding, D.D., of Dover; prayer by Rev. Edward Buxton of Webster; charge to the pastor, by Rev. James Doldt of Canterbury; right hand of fellowship by Rev. John H. Larry of Fisherville. Mr. Haley has been acting pastor of this church since June, 1881. and thirteen years ago he labored in this field for several months, but sickness obliged him to abandon his work (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), October 20, 1882).

Continued in his second pastorate (see below).

John N. Lowell – First Pastorate – “August 1874 to August 1875″

John N. Lowell was born in South Newburgh, ME, in September 1846, son of Jeremiah and Lucy M. (Fernald) Lowell.

Elijah Noyes, a farmer, aged forty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Newbury, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Martha Noyes, keeping house, aged fifty-five years (b. Ireland), Albert A. Noyes, at home, aged nineteen years (b. MA), John N. Lowell, a boarder, aged twenty-two years (b. ME), John M. Potter, a boarder, aged seventeen years (b. MA), George N. Does, a boarder, aged twenty years (b. NH), Charles A. Does, a boarder, aged eighteen years (b. NH), Jesse H. Bickford, a boarder, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), Frank M. Porter, a boarder, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Edward H. Potter, a boarder, aged eighteen years (b. MA), and Bernard Damon, a boarder, aged seventeen years (b. MA). Many of the surrounding houses had also taken in boarders, all of them young men, which might suggest that they were all students.

NEW ENGLAND NEWS BY MAIL. At the meeting of the Piseataqua Association of Congregational Ministers, held at Newmarket, N.H., Tuesday, with the Rev. Swift Byington, pastor of the First Church, Exeter, Mr. John N. Lowell, a member of Andover Theological Seminary, was licensed to preach for two years. Mr. Lowell has received and accepted an invitation to supply the pulpit, of the Congregational Church in Milton for one year (Boston Globe, January 22, 1875).

J.N. Lowell appeared as Milton’s Congregational minister in the Milton business directory of 1876.

Continued in his second pastorate (see below).

Samuel W. Clarke – “April 1876 to April 1877″

Samuel Worcester Clarke was born in MA, February 7, 1828, son of Benjamin F. and Sarah (Chapin) Clarke.

He married, probably in Johnstown, NY, circa 1853-54, Catherine Bruce. She was born in Washington, NY, July 4, 1833, daughter of James Bruce (b. Scotland).

Samuel W. Clark, a cabinetmaker, aged twenty-six years (b. MA), headed a Johnstown, NY, household at the time of the First (1855) NY State Census. His household included Catharin Clark, aged twenty-three years (b. Washington, NY), and Ernest C. Clark, aged five months (b. Tarlton, NY). He lived in Johnston for seven years, while she had lived there for only six years.

Samuel W. Clark, a mechanic, aged thirty=two years (b. MA), headed a Johnstown, NY, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Catherine Clark, aged twenty-eight years (b. NY), and Ernest Clark, aged five years (b. NY). Samuel W. Clark had real estate valued at $1,600. The Clarks shared a two-family dwelling with the household of Alvira Hall, a glove maker, aged twenty-two years (b. NY). Her household included Myra M. Scudder, a milliner, aged forty-five years (b. NY), and Elizabeth Van Allen, aged twenty-two years (b. NY).

Samuel W. Clark, a cabinetmaker, aged thirty-seven years (b. MA), headed a Johnstown, NY, household at the time of the Second (1865) NY State Census. His household included Cate Clark, aged thirty-three years (b. Washington, NY), E.C. Clark, aged ten years (b. Tarlton, NY), Luella Clark, aged two years, and Ethel Clark, aged four months.

S.W. Clark, works in cabinet shop, aged forty-two years (b. MA), headed a New Milford, CT. household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Katy Clark, keeping house, aged thirty-seven years (b. NY), Ernest Clark, aged fifteen years (b. NY), Luellah Clark, aged seven years (b. NY), and Ethel Clark, aged five years (b. NY). S.W. Clark had no valued real estate.

Samuel Worcester Clarke was ordained in Warwick, MA, January 14, 1874, where he then served as pastor.

Samuel W. Clark appeared as Milton’s Congregational minister in the Milton business directory of  1877.

Ministers and Churches. NEW HAMPSHIRE. REV. S.W. CLARKE closed his labors with the church at Milton April 29, and goes to Wenham, Mass. (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), May 19, 1877).

Ministers and Churches. Massachusetts. REV. SAMUEL W. CLARKE has closed his engagement at Wenham (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), April 20, 1878).

Samuel Clark, a clergyman, aged fifty-two years (b. MA), headed a Holyoke, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Catherine Clark, keeps house, aged forty-five years (b. MA), and his children, Ernest C. Clark, insurance agent, aged twenty-five years, Luella Clark, at school, aged seventeen years (b. NY), and Ethel L. Clark, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NY). They resided on Dwight Street.

In an August 1897 Boston Globe gossip column, Rev. Clarke received a visit from his daughter, Luella Scott, and  her children.

BARNSTABLE. At West Barnstable, … Rev S.W. Clarke is entertaining Mrs. Wm. Scott and children (Boston Globe, August 15, 1897).

Samuel W. Clark, a clergyman, aged seventy-two years (b. MA), headed an Ashford, CT, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of forty-four years), Catherine B. Clark, aged sixty-seven years (b. NY). She was the mother of five children, of whom two were still living.

Luella K. Scott, a music teacher, aged forty-seven years (b. NY), headed a Springfield (Ward 4), MA, household at the time of the Thirteenth (1910) Federal Census. Her household included her son, Everett C. Scott, aged fourteen years (b. MA), and her mother, Catherine B. Clarke, aged seventy-seven years (b. NY). both women were widows.

Rev. Samuel W. Clarke died November 12, 1906. Katherine (Bruce) Clarke, of Springfield, MA, died in Granby, MA, September 11, 1911, aged seventy-two years, two months, and sixteen days.

John N. Lowell – Second Pastorate – “1877 to 1880″

Continued from his first pastorate (see above).

John N. Lowell married in Rowley, MA, July 5, 1877, Harriet B. Richardson, he of New Haven, CT, and she of Rowley. She was born in Ipswich, MA, circa 1841, daughter of Edward and Sarah J. (Appleton) Richardson.

Ministers and Churches. Other States. Mr. John N. Lowell was ordained and installed as pastor of the church in Milton, N.H., on Thursday of last week. The sermon was by Rev. John Pike, D.D., of Rowley, Massachusetts (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), [Saturday,] December 1, 1877).

J.N. Lowell appeared as Milton’s Congregational minister in the Milton business directory of 1880.

John N. Lowell, a clergyman, aged thirty-three years (b. ME), headed a Milton (3-Ponds Village) household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Harriet B. Lowell, keeping house, aged twenty-nine years (b. MA).

NEW ENGLAND NEWS. NEW HAMPSHIRE, Rev. John N. Lowell of Milton has been invited by the Congregational Society of West Haverhill, Mass., to become their pastor (Boston Post, July 26, 1880).

AUGUST GAYETY. Mountain Resorts Crowded With Tourists. Jackson, Intervale, North Conway and Kearsage Scenes of Festivity. Dancing, Driving, Card Parties and Mountain Climbing Popular Pastimes. INTERVALE. A party from Haverhill, composed of John N. Lowell, Miss Harriett B. Lowell, Miss Elsie G. Webster, Miss Lilla A. Hayes, Miss Josephine L. Elliot and Messrs. Perry and Lowell O. Elliot, are having things pretty much their own way for few weeks at the Idlewild (Boston Globe, August 6, 1899).

John N. Lowell, a clergyman, aged fifty-three years (b. ME), headed a Haverhill (Ward 5), MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife (of twenty-two years), Harriet B. Lowell, aged forty-nine years (b. MA).

Harriet B. (“m.n. Richardson”) Lowell died in Haverhill, MA, November 24, 1901, aged fifty-one years, eight months, and twenty-one days. (Buried Rowley, MA).

Rev. John N. Lowell conducted the funeral services for two of the fourteen victims of the Isle of Shoals excursion sinking known as the “Tragedy of the Waitresses.”

MARSHALL SISTERS. Haverhill Victims of Isles of Shoals Burled. HAVERHILL, July 20. Miss Ena and Miss Mary E. Marshall were buried in Hillside Cemetery here today. Rev. John N. Lowell conducted services in West Parish Congregational church, which were largely attended (Boston Globe, July 21, 1902).

John N. Lowell died in Haverhill, MA, May 30, 1903, aged fifty-six years, eight months, and ten days.

NEW ENGLAND BRIEFS. Rev. John N. Lowell, pastor of the West Congregational church, Haverhill, Mass., died from pneumonia. He was born at Newburg, Me., in 1846.(Vermont Tribune (Ludlow, VT), June 5, 1903).

Hiatus

The Milton business directories of 1881 and 1882 listed no Congregational minister at all.

George Sterling – “October 1881 to March 1884″

George Sterling was born in New Milford, CT, July 27, 1842, son of Samuel B. and Minerva (Beard) Sterling.

[Andover Theological Seminary] CLASS OF 1873. George Sterling. Son of Samuel B. Sterling and Minerva Beard; born at New Milford, Conn., July 27, 1842; united with the church at New Milford, July 1, 1866; studied at the Union School, Schenectady, NY; Union College 1866-68; was graduated from Amherst College, 1870; studied at Union Theological Seminary, 1870-72, and was graduated from this Seminary, 1873. He was licensed to preach September 10, 1872; supplied the pulpit at West Stockbridge Centre, Mass., 1872, and at Grattan and Smyrna, Mich., 1873-74; was ordained at Wayland, Mich., December 8, 1874; acting pastor, Wayland, Mich., 1874-75; acting pastor, Stacyville, Io., 1875-76; acting pastor, Lenora, Minn., 1876-78; acting pastor, Higganum, Conn., 1878-80; supplied Templeton, Mass., 1880-81; installed Milton, N.H., Nov 30, 1881, dismissed April 1, 1884; installed at Glover, Vt., July 8, 1885, dismissed May 23, 1888; acting pastor, North Hyde Park, Vt., 1888-89; installed Dunbarton, N.H., November 13, 1889, dismissed June 16, 1892; acting pastor, Berkley, Mass., 1892-94; acting pastor, Manomet, Mass., 1894-97; acting pastor, Windsor, Mass., 1897 until his death. He married October 20, 1874, at West Stockbridge Centre, Mass., Lovina Reed, daughter of Uriah Reed and Mary Van Deusen of Alford Mass. She survives him with one daughter. Mr. Sterling died at Windsor, Mass., suddenly, of heart disease, November 26, 1901, aged fifty-nine years, three months, and thirty days (Andover Theological Seminary, 1902).

Geo. Sterling, a student, aged twenty-seven years (b. NY [SIC]), resided in an Amherst College residence, in Amherst, MA, at the time of the Seventh (1870) Federal Census. Alva B. Kittredge, a teacher, aged twenty-five years (b. MA), headed the residence list, which housed sixty-six students.

George Sterling married at West Stockbridge, MA, October 20, 1874, Lovina Reed. She was born in MA, in February 1852, daughter of Uriah and Mary (Van Deusen) Reed.

Geo. Sterling, a clergyman, aged thirty-seven years (b. CT), headed a Haddam, CT, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lovina Sterling, housekeeping, aged twenty-eight years (b. MA), and his daughter, Alice M. Sterling, aged three months (b. CT (in March)).

Ministers and Churches. New Hampshire. MILTON. Rev. George Sterling has accepted a unanimous call to the pastorate of the Congregational society. A larger sum than was required for the stipulated salary was raised in one day (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), October 8, 1881).

Ministers and Churches. New Hampshire. MILTON. A council is called by the Congregational Church to install as pastor Rev. George Sterling. The churches invited are the First church, Dover, and the churches at Farmington, Salmon Falls, Wakefield, Wolfeboro and Lebanon, Maine. Rev. Dr. Spalding is expected to preach the installation sermon (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), November 26, 1881).

Geo. Sterling appeared as Milton’s Congregational minister in the Milton business directory of 1884.

Ministers and Churches. New Hampshire. MILTON. Rev. George Sterling has preached as a candidate before the Congregational church at Greenfield for two Sundays past (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), March 21, 1884).

Ministers and Churches. Vermont. GLOVER. The church in Glover again has a pastor. A council assembled at the West Village, July 8, to examine and install Rev. George Sterling. Ten churches were represented in the council. The examination of the pastor-elect was thorough and well sustained. The written statement of his doctrinal belief was especially worthy of commendation for its fulness, clearness, soundness and strength, evincing a determination like Paul’s to hold and preach nothing but the gospel of Christ. The parts of the installation service were these: Sermon by Rev. S. Knowlton of Greensboro, prayer by Rev. W.N. Bacon of Coventry, right hand of fellowship by Rev. C.B. Moody of Barton, charge to the pastor by Rev. S.K.B. Perkins of Middleton, Mass., and address to the people by Rev E.P. Wild of Newport. Mr. Sterling is the fifth pastor of this church, which was organized in 1817. Rev. Reuben Mason was installed in March, 1826, and dismissed in 1836. Rev. Ora Pearson was installed in January, 1840, over the two churches in Glover and Barton, and was dismissed in November, 1844. Rev. S.K.B. Perkins was ordained pastor in January, 1860, and dismissed in 1876. Rev. C.B. Thomas was installed in January, 1878, and died in January, 1881. The present pastor is a graduate of Amherst College and Andover Seminary. He was ordained at Wayland, Mich., in 1874; was installed pastor at Milton, N.H., in November, 1881, from which charge he was dismissed in March, 1884. He has supplied the church in Glover for more than a year, and the people have become warmly attached to him. Quite a number of additions have been made to the church . during the year, seven persons having united by profession at the July communion. SCRIBE (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), July 27, 1885).

George Sterling, no occupation listed, aged fifty-seven years (b. CT), headed a Windsor, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Lovina R. Sterling, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), and his daughter, Alice M. Sterling, aged twenty-three years (b. IA).

Rev. George Sterling died in Windsor, MA, November 28, 1901. Lovina (Reed) Sterling died in 1935.

Frank Haley – Second PastorateMay 1885 to 1890 [?]

Continued from his first pastorate (see above).

Ministers and Churches. New Hampshire. MILTON. Rev. Frank Haley has accepted a call from this church, and began his services two weeks ago. All are glad at heart to recall our pastor of years ago, and hope the time is far distant when he will make another change (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), June 12, 1885).

Frank Haley appeared as Milton’s Congregational minister in the Milton business directory of 1887 and 1889.

Frank Haley was one of eleven trustees of the Nute High School and Library at its founding in 1889, and he served as its original librarian from its opening in September 1891 until his death. (His widow, Mrs. Sarah P. Haley, succeeded him as Nute librarian, through at least 1923).

Frank Haley, a retired clergyman, aged sixty-five years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Sarah Haley, aged fifty-two years (b. NH), his daughter, Susan P. Haley, an accountant, aged twenty years (b. NH), and his sister-in-law, Susan E. Plummer, aged sixty years (b. NH).

Frank Haley died in Milton, NH, March 28, 1904. Sarah (Plummer) Haley died in Milton, NH, April 10, 1931.

DEATHS. HALEY. In Milton, N.H., March 28, Rev. Frank Haley, aged 69. He graduated from Dartmouth Medical in 1857, and practiced medicine for some years, then entered Andover Seminary where he graduated and has preached since in Enfield and Milton, N.H., and Concord, Mass., and was in charge of a home missionary church and school in Macon, Ga. Although hampered by ill health all his life, he did important work wherever he was along educational lines and in the pulpit (Congregationalist and Christian World, May 21, 1904). 


Previous in sequence: Milton’s Congregational Ministers of 1827-46


References:

Andover Theological Seminary. (1902). Necrology. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3jDiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA62

Bailey, Sarah Loring. (1880). Historical Sketches of Andover: (comprising the Present Towns of North. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=M8soAAAAYAAJ

Bowker, R.K. (1923). American Library Directory: A Classified List of Libraries in the United States. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=YwkbAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA93

Congregational Publishing Society. (1905). The Year Book of the Congregational Christian Churches of the United States of America. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=jRdKAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA21

Find a Grave. (2011, February 26). Rev. Edward F. Abbott. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/66170798

Find a Grave. (2010, February 3). Rev. George Sterling. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/47532364

Find a Grave. (2005, January 4) Rev. Samuel Worcester Clarke. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/10215944

Lyford, James O. (1912). History of the Town of Canterbury, New Hampshire. Concord, NH: Rumford Press.

Saggerer, Melissa (2012, July 17). 110th Anniversary of the Tragedy of the Waitresses. Retrieved from vaughncottage.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/110th-anniversary-of-the-tragedy-of-the-waitresses/

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, and Representative Men. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=pA516

Wikipedia. (2018, December 13). Andover Theological Seminary. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andover_Theological_Seminary

Wikipedia. (2019, January 8). Ichabod Crane. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ichabod_Crane

Milton in the News – 1874

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | February 17, 2019

In this year, we encounter some large steer, the departure of Rev. Frank Haley, the reopening of the Brierly felt mill, the death of Rev. Daniel B. Goodwin’s adult daughter, and the destruction by fire of Milton’s entire business district.


AGRICULTURAL BREVITIES. James B. Downs of Milton, Three Ponds, N.H., has a yoke of red Durham steers, 4 years old, that weigh 4300 pounds (Vermont Record and Farmer (Brattleboro, VT), April 10, 1874).

This particular pair, or yoke, of shorthorn steer were notable for their great size and weight. A modern pair would be considered to be of “marketable” size at 2,300 pounds.


RELIGIOUS NEWS. Congregational. Rev. Frank Haley who has supplied the church in Milton. N.H., for the last four years, has removed to Macon, Georgia (Vermont Journal (Bellows Falls, VT), April 25, 1874).

Rev. Frank Haley would return to Milton for a second pastorate. He became also a trustee of the Nute High School and Library and its first librarian.


New Felting Mill. – The well-known and enterprising manufacturing firm of Messrs. E. Brierly & Son, Milton Mills, New Hampshire, whose felting mill was burnt on the 12th of June, 1873, has already rebuilt, and the new mill is one of the most thoroughly constructed establishments in the United States. It is already in operation, though not to its full capacity. Felting mills are not numerous in this country, but there is a steadily increasing demand for felt goods on account of their superior weight and durability. The Messrs. Brierly have been in business here for twenty years. Their new mill is brick-lined throughout, and every precaution has been taken against the recurrence of fire. There are nine tubs under the roof containing as many thousand gallons of water, with three hydrants and sprinklers in every room, so that in case of fire each apartment can be flooded almost instantly. There is also a vigilant watch on the premises. The mill stands just over the State line in Acton, Maine, on the Salmon Falls River, which supplies the Great Falls Manufacturing Company with water power. The river drains several large ponds. In case of drought the mill is provided with a steam-engine of 150-horse power. Wood is cheaper here than coal, costing only $4 per cord, and is used in the mill. The establishment bas 12,000 feet of steam and water-piping. Among the goods manufactured by the Messrs. Brierly are Petersham’s beavers, embossed skirts, table and piano covers, felts for lining India-rubber boots and shoes, Ulsters and over­ coatings, a soft flannel for children’s wear, etc., etc. The beavers are superior in weight and durability to the best woven cloths, and are of great beauty. They consist of drabs, dark greens, and blues, olives. Oxfords, dark olives, smoke browns, etc. The Petershams, Ulsters and other over­ coatings are water-proof, and of superior weight and stoutness. The cloth for boot linings is called “grizzly bear skin.” Messrs. Brierly & Son manufacture some $400,000 worth of felt goods annually and find a ready market for it even in these dull times. The felting machinery is English and of twice the working power of any American felting machinery. In the carding room are thirteen carding machines preparing the bats, and there are nine embossing presses printing the skirts, table and piano covers. Altogether Milton Mills, N.H., is one of the most enterprising villages in the Granite State, and its prosperity is largely due to the energy and public spirit of Messrs. E. Brierly & Son. It has several churches and is connected with the Eastern Railroad at Union Village by a coach (Boston Post, October 12, 1874).


DIED. In Somerville, Nov. 6, Martha S., wife of Benjamin Fitch and daughter of Rev. D.B. Goodwin of W. Milton, N.H., 33 yrs. 10 mos. (New England Farmer (Boston, MA), November 14, 1874).

Martha S. Goodwin was born in Middleton, NH, circa 1841, daughter of Daniel B. and Susan R. Goodwin.

Martha S. Goodwin married in Milton, NH, December 17, 1863, Benjamin Fitch, he of Boston, MA, and she of Milton. Benjamin Fitch was born in in Bedford, MA, September 20, 1838, son of Nathan and Louisa Fitch. Rev. Ezekiel True performed the ceremony. (True was then Free-Will Baptist minister of Farmington, NH; Rev. Daniel B. Goodwin was not yet fully ordained as West Milton’s Christian Church minister).

Benjamin Fitch, a provisions dealer, aged thirty years (born MA), headed a Somerville, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Martha Fitch, aged twenty-eight years (born NH), May Fitch, at home, aged three years (born NH), Louis Fitch, at home, aged two years (born NH), Charles Cotton, clerk in store, aged nineteen years (born NH), and Abbie Cotton, a domestic servant, aged sixteen years (born NH). Benjamin Fitch had real estate valued at $5,500 and personal estate valued at $8,000.

Martha S. (Goodwin) Fitch died in Somerville, MA, November 5, 1874, aged thirty-three years, ten months, and thirteen days. Benjamin Fitch died in Lexington, MA, in 1921.


Milton had a serious fire near the end of the year that destroyed its business district.

NEWS OF THE WEEK. Wednesday, Dec. 2d. A fire broke out about five o’clock this morning which destroyed the entire business portion of Milton, N.H. The losses aggregate $97,000, two-thirds insured. The principal loss is the Whitney House, which is $25,000, the remainder is divided among twenty-five losers in sums of $500 to $10,000. The insurance companies most heavily represented are the Home of New York, Hartford and Phoenix of Hartford, and the New Hampshire State (Buffalo Weekly Courier, December 9, 1874).

HARTFORD AND VICINITY. Brief Mention. The insurance companies have adjusted the losses at Milton, N.H., paying about $60,000; the Hartford loses $20,000, and the Ætna $1,500 (Hartford Courant, December 21, 1874).


Previous in sequence: Milton in the News – 1873; next in sequence: Milton in the News – 1875


References:

UNH Extension Project. (2018, June 18). Raising Dairy Beef Steers in New Hampshire. extension.unh.edu/blog/raising-dairy-beef-steers-new-hampshire

Wikipedia. (2018, August 1). Durham Ox. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durham_Ox

Non-Public BOS Session Scheduled (February 20, 2019)

By Muriel Bristol | February 15, 2019

The Milton Board of Selectmen (BOS) have posted their agenda for a BOS meeting to be held Wednesday, February 20.


This meeting is scheduled to begin with a Non-Public session beginning at 5:30 PM. That agenda has one Non-Public items classed as 91-A:3 II (a).

91-A:3 II (a) The dismissal, promotion, or compensation of any public employee or the disciplining of such employee, or the investigation of any charges against him or her, unless the employee affected (1) has a right to a meeting and (2) requests that the meeting be open, in which case the request shall be granted.

The agenda has the additional notation that, in this case, the Non-Public session concerns “Employee Compensation.”

The BOS intend to adjourn their Non-Public BOS session at approximately (*) 6:00 PM, when they intend to return to Public session.


The Public portion of the agenda has New Business, Old Business, and some housekeeping items.

Under New Business are scheduled seven agenda items: 1) Approval of Motor Vehicle Registration Fees Abatement (M. Beauchamp/D. Owen), 2) Annual Wastewater Operator Contract Renewal (Dale Sprague), 3) Approval of Town Planner to Serve as Spokesperson for Bridge Projects (D. Owen), 4) Approval of Town Planner to Serve as Spokesperson for Transportation Advisory Committee for Strafford Regional Planning (Dave Owen/Bruce Woodruff), 5) Sale of Old Fire Station 460 White Mountain Highway (Dave Owen), 6) Snowmobile Club Winter Beach Access (Andy Lucier), and 7) RFP For Legal Services.

Motor Vehicle Registration Fees Abatement. Wonders never cease.

Town Planner to Serve as Spokesperson for Bridge Projects and Town Planner to Serve as Spokesperson for Transportation Advisory Committee for Strafford Regional Planning. By now, most will have heard that the Milton-Lebanon bridge replacement has been put off by the State for a predicted two years. (Sympathies for the store owner who needed the new bridge as soon as possible). The Town proposes and the State DOT disposes. What are planners to do?

Sale of the Old Fire Station. If this time the BOS really means it, they will be accepting finally a market-clearing price. Assuming someone will make such an offer again. Time for selling near a peak is running out for this, as the current housing bubble cannot last forever.

Snowmobile Club Winter Access. One assumes the same beach-access fees apply in winter as they do in summer. Or perhaps all such fees are hereby cancelled.

RFP for Legal Services. Previous Town Lawyers have had some interesting legal opinions. One thought that Town edicts, rather than those of the State, have legal pre-emption. Another thought that the Town could impose parking restrictions on a State highway. And other novel ideas. Now we are shopping for other advice.


Under Old Business are scheduled three items: 8) Review and Approve Adjusted 2019 Town Warrant (Dave Owen), 9) Review and Approve 2019 Voters Guide (Dave Owen), and 10) Discussion of Town Owned Properties Available for Disposition (Dave Owen).

Adjusted 2019 Warrant. Tune in for the final adjustments. One supposes budgets and taxes have not been adjusted downwards.

Approve 2019 Voters Guide. Presumably held for final adjustments to the warrant.

Town-Owned Properties Available for Disposition. When last seen, the Little-Endians seemed to be having the best of the argument.


The boxed item list entitled Outstanding Items, as held over from prior BOS sessions, is no longer present. Its Town-Owned Property item appears under Old Business, elements of the Town Report item appear under Old Business, and the Website Update item presumably dropped off because the Town Website was updated.

The last BOS meeting informed us that Milton has no hand to play in the matter of Atlantic Broadband. One hopes at least that the contract term is a short one, allowing for future developments.

The Property Maintenance Code item, as well as the Recreation Revenue and Office Discussion item, were Selectman Lucier’s particular hobby horses, unlikely to have much traction without him.

The Property Maintenance Code was particularly ill-advised. You knew something dreadful was afoot when Selectman Lucier introduced it with, “Yes, I know, that whole ‘Live Free or Die’ thing, but …” And that “but” tells a tale. He evidently thinks there is a third choice that is neither freedom nor death: slavery, perhaps? Hopefully, it will never again see the light of day.

The Junkyard and NH Listens items might continue in some form.

The Town Deposit Location Policy was to be sorted out by department heads before the end of January. One of the proposed solutions had the Town Clerk, an elected official in her own right, being forced to break her own campaign promises regarding office hours. Let us hope that was not the solution.


Finally, there will be the approval of prior minutes (from the BOS meeting of February 4, and the Deliberative Session of February 9), the expenditure report, Public Comments “Pertaining to Topics Discussed,” Town Administrator comments (on the Town Election), and BOS comments.


The BOS will disappear into yet another Non-Public session at the conclusion of the Public session. The reason was not fully coded, so it might be any one of the coded reasons under which they justify these secret sessions.


Ms. McDougall has called a seventh meeting of her Milton Advocates group. It will take place again in the Nute Library’s Community Room, on Saturday, February 23, at 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM. All town residents are invited. Bring your best manners. (Not her words).


Mr. S.D. Plissken contributed to this article.


References:

NH Magazine. (2016, January). Losing Your Home. Retrieved from www.nhmagazine.com/January-2016/Losing-Your-Home/

State of New Hampshire. (2016, June 21). RSA Chapter 91-A. Access to Governmental Records and Meetings. Retrieved from www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/VI/91-A/91-A-3.htm

Town of Milton. (2018, February 15). BOS Meeting Agenda, February 20, 2019. Retrieved from www.miltonnh-us.com/sites/miltonnh/files/agendas/2.20.19_bos_agenda.pdf

Youtube. (1965). Cone of Silence. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1eUIK9CihA&feature=youtu.be&t=19

Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1860-81

By Muriel Bristol | February 14, 2019

Continued from Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1843-50

According to Scales’ History of Strafford County, Milton’s Free-Will Baptist church reactivated (or revived) itself, through construction of a church building in 1859 and reorganization in the Spring of 1860:

Although for the lack of pecuniary ability to build a meeting-house and support the regular preaching of the gospel, this little church was obliged for the time being, to give up its organization, many of its members continued to feel a lively interest in the cause, and in 1859 succeeded in building the present very neat and tasty meeting-house, which was dedicated on the 25th day of December of that year.

On the 17th day of May, 1860, a new church was organized under the supervision of Revs. Daniel I. Cilley, Ezra Tuttle, and E.P. Gerrish, with twelve members, viz.: Ezra Tuttle, Samuel Jones, N.B. Varney, Eli G. Downs, Eleanor Hubbard, Martha A. Varney, Luther Hayes, Benjamin Scates, Fred H. Tuttle, Mary H. Tuttle, Francis Jones, Mary A. Jones.

Luther Hayes was chosen clerk, and has continued in that position to the present time.

Samuel Jones was chosen deacon, and Rev. Ezra Tuttle was called to the pastorate, and remained in charge of the church nearly three years, resigning April 26, 1863. He was succeeded by Rev J.M. Bedell, May 1864, to May 4, 1865; Rev. N.C. Lathrop, Dec. 3, 1865, to Dec. 2, 1867; Rev. I.C. Guptill, May 2, 1868, to April 3, 1869; Rev. Ezra Tuttle, April 10, 1870, to Jan. 6, 1872; Rev. J.P. Jay, Aug. 31, 1872, to June 6, 1874; Rev. E.G. York, Sept. 28, 1878, to April 5, 1879; Rev. C.L. Plumer, Aug. 12, 1879, to July 2, 1881. Rev. E. Owen of Portsmouth preached one-half the time from April 1, 1876 to Dec. 30, 1877, but was not settled over the church. His labors resulted in much good sixteen members being added to the church during his term of service (Scales, 1914).

Ezra Tuttle – First Pastorate

Ezra Gardner Tuttle was born in Nottingham, NH, July 16, 1817, son of Nicholas and Rachel (Lucy) Tuttle.

Tuttle, Ezra G. -Younger
Rev. Ezra Tuttle

Ezra Tuttle, Free Baptist, son of Nicholas and Rachel (Lucy) Tuttle, was born July 16, 1817. Licensed to preach by the Deerfield and Nottingham Quarterly Conference, at Deerfield, May 1843. Supplied the Methodist Church, West Newbury, Mass., 1843-5; Charlestown, Mass., 1845-6. Ordained an evangelist, Nottingham, Sept. 6, 1846. Laboring as an evangelist, 1846-7; Pastor, South Boston, Mass., May 1847-53; Deerfield, July 1853-60; Milton, May 1, 1860-3; Deerfield, May 1, 1863-5. Without charge, Richland Centre, Wis., Oct. 1865-6, Organized a church there and was pastor, May 1866=70; Pastor, Milton, April 10, 1870-2; North Lebanon, Me., Jan. 1872-3; Second Church, Strafford, Nov. 11, 1873-4; West Lebanon, Me., Nov. 1874-7; Without charge, Lebanon Centre, Me., meanwhile acting briefly as domestic missionary, March 11, 1877, & Pastor Second Church, Strafford, May 1878-82; North Berwick, Me., May 1, 1882-5; Without charge, Providence, R.I., 1885-8. Member of the executive boards of Education, Home, and Foreign Missionary Societies many years, clerk of the New Durham Quarterly Meeting, and often moderator; town treasurer, Richland, Wis., one year; member of school board, Deerfield, Milton, and North Berwick, Me. Died Providence, R.I., June 7, 1888. Married Mary Harris Savage, at Charlestown, Mass., April 5, 1842 (Carter, 1906).

Religious Intelligence. Rev. Ezra Tuttle, who for five years has been pastor of the Free Will Baptist Society in South Boston, has accepted an invitation to settle in Deerfield Centre, N.H. (New England Farmer, July 30, 1853).

Ezra Tuttle, of the Freewill Baptist church, of Deerfield, NH, signed the anti-slavery Memorial of 3050 New England Clergymen of all denominations in April 1854 (Washington (DC) Sentinel, April 29, 1854).

Ezra Tuttle, a clergyman, aged forty-three years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Mary H. Tuttle, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), F.H. Tuttle, aged seventeen years (b. NH), P.E. Tuttle, aged five years (b. NH), A.C. Tuttle, aged one year (b. NH), and Abbie Ayer, aged fifteen years (b. NH). Ezra Tuttle had real estate valued at $500 and personal estate valued at $500. His household appeared next to that of L.L. Leighton, with unoccupied buildings on either side of them.

He moved next to Deerfield and then Wisconsin, returning to Milton in 1870 (see below).

Samuel P. Fernald

Fernald, Rev. Samuel P., was born in North Berwick, Me., May 25, 1809, and died in Melvin Village [Tuftonboro], N.H., June 9, 1888. His parents were Tobias and Sally (Pray) Fernald. He became a Christian at the age of twenty-one, received license to preach Oct. 23, 1831, and was ordained at East Wolfborough, N.H., May 26, 1833, by Rev.’s H.D. Buzzell, James Emery, Samuel Knowles, and Hiram Holmes. He itinerated a few years in Maine and New Hampshire, and had several revivals. He then settled with the East Tilton and Second Belmont churches. He organized the latter with fourteen members, and saw it increased to sixty-four members. He settled at Northwood in 1838. A large number were added, a house of worship built and equipped. He was pastor at Candia, at Gilmanton Iron Works, nine years, and three years at Bristol, where, in 1850, the church edifice was built. Returning to Northwood, fifty were added to the church, and a parsonage built. His next pastorates were in Portsmouth, Wakefield, Union, Gorham, Me., White Rock, and in Moultonborough and Tuftonborough, N.H. The church of these towns was increased from ten to fifty members, and a house of worship erected. He closed a four years pastorate here in 1870. After serving the Holderness and Centre Harbor church, one year, and the Water Village church, two years, and the Third Holderness, one year, he ceased his public labors on account of ill health. He has baptized about three hundred. He married March 28, 1838, Miss Hannah E. Palmer of Tuftonborough, N.H. who died July 1, 1888. They leave two children: Prof. O.M. Fernald of Williams College, Mass., and the wife of G.B. Files, Principal of the High School at Augusta, Me. She graduated from the Maine State Seminary at Lewiston, and taught in the Maine Central Institute, six years (Burgess, et al., 1889).

Samuel P. Fernald, a clergyman, aged sixty-one years (b. ME), headed a Tuftonboro, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Hannah E. Fernald, keeping house, aged fifty-nine years (b. NH). Samuel P. Fernald had real estate valued at $1,000 and personal estate valued at $220.

Rev. Samuel P. Fernald died in Tuftonboro, NH, June 9, 1888. Hannah E. (Palmer) Fernald died a month later, July 1, 1888.

J.M. Bedell

Bedell, Rev. I.M., son of John and Mary (Mills) Bedell, was born in Springvale, Me., July 11, 1820. He studied at Parsonfield Seminary, and in the Biblical School at Whitestown, N.Y. Converted in 1834, he was licensed in 1850, and the next year ordained by Rev.’s G.P. Ramsey, W.H. Littlefield, C.B. Mills, and L.H. Witham. Among his pastorates have been Woolwich, Farmington, and Topsham, Me., and Meredith, Belmont, and Strafford Centre, N.H. He has seen revivals in seven of the churches with which he has labored, and one church organized June 1, 1846; he married Ella E. Roberts and has three children. He retired on account of ill health and resides in Lynn Mass. (Burgess, et al., 1889).

Isaiah M. Bedell of the 1st FW Baptist church, of Upper Gilmanton, NH, signed the anti-slavery Memorial of 3050 New England Clergymen of all denominations in April 1854. Peter Clarke, of Upper Gilmanton’s 1st Baptist church; James Polley, of its Christian church; and R.U. Sergeant, of its Centre Congregational church, signed also (Washington (DC) Sentinel, April 29, 1854).

Isaiah M. Berdell, a clergyman, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Gorham, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Ellen C. Berdell, keeping house, aged forty-five years (b. ME), Lula A. Berdell, teaching school, aged twenty years (b. ME), Vianna O. Berdell, at school, aged eighteen years (b. ME), Felinda M. Berdell, at school, aged fifteen years (b. ME). Berdell has real estate valued at $1,200 and personal estate valued at $500. They resided next door to a hotel managed by Samuel B. Brown, aged seventy-two years (b. VT).

Isiah M. Bedell, no occupation, aged fifty-nine years (b. ME), headed a Lynn, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Ellen E. Bedell, housekeeping, aged fifty-five years (ME), Lilla A. Bedell, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME), Vienna O. Bedell, works in shoe factory, aged twenty-five years (b. ME), Fida M. Bedell, a music teacher, aged twenty-three years (b. NH), and a boarder, Frederick Jones, works on ice cart, aged twenty-two years (b. ME). They resided on Rockingham Street.

Ella E. (Roberts) Bedell died in 1880. Rev. Isaiah M. Bedell died in Lynn, MA, February 9, 1893.

Nathan C. Lothrop

Lothrop, Rev. Nathan C., son of Solomon and Fanny (Chase) Lothrop, was born in Norton, Mass., June 19, 1839. He was converted at the age of seventeen under the labors of Rev. S.D. Church, in Taunton, Mass., and two years after was baptized and united with the church at Taunton. He graduated from the New Hampton Institution in 1861, and from the Theological School in 1864. In September following he was ordained at South Berwick, Me., where he was pastor eighteen months. He was pastor at Milton NH, two years, Pelham over two years of the Second Strafford church, three years of Caudia Village church, four years where he baptized thirty six and added fifty to the church. During the next four years he was at Bristol, where he baptized thirteen and twenty-six were added to the church. He then settled in Deerfield for nearly five years, and baptized thirty-seven, receiving forty-two into the church. In all he has baptized 101 converts. He is now settled at West Lebanon, Me., 1887. He was married Nov. 16, 1865, to Miss Sarah J. Lovejoy of Laconia NH, and has a son and daughter (Burgess, et al., 1889).

Nathan C. Lothrop appeared as Milton’s Free-Will Baptist minister in the Milton business directory of 1867-68.

Nathan C. Lothrop, a clergyman, aged thirty years (b. MA), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Sarah J. Lothrop, aged twenty-six years (b. NH), Ormsby A. Lothrop, aged two years (b. NH), Fanny B. Lothrop, aged one month (b. NH; in May), and Josephine Woods, a domestic servant, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH). Nathan C. Lothrop had personal estate valued at $300.

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What Rev. N.C. Dothrop [SIC] says: “Excellent for Diseases of the Stomach and Liver. One Feels Better from the Moment of Taking them.”

Candia, N.H.,

Mr. Lane – Dear Sir:- I received the package of pills you sent, and gave them a faithful trial. I find them to be a most excellent Pill for diseases of the Stomach and Liver. Unlike other Pills they have a tonic, rather than a weakening effect on the system. One feels better from the moment of taking them. I have tried other Pills, but none seemed to fit themselves to my case like QUAlN’S MAGIC CONDITION PILLS. My wife has taken them with good results. They are quite popular in this village and vicinity. One woman on the road has received great benefit from them. Thinks they are the best medicine she ever took. For my part I heartily recommend them, and hope they will have an extensive sale. Yours most truly, N.C. LOTHROP, Pastor F.W. Baptist Church, Candia Village, N.H. (Vermont Christian Messenger (Montpelier, VT), August 2, 1877).

Rev. Nathan C. Lothrop died in Bristol, NH, February 15, 1920. Sarah J. (Lovejoy) Lothrop died in Bristol, NH, April 30, 1930.

I.C. Guptill

GUPTILL, Ira Clark, M.D., of Northborough, is a native of Maine, born in Cornish, York County, April 9, 1844, son of Obadiah True and Harriet Newell (Cilley) Guptill. His ancestors on both sides were closely connected with the early history of the Pine Tree State. His great-grandfather, Daniel Guptill, was a native of North Berwick, Me., where he married Miss Sarah Morrill, and they reared a large family of children. His maternal grandfather was Benjamin Cilley of Limerick, Me. Dr. Guptill’s early education was obtained from the common high schools, and the classical institutes, and his collegiate training at Bowdoin and Dartmouth. He graduated from the medical department of Dartmouth College, November 4, 1874, and further fitted for his profession through clinical practice in connection with the office of his instructor, Dr. Alvin Brawn, who was city physician of Biddeford, Me. Soon after his graduation he settled in Manchester, N.H., and was in active practice in Manchester and Auburn for three years, when on account of poor health he travelled for a while. Upon his return he resumed practice in his native State, and in October 1879 removed to Northborough, where he has since remained in the enjoyment of an extensive practice and a very pleasant home. He is a member of the Worcester District Medical Society, and a Fellow of the Massachusetts Medical Society. He has read several papers before the societies, has been concerned in a number of literary works, and has also contributed poems to magazines and newspapers, which have been quite extensively copied. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Odd Fellows, to the Royal Society of Good Fellows, and is president of the Fredonia Club of Social Fellows. He has been a lifelong Republican, and has served on the town committee. In his professional work, by offices of kindness and gratuitous service, he has done much often, at a sacrifice, to ameliorate the condition of the poor and unfortunate, which has been the pleasure of his ambition. Dr. Guptill was married November 4, 1871, to Miss Jennie J. Jones, of North Lebanon, Me., a graduate the West Lebanon Seminary and a very successful teacher. No children have been born to them (Bacon, 1896).

Ira C. Guptill is said to have been in Milton as a minister in 1868-69. I.C. Guptill was pastor in North Lebanon, ME, in 1870-71.

Ira C. Gubtail, a clergyman, aged twenty-six years (b. ME), headed a Lebanon, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census, in June 1870. His household included Mira L. Gubtail, keeping house, aged twenty-seven years (b. ME). Gubtail had real estate valued at $400 and personal estate valued at $200.

The York conference report of for 1871 stated that his North Lebanon church had 26 additions by baptism, 3 additions by letter [transfers], 1 dismissal [by letter, to another congregation], 1 exclusion, 0 deaths, 129 resident members, 12 non-resident members, 141 whole number, and 95 scholars (FWB Printing, 1871).

What followed next was certainly unusual. Ira C. Guptill obtained a divorce from Almira L. (Allen) Guptill in York County, ME, in September 1871. He then married (2nd) in Biddeford, ME, November 4, 1871, Joanna Jones, he of Biddeford [and she of North Lebanon, ME]. These events likely explain his dropping the ministry and returning to school. He went next to Dartmouth College, where he took a degree in medicine. (His ex-wife, Almira L. [(Allen)] Guptill, married (2nd) in Sanford, ME, December 21, 1873, John A. Dennett, both of Sanford).

Ira C. Guptill, a physician, aged thirty-four years (b. ME), headed a Northborough, MA, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Jennie J. Guptill, keeping house, aged twenty-eight years (b. ME). The Guptills shared a two-family dwelling with the household of Augustus M. Staples, a comb factory worker, aged thirty-six years (b. ME).

Northboro. Mrs. [Harriet N. (Cilley)] Guptill, who makes her home with her son, Dr I.C. Guptill, Main st,, is seriously ill with pneumonia (Boston Globe, January 1, 1904).

Jennie J. (Jones) Guptill died in September 1918. Ira C. Guptill died in Northboro, MA, December 3, 1918.

Funeral of Dr Guptill Saturday. NORTHBORO, Dec 5. The funeral of Dr. Ira C. Guptill will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock. He was 74 years old and was born in Limerick, Me. He was graduated from Bowdoin College and the Dartmouth Medical School. He came to Northboro 38 years ago. He married Miss Joanna Jones of Biddeford, Me. in January, 1871. She died last September (Boston Globe, [Thursday,] December 5, 1918).

Ezra Tuttle – Second Pastorate

Tuttle, Ezra G.
Rev. Ezra Tuttle

Rev. Ezra Tuttle (see details above) returned from Wisconsin for a second Milton pastorate in 1870 through 1872.

Ezra Tuttle, a clergyman, aged fifty years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Mary Tuttle, keeping house, aged forty-eight years (b. MA), Eldora Tuttle, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Alvah C. Tuttle, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), and Washington I. Tuttle, at school, aged nine years (b. NH).

Note the name of the third child. Ezra Tuttle and his wife were evidently fans of author Washington Irving (1783-1859).

Ezra Tuttle appeared as Milton’s Free-Will Baptist minister in the Milton business directory of 1871. He performed innocently a Milton marriage in that year that featured later in a sensational bigamy trial of 1886. (The Milton marriage was the first, non-bigamous marriage) (Oakland Tribune, June 9, 1886).

Ezra Tuttle, a minister, aged sixty-three years (b. NH), headed a Strafford, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary H. Tuttle, keeping house, aged fifty-nine years (b. MA), A. Chesley Tuttle, a printer, aged twenty-one years (b. NH), and Irving W. Tuttle, works in a shoe shop, aged seventeen years (b. NH).

Rev. Ezra Tuttle died in Providence, RI, June 7, 1888 (Boston Transcript, July 10, 1888). Mary H. (Savage) Tuttle died in Milton, NH, January 31, 1907.

J.P. Jay

Joy, Joseph F.
Rev. Joseph F. Joy

Joseph Franklin Joy was born in New Durham, NH, May 15, 1838, son of Samuel and Watie (Pettigrew) Joy.

Joseph Franklin Joy, Free Baptist, son of Samuel and Watie (Pettigrew) Joy, was born May 15, 1838. Graduated at Dartmouth College, 1863. For a time teacher, Rochester, N.Y. Attended medical lectures at Brunswick, Me. 1865. Licensed to preach at Northwood, Jan. 1865. Ordained New Durham, May 1865. Labored in New Durham and vicinity, 1865-72; Milton, 1872-5; New Durham, 1875-83; Without charge, Frankfort Dak 1888-91; Farmington, 1891-6; New Durham, 1896-7; Farmington, 1897-1904. School committee of New Durham, several years. Married Addie F. Berry at New Durham, May 14, 1868 (Carter, 1906). 

Joseph F. Joy, a clergyman, aged thirty-two years (b. NH). headed a New Durham, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Addie F. Joy, keeping house, aged twenty-four years (b. NH), and Anna Joy, aged six months (b. NH). Joseph F. Joy had personal estate valued at $740.

J.F. Joy appeared as Milton’s Free-Will Baptist minister in the Milton business directories of 1873 and 1874. (He served as one of three Superintendents, i.e., Superintendents of Schools, with J.U. Simes and H. Wentworth, in 1874).

Serena O. Berry, keeping house, aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a New Durham, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her daughter, Georgianna O. Berry, a teacher, aged thirty-five years (b. NH). Serena O. Berry shared a two-family dwelling with the household of her son-in-law, Rev. Joseph F. Joy, Rev. Joseph F. Joy, a clergyman, aged forty-two years (b. NH). His household included Serena O. Berry’s daughter, aged thirty-four years (b. NH), and her [grand] daughters, Annie M. Joy, aged ten years (b. NH), Eda O. Joy, aged seven years (b. NH), and Gracie Joy, aged three years (b. NH).

Rev. Joseph F. Joy died in New Durham, NH, June 13, 1912.

E.G. York

Elbridge Gerry York was born in Gilmanton, NH, November 29, 1830, son of Jonathan and Betsy York. He married (1st) in Belmont, NH, October 5, 1858, Laura M. Bowles, he of Gilmanton and she of Whitefield. She was born in Lisbon, NH, circa 1832-33, daughter of Benjamin and Mercy L. (Taylor) Bowles.

Elbridge G. York, Free Baptist, was born Nov. 29, 1830. Began to preach, 1854. Ordained, Woodstock, Jan. 11, 1860, and pastor, 1860-2; Lower Gilmanton, 1862-4; First Church Wolfborough, 1864-74; Moultonborough and Tuftonborough, 1874-9; Nottingham, 1879-81 (Carter, 1906).

Elbridge G. York, an F.B. clergyman, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), headed a  Woodstock, NH, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Laura M. York, aged twenty-seven years (b. NH), and Edwin K. York, aged three years (b. NH).

Elbridge G. York, a clergyman, aged thirty-three years (b. NH), married, registered for the Class II military draft in Londonderry, NH, in June 1863.

Elbridge G. York, a clerk, aged thirty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Wolfeborough, NH, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Laura M. York, keeping house, aged thirty-seven years (b. NH), Amy E. York, at home, aged five years (b. NH), Don E.E. York, at home, aged three years (b. NH), and Orland B. York, aged one year (b. NH). Elbridge G. York had real estate valued at $300 and personal estate valued at $400.

E. Tuttle appeared as Milton’s Free-Will Baptist minister in the Milton business directory of 1876. This was an error: the directory should have listed the minister as E. York or E.G. York.

Laura M. (Bowles) York died in Milton, NH, in 1878-79, aged forty-six years and ten months. Her death was “reported for year ending March 31, 1879.”

Elbridge G. York married (2nd) in Exeter, NH, April 24, 1880, Cynthia Abby ((Withee) (Thompson) (Randall)) Ellison, he of Nottingham and she of Exeter. He was a clergyman, aged forty-nine years, and she a domestic, aged forty-eight years. She was born in Skowhegan, ME, circa 1831-32, daughter of Walton and Pathenia Withee. (Yes, Pathenia). This was said to be the 4th marriage for each (It was his second and her fourth).

Elbridge Gerry York, an F.W. Baptist clergyman, aged forty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Nottingham, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Cynthia A. York, keeping house, aged forty-eight years (b. ME), his daughter-in-law, Carrie Thompson, a table girl, aged eighteen years (b. NH), his sons-in-law, Freddie C. Randall, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), and Granville D. Randall, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), and his children, Amy E. York, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Don E. York, at school, aged thirteen years (b. NH), Arlen B. York, at school, aged eleven years (b. NH), and Lucia A. York, at school, aged seven years (b. NH).

Elbridge G. York died in Taunton, MA, September 7, 1900. Cynthia A. York died in 1903. (She is buried in Exeter, NH, with her first husband, Sylvester E. Thompson, who died in Potomac, VA, while serving with the 12th NH Regiment).

E. Owen

Owen, Rev. Eleazar, was born in Belchertown, Mass., Oct. 11, 1834. His parents were Artemas Owen, of Belchertown, and Betsey Wright, of Hanover, N.H. He was educated in the seminaries of Monson and Wilbraham, Mass., For a number of years he was employed as a mechanic in the U.S. Armory at Springfield. He was ordained by the Advent Christian Conference, of Connecticut, at New Britain in 1867. He organized and became pastor of the church at Westfield, Mass. For several years he was secretary of the Massachusetts Advent Christian Conference. In 1870, he accepted a call to the Hanover Street chapel, Portsmouth, N.H. He resigned his office in the Advent Conference and at his request was dismissed from that body. In 1876, he became stated supply in an abandoned Free Baptist church at Milton N.H. There was a revival, and the church was renewed and has since prospered. After two years he received a call from the Pearl Street church, Portsmouth. He became its pastor after an examination by a council consisting of Rev.’s I.D. Stewart and others. After two years with this church, he resigned and accepted a call to the Lyndon Centre church, Vt. The Lyndon Institute was closed, and the school was passing out of the control of the denomination. Through his efforts, seconded by others, the school was recovered, an endowment of $25,000 was raised, the building repaired, and the school started again in a prosperous condition. He was in the work of endowing the school considerably, for three years, and in the pastorate nearly five years. He settled at Meredith Village, N.H. in July 1885, where he is now pastor. The church there has prospered under his labors (Burgess, et al., 1889).

Eliazar Owen, a clergyman, aged thirty-five years (b. MA), headed a Westfield, MA, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Census. His household included Mary Owen, keeping house, aged thirty-three years (b. MA), Frederic Owen, attending school, aged eleven years (b. MA), and Eliazar Owen, attending school, aged nine years (b. MA). Eliazar Owen [Sr.] had personal estate valued at $300.

E. Owens appeared as Milton’s Free-Will Baptist minister in the Milton business directory of 1877.

NEW ENGLAND NEWS. NEW HAMPSHIRE. Agreeable to an invitation from the Pearl Street Free Will Baptist Church of Portsmouth, the Council met Tuesday to advise that body in reference to a settlement of Rev. Eleazar Owen as their pastor. Mr. Owen, who was recently an advent preacher, changed his doctrinal views and become a Free Will Baptist. The Council was organized by choosing Rev. O.T. Moulton of 8onth Berwick moderator. and Rev. G.C. Waterman of Dover clerk. After a searching examination of the candidate the Council voted unanimously to recommend him to the fellowship of this church and denomination, and to advise his settlement as pastor of said church. In accordance with the above, Rev. Mr. Owen will commence his pastorate with the Free Will Baptist Church there next Sunday (Boston Post, January 2, 1878).

Eleazar Owen, a clergyman, aged forty-five years (b. MA), headed a Portsmouth, NH, household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included his wife, Mary Owen, keeping house, aged forty-two years (b. MA), and his sons, Eleazar F. Owen, an apprentice machinist, aged twenty-one years (b. MA), Ellery B. Owen, clothing store clerk, aged nineteen years (b. MA), and Bernard Owen, at school, aged nine years (b. NH).

Rev. Eleazar Owen died November 6, 1896. Mary A. (Walker) Owen died in Concord, NH, January 18, 1917.

Mrs. Mary A. Owen. – Mrs. Mary A. Owen, aged 80 years, died in Concord, N.H., January 18, at the home of her son, E. Scott Owen. She had been ill for several months. She was the widow of Rev. Eleazar Owen, a Free Baptist clergyman, who died in Portsmouth, N.H., 20 years ago. Mr. Owen held pastorates in different places in New Hampshire and Maine and was at one time in charge of the church at Lyndon Center (St. Johnsbury Caledonian (St. Johnsbury, VT), January 31, 1917).

Cyrus L. Plumer

Cyrus Lemuel Plumer was born in Fremont, NH, October 26, 1841, son of Rev. Abraham and Mary Ann (Ladd) Plumer.

A. [Abraham] Plummer, a Meth. clergyman, aged fifty years (b. ME), headed a Vinalhaven (Carver’s Harbor P.O.), ME, household at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. His household included Betsy Plummer, aged fifty-three years (b. NH), and Lemuel C. Plummer, a student, aged eighteen years (b. NH). A. Plummer had personal estate valued at $1,000.

Cyrus L. Plummer graduated from Boston University’s School of Theology, with its class of 1860.

C. Lemuel Plumer married in Concord, NH, June 17, 1863, Henrietta M. “Etta” Harrington, both of Concord. He was a clergyman. She was born in NH, circa 1841-42, daughter of Thomas and Harriet Harrington.

Plummer’s son, Edwin H. Plumer, reported his own birth as having occurred at Mt. Desert, ME, circa 1865-66 (at the time of his own 1892 marriage to Ruth Given).

C. Lemall Plummer, an M.E. preacher, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), headed a Pembroke, ME, household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Etta M. Plummer, keeping house, aged twenty-nine years (b. NH), Estella L. Plummer, aged six years (b. NH), and Eddy H. Plummer, aged four years (b. ME).

Cyrus L. Plumer, a clergyman, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. His household included Henrietta Plumer, keeping house, aged thirty-eight years (b. NH), Estella L. Plumer, at school, aged fifteen years (b. NH), Edwin H. Plumer, at school, aged fourteen years (b. ME), and Herbert F. Plumer, aged eight months (b. NH, in October 1879). His household appeared on a “3 Ponds Village” page.

C.L. Plumer appeared as Milton’s Free-Will Baptist minister in the Milton business directories of 1880, 1881, and 1882.

Harriet H. Shapleigh, Calvin L. Hayes, and Cyrus L. Plumer served on the Kittery, ME, school committee in 1884.

Cyrus L. Plummer, Canvasser Broom Co., aged fifty-eight years (b. NH), headed a Braintree, MA, household at the time of the Twelfth (1900) Federal Census. His household included Etta M. Plummer, aged fifty-eight (b. NH), Herbert Plummer, at school, aged twenty years (b. NH), Mabel E. Plummer, at school, aged seventeen years (b. ME).

Cyrus L. Plummer died in Boston, MA, October 1, 1910.

BRAINTREE. The funeral of Cyrus L. Plummer of 29 School st., who died suddenly on the [Faneuil Hall Sq.] Street in Boston last Saturday night, was held yesterday afternoon at his home. The services were conducted by Rev Thomas Simms, pastor of the First Congregational church. Burial was in Lakeside cemetery, South Braintree (Boston Globe, [Thursday,] October 6, 1910).


Previous in sequence: Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1843-50; next in sequence: Milton’s Free-Will Baptist Ministers of 1882-07


References:

Bacon, Edwin Monroe. (1896). Men of Progress: One Thousand Biographical Sketches and Portraits of Leaders in Business and Professional Life in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=5HFPAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA650

Burgess, Gideon Albert, and Ward, John T. (1889). Free Baptist Cyclopaedia. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=3GXiAAAAMAAJ

Carter, Nathan F. (1906). Native Ministry of New Hampshire. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=NXgRAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA275

Find a Grave. (2018, December 21). Cyrus L. Plummer. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/195488677/cyrus-l-plummer

Find a Grave. (2016, March 23). Rev. Eleazar Owen. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/159941218

Find a Grave. (2008, March 16). Rev. Ezra Tuttle. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/25319021

Find a Grave. (2014, May 30). Ira C. Guptill. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/130606422

Find a Grave. (2011, July 7). Rev. Isaiah M. Bedell. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/72966744

Find a Grave. (2011, October 11). Rev. John Manter. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/78715212/john-manter

Find a Grave. (2016, December 16). Rev. Joseph Franklin Joy. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/174156928

Find a Grave. (2017, November 27). Rev. Nathan Chase Lothrop. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/62270130

Find a Grave. (2015, July 8). Rev. Samuel Pray Fernald. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/148870617

Freewill Baptist Printing Establishment (1871). Freewill Baptist Register. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=7eURAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA35

Granite Monthly Company. (1894). Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=tVwSAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA141

Mitchell-Cony Company. (1908). Town Register: Farmington, Milton, Wakefield, Middleton, Brookfield, 1907-8. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=qXwUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA102

Scales, John. (1914). History of Strafford County, New Hampshire, and Representative Citizens. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=nGsjAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA516

Wikipedia. (2019, February 4). Washington Irving. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Irving

Milton in the News – 1877

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | February 28, 2019

In this year, we encounter a minister’s departure, a singular woman, and a stereotyper’s heart failure.


NEW HAMPSHIRE. Rev. S.F. Lougee is called to the church in Danbury, and Rev. D.B. Scott to the church at Milton Mills (Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, VT), April 28, 1877).

Rev. Darius B. Scott was not called to the church at Milton Mills. He left there when he was called to the church at Lynnfield, MA. (See his arrival in 1873).


Miss Joanna Farnham died at the American House hotel, on Hanover Street in Boston, MA,  May 19, 1877. She was a daughter of the Bunker Hill veteran Ralph Farnham, who drew so much attention in 1860. The story of her passing, and the discovery of her “nesting” trunks, became a viral story that was copied many times across the whole country. (It was even revived in 1894).

1877. March 19. Joanna Farnham, aged 81 years, 11 months, and 56 days, died at Hanover [Street], Boston, female, single, born Acton, Me., daughter of Ralph (born Lebanon, Me.) and Mehitable (born Raymond, N.H.), lung fever, buried Acton, Me., B.F. Smith, informant (Boston Vital Records).

BG760126-American House.jpg
Reduced or deflated rates after the Panic of 1873

A SINGULAR WOMAN. Foster’s Democrat, of Dover, N.H., of the 19tb, ult., gives a singular history of a Milton woman:

A short time since some of the Boston papers noticed the death of Miss Joanna Farnham, about 80 years of age, and for a long series of years known as the housekeeper at the American House in Boston. She went from Milton, N.H., in her early days, and during her long life at the hotel nobody supposed she had any property, and at her death it was not generally known that she had a surplus dollar anywhere. But she had a trunk at the American House, which was opened and found to contain a variety of dry goods, notes for $5,000 against the proprietor of the American House, a bank book of the Blackstone bank, showing deposits of $1700, a small sum of money, and also a piece of paper having a trunk key wrapped up in it, and on the paper was a writing stating that the key belonged to another trunk, which could be found at the house of a relative in Milton. This led to a visit to Milton, and there some very curious developments were made. The trunk referred to as being at Milton was found, opened with the key found in the former trunk, and this second trunk was packed full of all sorts of fine wearing apparel, and contained also a key in a piece of paper, upon which was the statement that this key belonged to another trunk at a certain other place. And so this thing was followed up until twenty very large-sized trunks and three huge packing chests were found, all crammed full of the most expensive articles of ladies’ wearing apparel and house furnishings that the Boston market afforded.

When these trunks and boxes were all collected they loaded down a four-ox team, and were drawn to a large hall in Milton, unpacked and inventoried, preparatory to an auction sale for the benefit of the heirs. Among all these valuables were 89 dresses, new and perfect, made of silk, velvet, satin and all kinds of plaid silks, black and colored thibets, poplins, alpacas, brilliantines, cashmeres, etc., three silk velvet cloaks, 19 shawls, from common to the richest paisley and wrought crape; 106 skirts of all colors; 114 pairs of hose; undergarments of all kinds, too numerous to mention; table linen, towels, handkerchiefs, counterpanes, sheets, coverlets, blankets, live geese feathers; sets of elegant China ware; a large lot of table and teaspoons of best coin silver, silver knives and forks; a fine gold watch and chain, and a large lot of fine jewelry, &c. It is said that the best dress cost not less than $200. All of these goods are perfectly new and in the best order, never having been used. There is enough of the whole to stock a large store, and the strangest legacy ever left by a housekeeper who worked for small wages all her life yet there is said to be no doubt that she came honestly by all, as it has since been ascertained where and of whom she purchased them at various times as she went along. The original cost of the goods was not less than $11000, and the owner while she lived went clad in the very cheapest sort of apparel, the strangest specimen of humanity ever known in these parts (Burlington Free Press (Burlington, VT), June 7, 1877).

The Vermont Journal carried also the same Foster’s story, with an additional detail of the auctioneer.

Park Copp will sell the whole at auction in Milton (Vermont Journal (Windsor, VT), June 2, 1877).

Joanna Farnham, a domestic, aged fifty years (born ME), was a resident employee of a Boston hotel at the time of the Seventh (1850) Federal Census. Lewis Price, hotel keeper, aged forty years, headed the hotel “household,” which included his own family, guests, as well as four resident employees. Price had real estate valued at $137,200.

Joanna Farnham, a domestic, aged sixty-five years (born ME), was a resident employee of Boston’s American House at the time of the Eighth (1860) Federal Census. Lewis Price, hotel proprietor, aged fifty years, headed the American House “household,” which included his own family, guests, as well as 104 resident employees. Price had real estate valued at $230,000 and personal estate valued at $40,000.

Johanna Farnum, a bath room girl, aged seventy-eight years (born ME), was a resident employee of Boston’s American House at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. Lewis Price, hotel proprietor, aged sixty years, headed the American House “household,” which included his own family, guests, as well as 126 resident employees: bartenders, billiards boys, cashiers, chambermaids, clerks, cooks, domestic servants, errand boys, fireman, gas man, laundresses, nurse, pantry girl, porters, seamstress, steam engineer, stewards, stove girls, sweepers, waiters, and wash girls. Price had real estate valued at $400,000 and personal estate valued at $75,000.


Stephen H. Knight, a stereotype printer (and former shoe factory employee) from Milton, aged sixty-six years, took sick and died in Boston, MA in September.

THE POLICE RECORD. Various Items, Criminal, Accidental and Otherwise, Gathered from the Courts and Police Stations. Stephen Knight, belonging in Milton, N.H., and sixty-six years old, while sitting in a slip in the saloon of Burns, 108 Portland street, was taken suddenly ill about 11 A.M. yesterday. Drs. Snow and Cilley were called, but in spite of their efforts he died shortly before noon. The deceased was a stereotyper by trade, and leaves a wife. He was, it is said, a brother to Dr. Edward Knight, at 618 Tremont street, this city. It is supposed the cause of death was heart disease (Boston Globe, September 5, 1877).

Stephen H. Knight, a shoe factory worker, aged fifty-seven years, headed a Milton (Milton Mills P.O.) household at the time of the Ninth (1870) Federal Census. His household included Louisa C. [(Clarey)] Knight, keeping house, aged fifty years, Adelaide Knight, at home, aged eighteen years, Clarinda A. Knight, at home, aged seventeen years, and Daniel B.  Nichols, a shoe factory worker, aged forty-six years. Stephen H. Knight had real estate valued at $600 and personal estate valued at $200.

Louisa Knight, keeping house, aged fifty-nine years, headed a Milton household at the time of the Tenth (1880) Federal Census. Her household included her children, Elbridge G. Knight works on shoes, aged thirty years, and Clarie A. Knight, does housework, aged twenty-seven years. Both Elbridge G. and Clarie A. Knight had been unemployed for six months of the year.


Previous in sequence: Milton in the News – 1876; next in sequence: Milton in the News – 1878


References:

Find a Grave. (2010, July 22). Joanna Farnham. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/55312457/joanna-farnham

Find a Grave. (2014, September 18). Stephen Knight. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/136056728

Wikipedia. (2018, October 15). American House (Boston). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_House_(Boston)

Wikipedia. (2018 November 26). Stereotype (Printing). Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereotype_(printing)

 

 

Bright Stars: Sirius

By Peter Forrester | February 13, 2019

The brightest star in the night sky, as seen from Earth, is called Sirius. It is the second brightest overall (obviously the Sun is the brightest star we can see).

Sirius is larger than the Sun, but weak and relatively dim compared to many other stars, but it is so close to the Sun (8.6 light years) that its apparent magnitude (-1.46) is almost twice as bright as any other star. It has an absolute magnitude of 1.42.

Being so bright, Sirius was important in the mythology of many ancient cultures. For example, its appearance in the sky shortly before sunrise (its “heliacal rising”) occurred just before the summer flooding in ancient Egypt and was an important omen in their religion. Their civil calendar was originally based on the return of Sirius, but wandered off within 4 years. However, they continued to observe its return and discovered a cycle that became part of the Julian and Alexandrian calendars.

The Ancient Greeks associated Sirius with hot weather, men becoming weak, and other bad consequences, terming the time right after its return “dog days” because of its constellation, Canis Major. Its association with dogs also concerned the way dogs pant in hot weather, which made some ancient people fear they might have a disease, even in some cases rabies. For more on the mythologies associated with Sirius, see the Wikipedia link below.

Sirius is in Canis Major, or the Great Dog, which is just to the left of Orion as seen in the Northern Hemisphere. Being the brightest star in this constellation, its abbreviation is α CMa. Canis Major is often depicted as a dog of Orion who is helping him hunt the Bull, Taurus.

Sirius is actually made up of two separate stars, Sirius A and Sirius B. Sirius A has an absolute magnitude of +1.42, while Sirius B (nicknamed “the Pup”) is much, much dimmer at +11.18. The distance between them is about 20 AU, or about the distance of Uranus from the Sun. 1 Astronomical Unit (AU), the distance between the Earth and the Sun, is about 93 million miles. Sirius A is blue-white, while Sirius B is a white dwarf, the second one ever discovered.

The existence of a second star was first hypothesized in 1844, and observed in 1862. A third companion star has been suggested to explain small changes in the movement of the star system but its existence has never been verified.

Sirius is one of the three stars in a shape called the “Winter Triangle”, along with Procyon in Canis Minor, and Betelgeuse in Orion. Those who know the constellation Orion should be able to find Sirius easily. You just follow the belt down to the left, the star is about 8 times the width of the belt away from it. These directions will be opposite in the Southern Hemisphere.

There are four planets brighter than Sirius (two of them, Jupiter and Venus, are always brighter when visible, with Mercury and Mars being brighter some of the time). Since it is known to be the brightest night-time star, knowing its location can help you identify planets in the sky.

It is possible to see Sirius in daylight, though there are several conditions that have to be met, such as the sky being clear, the Sun being low on the horizon, Sirius being overhead, and the observer being at a high altitude. These conditions are met more easily in the Southern Hemisphere, since the star gets higher in the sky there. Sirius is gradually moving to the south and will no longer be visible in northern or central Europe in about 7,000 years.

Sirius contains 2 of the 8 nearest stars to our solar system, and is the fifth closest stellar system to us. The Voyager 2 spacecraft launched in 1977 is expected to pass about 4 light years from Sirius in about 300,000 years. No planets have been detected in the Sirius system, and because of differences in the stars, the conditions for life being met would be much more difficult. In particular, Sirius B used to be a red giant and thus would have swallowed up any planets. Also Sirius A is much brighter than the Sun and thus habitable planets would have to be much further away than the Earth is from the Sun. Sirius A is also much younger than the Sun and thus there would have been much less time for life to have evolved on any planet there.

There are a couple of historical controversies concerning Sirius. The first is about the color of the star, which ancient authors described as red, but the star is now known to be white to blue-white in color (various colors can be seen in its twinkling, because of effects of the light passing through Earth’s atmosphere).

The second controversy concerns a native tribe in Mali, Africa, which has been claimed to have known about the second star before Western astronomers (they also said there was a third star with a planet). But the accounts have been disputed and it seems the author who wrote about it in 1938 may have been the one to tell them, or they may have learned about it from a French expedition to view an eclipse in 1893.

This is the best month of the year to observe Sirius in the early evening, although it can also be seen in the early morning during summer. Happy skywatching!


References:

Byrd, Deborah. (2019, February 7). Sirius is Dog Star and brightest star. Retrieved from https://earthsky.org/brightest-stars/sirius-the-brightest-star on February 13, 2019.

Howell, Elizabeth. (2018, October 24). Sirius: Brightest Star in Earth’s Night Sky. Retrieved from https://www.space.com/21702-sirius-brightest-star.html on February 13, 2019.

Wikipedia. (2018, December 31). Heliacal rising. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heliacal_rising.

Wikipedia. (2019, February 12). Sirius. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirius.

The Georges Ended

By S.D. Plissken | February 10. 2019

We have “on offer” five candidates for the single open seat on the Milton Board of Selectmen. Now, things are arranged currently such that three three-year terms are overlapped or “staggered.” It would take years to completely replace the Board of Selectmen.

We are told that this is to ensure “continuity.” We are assured that someone – usually, two someones – will know always what was done before and why. Institutional memory must preserved.

One might well question that premise. It might make some sort of sense if the memory being preserved were a memory of success, but what if it is a memory of failure that is to be preserved? Well, obviously, one would want to clean house instead.

Sadly, we lack that cleaner option. The most we can hope for is to change out one failure this year and another next year. That could bring about a change for the better, over two years, or we might have to endure these people even longer before relief can occur. Because “continuity.”

At past Candidate nights, a lot of vague twaddle about “community” has been featured. Of course, that sounds good, superficially, but it means less than nothing in practice. There has been made an increasingly false equivalence between the Milton Town government apparatus and the taxpayers it supposedly “represents.” Too often, the “community” actually represented has been that Town government alone. Do not be taken in by vague generalities regarding “community.”

But how then to choose? One might hope that the candidates would distance themselves distinctly from past budget failures. The current selectmen might even see the light. Those that hope to “manage” things should make it crystal clear that they can recognize failure when they see it, and that they intend to make a clean break with the thinking and methods that produced them. To head in the opposite direction.

The philosopher William James once observed that “A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”

Now, the burden of clearly breaking with past failures falls most heavily on those that actually participated in past failures. Three of the candidates need to show that they have seen the light,  and will not repeat their past failures. No vague, “going along to get along” talk from them will suffice, no blather about “community.” No simple rearrangement of their prejudices can get the job done.

Last year’s Federal Chained-CPI inflation has been calculated to have been 1.8%. One-sixth of Milton’s retired taxpayers might – I say might – get something approaching that in their Social Security pensions. Any selectman who is not working actively, right from Day One, to keep Town budget increases below that amount of increase, will be working actively against the interests of that elder segment of our “community.”

You are entitled to hear a clear and ringing rejection of any increases above that amount. If a candidate can not so commit themselves, you should pass them over. Better to vote for nobody than to vote for more “continuity” with past failures. Because, at that point, “nobody” represents you.

This pernicious management must end some day, either through electoral change or budgetary collapse. The economist Herbert Stein once observed a simple truth that is often overlooked: “If something cannot go on forever, it will stop.”

So, this will stop at some point. Taxes will come down. Count on it. We might hope that “somebody” – some two of our selectmen – will work for a soft landing instead of a crash. But, either way, it will stop, because it can not continue.

And when the last big spender is gone, when our long Town nightmare ends finally, we may feel then as English poet Walter S. Landor did when the last of the Hanoverian monarchs shuffled off the stage:

George the First was always reckoned
Vile, but viler George the Second;
And what mortal ever heard
Any good of George the Third?
When from Earth the Fourth descended
God be praised! The Georges ended!

Do not vote for one more George.