Milton Businesses in 1894

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | November 16, 2018

Extracted below are the Milton entries from the N.H. Register, Farmers’ Almanac, and Business Directory, for 1894.


MILTON, STRAFFORD – Pop 1,640. N.E. fr. C., 40 m.; N.W. fr. Dover, 20 m. R.R.S. [Railroad Station] – Milton, on Ports., Gt. Falls & Conway R.R.; for Milton Mills, Union, 4 m., connects twice daily by stage.

OFFICERSClerk, C.D. Jones; Treas., Ira Miller; Selectmen, G. Lyman, G.H. Plummer, C.W. Lowe; Board of Education, Ira A. Cook, Frank Healey, E.F. Fox

Postmaster – N.G. Pinkham. 

Justices [of the Peace] – J.U. Simes, B.B. Plummer, E.W. Fox, M.V.B. Cook, C.C. Hayes, C.H. Looney, Luther Hayes, Geo. Lyman, B.F. Avery, E.F. Fox, F.L. Mason, State; Ira Miller, Joseph Plummer, G.I. Lowe, G.H. Goodwin. 

Churches – Chris., D.B. Goodwin, Cong., Myron Dickey, F. Bap. J.S. Manter

Exp. & Tel. Ag’tJohn E. Fox

HotelsRiverside House, C.H. Downs; Phenix House, F.M. Chamberlin; Milton Hotel, E.M. Bodwell. Summer Boarding Houses – S.W. Wallingford, J.L. Twombly, J. LeGallee.

Livery Stables – FM. .Chamberlain, C.H. Thurston.

Literary InstitutionNute Free High School and Library

Manufacturers – Blacksmiths, I.W. Duntley, N.B. Varney; boots and shoes, Burley & Usher Co., N.B. Thayer & Co. [Dam No, 14]; builders, Webber Bros., F.B. Roberts; excelsior, S.M. Bragdon; leatherboard mill, Milton Leatherboard Co. [Dam No. 13]; lumber, L. Hayes,, L Plummer, p.o. ad. Union; mowing machines, horse rakes &c., B.B. Plummer, C.A. Jones; oars, Shaw & Son; paper, Milton Manufacturing Co. [Dam No. 12]; soap, C.M. Wallingford; carriage and sign painter, Frank P. Twombly; tonsorial artist, W.F. Hargraves.

Merchants – E.C. Hodge, J.D. Willey, A.M. Roberts, L. Lucas; boots and shoes, N.G. Pinkham; groceries, W.T. Wallace; gents furnishing and sporting goods, cigars and tobacco, C.D. Jones; drugs, B.B. Sloan, C.D. Jones; ice, Boston Ice Co., Lynn Ice Co. Union Ice Co.; jewelry, F.A. Marks; provisions, G.E. Wentworth, C.A. Horne; fish, L.S. Nutter.

PhysicianM.A.A.H. Hart

Milton MillsPostmaster – Elijah T. Libbey. 

Churches – Adv., Joseph Spinney; Cong., I.E. Stuart; F. Bap., Eben. Fernald; Meth., ___ Collen.

Ex. Agent – Charles Stearns. 

Hotels – Central House, C. &. [C.D.] Fox.

Livery Stables – C.D. Fox, J.D. Hanson.

Manufacturers – Blacksmiths, J.E. Wentworth, S.F. Rines; builders, A.B. Shaw, A.A. Fox, J.F. Titcomb, E.S. Simes; doors, sash and blinds, A.B. Shaw; flannels, Waumbeck Manuf’g Co. [Dam No. 17]; felt cloth, Riverside Mfg. Co.; harnesses, A. Sanborn; picture frames, E. Deardin; soap, S.G. Chamberlain; woolen goods, H.H. Townsend [Dam No. 16]

MerchantsAsa Fox & Son, Ira Miller; boots and shoes, E.R. Campbell; confectionery, C.E. Ellis, E.T. Libbey, F.S. Marsh; dry goods, G.S. Lovering, Harry Wentworth; groceries, H.A. Pettengell & Co.; fish, C.S. Lowd; furniture, E.F. Fox; jewelry, E.T. Libbey; merchant tailor, Harry Wentworth; millinery and fancy goods, Lizzie L. Hart; provisions, C.S. Lowd; stoves and tinware, Murray Bros; soda fountain and periodicals, E.T. Libbey, F.L. Marsh

Miscellaneous – Conveyancer, claim and collection agent, E.W. Fox; job printer, E.T. Libbey; undertaker, A.A. Fox. 

PhysiciansC.W. Gross, W.E. Pillsbury; dentist, E.G. Reynolds

Summer Boarding Houses – Chas. A. Reynolds, C.S. Lowd, Cyrus Miller, J.D. Willey, C.H. Prescott, Benj. Hoyle.


Although not listed as running a livery stable, confectioner Forrest L. Marsh offered to board horses over the winter of 1893-94.

HORSES, CARRIAGES, ETC. WINTER BOARD for horses, best of care; terms reasonable. F.L. MARSH, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, October 26, 1893).

By 1900, he was an attorney in Milton Mills.

New Hampshire. A safe in the postoffice in Murray Brothers’ store at Milton Mills was blown open Wednesday morning of last week. Three men were seen leaving the store, but the robbers made good their escape. They secured about $400 in money and stamps. It is thought to be the work of the same gang that has been operating in New Hampshire and Maine for several months past and has blown safes in 12 or 15 postoffices (Bellows Falls Times, May 24, 1894).


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1892; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1898.


References:

Home Publishing Company. (1893). N.H. Register, Farmers’ Almanac, and Business Directory, for 1894. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=ie4WAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA131

Milton Businesses in 1892

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | November 14, 2018

Extracted below are the Milton entries from the Strafford County Business Directory section of the Dover, Great Falls, and Strafford County Directory, 1892-93.


MILTON.

Twenty miles N.W. of Dover. R.R. station at Milton on Ports., Gt. Falls & Con. RR. Four miles from Union, stage twice daily. It was originally a part of Rochester. Incorporated June 11, 1802. Farming and manufacturing are the principal employments. Area 25,000 acres. Population 1,640. Valuation, $857,367. Polls 450.

Apothecaries. Jones, Charles D.; Mason, Frank L.

Bands. Milton Mills Brass Band

Blacksmiths. Duntley, Ira W.; Grant, Roscoe E., Milton Mills; Varney, Bartlett; Wentworth, John E., Milton Mills

Boot and Shoe Dealers. East Lake Shoe Co., Milton Mills; Pinkham, Nathaniel G.

Boot and Shoe Mnfrs. Burley & Usher; Thayer, N.B. & Co.

Box Mnfr. Shaw, Aratus B., Milton Mills.

Carpenters and Builders. Giles, Jesse, Milton Mills; Webber, Royal K.

Clothing Dealer. Albee, Benjamin F., Milton Mills.

Confectionary and Fruit. Ellis, Charles E., Milton Mills; Lucas, Levi M.; Marsh, Forest L., Milton Mills

Contractor and Builder. Shaw, Aratus B., Milton Mills

Dentist. Reynolds, Everett G., Milton Mills

Dressmakers. Ricker, A.M. Miss; Wentworth, Cora E., Milton Mills

Dry and Fancy Goods. Lucas, Levi M.

Excelsior Mnfr. Bragdon, S.M.

Fancy Goods. Fox, Laura E., Milton Mills; Mason, F.L. Mrs.

Fish Dealer. Nutter, L. Sidney

General Stores. Fox, Ira [Asa] & Son, Milton Mills; Pettingell, H.A. & Co., Milton Mills; Willey, Joseph D.

Grocers. Miller, Ira, Milton Mills; Roberts, Amos M.; Wallace, William T.

Hairdressers. Ellis, Charles E., Milton Mills; Hall, Fred; Hargraves, William F.

Hardware Dealers. Murray Bros., Main, Milton

Harness Maker and Dealer. Sanborn, Abraham, Milton Mills

Hotels. Horace Drew, Hotel Phœnix, E. Edgerly, prop., Main; Hotel Prescott, C.H. Prescott, proprietor, Main, Milton Mills; River Side House, C.H. Downs, prop., West Lebanon road

Ice Dealers. Boston Ice Co.; Marblehead Ice Co.

Jewelry and Watches. E.T. Libby, Main, Milton Mills

Leather Board Mnfr. Carrecabe, John M.

Meat Market. Grant, Walter B.

Milk Dealer. Hayes, Rufus C.

Milliner. Fox, Laura E., Milton Mills

Painters. Hodgdon, George F.; Mills, William F., Milton Mills; Twombly, Frank P.

Paper Hanger. Hodgdon, George F.

Paper Mnfrs. Milton Mnfr. Co.

Physicians. Gross, Charles W.; Hart, M.A.H., Milton Mills; Jones, Charles D.; Mason, Frank L. 

Plumbers. Murray Bros., Main, Milton Mills

Roofers. Murray Bros., Main, Milton Mills

Saw Mills. Hayes, Luther, South M.; Shaw, Aratus B., Milton Mills

Stables. Chamberlin, Fred M.; Nutter James W.

Stage Line. Milton Mills to Union Village

Station Agent. Fox, John E.

Stationer. Pinkham, Nathaniel G.

Tailor. Albee, Benjamin F., Milton Mills

Variety Stores. Kimball, Rolfe M.; Lucas, Levi M.

Wooden Ware Manufacturer. Atkinson, Sullivan H., Milton Mills

Woolen Goods Manufacturers. Townsend, John, Waumbeck Co., Amasa Clark, agt.


The following advertisements for cloth workers appeared in the Boston Globe near the end of 1892 (and beginning of 1893).

MALE HELP WANTED. A RELIABLE MAN who thoroughly understands the business of piece dyeing to dye dress goods, flannels, etc. A man of this stamp may address JOHN A. BUGUEY, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, November 27, 1892).

MALE HELP WANTED. WANTED. A good experienced man to run a Parks & Woolson six-quarter shear. Write at once or come to JOHN A. BUGUEY, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, November 29, 1892). 

MALE HELP WANTED. WANTED. Boss weaver on Davis & Furber looms, must be a good manager of help, competent, steady and reliable. Man with family preferred. Address JOHN A. BUGNEY, supt., Milton Mills, N.H. (January 26, 1893).

John A. Buguey was then superintendent for the Waumbeck Company. His wife Mary E. (Keating) Buguey died in Milton Mills, NH, April 22, 1896. He and his children resided in Concord, MA, in 1900, where he was a weaving instructor at the Massachusetts State Prison there.


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1889; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1894.


References:

Littlefield Directory Publishing Company. (1892). Dover, Great Falls, and Strafford County Directory, 1892-93. Boston, MA: Littlefield Directory Publishing Company, 12 Post Office Square

Puzzle #10: J.O. Porter’s Cork Problem

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | November 13, 2018

J.O. Porter, Jr., was son of Milton ice industry magnate J.O. Porter. The younger Porter posed the following problem to the Puzzle Problems column of the Boston Globe in December 1901:

I have been reading your puzzle column and am very much interested therein, and now send one that I think will interest your readers.

If a bottle and its cork cost $1.10 and the bottle cost $1 more than the cork, how much did the cork cost?

J.O. Porter, Jr., Marblehead (Boston Globe, December 19, 1901).

The Porters may have been preparing for their next Milton ice harvest when the younger Porter sent in this relatively simple problem.


[Answer to Puzzle #10 to follow in the next Puzzle]


Solution to Puzzle #9: Puzzle #9: How Did They Get There?

The coal, carrot, and scarf came from a snowman. “Nobody put them on the lawn” because they placed them on the snowman. When the snowman melted, they fell to the lawn.

Yes, yes, this one was much too easy. Commenters thought I might not be well. Philo Beddo got there within minutes, with several others following shortly thereafter.

If you have a nice logic puzzle, situated somewhere between those intended for schoolchildren (like this one evidently was) and those intended for MIT physicists (with charts, diagrams, and calculus), drop it in a comment.

Milton Businesses in 1889

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | November 13, 2018

Here is extracted the Milton (including Milton Mills) entry from the New Hampshire Register, State Year-book and Legislative Manual, 1889.


MILTON, STRAFFORD – Pop. 1,516, N.E. fr. C. 40; N.W. fr. Dover, 20. R.R.S. [Railroad Station] – Milton, on Ports., Gt. Falls & Conway R.R.; for Milton Mills, Union, 4 m., connects twice daily by stage.

OfficersClerk, C.H. Looney; Treas., Ira Miller; Selectmen, J.H. Avery, Charles C. Hayes, Chas. Hayes; Board of Education, John U. Simes, Charles D. Jones, B.B. Plummer.

PostmasterN.G. Pinkham.

Justices [of the Peace] – J.U. Simes, E.W. Fox, Geo. Lyman, M.V.B. Cook, C.C. Hayes, B.F. Avery, Luther Hayes, B.B. Plummer, E.F. Fox, C.H. Looney, John S. Hersey, State; Ira Miller, Joseph Plummer, G.I. Lowe.

Churches – Chris. D.B. Goodwin; Cong. Frank Haley; F. Bap. C.E. Mason.

Exp. & Tel. Ag’tWilliam T. Wallace.

Hotels & Livery StablesRiverside House, C.H. Downs; Phenix House, J.E. Hayes.

Literary InstitutionMilton Classical Institute, Miss Fannie L. Hayes.

Manufacturers – blacksmith, I.W. Duntley, M.B. Varney; boots & shoes, Burley & Usher; builders, P.G. Webber & Bros.; clothing, Horne Bros.; excelsior, S.M. Bragdon; flour & meal, J.H. Avery; harnesses, ___ Bealls; Leather Board Mills, John Carricabe; lumber, Luther Hayes, Scates & Lyman, Wentworth & Plummer, L. Plummer, p.o. ad. Union; mowing machines, horse rakes &c, B.B. Plummer; oars, Shaw & Son; paper, Milton Manuf’g Co.; soap, C.M. Wallingford; soles, heels, etc., ___ Law.

MerchantsJ.D. Willey, Looney & Downes, Levi Lucas; boots and shoes, N.G. Pinkham; clothing and gents furnishing goods, Goodwin and Co.; fancy goods, Mrs. Ira S. Knox, Mrs. J.F. Hart; ice, Granite State Ice Company, Lynn Ice Co., Boston Union Ice Co.; jewelry, F.A. Weeks; millinery, Alta Knox; provisions, W.B. Grant.

PhysicianChas. D. Jones.

Milton MillsPostmaster – B.F. Albee.

Churches – Adv., Joseph Spinney; Cong., H.S. Ives; F. Bap., C.E. Hurd; Meth., I.G. Tibbetts.

Ex. Agent – Charles Stevens.

HotelsPrescott House, C.H. Prescott; Centennial House, Benj. Hoyle.

Livery StablesC.H. Prescott, J.D. Hanson.

Manufacturers – blacksmiths, H.J. Burrows, J.E. Wentworth, A. [ – missing section – ] Townsend.

MerchantsAsa Fox & Son, J.U. Simes, Ira Miller; boots and shoes, J.W. Hanson; confectionary, C.E. Ellis; dry goods, G.S. Lovering, B.F. Allbee, O.F. Marsh; fancy goods, M.A. Berry; fancy goods and groceries, Lewis Fox & Co.; fish, J.F. Archibald; furniture, E.F. Fox; groceries, E.J. Brierley, C.D. Fox; jewelry, E.T. Libbey; merchant tailor, B.F. Albee; millinery, Augusta Berry; millinery and fancy goods, L.F. Hart; periodicals, B.F. Allbee; provisions, C.S. Lowd; stoves and tin ware, Murray Bros.

Miscellaneous – conveyancer, claim and collection agent, E.W. Fox; job printer, E.T. Libbey; machinist, E. Osgood; undertaker, A.A. Fox.

PhysiciansC.W. Gross, M.K. Cowell, W.E. Pillsbury; dentist, E.G. Reynolds.

Summer Boarding Houses – Charles A. Reynolds, John Lewis, C.S. Lowd, J.D. Willey.


In subsequent years, the Nute High School and Library celebrated February 15 of this year as their founding, although the building was not completed and opened for students until 1891.

The Boston Globe reported the bankruptcy of a Milton Mills grocery store:

Business Troubles. Firms Forced to Assign Under Stress of Financial Storms. Pettingill & Brown, grocers, Milton Mills, N.H., have failed. They owe $4500; assets $2100 (Boston Globe, May 7, 1889).

BUSINESS TROUBLES. Financial Difficulties Reported in Various Trades. The Boston creditors of H.A. Pettingell of the firm of Pettingell & Brown, grocers, Milton Mills, N.H., held a meeting in this city yesterday at the New England Furniture Exchange. The committee reported the liabilities as $4180. Assets varied and uncertain. Mr. Pettingell made an offer of 25 cents on a dollar, and the committee recommended its acceptance. All present signed the composition paper (Boston Globe, June 6, 1889).

Meanwhile, Varney & Lane, shoe manufacturers, sought shoe workers. They were based in Lynn, MA, but had opened a Milton Mills branch during the previous year.

MALE HELP WANTED. CUTTERS wanted on grain and gl. grain piece work, at VARNEY & LANE’S, Milton Mills, N.H.; also 3 good closers-on; come ready for work (Boston Globe, May 30, 1889).

The Milton Mills shoe strike against the newly-arrived shoe manufacturing firm began in November of this year.

This was also the year of the institutional founding of the Nute Memorial Chapel, as well as the Nute High School and Library (February 15), although their completed building dedications did not occur until later, October 23, 1890 and September 1891, respectively.


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1887; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1892.


References:

Tower, F.L. (1889). New Hampshire Register, State Year-book and Legislative Manual, 1889. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=d98WAAAAIAA

Milton and the Rusticators

By Muriel Bristol | November 12, 2018

Some few tourists may have come to Milton with the railroad in the mid 1850s. They likely stayed in one of Milton’s hotels or boarding houses. Other seacoast and mountain communities began to experience an increase in tourism with the generally increasing productivity and incomes of the 1870s. Some Milton farm families and others saw the same opportunity and began to advertise for Summer boarders around 1874. Milton and East Milton did advertise their Summer opportunities, but Milton Mills seems to have become especially active in this.

It began to become quite a cottage industry around this time – the B&B of its time.

One may gain some idea of what the tourist of those days, then known as a “rusticator,” sought in a Summer holiday. The advertisers pitched elevated ridgeline situations with scenery, views, shade, dry air and breezes. Dining would feature good farm food, including eggs, fresh milk, fruit, and berries.

These settings and amenities seem to have been considered especially “healthful” for children and invalids.

OUR FOLKS AND OTHER FOLKS. Mrs. Adelaide L. Nichols of 112 New Boston road is boarding in Milton, N.H., hoping to improve her health (Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, MA), August 19, 1907).

For the more active visitor, driving carriages on country roads seems to have been a popular activity. The rusticator had little interest in swimming or beaches; and many may not have even known how to swim. But boating, fishing, and hunting (or “gunning”) were mentioned often as attractions.

For those unable to make a complete break from their city lives, some situations emphasized their proximity to train stations, telegraphs, post offices, and newspapers. Churches too.

Summer Resorts and Hotels. In New Hampshire. BOARD – A few Summer boarders can find a pleasant home in a private family, convenient to churches, railroad, telegraph and Post Office, in a quiet and healthy little village, situated between mountain and pond. For particulars, address Box 30, Milton, N.H. (Boston Globe, August 7, 1874).

Hotels & Summer Resorts. CENTENNIAL HOUSE, Situated in the pleasant village of Milton Mills, N.H., is now open for boarders. Good board and rooms, gunning and fishing, pleasant drives and pure air. Terms satisfactory. Address JOHN W. PRESCOTT, Milton Mills (Boston Globe, June 27, 1876).

BG760627-Centennial

Summer Board. SUMMER BOARDERS wanted by a Christian family; pleasantly situated, high grounds, and a good farmer’s table; terms for adults, $5; children under seven, $2.50. Address box 329, East Milton, N.H. (Boston Globe, July 16, 1877).

SUMMER BOARDERS for the season at $4 per week. Boat on Lovell’s Lake, close by, and carriage to and from depot free. Unequalled facilities for driving, boating and fishing. Address JOHN F. GARLAND, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, June 24, 1879).

SUMMER BOARD. MILTON, N.H. – A child or invalid can find a pleasant home with kindest care; best references; terms reasonable. Address Box 9 (Boston Globe, August 6, 1882).

SUMMER BOARD. – At a farm house, near a splendid lake, mountain scenery, fine drives, etc.; terms to suit the times. Address Box 262, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, June 27, 1884).

SUMMER BOARDERS can have first-class accommodations at Tamaline Heights Cottage, Milton Mills, N.H. Pleasant situation; splendid views; fine drives; pure air, trout, bass and other fishing near; three minutes’ walk to post office, churches, stores, etc.; house newly refinished and furnished; no pains will be spared to make it comfortable and attractive; reference Elbridge W. Fox, P.M., Milton Mills, N.H. Apply through box 113, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, July 3, 1884).

SUMMER RESORTS. SUMMER BOARDERS. – Can have first-class accommodations at Tamaline Heights Cottage. Pleasant situation; splendid views; fine drives; pure air; near post office, churches, stores, etc.; no pains spared for comfort and ease. Apply through box 113, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, July 25, 1885).

SUMMER RESORTS. SUMMER BOARD at a pleasant farm house within 10 minutes’ walk of post office; nice shade grove; good rooms and table; terms reasonable. Address Box 146, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, June 2, 1886).

SUMMER RESORTS. SUMMER board – Large farm house, near Lovell’s lake; highest land in Strafford county; oak and maple shade trees; splendid mountain scenery; fine drives and fishing; good rooms and table; ladies $4, gents $5 per week; teams to and from depot free. CHARLES E. LOWD, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, August 4, 1886).

SUMMER RESORTS. SUMMER BOARD – At a farmhouse near a splendid lake, mountain scenery, fine drives, etc., terms to suit times. Box 235, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, June 10, 1887).

SUMMER RESORTS. SUMMER BOARD, at pleasant farmhouse, ½ mile from post office and village; cool, shady, fine drives, pleasant scenery, good rooms, plenty of meats, eggs, milk, vegetables; terms reasonable. Box 146, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, July 12, 1887).

SUMMER RESORTS. BOARD – Farm board on high ridge; dry air and plenty of shade; fruit, berries, milk, etc.; daily mail and papers; terms, ladies $4, gents $5 per week. Box 221, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, July 12, 1888).

SUMMER RESORTS. HOTEL PRESCOTT – Pleasantly situated in a beautiful village in New Hampshire, close to 3 churches and post office; 2 mails a day from Boston; a desirable home for those seeking health, comfort and pleasure; good fishing and gunning; nice drives; good livery connected with the house. C.H. Prescott, proprietor, Milton Mills, N.H (Boston Globe, July 28, 1889).

BG890728-Hotel Prescott

SUMMER RESORTS. SUMMER BOARD for ladies or gentlemen can be obtained in a beautiful village in New Hampshire; home comforts, close to 3 churches and post office, organ, Boston papers, good livery, etc.; board $4 to $7 per week. Address C.H. PRESCOTT, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, July 16, 1890).

SUMMER RESORTS. BOARD. – Farm board on high ridge; dry air and plenty of shade, fruit, berries, and milk, etc.; daily mail and papers; terms ladies $4, gents. $5 per week. Box 221, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, August 9, 1891). 

SUMMER RESORTS. WANTED. – Summer boarders at Sunset cottage; good farm board, high land, healthful climate; parties seeking rest write for full particulars. Box 71, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, August 9, 1891).

Summer Resorts. NEW HAMPSHIRE. BOARDERS wanted, Sunset cottage, on a farm, high land, beautiful scenery, healthy climate, plenty fresh eggs, milk, vegetables, etc., daily mail, reasonable. Box 71, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, July 21, 1895).

SUMMER RESORTS. NEW HAMPSHIRE. BOARDERS wanted at Sunset cottage; high land, healthy climate, scenery unsurpassed, shade, pleasant walks, drives, milk, eggs, berries, vegetables. Box 71, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, August 2, 1896).

Summer Resorts. FARM BOARD at Mountain View farm, location elevated and healthy, scenery fine, table supplied with fresh milk, berries and vegetables; testimonials given. Box 63, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, July 13, 1897).

The business directories first took notice of this Summer boarding phenomenon in their 1889 issue, which included four Summer boarding houses situated at Milton Mills:

Summer Boarding Houses – Charles A. Reynolds, John Lewis, C.S. Lowd, J.D. Willey.

At some point, some Summer visitors began to buy their own Summer properties in Milton.

Things Seen and Not Seen

By S.D. Plissken | November 10, 2018

The nineteenth-century French economist Frédéric Bastiat (1801-1850) revealed to us the important distinction that must be made between That Which Is Seen and That Which Is Not Seen.

He began his argument with his now-famous “Parable” of the Broken Window. A boy breaks a window accidently. Onlookers console the father by observing that the glazier benefits by six francs in replacing the window, which he will spend with some other tradesman, who will spend it with someone else again. The boy’s mistake has benefitted the economy to the amount of six francs. That is what is seen: six francs has been set in motion to benefit the economy and society, as represented by a succession of tradesmen, merchants and others along its way.

Bastiat points out that what is just as important, if not more so, is that which is not seen. Had the window not been broken, or wasted, the father might have spent the money on something else, something of his own choosing, such as a book or a new pair of shoes. That would have benefitted the economy too, but along a different path.

The father’s choice and that potential different path are not the only difference. The destruction of the window, or any  waste of resources, is a net loss to the society. If the father did not have to replace the window, he would have had the enjoyment of both the window and the book. As it happened, he paid twice for the window alone.

Bastiat goes on to apply this principle of things that are seen and not seen to taxes, maintenance of standing armies, publicly-funded arts, public works projects, and the support of bureaucracies in general. In each case, there is some obvious visible benefit or, at least, some visible partial benefit. (Those that exact the taxes, organize the armies, and administer publicly-funded arts, public works, and services, subtract their own carrying charges along the way). Those visible partial benefits are the things that are seen.

The things that are not seen cannot be known. They are what society loses. There might already have been a cure for cancer, an end to hunger and homelessness, shorter work weeks, sounder money, hover cars, everlasting gobstoppers, and a myriad of other benefits. Milton restaurants. Who can know?

We would almost certainly be living better lives in a better world than that which can be seen around us.

Our load would be lighter to the extent of not carrying the dead weight of things that bureaucracies choose for us. (A camel is a horse that was designed by a committee). We would certainly be enjoying more of our own preferences, which is in itself an essential element of a better life.

Modern economists express this same concept in terms of paying an Opportunity Cost. If you choose Option A, you cannot also choose mutually-exclusive Option B. Not having Option B is the opportunity cost that you pay for selecting Option A. And vice versa. It is expressed also in the adage “You cannot have your cake and eat it too.”

You may see the same idea deployed in the beloved Christmas movie It’s a Wonderful Life. Had George Bailey never existed – if he had remained unseen – then he could not have influenced events towards the satisfying life of Bedford Falls. The hapless residents would have been forced to live instead the less palatable existence to be seen in Potterville. (Back to the Future “reboots” the same theme).

It is well worth a read (below). You might enjoy also Bastiat’s devastatingly funny satire of protectionism: the Candlemakers’ Petition.

References:

Bastiat, Frédéric. (1850). That Which Is Seen, and That Which Is Not Seen. Retrieved from en.wikisource.org/wiki/Essays_on_Political_Economy/That_Which_Is_Seen,_and_That_Which_Is_Not_Seen

Wikipedia. (2018, November 4). Frédéric Bastiat. Retrieved from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frédéric_Bastiat

YouTube. (2016, January 30). I Call This Enemy: The Sun (The Simpsons) [a spoof of the Candlemakers’ Petition]. Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3LbxDZRgA4

Nute High School & Library Founded

By Muriel Bristol | November 10, 2018

Lewis W. Nute was born in West Milton, NH, February 17, 1820, son of Ezekiel and Dorcas (Worster) Nute. He became a successful Boston leather merchant and shoe manufacturer. He died “at the homestead” on Nute Ridge in West Milton, NH, October 20, 1888. His wife Priscilla (Farrar) Nute had predeceased him in 1886. They are buried together in Mount Auburn Cemetery, in Cambridge, MA (where the inscribed date is at variance with published obituaries).

LEWIS W. NUTE DEAD. Boston’s Biggest Leather Dealer Expires at His Home. DOVER, N.H. – Sept. 5. – Lewis W. Nute died this morning at the homestead at Milton.

When a young man Mr. Nute went to Boston to work for the leather firm of Potter & Co. He worked there for several years, when he was taken sick and nearly died. When he recovered he found that all his bills were paid and he was a silent partner in the firm. He was considered the best judge of leather in Boston.

Shortly after the name of the firm was changed to Nute, Potter, White, & Bailey. He stayed with them some years, then sold out and went into business himself with an office in Boston and manufactory in Natick, and five years ago he started the shop in Dover (Boston Globe, September 6, 1888).


Foundings

Lewis W. Nute’s last will provided for the construction and endowment of a high school and library and, separately, a chapel in West Milton. When the various writers speak of the “founding” of these institutions, they mean the legal authorizations, which were accomplished through probation of the will, legislative acts, appointments of trustees, and the formation of boards and committees.

Purchase of land and construction of buildings followed those institutional “foundings.” The completed Nute Chapel was dedicated on October 23, 1890. In subsequent years, the Nute High School celebrated February 15, 1889 as its founding day, although the completed school building opened its doors to students at the same time as the library: September 1891.

(Note that the Milton Classical Institute closed its doors shortly before its successor, the Nute High School and Library, opened theirs).

The Nute High School was founded in 1889, as was the Nute Library, in accordance with the provisions of the will of Lewis Worster Nute, a native of Milton who died in 1888. Among the many worthy benefactions which Mr. Nute bequeathed to his townsmen were the $125,000 for the institution which bears his name, and $50,000 for the public schools. As a result of Mr Nute’s generosity and the praiseworthy interest which Milton people have always had in education, this town has splendid educational facilities, which are second to those of no town of a similar size in New Hampshire.


CHAPTER 250

AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE NUTE HIGH SCHOOL AND LIBRARY IN THE TOWN OF MILTON

Section 1. Corporation constituted. 2. Trustees, bequest, etc. 3. Trustees vacancy. 4. Buildings; library; school. 5. Non-sectarian. Section 6. Real estate. 7. May be taken by condemnation. 8. Right of appeal. 9. First meeting. 10. Takes effect when Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened.

Section 1. That Charles H. Moulton, of Waltham, and Henry Cobb, of Newton, both in the county of Middlesex, and John L. Brewster, of Lawrence, in the county of Essex, all in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Joshua G. Hall, of Dover, Eugene P. Nute, of Farmington, Elbridge W. Fox, Charles C. Hayes, Bard B. Plummer, Charles H. Looney, Frank Haley, and Charles A. Jones, all of Milton, in the county of Strafford and State New Hampshire, are hereby made a body corporate, to be, with their successors, known as the Trustees of the Nute High School and Library, to be located at the village of Milton Three Ponds, so called, in the town of Milton. 

Sect. 2. The board of trustees so constituted under the first section of this act shall receive and ever have charge of moneys received and to be received from the estate of Lewis W. Nute, late of Boston, Massachusetts, and expend the capital and income of the same as directed in the will of said Lewis W. Nute. They may also exercise all corporate powers and transact all corporate business necessary to administer the affairs of the Nute High School and Library, and for this purpose may from time to time make such regulations and by-laws, not repugnant to the constitution and laws of the State, for the management of said corporation, as they may deem proper, and also appoint such and so many officers and agents as they may think proper, and prescribe their powers and duties. A majority of the board shall constitute a quorum for doing business. 

Sect. 3. The board shall consist of eleven persons, a majority of whom shall be residents of the town of Milton, New Hampshire, and whenever any vacancy occurs by death, resignation, or otherwise, the survivors shall fill the vacancy at the next annual meeting. The removal from town of any trustee resident in Milton is to be considered as a resignation. 

Sect. 4. The corporation is charged with the duty of erecting school and library buildings as set forth in the will of said Lewis W. Nute, and the establishment and support of a high school and library, to be forever free to the inhabitants of the town of Milton; they may also receive by gift, devise, or otherwise, other property for the purpose of said school and library, and hold the same free from taxation, to the amount of three hundred and fifty thousand dollars.

Sect. 5. The principles and precepts of the Christian religion shall be inculcated, but the Nute high school shall not be a denominational or sectarian school.

Sect. 6. Said corporation is empowered to acquire by purchase or otherwise, and hold in fee simple or otherwise, any real and personal estate necessary for carrying into effect the purpose of this act, not exceeding three thousand dollars at the time of acquiring the title thereto. 

Sect. 7. If said corporation shall not be able to secure on satisfactory terms, or the owner thereof shall be unknown, the necessary land upon which to locate said high school and library buildings, the same not to exceed three acres in extent, said corporation may apply to the county commissioners for the county of Strafford, to assess the damage to the owners of such land; and such commissioners shall appoint a time and place of hearing, and give notice thereof in the same manner as is now provided by law for laying out highways, and shall assess and award damages to the owner or owners of such land as are required by said corporation on which to locate said high school and library buildings, which assessment and award shall be in writing and filed in the office of the town clerk of the town of Milton within ten days after the same is completed, and upon payment or tender to the owner of the sum so assessed, the rights so taken shall be vested in said corporation.

Sect. 8. The same rights of appeal from such assessment and award shall exist as in the case of lands taken for highways by the action of said commissioners. 

Sect. 9. The first meeting of the board of trustees may be called by any one of said trustees by a notice in writing, stating the time and place of the meeting, sent by mail to each of the corporators at least one week prior thereto. 

Sect. 10. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

[Approved August 14, 1889].


Nute Library

The NH State Librarian described the newly-created Nute Library in a general report to the NH State Legislature in 1892:

MILTON. – The Nute Library, 400 volumes. Free.

The Nute Library was opened to the public September, 1891. In 1888, by will of Lewis W. Nute, of Boston, a native of Milton, the town came into possession of $25,000 to be used for erecting a “Nute High School and Library” building, and $100,000 as an endowment. The library occupies a portion of this building.

The library is general. Fiction is the class most in use: except fiction, historical works are most in use. The library is open Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. A reading-room in connection with the library is open during the same hours. The total amount of income from the endowment fund is about $5,000. Of this sum $150 are expended yearly for books, and $50 for papers and periodicals.

Librarian, Frank Haley, appointed by the library committee; library committee, Elbridge W. Fox, Frank Haley, of Milton, and Henry E. Cobb, of Newton, Mass., appointed by the board of trustees. At the incorporation of the “Nute High School and Library,” the trustees were named by the town (NH State Librarian, 1892).


Nute High School

Nute High School’s first year was the 1891-92 academic year, which began in September 1891.

In its third year, Nute High School hosted what sounds like a county-wide teachers’ workshop on Tuesday, January 9, 1894.

Teachers’ Institute at Milton, N.H. MILTON, N.H., Jan. 7 – A teachers’ institute for Strafford county will be held here Tuesday at the Nute high school (Boston Globe, January 8, 1894).


The NH State Superintendent of Public Instruction described the number of students and a part of the curriculum in 1894:

Table No. 4. Schools of a Higher Grade (Public Schools) [1894]

The 1894 Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction tabulated Nute High School, in Milton, N.H., as having 1 male teacher, 2 female teachers, 20 male students, 31 female students, 46 students residing in New Hampshire, 51 students pursuing higher branches, 25 students studying ancient languages, 20 students studying modern languages, 900 volumes in the library, a school year beginning in September and lasting 39 weeks, and $35,000 in value of buildings, apparatus, and grounds. William K. Norton was the Principal.


Arthur T. Smith became the Nute High School’s second principal in or around its sixth (1896-97) academic year.

Personals. Arthur Smith, principal of the Nute high school at Milton, paid a visit with friends in this [Portsmouth] city on Monday (Portsmouth Herald, July 26, 1898).


[Dartmouth Class of] 1896

The Boston Herald of February 16 [1901] contains an account of the tenth annual observance of Founder’s Day at the Nute High school, Milton, N.H., of which Arthur Thad Smith is principal. The Herald says:

“The Nute High school was dedicated in 1891, and was the gift of Lewis W. Nute, a millionaire of Boston, to his native town, together with a fund of over $100,000 for its maintenance. The building was erected at a cost of about $40,000, and is a modern edifice, admirably equipped for careful work.

“During the past four years, under the principalship of Mr. Arthur Thad Smith, the membership of the school has nearly doubled, and the educational standard greatly improved. Mr. Smith graduated from Dartmouth in 1896 at the head of his class, having taken prizes and honors in Greek, Philosophy, Chemistry and Oratory, together with the first competitive prize scholarship of his class. He was a member of the D.K.E., Casque and Gauntlet and Phi Beta Kappa fraternities. It was Mr. Smith, who working for the stockholders in the Jernegan gold-from-sea-water swindle, proved the fraud by his work.

“The programme of the evening consisted of musical selections by the Nute High School orchestra of ten pieces, under the leadership of Mr. Smith, vocal and instrumental solos, and orations and essays by members of the school” (The Dartmouth, 1901).


New England Notes. Briefer Items.

Milton, N.H. – The Nute high school celebrated its tenth observance of founder’s day on February 15, with attractive public exercises, consisting of essays and orations, interspersed with selections of music. This school, one of the youngest in the state, built and endowed with a fund of $100,000 as a gift from Mr. Lewis W. Nute, of Boston, has taken an excellent stand as a preparatory school. For the last four years it has been under the charge of Mr. Arthur Thad Smith, a graduate of Dartmouth, class of 1896 (Kellogg, 1901).

Principal Arthur T. Smith, moved on to become a Boston lawyer.

Dover Doings. Arthur T. Smith and family of Boston are visiting Mr. Smith’s father, Dr. A Noel Smith of this city. Mr. Smith is now in one of the leading law offices of Boston. He was formerly principal of the Nute high school of Milton (Portsmouth Herald, July 29, 1909).


Oddly enough, the Nute High School and Library acquired some Boston real estate in 1911. One might suppose this was some residual portion of Lewis W. Nute’s property and a part of the endowment.

BACK BAY SALES. The Nute High School and Library of New Hampshire has taken title from George E. Mackintire of two four-story brick apartment houses, 203 to 205 Hemenway st., near the corner of Huntington entrance to the Fens. Both parcels have a rating of $33,200 and there is 3789 square feet of land, taxed for $7,800 (Boston Globe, November 2, 1911).

The Back Bay buildings have been replaced, although several like them survive across the street. The addresses mentioned are located in a block or area ringed by Boston’s Back Bay Fens, Forsyth Park, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (under construction there 1907-15), and Northeastern University.


See also Nute High School Principals, 1891-21 and Nute High School Principals, 1923-57


References:

Find a Grave. (2014, March 21). Lewis Worster Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/126657931

Kellogg, E.L., and Co.. (1901, March 9).  School Journal – New England Notes – Briefer Items. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=sv9KAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA270

NH General Court. (1889). Laws of the State of New Hampshire, Passed June Session, 1889. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=6ppGAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA231

NH State Librarian. (1892). Report of the State Librarian to the New Hampshire Legislature for the Year Ending October 1, 1892. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=gC5FAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA150

Superintendent of Public Instruction. (1894). Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=mCYlAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA172

The Dartmouth. (1901, March 8). 1896. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=QfomAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA379
Continue reading “Nute High School & Library Founded”

Nute Memorial Chapel Dedicated

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | November 8, 2018

The Nute Memorial Chapel or Nute Ridge Bible Chapel, at 99 Nute Ridge Road in West Milton, NH, was dedicated on Thursday, October 23, 1890.

MILTON HAS A CHAPEL.

Dedication of Building Paid for by the Nute Executors.

MILTON, N.H., October 23. – The chapel erected under the provisions of the will of Lewis W. Nute by his executors, Charles H. Moulton and Henry E. Cobb, was dedicated this afternoon in the presence of a large assembly. The building is a brick structure calculated to accommodate the presence of 150 people, with a library attached, the cost being about $10,000.

The exercises were as follows: Introductory addresses by the executors and delivery of keys; opening prayer, Rev. J. Manter of Milton; anthem; Scripture reading, Rev. Frank Haley of Milton; choir selection; sermon, Rev. E.B. Webb, D.D., of Wellesley, Mass.; dedicatory prayer, Rev. W.I. Sweet of Farmington; response; solo by W.H. Dunham; hymn by the congregation; closing prayer and benediction by Rev. H.H. Hamilton, pastor of the chapel.

The trustees of the chapel fund are Charles H. Moulton, Henry E. Cobb, and Jerome Jones (Boston Globe, October 24, 1890).


Lewis W. Nute was born in West Milton, NH, February 17, 1820, son of Ezekiel and Dorcas (Worster) Nute. He became a successful Boston leather merchant and shoe manufacturer. He died “at the homestead” on Nute Ridge in West Milton, NH, September 5, 1888. His wife Priscilla (Farrar) Nute had predeceased him in 1886. They are buried together in Mount Auburn Cemetery, in Cambridge, MA (where the inscribed date is at variance with published obituaries).

Rev. John S. Manter was the Milton Baptist minister, Rev. Frank Haley was the Milton Congregational minister, Rev. Edwin B. Webb, D.D., was a prominent Massachusetts Congregational minister, and Rev. William I. Sweet was the Farmington Congregational minister (1888-92).

Rev. Haley was also a trustee of the Nute High School and Library, as well as its Librarian, until his death in 1904. (He had also practiced as a physician for a time; among his published works were an appreciation or eulogy of Dr. Stephen Drew).

The current pastor is Rev. Robert E. Walsh.

References:

Find a Grave. (2014, March 21). Lewis Worster Nute. Retrieved from www.findagrave.com/memorial/126657931

Nute Ridge Bible Chapel. (2013). Nute Ridge Bible Chapel. Retrieved from nute-chapel.org/

Milton Businesses in 1887

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | November 8, 2018

Here is extracted the Milton (including Milton Mills) entry from the New Hampshire Register, State Year-book and Legislative Manual, 1887.


MILTON, STRAFFORD – Pop. 1,516, N.E. fr. C. 40; N.W. fr. Dover, 20. R.R.S. [Railroad Station] – Milton, on Ports., Gt. Falls & Conway R.R.; for Milton Mills, Union, 4 m., connects twice daily by stage.

Officers – Clerk, C.H. Looney; Treas., Ira Miller; Selectmen, A. Jones, Charles T. Haines, Chas. Hayes; Board of Education, John Simes, Luther Hayes, Martin V.B. Cook

PostmastersN.G. Pinkham; West, T.F. Canney

Justices [of the Peace], J.U. Sims, E.W. Fox, J.S. Hersey, M.V.B. Cook, C.C. Hayes, B.F. Avery, Luther Hayes, B.B. Plummer, E.F. Fox, C.H. Looney, State; Ira Miller, Joseph Plummer

Churches – Chris. D.B. Goodwin; Cong. Frank Haley; F. Bap. C.E. Mason

Exp. & Tel. Ag’tWilliam T. Wallace.

Hotels & Livery StablesRiverside House, C.H. Downs; Phenix House, J.G. Garland

Literary InstitutionMilton Classical Institute, Mrs. E.E. Cowell

Manufacturers – blacksmith, I.W. Duntley; builder, E.H. Hursome; boots & shoes, Burley & Usher; clothing, Horne Bros.; excelsior, S.M. Bragdon; flour & meal, J.H. Avery; Leather Board Mills, John Carricabe; lumber, Luther Hayes, Scates & Lyman, Wentworth & Plummer, L. Plummer, p.o. ad. Union; mowing machines, horse rakes &c, B.B. Plummer; oars, Shaw & Son; paper, Milton Manuf’g Co.; soap, C.M. Wallingford; woolens and blankets, I.W. Springfield & Son.

MerchantsJ.F. Hart, J.D. Willey, Looney & Downes, Wm. O. Shattuck, J.Q.A. Tappan: boots and shoes, N.G. Pinkham; fancy goods, Mrs. Ira S. Knox, Mrs. J.F. Hart; ice, Granite State Ice Company, Lynn Ice Co., Boston Union Ice Co.; millinery, Alta Knox; provisions, W.B. Grant.

PhysicianW.F. Wallace

Milton MillsPostmaster – B.F. Albee. Exp. Agt. – O.T. Fox

Churches – Adv. Joseph Spinney; Cong. S.H. Atkins; F. Bap. C.M. Anderson; Meth. H.E. Allen.

Hotels & Livery Stables – Central House, C. Remick; Centennial House, Benj. Hoyle.

Manufacturers – builders, A.B. Shaw, A.A. Fox, J.F. Titcomb, E.S. Simes; carriages, J.W. Brierly, A.O. Prescott; clothing, J.W. Brierly, C.S. Stevens & Bros.; doors, sash and blinds, A.B. Shaw; flannels, Waumbeck Manuf’g Co.; felt, cloth, table and piano covers, D.H. Buffum’s Sons; harnesses, A. Sanborn; hosiery, Riverside M’fg. Co.; picture frames, E. Deardin; plows, W.F. Cutts; soap, S.G. Chamberlain; woolen goods, H.H. Townsend 

MerchantsAsa Fox & Son, J.U. Simes, Ira Miller; carriages, J.F. & G.E. Hart; confectionary, J. McGibbon, W.F. Hargraves; boots and shoes, J.W. Hanson; dry goods, G.S. Lovering, F. Roberts; drugs and medicines, W.F. Fassett; fancy goods, Miss M.A. Berry, Louis Marxshon; fish, J.F. Archibald, E. Trefethen; furniture, Wormwood & Shaw; groceries, F.H. Lowd, J. Lewis, E.J. Brierley, O.H. Hussey; jewelry, E.T. Libbey; merchant tailor, B.F. Albee; millinery, Augusta Berry; millinery and fancy goods, Mrs. J.W. Prescott; periodicals, E.W. Fox, J. McGibbon; provisions, C.S. Lowd, J.E. Hayes; stoves and tin ware, Murray Bros.

Miscellaneous – conveyancer, claim and collection agent, E.W. Fox; job printer, E.T. Libbey; machinist, E. Osgood; nurseryman, John Copp

PhysiciansC.W. Gross, M.K. Cowell, W.E. Pillsbury; dentist, E.G. Reynolds.


The Milton Mills merchant tailor Benjamin Franklin “B.F.” Albee listed above posted the following advertisement in the Boston Globe in this year.

FEMALE HELP WANTED. TAILORESS. A first-class tailoress and custom coatmaker. B.F. ALLBEE, Milton Mills, N.H. (Boston Globe, April 23, 1887).


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1884; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1889.


References:

Tower, F.L. (1887). New Hampshire Register, State Year-book and Legislative Manual, 1887. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?lr=&id=lN8WAAAAIAAJ

Milton Businesses in 1873

By Muriel Bristol (Transcriber) | November 8, 2018

Extracted below are the Milton entries from the New Hampshire Register, Farmer’s Almanac and Business Directory, for 1873.


MILTON, STRAFFORD. Роp. 1598. N.E. from C., 40. R.R.S. [Railroad Stations], Мilton, and South Milton on Ports., Gt. Falls & Conway R.R.

OFFICERSClerk, Joseph Mathes; Treas., George Lyman; Selectmen, George Lyman, G.H. Plumer, Т.H. Roberts; Supts., C.A. Sawyer, J.U. Simes, A.H. Wentworth

Postmasters. – C.H. Looney; South, H.H. Wentworth; West, T.F. Canney.

Justices [of the Peace]. – Charles Jones, Luther Hayes, State; E.W. Fox, Joseph Plummer, Ebenezer Wentworth, Joseph Mathes, Asa Jewett, Joseph Cook, Robert Mathes, George Lyman, G.W. Peavey, J.S. Hersey, G.W. Tasker, M.V.B. Cook, T.H. Roberts, H.H. Wentworth, J.N. Simes, B.P. Roberts, C.H. Looney; Mills, E.W. Fox, T.H. Roberts, J.U. Simes.

Churches. – Chris., D.B. Goodwin; Cong., F. Haley; F. Bap., J.F. Joy

Exp. Ag’t C.A. Sawyer. Tel. Ag’tC.H. Looney.

HotelFranklin House, Joseph Jenness. 

Literary InstitutionMilton Classical Institute, J.N. Ham, prin.

Livery StablesW.H. Huntress, W.H. Jones.

Manufacturers – boots and shoes, South, H.V. Wentworth; lumber, Luther Hayes, Scates & Lyman; Lewis Plumer, p.о. ad. ,Union. 

Mechanics – blacksmiths, H. Duntley & Son; carpenters Joseph Mathes, John Lucas, E.H. Hersom; mason, Daniel Foss; painter, G.F. Hodgdon; wheelwrights, Joseph Matthes, Daniel Jenness. 

MerchantsJ.E. Twombly, Gilmore & Whitehouse, J. Hart; millinery, Mrs. C.M. Roberts. 

PhysiciansG.W. Peavey, Frank Haley.

Mills. – PostmasterE.W. Fox. Hotel – Central House, Ira Miller

Churches – Cong., D.B. Scott, C.F. Page; F. Bap., J.S. Potter; Meth., I.J. Tibbets.

Express AgentE.W. Fox

Hotel – Central House, Ira Miller.

Livery StableIra Miller.  

Manufacturers – carriages, John Brackett; flannels, Waumbeck Manuf’g. Co.; flannels, felt cloth, piano and table covers, Edward Brierly & Son; table covers, H.H. Townsend; table and piano covers, John Meikle

Mechanics – blacksmiths, Ebenezer Osgood, Nathaniel Rines, S.F. Rines; carpenters, J.F. Titcomb, Samuel Hooper, E.S. Simes, A.B. Shaw; dyer and table cover printer, John Meikle; engraver, H.W. Dewhurst; mason, J.G. Rines; painter, G.W. Came. 

Merchants – F.H. Chesley, A.A. Fox & Co., J.U. Simes; fancy goods, Mrs. W.P. Farnham; groceries, Geo. Olney; millinery, H.A. Farnham; provision, S.A. Felch. 

PhysiciansJ.C. Buck, R. Buck.


The Boston Globe reported a Milton Mills house fire in this year:

New Hampshire. The house known as the Nathan Jewett House at Milton Mills was destroyed by fire on the 11th inst. Loss not reported. Insured (Boston Globe, October 23, 1873).


Previous in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1871; next in sequence: Milton Businesses in 1874.


References:

Claremont Manufacturing Company. (1873). New Hampshire Register, Farmer’s Almanac and Business Directory, for 1873. Retrieved from books.google.com/books?id=PSw0AQAAMAAJ

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